Feta and Roasted Red Pepper Dip

This content originally appeared on ForGoodMeasure. Republished with permission.

In my humble opinion, picnics are ubiquitous with summer & no al fresco dining experience is complete without crisp, crunchy vegetables & an accompanying dip. Here’s one of our favorites. A simplified version of Greek Ktipiti, this recipe combines the briny tang of fresh feta with the sweet, slightly smokey undernote of roasted red bell peppers. Cutting the traditional heat allows the flavor of an accompanying crudités to shine through, although you could always jazz things up with a dash of hot sauce or pinch of red chili flakes.

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Feta & Roasted Red Pepper Dip

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This recipe combines the briny tang of fresh feta with the sweet, slightly smokey undernote of roasted red bell peppers.
Course Dip
Cuisine Greek
Calories 84kcal

Equipment

  • Food processor

Ingredients

  • 2 red bell peppers halved & seeded
  • 1 cup feta cheese crumbled
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon garlic minced
  • teaspoon black pepper
  • teaspoon salt

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  • Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment.
  • Arrange halved peppers cut-side down on baking sheet.
  • Locate a glass or ceramic bowl large enough when inverted to cover the peppers, set aside.
  • Roast peppers for 40 minutes, until skins are soft & blackened.
  • Invert bowl over charred peppers, creating a steam bath.
  • After 15 minutes, remove the charred skins from the peppers.
  • Using the processor, combine the skinned peppers, feta cheese, olive oil, garlic, black pepper and salt, until thick and creamy.
  • Chill before serving.

Notes

Naturally low-carb & gluten-free.

Nutrition

Serving: 2tbsp | Calories: 84kcal | Carbohydrates: 2g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 8g | Cholesterol: 17mg | Sodium: 485mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Feta and Roasted Red Pepper Dip Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Turkey Meatballs with Creamy Vodka Sauce

These turkey meatballs are a fantastic alternative to a typical beef recipe that you might have made in the past. The sauce pairs fantastically with the savoriness of the meatballs, as well as any chicken or fish recipe that you might have as well. As a person with type 1 diabetes, I have found these recipes are well-rounded and enjoyable without spiking my blood sugar. At the same time, it is incredibly satiating and will hold well for up to five days if you’re craving leftovers or doing meal prep!

Turkey Meatballs with Creamy Vodka Sauce

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Turkey Meatballs with Creamy Vodka Sauce

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These turkey meatballs are a fantastic alternative to a typical beef recipe that you might have made in the past.

Ingredients

Chef Paul’s Creamy Vodka Sauce

  • 1 yellow onion medium
  • 4 tbsp butter unsalted
  • 2 cans diced tomatoes
  • 2 large cans tomato sauce 46 oz. total
  • 3 tbsp sugar or sugar substitute (Stevia or Monkfruit)
  • 1 tbsp chicken base
  • 1/2 to 3/4 cup heavy cream
  • Fresh ground black pepper
  • Salt and red pepper flake to taste
  • 1/2 cup sherry optional
  • 1/4 cup chopped basil or parsley optional

Chef Paul’s Turkey Meatballs

  • 1.5 pounds ground turkey
  • 1/4 cup onion diced
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan
  • 1/4 cup diced basil or chives
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 1/2 cup GF or regular panko breadcrumbs
  • 1 egg large, beaten
  • 1/2 tsp. cracked pepper fresh
  • Red pepper flakes a pinch
  • 1/2 tsp. oregano dried
  • Salt to taste 1-2 tsp.
  • Olive oil

Instructions

Chef Paul’s Creamy Vodka Sauce

  • Dice the onion and sauté in butter until translucent.
  • Pour in diced tomatoes and tomato sauce and stir.
  • Add sugar and chicken base and stir until mixed.
  • Add lots of fresh cracked pepper (1-2 tablespoons).
  • Add sherry and cream if desired and stir until a low boil and turn off the heat
  • Add basil and parsley if desired and simmer for 10-15 minutes and enjoy!

Chef Paul’s Turkey Meatballs

  • In a large bowl, combine cheese, panko, onion, red pepper, basil, garlic, salt, beaten egg.
  • Add ground turkey and mix well. Form into 2 oz. (golf ball size) meatballs and let sit for 1-2 hours for best flavor (this is optional).
  • Heat olive oil in pan or iron skillet and brown turkey meatballs on 2-3 sides and set aside. (Do this in groups as to not crowd the pan)
  • Add seared meatballs to Chef Paul’s Vodka Sauce or marinara and simmer for 15-20 minutes.
  • Serve with fresh grated parmesan and pasta of choice (or just eat by themselves because they are delicious and healthy!)

