Hazelnut & Orange Dark Chocolate Bark

This content originally appeared on ForGoodMeasure. Republished with permission.

The pairing of chocolate and hazelnuts conjures up creamy, sweet Nutella for most palates. This recipe is about to rearrange your tastebuds. Found in prehistoric China, the hazelnut has shared a long, sacred history in Scandinavia, Scotland and Ireland. It entered the confectionary scene in Italy in the 1800s and has been a staple ever since. For our modern twist, we matched it against rich, dark chocolate and tangy orange zest with a sprinkling of sea salt for a delightful endnote.

Hazelnut & Orange Dark Chocolate Bark

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Hazelnut & Orange Dark Chocolate Bark

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Hazelnut matched against rich, dark chocolate and tangy orange zest with a sprinkling of sea salt for a delightful endnote.  
Course Dessert, Snack
Cuisine Italian
Keyword Chocolate, hazelnut, orange
Prep Time 15 minutes
Waiting Time 30 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 16 servings
Calories 166kcal

Ingredients

  • 9 ounces dark chocolate 85%
  • 1 cup hazelnuts skins removed & chopped **
  • ¼ cup orange zest finely sliced
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt

Instructions

  • Line a small rimmed baking sheet with parchment, refrigerate.
  • Break apart chocolate into small pieces.
  • Set a double boiler over medium heat. *
  • Add chocolate pieces and stir occasionally until melted.
  • Remove from heat and add ½ cup hazelnuts & ⅛ cup orange zest, stirring until combined.
  • Pour chocolate mixture onto prepared sheet.
  • Sprinkle remaining hazelnuts, orange zest & sea salt over surface.
  • Refrigerate for 30 minutes, until set.
  • Break into quarter-sized pieces.
  • Store refrigerated in an airtight container.

Notes

Naturally low-carb & gluten-free

Net carbs: 3g

* If you do not have a double boiler, simmer a few inches of water in a medium saucepan, fit a glass bowl inside, ensuring water does not enter the container.

** To remove bitter skins, heat oven to 400 degrees. Lay hazelnuts in a single-layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast for 10-15 minutes, until skins have darkened, mindful not to burn nuts. Place roasted nuts in a clean kitchen towel & rub until skins flake off. Repeat roast and rub process until all skins are removed.

Nutrition

Serving: 2tbsp | Calories: 166kcal | Carbohydrates: 6g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 14g | Sodium: 41mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 4g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Hazelnut & Orange Dark Chocolate Bark Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

When a Child’s Type 1 Diabetes Takes a Toll on Couple’s Relationship

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Bonnie O’Neil

“You have to fly home now!” was all I could say before bursting into uncontrollable sobs. “Austin has diabetes.”

My worst nightmare had come true — my 5-year-old son was just diagnosed with the same disease that claimed my brother’s life when he was eight years old and has afflicted my sister since she was sixteen. We had been in New Jersey that weekend celebrating my mother’s birthday when my suspicions began to mount, but I kept them to myself. On Sunday afternoon I drove our three children home to Connecticut, while my husband flew to Florida for a business trip.

By Monday afternoon I could contain my suspicions no longer. I purchased a urine test kit at the pharmacy and made the diagnosis myself, in the first-floor powder room of my Connecticut home. Urine testing for diabetes wasn’t new to me — because of my family history, I had done hundreds of tests over the years, both as a child and later, as an expectant mother.

The nurse shepherded my son and me into the pediatrician’s office while my other two children waited in the waiting room. She attempted to allay my fears with comforting words, but I knew. And the meter knew. We had entered a new reality.

“You caught it early, his blood sugar is only 387, no ketones, no need for hospitalization. Here’s the address of an endocrinologist, you have an appointment tomorrow.” The doctor’s words rang out in muffled tones, as if through a tunnel. No insulin? No hospitalization? The irregularity of what he was proposing didn’t feel right, but nothing felt right about this so I tried to suppress my fears for my son’s safety.

Returning Home

Once home, I settled the children and called my husband. Never before had I asked him to return from a business trip. Being strong was always important to me, but I knew I didn’t want to muscle through this alone. I barely slept that first night knowing my brother didn’t survive his T1D diagnosis. Pulling Austin into bed with me, I watched over him like a mama hawk until moonlight gave way to the break of dawn.

Austin and I saw the endocrinologist the following morning before my husband could get home from Florida. The doctor was a kind man who tried his best to assuage my worry and Austin’s fears about diabetes. Austin received his first shot of long-acting insulin and I found I could breathe again. We were to return two more times that week — with my husband — to check on Austin’s dosing and so we could be educated and trained. Austin still wasn’t given any fast-acting insulin, so we were told to keep his carbs to a minimum.

“The prescribing and monitoring of Austin’s fast-acting insulin will be up to his new doctor,” the endocrinologist told me.

Did I neglect to say that we were moving to Philadelphia less than a week after Austin’s diagnosis?

Two weeks after my son’s diagnosis, he finally received his first dose of Novolog. I had yet to learn about sliding scales and insulin-to-carb ratios, glucose tabs, and glucagon. It was time to play catch-up and learn all we should have been taught in those earliest days of diagnosis, when the world is still frozen in time and parents push pause to get themselves up to speed.

Graduation had come and we were caught not having gone to class.

Thankfully I at least had some familiarity with diabetes from my sister, but that’s not the same as managing it yourself. And so, I spent every day reading and researching, in hopes of better understanding my son’s disease. And my husband spent every day at the office.

I’m sure the doctors in Connecticut thought they were offering us a gift in not hospitalizing our son, but they unwittingly deprived us of the space to pause amidst the crisis and learn. With no real diabetes education under our belts, we eventually returned to our established routines — I took care of the children while my husband went off to work.

As we settled into that pattern, a certain asymmetry developed in our relationship that created a dissonance between us. The more I learned, the less qualified he felt to participate in our son’s care. And the less he learned, the less capable I felt he was to participate in managing our son’s diabetes.

Reset, Roles & Responsibilities, Respect

Even if offered the best diabetes education at the time of diagnosis, unhealthy patterns in the caregiving couple’s relationship can unintentionally be established very early on. It’s important to step back and take inventory from time to time to evaluate where we are and where we’d like to be. Often there’s a great chasm separating those two spaces.

To undo some of the unhealthy patterns we’ve fallen into requires us to take the time to reset our expectations. We begin by nurturing a relationship built on open communication so each partner feels safe in sharing what they’re observing. Setting aside time for occasional check-ins to see what might need resetting is the best way to change unhealthy patterns before they get too well established.

When we’re engaging in a reset conversation, we have to give an honest and open look at our respective roles and responsibilities. Some of these can’t easily be changed because of work or family constraints. Others have been artificially created if an asymmetry has developed in the relationship. Openly sharing our feelings of abandonment and judgment from our partner is critical to moving forward. One partner likely needs to be willing to accept help, while the other must be willing to participate more.

Above all, when seeking to reset our unhealthy patterns, offering respect to one another is paramount. Respect is the opposite of resentment. Resentment breeds in the gap between our expectation of our partner’s actions and the reality of how s/he chooses to act. We provide fertile soil for resentment to grow when we refuse to allow our partner’s responses to be different from our own. But, when we stop asking the question, who’s right and who’s wrong, we begin to operate out of respect.

Parents are the heart of any family. It’s worth spending a little extra time to take inventory and evaluate what might need a reset. And you may just rekindle a little love along the way!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Upcoming Apple and Android Watches to Include Glucose Monitors

In 2015, when Apple first launched its smartphone “watch”, or “smartwatch” people all over the world flocked to the new device, but it clearly became evident that the most popular feature (besides telling time), was health and fitness tracking. Suddenly, literally within arm’s reach, users had the ability to not only track their steps and mileage but to track floors climbed, standing time, moving time, heartbeats per minute (HBM), electrocardiogram monitoring, and even check for atrial fibrillation (AFib), among other things.

Apple CEO, Tim Cook, had initially suggested that they would be cautious in adding medical tracking to the watch, as approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) could slow innovation.

“We don’t want to put the watch through the FDA process. I wouldn’t mind putting something adjacent to the watch through it, but not the watch because it would hold us back from innovating too much, the cycles are too long. But you can begin to envision other things that might be adjacent to it, maybe an app, maybe something else,” Cook said.

But customer demand for health tracking proved unmatched, and the company decided to change its mind, slowly adding more and more health tracking capabilities with every new version of the watch.

It should come as no surprise that according to a report out of South Korea, the newest Apple Watch, the Series 7 as well as the newest Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 (both of which are slated to launch later this year) will feature continuous glucose monitoring, developed in partnership with MIT, as people with and without diabetes alike are finding a constant watch on their blood sugars to be extremely beneficial to one’s health.

Both watches promise a “no-blood sampling method” to detect blood glucose levels using an optical sensor, and the feature will be advertised to those with and without diabetes. Unlike popular continuous glucose monitoring devices like the Freestyle Libre or Dexcom, these watches will rely on non-invasive detection of blood glucose levels, which can be achieved via infrared sensors.

Since this technology would be truly groundbreaking, it would be all but impossible to launch without FDA approval, which means that both watches would have to face several clinical trials before being available for public consumption. Clinical trials take a lot of time and money and can mean delays in a launch, especially if the glucose-sensing technology is non-invasive (which has not been seen yet, especially for people with diabetes who rely on this technology to successfully manage their diabetes).

There are many doubters, including the CEO of Valencell, an optical heart rate sensor company, who stated in 2017 that non-invasive blood glucose tracking “would never happen”.

“It is completely impossible to have a truly non-invasive glucose monitor,” Valencell CEO Steven LeBoeuf said.

Additionally, unleashing this kind of technology for mass-consumption could have unintended consequences: Will high demand for the product raise or lower the price? Will people with diabetes be priced out of their lifesaving durable medical equipment? Will blood sugar monitoring become the newest “it” thing? Will companies like Abbott and Dexcom go out of business? Will test strips eventually be a thing of the past? Will health insurance companies be mandated to cover smartwatches eventually? Will smartwatches eventually loop with insulin pumps for automatic insulin delivery? Will this be a good thing or a bad thing for the diabetes community? Is it even possible to have reliable blood glucose readings without invasive technology, interstitial fluid, or blood samples?

Can two of the leading technology companies prove all of the doubters wrong? Can people with (and without!) diabetes finally be able to track their blood sugars without invasive tactics, and achieve better control, all through a smartwatch? Can Tim Cook and Samsung CEO Ki-Nam Kim prove everyone wrong? A lot seems to be in store for the latter half of 2021, so we will just have to wait and see!

Do you monitor your blood sugars from a smartwatch? How would having your smartwatch double as a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) help you? Do you see any negatives to such a device? Share this post and comment below; we love hearing from our readers!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

10 Ways to Avoid Overnight High Blood Sugar

My biggest challenge when it comes to managing my blood sugars is the overnight hours. I know it is largely in part to the fact that I am a nighttime eater, consuming most of my calories after 7 pm. But I have also done some investigating and noticed my blood sugars naturally rise around 9-10 pm, so I am fighting an uphill battle. I started looking for some tips and tactics to try in order to improve my nighttime blood sugar levels.

Here are 10 tips on how to lower your overnight numbers, which will give you a better night’s rest too.

1. Basal Testing

This should come first no matter what issues you are having when it comes to your blood sugars. Without knowing the proper dose of “background” insulin your body needs, it becomes much more difficult to figure out how to dose for meals, creating a rollercoaster of events. In Gary Scheiner’s book “Think like a Pancreas” he explains basal testing in an easy-to-understand and methodical way.

2. Don’t Eat Too Close to Bedtime

Many people confuse this statement to mean that you can gain more weight by eating late at night. This simply not true. It comes down to a science and so long as you are in a caloric deficit, it doesn’t much matter when you take in your food. However, if you eat too close to the time you shut your eyes, it becomes more challenging to stay on top of your blood sugars. Eating about two hours prior to when you shut the lights will give you more time to assess how your blood sugar is trending, and (if needed) get your blood sugars back in range so you can get some sleep.

3. Take Advantage of Technology

If you are fortunate enough to own a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) , you should make the most of its features. Keep the alarms set to a high and low blood sugar number that you are comfortable with to help wake you if damage control is needed. You can also share Dexcom with a loved one who could alert you of dangerous numbers if you are unable to wake from the alarm on your own. Pumps like Tandem Basal Control have become extremely popular, as they can release insulin if your blood sugars get too high allowing you to focus solely on dreaming of a cure!