Notes

Nutritional Facts for the Vodka Sauce:

  • Serving size: 0.5 cup
  • Calories: 90.3
  • Calories from fat: 54
  • Total fat: 6g
  • Saturated fat: 2g
  • Cholesterol: 35mg (12%)
  • Sodium: 429.4mg (18%)
  • Total carbohydrate: 8g
  • Net carbs: 6.1g
  • Dietary fiber: 2g
  • Sugars: 6g
  • Protein: 2g

Nutritional Facts for the Turkey Meatballs

  • Serving size: 3 pieces (85g)
  • Calories: 140
  • Calories from fat: 80
  • Total fat: 9g (14%)
  • Saturated fat: 2.5g (12%)
  • Cholesterol: 35mg (12%)
  • Sodium: 610mg (26%)
  • Total carbohydrate: 5g (2%)
  • Dietary fiber: 2g (7%)
  • Sugars: 0g
  • Protein: 14g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Turkey Meatballs with Creamy Vodka Sauce Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

The New Type 1 Diabetes Detection Program from JDRF

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Stacey Simms

Stacey: Tell me more about T1detect.

Frank: T1Detect is an education and awareness program about type 1 diabetes(T1D) and its risks, and a very important component of that is making the [autoantibodies] test available to people. Because right now, they’re not really available to people except in the context of research settings, or as people like you might know, in the context of an actual T1D diagnosis, when someone has super high blood sugar, they’re in the hospital. Then the doctors will do a confirmation test to see if it’s type 1, we want to make it available to people who don’t yet have symptoms. So hence, T1Detect.

You can go and find the test in a couple of different places. First and foremost is the JDRF website, we have access to information and the test kit button on our website through T1Detect. You click the button, it gives you some information about what it is to have T1D, what the risk factors are, what are autoantibodies.

You click the button you go to the Enable portal, fill in some information, we’re asking for your name, mailing address, things like that. We’re also asking for some demographic information, we want to learn who’s getting to the end, who’s at risk, and that’ll help us improve the program going forward. Then you come to a choice where you can pay for the test, the test is not terribly expensive, it’s $55. To run the test, plus or minus a couple of taxes, you also have the option if you cannot afford the test to have JDRF [help] pay for the test and you will pay for the bulk of the cost.

Right now, it’s not a feature to ask your insurance company to pay for this, but in the future, it will be. All that being done, the test will get sent to you, you’ll get a little box in the mail. It was pretty simple, I did it. You have a Lancet, you poke your finger. Then you fill in two out of four of these circles on a piece of cardboard, let that dry, and send it back. A couple of weeks later, the company will tell you, you have one, two, or three of the type 1 diabetes-specific autoantibodies.

Stacey: What are you testing for?

Frank: Let’s take a little step back to the biology of type 1 diabetes, the biology of autoimmune diseases. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease, and one of the ways we can tell a person who has an autoimmune disease is we can look in their blood for signs and symptoms of that their immune system is doing something that it is not supposed to be doing. In type 1 diabetes, we look for something called autoantibodies.

Now autoantibodies are something that that’s sort of a general term to all different autoimmune diseases. People with multiple sclerosis have autoantibodies, people with lupus have autoantibodies. What we’re looking for in type 1 diabetes are autoantibodies that are specific to type 1 diabetes. What makes them specific to type 1 diabetes is they are specific to things that are in your pancreas. We actually are looking for three of the four primary autoantibodies that have been determined through many many years of research to be very good diagnostics for type 1 diabetes, they’re IAA [Anti-Insulin], IA2 and GAD65. Some people may remember those names from TrialNet or other organizations, but there are three of the four that help us diagnose to end and predict your risk…. Based on those three, if you have two or more of those, we know pretty well that your risk of developing insulin dependence is very, very high. In fact, if you have two or more of those in your blood, you already have type 1 diabetes… you may not be symptomatic, but you already have it.

Watch the full interview below:



Source: diabetesdaily.com

COVID-19 Vaccine: Experience and Thoughts from the Diabetes Community

We are almost one year into the COVID-19 pandemic and while it is still causing devastation, there is light at the end of the tunnel thanks to two companies, Pfizer and Moderna, now offering a vaccine.

It varies by state but healthcare workers and people over 75 years (over 65 in some states) are the first in line. After that, people with high-risk, pre-existing conditions will be next. See here to find out your exact eligibility per state.

Many people have mixed feelings about the vaccine. Some are certain they will get it, not only because they don’t believe the vaccine is at all harmful but because they want life to go back to normal as soon as possible, while also protecting their health. Others are reluctant, possibly questioning the novelty and quick turnaround of the vaccine and wondering if there may be unforeseen side effects.

We thought it would be nice to hear from people like ourselves, who also live with diabetes, and see how they feel about getting vaccinated. We also spoke to some people who have already received the vaccine and heard about their experiences with side effects.

We asked our own Diabetes Daily forum members and the diabetes online community and here is what they had to say:

My wife with type 2 diabetes also suffers from COPD, bronchitis, and asthma. Accordingly, she would have a problem surviving COVID, so we have both registered with the NJ Covid Registry and will take the vaccine as soon as it becomes available. ~ Don1942

As I see it, two of these vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna) use a completely new and untested approach called mRNA. They were tested for only a short term on young, healthy adults. Animal, medium, and long-term testing were bypassed entirely. No testing on those with various health issues, and no testing for drug interactions. They only claim to reduce the number of symptoms. Zero claims are made about keeping you from getting or transmitting the virus. Last statement verified by Fauci saying anti-social distancing, lockdowns, and masking will still apply once you have had the vaccine. Then there are the 3+% of those who are vaccinated who suffer worse side effects than the symptoms the drug is supposed to reduce, keeping in mind that in the age groups tested only 1% would ever show any symptoms at all.

Finally the manufacturers take zero fiscal responsibility for bad outcomes. If they don’t believe their drugs are safe, why should I? ~ BobCan2

I have a nephew that has a doctorate in biochemistry (currently working on gene therapy). Said “I would take any of the vaccines in a second.” His wife also an MD has had the Moderna vaccine. I have a niece that is working on her doctorate in microbiology who has had the vaccine. So yes, I will take it. ~ 1986

I’m a no. Given my recent extended exposure, I’m not concerned. I’ll gladly wait for herd immunity. ~ HaoleBoy

I am a surgeon. I got the first dose of the Moderna vaccine. Just a sore arm. I have reviewed all of the science presented to the FDA and have no concerns. Glad to have access! ~ Dr. Carrie D.

So I voted yes… I’ve stated before that I used to be in the vaccine industry and I trust the science and the process. It’s not new technology being used. ~ Jughed

I’m getting the Moderna vaccine on Monday. I am a special education teacher in WI and we are the first group identified in the school district. Blessing! ~ Melissa R.

I think most people of my age remember friends getting polio, and I also remember giving my father chickenpox, which made him very, very ill; so having seen the miracles these vaccines did for quality of life, and preventing unnecessary deaths, I know I am very much pro-vaccination. My name will go down for a vaccine when it finally arrives here, hopefully, next month. I’m eligible for priority vaccination because of my age and a couple of chronic conditions.

I am 81 years old and a type 1 diabetic for 75 years. I am very high risk if I have the COVID virus. I am scheduled for the vaccine on Wed, Jan 21. My only hesitance is that the vaccine is being given in the gym complex at the local high school. I will probably encounter several individuals in the parking lot, while entering the building, inside the building, etc. In some states, people are receiving the vaccine without getting out of their cars. I wish it was done that way here where I live. ~ Richard `57

I am getting mine next weekend. I am 100% behind the science and haven’t given it a negative thought. Bring it on! ~ Susan K.

I’ll have it as soon as it’s offered. I am just recovering from COVID and it is awful. Sugars were terrible. I never want it again if I can help it. ~ Michelle R.

I will not be getting one. Mostly because I can’t help but think childhood vaccines play a major role in type 1 diabetes in the first place as vaccines are designed to trigger the immune system. ~ Fabian B.

I plan on getting the J&J one once it’s approved. I’m uncomfortable with the speed of the first two on the market, despite all I know everyone is saying. I feel better about the slow poke even if it’s irrational. ~ Caroline L.

Nope, nope and nope again. ~Kristin R.

I won’t be giving it to my son or myself. ~ Julie P.

I plan on getting one. In Nebraska, people living with diabetes are now eligible. ~ Wendy G.

My daughter is type 1 but it is not approved for children yet but she will not receive one and will remain not vaccinated as she always has been. ~ Stefanie R.

Here is what the people who have already received the vaccine had to say:

I had both doses. I’m 10 days out and still feel very run down. I was COVID-tested yesterday because it felt like a mild case but was negative. I received the vaccine 2 weeks ago and no side effects. Type 1 for 55 years. ~ Cindi H.

Tolerated both injections. Side effects were mild, with some deep muscle soreness, at least for me. I did note some insulin resistance post injections. ~ Chris A.

I got my first dose a couple of weeks ago and will get my next one in two weeks. I just had a sore arm and a little fatigued the next day. By the third day, I felt pretty normal. I didn’t notice any changes to my insulin sensitivity or blood sugar levels. ~ Karissa G.

I received both doses. My only issues were headache, fatigue, and chills.

COVID vaccine update #2: 24 hours later, I don’t feel horrible, but definitely off. Some body aches, headache and overall sluggishness. I went to bed at about 8:30 and “slept” till 10:30. (with my saul dog interruptions and the baby kicking my bladder, etc.)” ~ Nicole M.

I had mine because I work for the National Health Service and I had no side effects at all. ~ Kate B.

I was nauseous after my first dose for about 12 hours. I took a Zofran and was fine. ~ Jamie B.

I did have side effects (pain, mild fever) but I won’t hesitate to go for the second shot.

I have completed the series and just had a sore arm for a couple of days each time.

No side effects beyond a sore arm. I like the peace of mind and I did extensive research before getting it to fully understand what I was getting into. ~ Sarah R.