4. Try to Relax

It is known that stress can lead to higher blood sugar numbers and can also contribute to insulin resistance. When stress hormones like cortisol kick in, it can raise blood sugar levels, which is often what you see in the morning with dawn phenomenon. Additionally, stress hormones are known to increase insulin resistance. “Hyperglycemia is particularly exaggerated by elevations of cortisol and epinephrine in diabetes as a consequence of an altered response of the liver to these hormones,” scientists summarize. Put down your phone, drink some hot tea or read a good book in order to relax and put yourself in the right mindset for both in-range blood sugars and restful sleep.

5. Carb Count and Dose Accordingly

If you are taking insulin, this is something you likely do on a regular basis. Since I am so picky and stick to the same foods, I really don’t count carbs at all. I use the “WAG” strategy (wild a** guess), but this could wind up costing you a good night’s sleep. Make sure to count your carbs, know your carb-to-insulin ratio, time your dose correctly and keep your fingers crossed. Pumps have calculators built in to help make this easier for you and if you are on shots, you should check out the InPen, which has been a lifesaver for me in regards to getting my doses right and keeping my blood sugars in range.

6. Set Alarms and Stick to a Routine

Setting alarms will not only help remind you to take any oral medications and/or insulin but setting an alarm in the middle of the night can allow you to do a quick correction or chug some water if you are experiencing high blood sugars. Many times, if you take your medication or basal insulin an hour too soon or too late, it could impact your blood sugar levels.

7. Adjust Doses If Necessary

We are often so busy that we forget that many different things can affect both our medication and insulin doses. If you recently lost weight, started exercising, are taking steroids, changed your diet, or have become pregnant, to name a few, you should check in with yourself and your health care team to make sure you are taking the proper amount of medication. Ensuring that you are will no doubt give you better results at all times including the hours of rest.

8. Don’t Exercise Too Close to Bedtime

Many of us have busy schedules that only allow for nighttime workouts. If this is the case, try to fill up on protein-rich foods prior so that you don’t wind up with too much insulin in your system a few hours later when you are trying to fall asleep. Also, weight training can spike our blood sugar meaning you may wind up having to correct it. Being awake and alert for a few hours after a workout can only help your blood sugar management.

9. Be Wary of Delayed Blood Sugar Spikes Due to Protein

There are many times when two hours after dinner I am pleasantly surprised by my blood sugar number. But, I notice it starts to slowly creep up shortly after. Unlike carbs that quickly break down to glucose, protein can trigger a blood glucose rise that takes place over several hours. If your dinner is protein-heavy make sure to check your blood sugars a few hours after to troubleshoot any blood sugar spikes.

10. Stay Hydrated

Water plays a key role in keeping blood sugars in range. If we are adequately hydrated, the glucose levels in our blood can’t become too concentrated resulting in hyperglycemia. Water has the ability to reduce blood sugar by diluting the amount of sugar in the blood. Staying hydrated can also help you in your weight loss efforts. My advice is to make sure you get your water in throughout the day so you’re not paying for it with trips to the bathroom all night!

It isn’t easy to schedule in “troubleshoot my overnight numbers” to our already busy schedule, but taking the time to heed some of the above advice is sure to help your numbers improve, allowing for a more peaceful night.

Do you have trouble with your overnight blood sugars? Do you have any advice that worked for you? Share and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

6 Tasty Recipes for Peanut Butter Lovers

March kicks off with National Peanut Butter Lovers Day. While we think there’s more than enough reason to celebrate the existence of our all-time favorite spread every day, we’re honoring this event by featuring low-carb peanut butter recipes you (and your pancreas) will love.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Shortbread

Photo credit: Jennifer Shun

Chocolate Peanut Butter Shortbread

This shortbread is candy and cookie rolled into one. It uses low-carb almond and coconut flours for its base and rich dark chocolate with a tad of espresso for its topping, making it a flavorful option for snacks or dessert.

No-bake peanut butter cookies

Photo credit: Lisa MarcAurele

Peanut Butter No-Bake Cookies

No oven, no problem. With this recipe, you just mix the peanut butter with sunflower and pumpkin seeds, chocolate chips, and other ingredients for the batter, scoop them onto a baking sheet, and place them in the freezer. After 2 hours, you get to enjoy a sweet, crunchy, and satisfying dessert.

Peanut Butter Cheesecake

Photo credit: Brenda Bennett

Low-Carb Peanut Butter Cheesecake

Peanut butter in cheesecake sounds good, and it tastes even better if you top it with sugar-free melted chocolate. This recipe guides you on how to prepare this magical treat — without an oven. You make the crust in the processor and the cheesecake in the mixer. After putting them together, you let them set in the fridge for a few hours before adding the optional toppings.

Peanut Butter Smoothie

Photo credit: Carine Claudepierre

Peanut Butter Smoothie

This peanut butter smoothie is a light and refreshing drink for snacks. On days when you barely have time to make breakfast, or you’re bored with eggs and bacon, this can be a good alternative too. Add a scoop of low-carb protein powder if you want to make it extra fulfilling.

Peanut Butter Ice Cream

Photo credit: Taryn Scarfone

Peanut Butter Ice Cream

While the creamy and rich ice cream tastes good, the peanutty caramel sauce makes this treat even more savory. Top it with roasted salted peanuts for more protein, fiber, and crunch. If you prefer chocolate instead, the recipe has a link to a 3-ingredient keto hot fudge.

Peanut Sauce

Do you love munching vegetables for snacks? Use this recipe for your dipping sauce. Made by stirring only 5 ingredients in a bowl, this sauce has the right combination of salty, sweet, and sour. It’s also versatile; you can use it for salads, in noodle dishes, and on cooked chicken among others.

How do you like to use peanut butter in the kitchen? Share your tips with us in the comments!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Keto Cinnamon Rolls Recipe with Coconut Flour Fathead Dough

This content originally appeared on Low Carb Yum. Republished with permission.

The first time I made low-carb cinnamon rolls, I never shared them on my blog because I didn’t love the texture. Cinnamon rolls need to be soft and chewy. Otherwise, they just aren’t right.

But a few years later, I had the idea to use the fathead dough from my low-carb bagels. That dough uses coconut flour, which I prefer to almond flour.