My 82-year old identical twin sisters each received the first dose. One got the Pfizer and the other the Moderna. No adverse reactions thus far. The one that got the Pfizer has allergies so was a bit concerned but had no reaction. ~ Auburn75

It should be mandatory that vaccines like this are taken. It’s not a conspiracy theory. There aren’t robots in the vaccine. This whole virus story isn’t a hoax, and this hasn’t been started because some people are simply trying to make some money. The sheer lunacy I’ve seen out there is beyond description. Some people think the world is flat. I’ve gotten both doses and have had zero side effects. ~ Sheralyn B.

I received my first vaccine on Jan 8 with minimal side effects being a sore arm and mild low blood sugars. On Jan 27 I received my second vaccine. Initially only had a sore arm and headache but after 36 hours, developed mild fever of 99.7, body aches, headache, continued low blood sugars, and a grape side swollen lymph node in my armpit, the arm I received my vaccine in. Fever and swollen lymph node improved with Tylenol and Ibuprofen! ~ Carlie W.

Will you be getting the vaccine once it is available to you? Have you had one or both doses and experienced side effects? Share and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How Race and Ethnicity Affect Diabetes Prevalence, Management, and Complications

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Julia Kenney, Matthew Garza, and Eliza Skoler

Black, Indigenous, Hispanic, and Asian individuals, and people of all non-white racial and ethnic groups are more likely to have diabetes and diabetes-related health complications than their white peers. Here’s how social determinants of health lead to differences in diabetes care and outcomes, creating racial, ethnic, and economic health disparities in the United States.

According to the 2020 National Diabetes Statistics Report published by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), diabetes affects over 34 million people in the United States – that’s more than one in ten people. However, diabetes does not affect all communities equally. As with many conditions – such as heart disease, chronic lung disease, and chronic kidney disease – a person’s race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status influences both their risk for developing diabetes and their access to diabetes management resources. The health disparities that exist among the many races in the US are not attributable to genetics or biology alone, but also to socioeconomic factors and social determinants of health that disadvantage people of color.

Though genetics and biology do play important roles in diabetes prevalence and complication rates, this article will focus on the societal factors that affect the lives of people living with diabetes – such as access to healthy food, healthcare, employment, and other socioeconomic factors. We aim to specifically explore the racial health disparities that disadvantage communities of color. We will also highlight some of the factors underlying the concerning patterns in diabetes prevalence, management, and complications, and share ways to promote health and access to care for people with diabetes, regardless of race and ethnicity.

Defining Key Terms

  • Race & Ethnicity – Race is a socially constructed way to group individuals based on skin color and physical features. There is no specific set of genes that defines a race. Ethnicity is also socially constructed, and it categorizes people based on a shared sense of group membership (like language, culture, history, or geography).
  • Socioeconomic status – Socioeconomic status is a measure of a person’s economic and social standing. This term is often used interchangeably with social or economic class.
  • Health disparities – Health disparities are differences in health outcomes among various populations or communities. They are closely linked to social, economic, and environmental disadvantages that affect groups that have systematically experienced greater obstacles to health (due to factors including race, gender, age, sexual orientation, and economic status.)
  • Health equity – Health equity is the goal that every person, regardless of their background or circumstance, is able to live a healthy life with full access to quality healthcare and other health resources. Achievement of health equity requires valuing every person equally and addressing avoidable inequalities with focused, societal efforts to eliminate injustices and health disparities.
  • Social determinants of health – These are factors that influence a person’s health but fall outside the scope of a healthcare professional’s influence. They are the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age. For example, social determinants of health can include a person’s race, gender, socioeconomic status, education, and where they live and work; these factors are often longstanding and have multi-generational effects. Social determinants of health are one of the major causes of health inequities – the unfair and avoidable differences in health status.
  • Systemic racism – Also called institutional or structural racism, it is defined by systems and structures (such as medicine or the healthcare system) that have procedures or processes that disadvantage people of color.

Systemic racism lies at the center of this article. As we discuss racial health disparities and their underlying causes, keep in mind that these factors are a result of the long-standing structures that affect the lived experiences of people of color – they are not attributed to the personal decisions of individuals.

A Look at Racial Health Disparities in Diabetes

What do health disparities actually look like in the US? The data show concerning patterns: Black, Indigenous, Hispanic, and Asian populations are more heavily affected by diabetes than their non-Hispanic, white counterparts, in diagnoses, management challenges, and diabetes-related complications.

The CDC’s diabetes statistics report showed alarming differences among races in the estimated percentage of adults with diabetes (both diagnosed and undiagnosed) in the US from 2013 to 2016:

  • Black, non-Hispanic: 16.4%
  • Asian, non-Hispanic: 14.9%
  • Hispanic: 14.7%
  • White, non-Hispanic: 11.9%

While these differences in rates are stark, the evidence shows that diabetes prevalence is not dependent on race from a genetic or physiological standpoint alone. For example, in this study from 2007, when researchers accounted for socioeconomic factors, the differences in rates of type 2 diabetes between racial groups were reduced. This supports the idea that socioeconomic factors that disadvantage people of color are a significant cause for these health disparities.