Sure enough, coconut flour was the answer! I was so impressed with how these keto cinnamon rolls turned out the second time. The dough is light and fluffy, like a traditional pastry, with just the right amount of sweetness.

These remind me so much of Cinnabon rolls, especially when served warm! They are amazing fresh out of the oven. If eating them later, I recommend reheating them in the microwave for about 40 seconds.

Coconut flour cinnamon rolls make for a delicious grab-and-go breakfast, or the perfect treat to savor alongside your morning coffee. They are also very straightforward to make.

keto cinnamon rolls

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Keto Cinnamon Rolls

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It’s simple to make low-carb cinnamon rolls using coconut flour fathead dough. Serve them warm with melted cream cheese icing on top. They are a heavenly treat any time of day.
Course Breads and Baked Goods, Breakfast, Snack
Cuisine American
Keyword cinnamon
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 16 minutes
Total Time 31 minutes
Servings 12 people
Calories 209kcal

Ingredients

Dough:

  • 60 grams coconut flour about ½ cup
  • ¼ cup low-carb sugar substitute
  • 2 tablespoon baking powder can be cut in half to reduce sodium but may not rise as well
  • 250 grams mozzarella cheese shredded, about 2-½ cups
  • 55 grams cream cheese 2 ounces
  • 3 large eggs beaten
  • 2 tablespoons butter melted, add a bit more if needed and use unsalted to reduce sodium
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract optional

Filling:

  • ¼ cup low-carb brown sweetener
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 3 tablespoons butter softened, can be omitted but gives a better filling taste

Icing:

  • 3 ounces cream cheese softened
  • 3 tablespoons butter softened
  • ¼ cup Swerve Confectioners Powdered Sweetener
  • ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • low-carb almond or coconut milk if needed

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400°F and grease a 9×13-inch pan baking pan if needed.
  • Mix coconut flour, low-carb sweetener, and baking powder in a small bowl. Set aside.
  • Melt mozzarella cheese and cream cheese in microwave on high power for one minute. Stir. Place back in microwave on high for another minute. Stir.
  • Add in beaten eggs, butter, vanilla extract (if using), and coconut flour mixture until a dough is formed. Dough should be a bit wet and sticky. If dry, try adding in another egg or more butter.
  • Roll dough out into a rectangle about 9×12 inches.
  • In small bowl, combine the brown low-carb sweetener with cinnamon. Spread butter evenly over the dough then sprinkle the cinnamon mix on top.
  • Roll dough into a log starting at one of the shorter ends. Slice into 1-inch thick rounds.
  • Rounds into prepared baking pan. Bake at 400°F for about 14-16 minutes or until lightly browned. Allow to cool slightly on a wire rack.
  • In a medium mixing bowl, cream the cream cheese and butter with an electric mixer. Beat in the powdered sweetener and vanilla extract. Add in a little low-carb milk (coconut or almond) if needed to thin the icing.

Notes

Pecans can be added to the cinnamon mixture if desired.

Nutrition

Serving: 1roll | Calories: 209kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 17g | Saturated Fat: 10g | Cholesterol: 90mg | Sodium: 262mg | Potassium: 249mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 590IU | Calcium: 213mg | Iron: 0.6mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Keto Cinnamon Rolls Recipe with Coconut Flour Fathead Dough Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

When You Can Expect to Get Your COVID-19 Vaccine

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Lala Jackson

We now have two FDA-approved and safe COVID-19 vaccines in the US! So as a person with type 1 diabetes, you may be wondering when you can get yours.

The answer? Unclear. It’s all a bit of a logistical mess right now, but here’s what we do know – when you are able to receive your COVID-19 vaccine is dependent on your age, your specific health history (not necessarily whether or not you can check the ‘type 1 diabetes’ box on a form), the state and county in which you live, your employment type, and your healthcare provider’s recommendations.

Overall, having type 1 diabetes does not seem to put anyone more at risk for contracting the novel coronavirus, but other factors like older age, high-exposure employment, consistently elevated blood glucose levels, or other non-diabetes related health factors like obesity and hypertension may increase your risk of infection.

However, we also know that diabetes care itself is made far more complicated after contracting COVID-19 and protecting anyone with diabetes from COVID-19 is our ultimate goal. That’s why Beyond Type 1 has signed onto calls to action urging equal prioritization and is working closely with JDRF, the ADA, and other diabetes patient organizations to advocate for all people with diabetes to be included in Phase 1c of the CDC’s immunization recommendations.

Additionally, because vaccine rollout is happening on a state level, individual advocacy at a state level may be more efficient than federal action. In your community, reach out to your state representatives to let them know that people with any type of diabetes should be included in Phase 1c. Utilize JDRF’s COVID-19 Vaccine Access Toolkit for more resources.

The COVID-19 Vaccine Phased Us Rollout

In the US, the vaccine is being rolled out in phases in *most* states. Already, there are inconsistencies that make it difficult to estimate when you might get a vaccine.

Following approval of the vaccines, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices created a set of rollout guidelines they recommend for states to follow. These guidelines include phased recommendations for which groups of people should be prioritized to receive the COVID-19 vaccines based on risk factors like older age, underlying health conditions, and lines of work that expose them to COVID-19.

Phase 1a is in process, having begun in December 2020 immediately following the approval of the COVID-19 vaccines in the US. It includes frontline healthcare providers and residents of nursing homes, where COVID-19 cases and deaths have been dramatically highest.

Phase 1b is happening in some states already, includes people over the age of 74, and expands to more frontline workers, including first responders, food and agricultural workers, U.S. Postal Service workers, manufacturing workers, grocery store workers, public transit workers, teachers, and child care workers.

Phase 1c is also happening in some states already, while still several months out others. This phase includes people over the age of 64, anyone else aged 16 or above with medical conditions that increase the risk for severe COVID-19*, and all other essential workers, like those in transportation and logistics, water and wastewater, food service, construction, finance, information technology and communications, energy, legal, media, public safety, and public health workers.

Note that Phase 1c is a BROAD group of people, and this is where things get a bit fuzzy. It is up to each state to control rollout. Many states are following the CDC’s recommendations quite closely, some are following them but not precisely (grouping some phases together, accelerating others), and some have created their own systems, often down to a county-by-county basis.

*What Does This Mean for People With Diabetes?