In a 2017 study published in the Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, a team of researchers from Meharry Medical College and Vanderbilt University found that there were differences in the quality of diabetes care between racial and ethnic groups. Using the 2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) data, they looked at adherence to five ADA-recommended services over one year that indicate quality of diabetes care. Compared to white individuals, Hispanic, Black, and Asian individuals received fewer diabetes management checks, including A1C tests, eye exams, foot exams, blood cholesterol tests, and flu vaccines. Even in adjusted models which controlled for factors like insurance coverage, poverty, and education, some of the disparities remained. Most notably, Hispanic, Black, and Asian individuals were still less likely to receive the two recommended annual A1C checks. The researchers showed that this difference in quality of care occurred partly because populations of color had less access to health insurance and diabetes management education, compared to white populations.

Trends in care translate to trends in diabetes outcomes – including complications and death rates. A study from 2014 looked into racial and ethnic differences in diabetes complications and mortality. Black, Indigenous, and Hispanic individuals had higher rates of retinopathyend-stage kidney disease, and amputations than non-Hispanic white individuals. Furthermore, these groups were more likely to die from diabetes than non-Hispanic white Americans:

  • Indigenous populations were 3 times more likely to die from diabetes
  • Non-Hispanic Black Americans were 2.3 times more likely to die from diabetes
  • Hispanic Americans were 1.5 times more likely to die from diabetes

Just as with the risk of diabetes, people of color are not genetically predisposed to diabetes-related complications due to race alone. A combination of social and environmental factors plays into a person’s ability to successfully manage their diabetes.

How Genetics and Biology Are Involved

Racial and ethnic categories are not as closely associated with genetics and biology as some people think. In fact, categories such as white, Black, Asian, and Hispanic are defined more by society than by any set of specific genes. However, to fully address the factors that affect diabetes prevalence and outcomes, we must understand the role of genetics and biology. Studies have shown that there are biological differences among races that correspond to how a person metabolizes (or utilizes) glucose, their insulin sensitivity, and how fat is distributed in the body – however, a person’s family history of diabetes is more telling of their genetic risk for that condition than the color of their skin. The research on how genetics, biology, and race all intersect and interact to influence diabetes is complex; there is still much to determine.

As discussed, genetics alone do not explain diabetes-related health disparities among the races. Furthermore, we cannot reduce the large health disparities by focusing solely on biological factors, which are largely predetermined; we must instead focus on the socioeconomic factors and social determinants of health that exacerbate racial disparities, which are in large part founded in longstanding systemic racism. Below we describe some of the many elements of systemic racism that affect a person’s ability to manage their diabetes and receive quality diabetes healthcare.

Main Causes of Racial Health Disparities in Diabetes Prevalence

The factors we discuss here are influenced by systemic racism that is built into the social, economic, and political fabric of the United States. The systemic racism that people of color experience results in things like lower wages, fewer academic and professional opportunities, and reduced community resources. With this in mind, factors like income, unemployment, health insurance, and food and exercise environments are not entirely personal choices, but can be explained by a number of external causes.

Income 

In the US, there are major racial differences in wealth. A 2018 Kaiser study offered this breakdown of people living below the federal poverty level:

  • 1 in 4 Indigenous people
  • 1 in 5 Black people
  • 1 in 5 Hispanic people
  • 1 in 10 white people

Further statistics on income and poverty levels can be found in the US Census Bureau’s 2019 report, which confirms the racial disparities in poverty rates. People living with incomes below the federal poverty level in 2018 were earning only $12,000 a year (or $25,000 for a family of four). These families – and many above the federal poverty level – often can’t afford the nutritious food, safe exercise opportunities, and healthcare needed to prevent and manage diabetes.

Unemployment and Health Insurance

People of color in America are also more likely to be unemployed. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the rates of unemployment in 2019, broken down by race, were:

  • 6.6% of Indigenous people
  • 6.1% of Black people
  • 3.9% of Latino and/or Hispanic people
  • 3.1% of white people

These unemployment rates and racial disparities have been further exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, which dramatically increased unemployment rates in the US. Though unemployment is closely tied to income, it can also influence a person’s access to health insurance, since many people receive health insurance from an employer.

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Image source: diaTribe

The high cost of healthcare means those who are uninsured or underinsured often do not get the care they need, including preventive healthcare (such as annual check-ups and prediabetes screenings) and instead must rely on inconsistent care. Unfortunately, Black, Indigenous, and Hispanic people are less likely to be insured in America. According to a Kaiser study of non-elderly individuals in the US, these were the rates of uninsured people in 2018:

  • 21.8% of Indigenous people (identified as American Indian or Alaskan Native
  • 19% of Hispanic people
  • 11.5% of Black people
  • 7.5% of white people

Food and Exercise

A healthy diet and regular exercise are known to reduce the risk and improve the outcomes of type 2 diabetes. However, Black, Hispanic, and Indigenous communities in the US have less access to healthy foods and experience higher rates of food insecurity than white communities. According to the USDA, more than 35 million people lived in food insecure households in the US in 2019, including:

  • 25% of Indigenous people
  • 19.1% of non-Hispanic, Black households
  • 15.6% of Hispanic households
  • 7.9% of non-Hispanic, white households

Food insecurity is most common among low-income communities, which are disproportionately occupied by people of color. Moreover, food deserts (where there is little to no access to healthy foods) and food swamps (full of unhealthy fast-food options) are located primarily in minority neighborhoods. These communities are often faced with local food options that put them at an increased risk for diabetes: more small grocery stores with limited choices, fast food restaurants, and liquor stores, and fewer supermarkets with fresh fruit and vegetable options, bakeries, and natural and whole foods.