For people living with diabetes who are not otherwise prioritized because of age or employment type, Phase 1c is the one to look at carefully. As defined by the CDC, people aged 16 or over with medical conditions that increase the risk for severe COVID-19 are included in this phase. But what medical conditions are included?

Short answer – it’s in flux and it depends entirely on your state. Important to remember is that the CDC’s recommendations are just that – recommendations. They have very purposely created guidelines to inform rollout based on most recently available data on high-risk medical conditions, but their guidelines are not meant to be absolute law.

Currently included in Phase 1c recommendations are people with the following conditions: cancer, chronic kidney disease, sickle cell disease, COPD, Down Syndrome, heart conditions, weakened immune systems, obesity, pregnancy, smoking, or Type 2 diabetes.

This means that for those with type 1 or any type of diabetes other than Type 2, you are possibly, depending on your state, not included in the initial rollout and may need to wait to receive your vaccine with the general population, which is likely to be in April 2021 or later.

But don’t panic – as we’ll explain further below, you may still be able to receive the vaccine earlier, based on state or based on your specific health history.

Type 1 Diabetes + COVID-19

Type 1 diabetes itself is not likely to make you more at risk of catching coronavirus. While some have pointed toward the callout of people with immunocompromised systems being in Phase 1c, it is important to remember that having an autoimmune disease (where the immune system attacks itself) is not the same thing as being immunocompromised (where the immune system is susceptible to outside illnesses).

However, other factors associated with T1D may increase your risk of more intense symptoms and severe complications, and if you have to get hospitalized for COVID-19, diabetes care becomes dicey.

This is a piece that has been very confusing and not communicated as clearly as it could be throughout the pandemic – the factors that make a person with any type of diabetes most at risk catching coronavirus and for experiencing severe symptoms and complications of COVID-19 are systemic racism (like being denied or not believed when care is needed), healthcare access issues (like not being able to see a doctor for non-COVID care when needed, or not being able to afford medications and supplies because of job or healthcare loss), consistently elevated blood glucose levels, recent diabetes ketoacidosisjobs that increase exposure to COVID-19, etc.

Type 1 diabetes combined with these factors does create elevated risk. But well-controlled type 1 diabetes on its own does not seem to make someone more at risk of severe illness from COVID-19.

A few studies have raised concerns that outcomes for people with type 1 diabetes who get COVID-19 are far more severe than a person without diabetes, but digging into those studies provides clarity on what’s actually being shown.

  • In May 2020, the UK’s health system released numbers showing severe hospitalization and death rates for people with diabetes. It sounded scary, but what it did not clarify was that additional risk factors like heart disease were of great impact to outcomes, and that the study actually showed that people with type 1 diabetes and no other underlying risk factors like older age or other health history actually did quite well – they were not frequently hospitalized for COVID-19 and those who were had low frequencies of severe outcomes.
  • In December 2020, a similar study was released in Diabetes Care, with a headline saying that COVID-19 severity is tripled in the diabetes community. But again, what it did not immediately clarify was how much the severity was dependent on additional factors, like race (due to long-standing systemic racism), elevated HbA1c, hypertension, lack of diabetes technology, lack of health insurance, less diabetes technology use, etc.

Another study that shows these risk factors well was published in July 2020, outlining the fact that older age and other health-related risk factors were more impactful on severe outcomes than diabetes itself, particularly type 1 diabetes.

Overall, yes – anyone living with diabetes of any type needs to pay careful attention to their health amidst this pandemic. The safest thing anyone can do is practice safety measures to avoid getting COVID-19. For those who cannot – essential workers or people who otherwise have to be exposed to the virus – or those with other underlying health factors, those are the most important factors that must be taken into consideration for priority vaccination.

But just having type 1 diabetes alone, if you are otherwise healthy and not significantly exposed to the virus, should not give you reason to panic. Perhaps more important is ensuring everyone in the general public gets vaccinated as quickly as possible so that diabetes care can be safely accessed, and so hospitals and ICUs are not overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients in the event of emergency diabetes care needs.

How You Get Your Vaccine

Look up your state health department’s guidelines. If it is unclear or you are unsatisfied with what you’ve found, go ahead and reach out to your healthcare provider. Particularly if you have a healthcare provider like an endocrinologist who helps you take care of your diabetes, they may have some insider information on how their hospital or practice is planning to distribute the vaccine.

Remember to be kind and patient – healthcare providers are carrying an immense amount and they may not have an answer for you immediately.

Every vaccine taken decreases the risk and prevents the spread of COVID-19. While it is frustrating to watch the logistical mess, the more people who get vaccinated quickly the better, and in the meantime, continue to practice safe measures that protect you and your loved ones from COVID-19, including doing your best to keep tight control of your blood sugar levels, wearing a mask and physical distancing from anyone outside of your household, and avoiding indoor gatherings.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Toddler Changes His Own Dexcom on TikTok: Advice From His Mom

TikTok has become more than just a place to dance along to the latest trend; it has become a platform for advocacy for many issues, and diabetes has received increased exposure thanks to this social media app. I couldn’t believe my eyes when I saw a TikTok of a very young boy putting on his own Dexcom G6! And he did it with confidence, bravery, and pride. I wanted to share Daxon’s story in the hopes that it inspires others as well. I reached out to his mom who was gladly happy to chat.

Hi Cassie, thank you so much for taking the time to answer my questions! I would love for our community to get to know Daxon a little better! He is such a great role model for other children living with type 1 diabetes (T1D)!

At what age was Daxon diagnosed and what were the symptoms?

Daxon was diagnosed exactly 1 month from his second birthday at 23 months old.

He started to get a bad temper spring of 2019 and we never understood why. He would get so upset so easily and we just thought it was because of terrible twos. In July, he threw up twice one morning for no reason and out of the blue. He started throwing up at nighttime multiple nights in a row and only at night. I took him to his pediatrician, and they told me “it’s probably the stomach bug, it’ll pass” but I told him “but randomly like that? It doesn’t make sense”.

After about two weeks, it stopped until August. He threw up one more time in the morning and then stopped. Once again, we had no idea why. At the end of August he started drinking and peeing excessively. What really gave it away was that he was drenched from head to toe in pee after a 2-hour nap period one day and that was it. I checked his sugar and it was 461 mg/dL (borderline DKA).

How did you as a family adapt to your new normal?

Honestly, we are still trying to adapt. We take it day by day because it is always changing. The one thing about diabetes is that no matter what, it is different each day. Even if you do the same exact thing, sugars will change.

Did you change Daxon’s and/or your family’s diet at all? What are his favorite go-to foods that don’t wreak havoc on his blood sugars? I’m sure lots of moms could use some tips!

I did not completely change his diet, but I do swap stuff out for healthier carbs and a lower glycemic index. He does low-carb bread, cheese, and crackers instead of mac-n-cheese, Go-Gurts, Two Good yogurts instead of the higher-carb ones, chicken meatballs instead of chicken nuggets, Fairlife milk instead of others  (because of his milk allergy, but it is better carb-wise also), keto-friendly cereal because others spike so much that I cannot get it down for hours, keto-friendly bread only because the GI level is so much better. There are some other changes, but the family has not changed any really. He does still eat candy, it is just more in moderation than before.

His go-to foods are pork rinds eggs, a brownie bar called “Good to Go”, keto-friendly ice cream, yellow bell peppers, broccoli, really any vegetable, cheese sticks, pepperoni, lollipop suckers. Any time we are out Chik-fil-A, grilled chicken and fruit are a must. That is all I can think of right now.

Photo credit: Cassie Daniels

At what point did you start using the Omnipod and Dexcom G6? How did Daxon handle that? 

The Dexcom was a month after being diagnosed and he did not handle it well at first. We would have to hold him down to get him to let me put it on. It was a nightmare but once he watched a friend of ours put her’s on and she told him “you have a robot just like me” he got used to it and now it is normal. When his phone tells us it’s time to change it, he’ll tell me “robot needs changed” and he will 100% do it solo now which is amazing.

The Omnipod was a little different. His first endo wouldn’t approve it because they thought he would take it off, so we had to wait but once we switched to a different hospital, they got him on it right away; so, he was about 7 months in when he was able to get the pod. At first, once again — NOT a fan and it was horrible — but once he learned it meant “no more shots” he was perfectly fine with it (sometimes). We will scream — and I mean scream  — the song “Baby Shark” so he will not hear the clicking for the needle and that seems to help also. He is currently working on putting the insulin in his pod so he is super excited about that.

I know I personally prefer shots, but am often intrigued by the control some pumpers get. Do you find using the pump helps make blood sugar management easier?

The pump for us personally is a lot better for different reasons. Omnipod allows such a small dose, so even 1 gram of carbs he would get some insulin, but with shots, we would have to round up or down, which meant [more fluctuations for him]. Also, in the middle of the night, being able to give him insulin without even touching him has been great. I hated waking him up to poke him with a needle. Also, when on the go we can dose from the front seat of the car. However, if he ever decides that he wants to stop the pump and go back to shots I will support him and what he wants 100%.

@cdaniels2015

95% completely solo 💙💙💙💙 He’s get the hang of this soooo quickly 😭🙏💙 #typeonediabadass #BigBoy

♬ Bang! – AJR

I couldn’t believe my eyes when my diabestie, Hillary Emmons,  sent me this TikTok of Daxon changing his own Dexcom! I am so impressed and inspired! At what point did he express interest in doing that?

After about six months of being a type 1, he has always been curious about everything. He has been checking his own sugar with the meter since about 6 months in when needed to be checked. And recently he was really showing interest in the Dexcom and doing it solo. He did half of it one day and then the next change he did it completely on his own, all I did was hold it and help place it. I never asked him to do it because I didn’t think he was ready for that task yet but that day he told me “I do it” and that was it. Now he is showing interest in some of the Omnipod stuff, which is amazing because he feels in control.

I give you credit as a parent for letting him own his management and giving him the confidence to know he can manage his disease! What would you like to tell other parents about how to get children to want to be a part of their daily care?

Make it positive, make it fun, and make it normal. We have the JDRF bear and we practiced on that since being diagnosed. At first, we used it so he could understand more of it. We also got his big brother and all the other family members involved since day one. We check everyone’s sugars, so it is normal for everyone. All the children in our family (our boys and our 3 nieces) have been very curious about it since day one.

I see you are using TikTok as a platform for awareness and this one video alone got over 103,000 likes! Kudos! What would you like people to take away from your videos?

I want people to know the signs of T1D and to normalize it. I hate when I see people hide that they check their sugar or even giving their self insulin. I want to help parents have a voice for their children because doctors sometimes do not listen, and we need to be loud for our children and to follow their gut. I have a lot of people say that he encouraged their children to try putting the Dexcom on solo and I love that it is helping other children also. One of my TikToks potentially saved a child from dying. Her sugar was almost 1000 mg/dL and she was in DKA and doctors were surprised she wasn’t in a coma. Children should not die for people [not being able] to figure out what is wrong!

Does Daxon enjoy making the TikTok videos? I think “injecting” some humor and fun is the best medicine of all! And one you can all do together as a family!

Daxon loves showing people his stuff. He knows it makes him unique and he loves seeing others who are like him. So, when people duet his videos and they show their Dex or pod it’s helpful for him also to see that there are others like him.

Photo credit: Cassie Daniels

What else does Daxon like to do with his free time when he’s not managing his diabetes and TikTok’ing?

Daxon is a typical boy and I mean ALL boy. He rough houses with his brother, loves to color, help with dishes, cooking, loves to read books, play outside, ride his 4-wheeler, and absolutely loves cuddling with me. I think him being a T1D made our bond even stronger.

How does Daxon feel about being a TikTok sensation and knowing that he is helping to inspire many other children just like himself!

I have told him many times that he is helping other children and I don’t think he really understands what it means yet, but he always smiles and says “they have a robot like me” or he’ll go “yay that makes me happy”. I ask him “do you want to make a video?” and normally he’ll tell me “yessss let’s make a video”. I will never make him make TikToks so if he tells me no then I’ll leave it alone.

I ask this in every interview! Do you think they’ll be a cure in Daxon’s lifetime?

100% honestly I do not foresee a cure ever. They make way too much money from insulin (when it should be free, but that’s another story for another time). I wish there would be a cure, but I don’t see it happening.

Daxon

Photo credit: Cassie Daniels

What advice helped you? Can you pass it along to parents of newly diagnosed children?