In addition to less access to healthy and affordable food, people of color often also have less time, money, and overall access to venues for exercise. This article from the New York Times about the racially exclusive culture around jogging is an eye-opening example of the barriers to exercise that many Black people face. Even at a time when some of the world’s most elite runners are African or Black, Black runners and joggers (in America, especially) often engage in protective measures such as running only during the daytime, steering clear of certain neighborhoods, or wearing Ivy League sweatshirts to deflect any suspicions that could lead to racist attacks.

Main Causes of Racial Health Disparities in Diabetes-Related Health Complications

Barriers to healthcare (such as a lack of health insurance or insufficient income) continue after a person is diagnosed with diabetes. Without ongoing, regular diabetes care, people face higher rates of health complications. Here are some of the barriers:

  • The high cost of insulin has made the life-saving drug inaccessible to many people, including people of color who have higher rates of unemployment and little or no health insurance. An American Action Forum report showed that insulin costs a person an average of $6,000 per year and found that one in four people with diabetes report rationing their insulin because they cannot afford the cost of their full prescribed dose.
  • Despite major advances in diabetes technology that make diabetes management easier, including wider use of CGM and insulin pumps, disparities exist in who has access to these tools. Black individuals are less likely to use an insulin pump or CGM than their white counterparts – which may be due to failure of the healthcare professional to write a prescription for technology, insufficient information about diabetes technology, an inability to afford these devices, or subtle racism on the part of the established medical system.
  • Even for people who have insurance, the costs of diabetes care and a diabetes-friendly nutrition plan can be challenging for people with low incomes.

Social and racial barriers widen diabetes health disparities. There is a history of prejudice against people of color in our healthcare system: Black, Indigenous, and Hispanic individuals can have the same income, insurance, and medical condition as white people yet still receive lower quality care due to systemic racism. In 2018, fewer than 12% of practicing physicians in the United States were Black, Hispanic, or Indigenous individuals. This means that there are fewer healthcare professionals who can earn trust and identify with communities of color. For more information on racism in healthcare, check out Unequal Treatment.

The Importance of Addressing Health Inequity in Communities of Color

It is clear that the disparities in diabetes prevalence, care, and management can be explained in part by of a number of social determinants of health, many of which are influenced by systemic racism. Every person with diabetes faces health barriers. But for many, the color of their skin can make successful diabetes management even more difficult and sometimes impossible. Every person with diabetes should have access to diabetes care, medication, and technology, and to living a healthy life with diabetes.

What Can We, as a Society, Do to Reduce These Disparities?

It will take extensive, collaborative, and creative work to address these disparities. We can begin by educating ourselves and others. Some good first steps include learning about the challenges faced by people of color with diabetes, about the people working to address these issues already, and about the ways to get involved. Check out some of our other articles on these subjects:

At diaTribe, we want to acknowledge the people and the organizations at the local, state, and national levels who are already doing the work needed to effectively tackle the health inequalities that lead to higher rates of diabetes and less favorable outcomes among people of color. In addition to those whose jobs focus on addressing health disparities, there are other ways for people to be involved in promoting health equity. Here are some ideas to consider:

No matter what skills or resources you may have, determine how your expertise might be of benefit – particularly if you are in the health field where you can address systemic racism and health disparities. The more we learn about how the social determinants of health and racism in healthcare contribute to a person’s risk for diabetes and influence their diabetes management, the better prepared we’ll be to knock down barriers to quality care.

We acknowledge that every person should have the resources to manage their diabetes and, in the case of type 2 diabetes, to prevent it. All people, and especially people in positions of privilege, have a responsibility to help break down barriers to equal care for underserved communities. As people with diabetes and their allies, we have to do the work – and build upon the work already being done – to address racial health disparities and create more equitable and inclusive healthcare for people of color – in fact, for all of us.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

CGMs to “Hack” Your Blood Sugar? People with Diabetes Speak Up

It’s becoming more and more common: whether in a coffee shop in Silicon Valley or in a weightlifting gym in Boulder, Colorado, people without diabetes are using continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) to “hack” their blood sugars, lose weight, and hone their diets accordingly. This article will explore the use of CGMs in the non-diabetic population, what the backlash from the diabetes community has been, and what the call to action should be.

CGMs for More Than Just Diabetes Management?