My advice for parents is:

  1. Take one day at a time because it is an always-changing, never-stopping, headache of a disease.
  2. Do your best and never get down on your child for their blood sugars. That is the one thing I will never do to Daxon, anytime he has “bad” sugars, I never express it to him or show it on my face because it is not his fault, so I don’t want him to feel like he is failing.
  3. Always tell your child they can still do anything they like and never change activities. Just change foods to help [manage sugars during] the activities. For example, we took Daxon and his brother to a trampoline park and I knew his sugar was going to drop. He started at 170 mg/dL and dropped to 50 mg/dL. I was prepared with milk, yogurt, chocolate, and others, so he could still have fun and be a kid.
  4. Try not to have a fight if sugars are not in range, because everything is magnified if high or low. So what I do with Daxon if he is high or low and has a temper tantrum, I ignore it and let him do what he needs to do. Once he calms down, we discuss what happened and I explain I understand he doesn’t feel good but he doesn’t need to act that way.
  5. Treat them like you would any other child because diabetes does NOT define them.

Where do you see going with your advocacy and awareness on social media or elsewhere? Do you have other plans in the future?

I would love to bring more awareness to this disease. I would love for there to be a law that pediatricians must check A1c every year or every other year. They check your iron, and they check lead so why not diabetes? [Some] pediatricians think that younger children cannot get diabetes until at least six years old which is not true. It is ridiculous because a child’s death is avoidable if people were more aware of the signs and doctors tested when they should.

Thanks again Cassie, we really appreciate you taking the time! I look forward to continuing to follow Daxon’s journey and see how many kids he inspires along the way!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Metformin May Reduce Your Risk of Death from COVID-19 Infection

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Eliza Skoler

The use of metformin – the most common initial medication for people with type 2 diabetes – was associated with a lower rate of mortality from COVID-19 among people with diabetes in a study in Alabama, confirming five previous studies.

Do you take metformin? It’s the first-line therapy used to lower glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes. A recent study found that metformin use was associated with a lower rate of COVID-related death among people with type 2 diabetes. Since people with diabetes are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19, including hospitalization and death, the relationship between metformin and COVID outcomes in this report may be of interest to many people around the world who take the medication.

Want more information like this?

The study looked at the electronic health data from 25,326 people tested for COVID at Birmingham Hospital in Alabama, including healthcare workers, between February and June of 2020. Of those tested, 604 people were positive for COVID-19 – and 239 of those who were positive had diabetes. These results showed that the odds of testing positive for COVID were significantly higher for people, particularly Black people, with certain pre-existing conditions, including diabetes. This does not mean people with diabetes are more likely to get COVID-19, only that people with diabetes were more likely to test positive at this hospital.

Importantly, the study found an association between metformin use and risk of death – the study reported that people who were on metformin before being diagnosed with COVID-19 had a significantly lower chance of dying:

  • People taking metformin had an 11% mortality (or death) rate, compared to 24% for those with type 2 diabetes not on metformin when admitted to the hospital.
  • This benefit of metformin remained even when people with type 2 diabetes and kidney disease or chronic heart failure were excluded from the calculations. This is important because people with kidney or heart disease are often advised against taking metformin. By removing this population, it helps to support the notion that metformin may be involved in this difference.
  • Body weight and A1C were not associated with mortality among people with diabetes taking metformin. This suggests that the association of metformin use with reduced COVID-related deaths was not due to the effects of the medication on weight or glucose management.

The data suggest that being a person with diabetes who takes metformin may provide some level of protection against severe COVID-19 infection among people with diabetes. Other studies have shown similar results, though it is not known whether metformin may itself reduce COVID-related deaths among people with type 2 diabetes. The authors discussed some previously reported effects of metformin beyond lowering glucose levels, such as reducing high levels of inflammation (the body’s natural way of fighting infection), which has been described as a risk factor in severe COVID infection. Severe infection with COVID-19, resulting in hospital admission, can lead to damage to the kidneys and decreased oxygen supply to the body’s tissues – and in these circumstances, serious side effects of metformin can occur.

“Given that COVID leads to higher mortality rates and more complicated hospital courses in people with diabetes, it is important to consider whether specific diabetes medications can provide some relative degree of protection against poor COVID outcomes,” said Dr. Tim Garvey, an endocrinologist at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “This study adds to growing evidence that people with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin have better outcomes than those not receiving metformin.”

Dr. Garvey also cautioned: “Of course, these case-control studies show associations and do not rise to the level of evidence that might be found by a randomized clinical trial. For example, people with diabetes not treated with the first-line drug, metformin, may have a larger number of diabetes complications or longer duration of disease compared with people not on metformin – which could explain the more severe outcomes. In any event, we advocate for early administration of COVID-19 vaccines and other protective measures for people with diabetes.”

Professor Philip Home, a professor of diabetes medicine at Newcastle University in the UK, agreed, saying, “Multiple studies have now addressed the issue of whether metformin and insulin use are associated with better or worse outcomes in people with diabetes who contract COVID-19. In line with previous literature on other diseases, it was expected that people on metformin would do better, and people on insulin worse, than people with diabetes not using these medications. This is confirmed.”

Home continued: “It is believed to happen because people using metformin are younger and have better kidney function than those not taking the medication, while those on insulin tend to have other medical conditions. The good news is that if you have type 2 diabetes and are taking metformin, you are likely to be fitter than if you have type 2 diabetes and do not take the medication – but there is no evidence that metformin itself will make a difference to your outcome if you do get COVID-19. So, get vaccinated as soon as possible!”

To learn more about metformin, read “Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Metformin, But Were Afraid to Ask.”

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Getting the Most Out of Your Remote Healthcare Visits

This content originally appeared on Integrated Diabetes Services. Republished with permission.

By Gary Scheiner MS, CDCES

A long, long time ago, before the days of coronavirus, there was a little diabetes care practice called Integrated Diabetes Services (we’ll just call it IDS for short). IDS taught people with diabetes all the wonderful things they can do to manage their diabetes. Word got out, and people who lived far from IDS’s local hamlet (better known as Philadelphia) wanted to work with IDS. Even people IN the hamlet wanted to work with IDS but were often too busy to make the trip to the office. So IDS had an idea: “Let’s offer our services via phone and the internet so that everybody who wants to work with us can work with us!” The idea took off, and IDS grew and grew.

And virtual diabetes care was born.

Today, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, virtual healthcare has become a virtual norm. Often referred to as “telehealth” or “telemedicine,” people with diabetes are connecting with their healthcare providers for everything from medical appointments to self-management education to coaching sessions. Some consults are conducted via phone calls, while others utilize web-based video programs (like Zoom) or simple email or text messages. Regardless of the form, virtual care can be highly effective. But it can also have its limitations. Whether you’ve been receiving virtual healthcare for months or have yet to give it a try, it pays to learn how to use it effectively. Because virtual care will certainly outlive the pandemic.

What Can… and Can’t… Be Accomplished Virtually

Most diabetes care services, including medical treatment and self-management education, can be provided effectively on a remote basis. We have managed to teach our clients everything from advanced carb counting techniques to strength training routines to self-analysis of glucose monitoring data, all while helping them fine-tune their insulin program, on a 100% virtual basis.

Some clinics and private healthcare providers have gone 100% virtual since the pandemic began, while others are using a “hybrid” approach – periodic in-person appointments with virtual care in-between. Depending on the reason you’re seeking care, a hybrid approach makes a lot of sense. While virtual visits are generally more efficient and economical (and in many cases safer) than in-person appointments, there are some things that are challenging to accomplish on a remote basis. From a diabetes standpoint, this includes:

  • Checking the skin for overused injection sites
  • Learning how to use medical devices (especially for the first time)
  • Examining the thyroid gland and lymph nodes
  • Evaluating glucose data (unless you can download and transmit data to your provider)
  • Performing a professional foot exam
  • Listening to the heart rhythm and feeling peripheral pulses
  • Checking for signs of neuropathy and retinopathy
  • Measuring vital signs (unless you have equipment for doing so at home)

The Logistics

Virtual care can be provided in a variety of ways, ranging from a phone call to an email, text message or video conference. Video can add a great deal to the quality of a consultation, as it allows you and your healthcare provider to pick up on body language and other visual cues. It also permits demonstrations (such as how to estimate a 1-cup portion of food), evaluation of your techniques (such as how to insert a pump infusion set), and use of a marker board for demonstrating complex subjects (such as injection site rotation or how certain medications work).

When using video, it is important to have access to high-speed internet. A computer is almost always better than a phone for video appointments, as the screen is larger and has better resolution. If you have the ability to download your diabetes data, do so and share access with your healthcare provider a day or two prior to the appointment. It may also be helpful to share some of your “vital” signs at the time of the appointment – a thermometer, scale, and blood pressure cuff are good to have at home.

In many cases, care provided on a remote/virtual basis is covered by health insurance at the same level as an in-person appointment. This applies to public as well as private health insurance. However, some plans require your provider to perform specific functions during the consultation (such as reviewing glucose data) in order for the appointment to qualify for coverage. Best to check with your healthcare provider when scheduling the appointment to make sure the virtual service will be covered. At our practice (which is 100% private-pay), virtual and in-person services are charged at the same rates.

If security is of the utmost importance to you, virtual care may not be your best option. Although there are web-based programs and apps that meet HIPPA guidelines, there really is no way to guarantee who has access to your information at the other end. My advice is to weigh the many benefits of virtual care against the (minuscule) security risk that virtual care poses.

Optimizing the Virtual Experience

Just like in-person appointments, virtual care can be HIGHLY productive if you do a little bit of preparation.

  • Do yourself and your healthcare provider a favor and download your devices, including meters, pumps, CGMs, and any logging apps you may be using, prior to the appointment. If you don’t know how to download, ask your healthcare provider for instructions, or contact our office… we can set up a virtual consultation and show you how. If you have not downloaded your information before, don’t be intimidated. It is easier than you think. People in their 80s and 90s can do it. Oh, and look over the data yourself before the appointment so that you can have a productive discussion with your healthcare provider.
  • Be prepared with a list of your current medications, including doses and when you take them. Check before the appointment to see if you need refills on any of your medications or supplies. If you take insulin, have all the details available: basal doses (and timing), bolus/mealtime doses (and dosing formulas if you use insulin:carb ratios), correction formulas (for fixing highs/lows), and adjustments for physical activity.
  • Try to get your labwork done prior to virtual appointments. This will give your healthcare provider important information about how your current program is working.
  • To enhance the quality of the virtual meeting, do your best to cut down the background noise (TV off, pets in another room, etc…) and distractions (get someone to watch the kids). Use of a headset may be preferable to using the speakers/microphone on your phone or computer, especially if there is background noise or you have limited hearing.
  • Use a large screen/monitor so that it will be easy to see details and do screen-sharing. And use front lighting rather than rear lighting. When the lights or window are behind you, you may look more like a black shadow than your beautiful self. “Ring” lights are popular for providing front-lighting.
  • Provide some of your own vitals if possible – weight, temperature, blood pressure, current blood sugar. This is important information that your healthcare provider can use to enhance your care.
  • Prepare a list of topics/questions that you want to discuss. Ideally, write them on paper so that you can take notes during the appointment. If there is a great deal of detail covered, ask your healthcare provider to send you an appointment summary by mail or email.
  • Be in a private place that allows you to speak openly and show any body parts that might need to be examined – including your feet and injection/infusion sites.
  • Be a patient patient! Technical issues can sometimes happen. It is perfectly fine to switch to a basic phone call or reschedule for another time.
  • Courtesy. Be on-time for your virtual appointment. If you are delayed, call your healthcare provider’s office to let them know. And if you are not sure how to login or use the video conferencing system, call your provider beforehand for detailed instructions. This will help to avoid delays. Have your calendar handy so that a follow-up can be scheduled right away. Oh, one other thing: Try not to be eating during the appointment… it is distracting and a bit rude. However, treating a low blood sugar is always permissible!

If there is one thing we’ve learned during the pandemic, it’s that virtual care is a win-win for just about everybody. Expect it to grow in use long after the pandemic. In-person care will never go away completely, but for treating/managing a condition like diabetes, virtual care has a lot to offer… especially if you use it wisely.

Note: Gary Scheiner is Owner and Clinical Director of Integrated Diabetes Services, a private practice specializing in advanced education and intensive glucose management for insulin users. Consultations are available in-person and worldwide via phone and internet. For more information, visit Integrated Diabetes.com, email sales@integrateddiabetes.com, or call (877) 735-3648; outside North America, call + 1-610-642-6055.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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