According to one website that promotes the use of CGMs in a non-diabetic population,

“ Wearing a CGM can facilitate the effort for someone who wants to hack their diet, blood sugar control, and overall health. This technology can go beyond a single blood sugar reading that a blood glucose meter provides. A CGM can provide real-time insight on whether blood sugar is trending up or down.”

What may seem like an innocuous accessory for the upper-class elite has many people with diabetes enraged. CGMs are crucial in providing regular, near-constant blood glucose readings to track time spent in range (TIR), identifying patterns in blood sugars, and anticipating both low and high levels.

The Original Purpose of a Continuous Glucose Monitor

For people with diabetes, they are life-saving, and more and more often are being coupled with insulin pumps that will then increase or suspend insulin according to the blood sugar that a CGM reads. It almost entirely eliminates the need for manual finger testing and has proven to help lower HbA1c levels, reduce dangerous low blood sugars, increase time in range, prevent unnecessary emergency room (ER) visits, and save the health care system money and save many lives. It has quickly become a necessity for tight diabetes management in recent years for many people.

For something so seemingly necessary for most people with diabetes, it clearly isn’t seen that way by industry: 16 states, including California (the most populous), do not have Medicaid coverage for continuous glucose monitors at all. And while most private health insurance plans (and even Medicare) now cover CGMs, affording one without health insurance is nearly impossible: the most popular CGM and the one that most commonly connects with insulin pumps, the Dexcom CGM, costs thousands of dollars out of pocket per month without insurance.

So when someone with diabetes, who is already struggling to afford their insulin, goes to the local coffee shop and overhears two dudes from Crossfit comparing their (perfect) blood sugar readings on their respective CGMs over their non-fat decaf lattes, the inequity of the situation can be enough to make your skin crawl.

Clair from Illinois says,

“The general population using CGM devices trivializes them.”

Cate from Nebraska adds,

“It absolutely incenses me [when non-diabetics use CGMs]. There’s a local doctor in my area who treats patients for weight loss and gives everyone a free CGM; meanwhile, it’s an arm and a leg to refill my own.”

Bonnie from Minneapolis says,

“It drives me absolutely bananas.”

We Are All Just Products of the System

Managing diabetes with a continuous glucose monitor is life-changing, but it is expensive, and living with diabetes in America is anything but easy. We have the most expensive insulin prices in the world, health insurance isn’t compulsory or cheap, and even when you do have a job that has health insurance, necessary diabetes technology is sometimes not even covered or affordable under your plan.

Seeing people use technology that we need can be seen as a slap in the face, but we’re directing our anger at the wrong place. The problem with accessibility in the United States is not a supply issue. The problem with accessibility in the United States is that we use health care as a commodity when it is not. We put health care into a capitalist box when it’s something that should be treated as the human right it is. We’ve priced people out of their lives. We treat things like insulin and insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors as if they’re elastic goods when they’re 100% inelastic. We cannot negotiate our own pricing for insulin. We can’t haggle down the price or walk away. We need the drug or we die.

People without diabetes see products like continuous glucose monitors as the valuable goods they are and are willing to pay for them. No person who uses a CGM recreationally has it covered by their insurance, and it’s important to remember that.

It’s not a zero-sum game where someone’s CGM that’s paid for out of pocket in San Francisco precludes another person on Maine’s Medicaid program from accessing one of their own, but it feels like it does. Instead of taking our anger out on the gym-rat in Colorado who’s paying thousands of dollars out of pocket for their Dexcom each month (which is stupid, but why question their motives?), we should be angry at the government and systems that created this situation to begin with.

If the United States had a single-payer health care system where everyone who lives here had health coverage, we wouldn’t care what people buy on the free market. If all plans (including Medicaid!) covered CGM use for people with diabetes at 100% of the cost, it wouldn’t bother us what anyone else was doing with their blood sugar levels (diabetic or not). It’s a symptom of a system that denies people with diabetes the proper care and regular, reliable access to proper durable medical equipment that makes them covet these devices as much as we do. There’s nothing inherently wrong with people without diabetes using CGMs, but it does sure feel like there should be. 

CGM for non-diabetic population

Photo credit: iStock

Some People Support Wider Use of CGMs

In speaking with others for this story, I found several people who encourage non-diabetics to use CGMs, like Mindy, a registered dietician from Colorado,

“I am pleased that there is adequate supply for people without diabetes who can view the real-time movements and fluctuations of blood glucose. The more understanding there is in groups of non-DMs, maybe we can finally change the direction of people diagnosed with (type 2) in the future.”

Christie, from California, added,

“being mad about someone having a CGM that they bought on the free-market is similar to someone with hypertension being angry over another person having an at-home blood pressure monitor. It just doesn’t compute.”

In a country with nearly 100 million people living with prediabetes, learning to respond to blood sugar trends and figuring out which foods work best for your body can only be a good thing. And although it hasn’t happened yet, the more “mainstream” these devices become, the more affordable they’re bound to become, which would be great for everyone. Additionally, for shy diabetics, CGMs becoming more mainstream can also take away the stigma of having a visible device on your body 24/7. It’s suddenly “cool”.

Benefits for Everyone

Whether or not you have diabetes, a continuous glucose monitor can help with several things:

  • Learning how your body responds to certain foods (grapes versus crackers, for instance)
  • Identifying blood sugar patterns around mealtime and exercise
  • Diagnosing diabetes before the onset of ketoacidosis (DKA) in people at high risk (people who are overweight, obese, live with prediabetes, or who have the antibodies for type 1 diabetes)
  • Improving blood sugar to help maximize energy for a workouts
  • Helping people lose weight by managing their hunger (which is the result of fewer blood sugar fluctuations throughout the day)

In a country where over 70 million adults are obese and another 99 million are overweight, having more data regarding how our bodies respond to the foods we eat is vital. We have a type 2 diabetes epidemic on our hands that is only getting worse, and wider CGM usage may help curb that, but people need to be careful.

Using them as “wellness gimmicks” may bombard those who truly do not understand the relationship between glucose and blood sugars, leaving users overwhelmed with data and confused, while not making any dietary changes at all. In a true market economy, the greater the demand, the more competition will spring up, the more prices will fall (for both people with and without diabetes).

The real issue that people need to focus on is making sure that everyone with diabetes who wants a CGM can get one, but people without diabetes accessing CGMs on the open market will not prevent that from happening. We need to push for greater coverage for CGMs on the private and public health insurance market with our elected officials and make sure that we inch ever closer to the illustrious universal health care system that other industrialized countries enjoy. We need to make sure that everyone with diabetes has access to affordable insulin, pumps, and supplies (including CGMs), with strong grassroots advocacy to equip people with all the tools they need to thrive. If we achieve universal health care maybe someday everyone who truly needs a CGM can get one, but until then, let the Crossfit bro with his Dexcom sensor alone. Although you can let him know that the caffeine in his latte will raise his blood sugar a few points in the meantime.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

New Therapy to Treat Type 1 Diabetes Rolls Out Clinical Trial

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition whereby the person’s own immune system attacks the pancreatic cells that produce insulin. Insulin signals for glucose uptake into cells, a carefully regulated and important process, that when disrupted, can lead to an array of health complications, and without treatment, results in death. Many advances in the care of type 1 diabetes have been made in the last century; however, there is no cure for the condition, and patients rely on frequent blood glucose monitoring and insulin injection or infusion therapy to survive.

We have been closely following the work of Dr. Bart Roep and his colleagues at the City of Hope over the last several years. We first spoke to him at the 79th American Diabetes Association (ADA) Scientific Sessions in 2019.

“Dr. Roep has dedicated his professional life to trying to cure type 1 diabetes. Over an almost 30-year career, he has earned numerous prestigious awards and is perhaps most well-known for his work discovering how T-cells recognize specific antigens on beta cells in the context of type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. Currently, he is Chan Soon-Shiong Shapiro Distinguished Chair in Diabetes and the founding chair of the Department of Diabetes Immunology within City of Hope’s Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute. Dr. Roep is also the director of the Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes.”

The immune system coordinates defenses against pathogens (like viruses and bacteria) via intricate cross-talk between different immune cells in the body. It is also able to recognize the host (self-tolerance) and under normal circumstances, should not attempt to destroy the person’s own cells (with the exception of special circumstances, like cancerous cells, for instance).

Photo by iStock

For the treatment of autoimmune conditions, like type 1 diabetes, much research is ongoing in an effort to “re-write” some of the “programming” and cellular cross-talk thought to be responsible for autoimmune attack. The “inverse vaccine” for the treatment of type 1 diabetes attempts to do just that in the following process:

  1. Immune cells are taken from patients and “re-educated” in the test tube to improve self- tolerance
  2. These cells are injected back into the patient, in hopes that they will not longer drive autoimmune attack, but rather “educate” the immune system to tolerate the person’s own beta cells

Last year, we reported that the initial safety and tolerability studies appeared promising.

Now, additional clinical trials are poised to begin:

“The vaccine is made using one’s own immune cells (dendritic cells) and a beta cell protein. The vaccine may teach the immune system to stop attacking the beta cells, which may help the beta cells recover and make enough insulin to control blood sugar levels. The vaccine may also help reduce future type 1 diabetes related complications.”

It is a very exciting time for type 1 diabetes as we move from just treating the symptoms to actually trying to stop the disease,” Roep remarked in a recent press release.

What are your thoughts on this research? Would you participate in the trial?

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Low-Carb Turnips Au Gratin

This content originally appeared on Sugar-Free Mom. Republished with permission.

Au gratin means it’s covered with breadcrumbs or grated cheese and browned. The most popular high-carb favorite is potatoes au gratin. Obviously when you’re eating low-carb, white potatoes are not going to fit into your food plan.

My low-carb swap for replacing potatoes in this recipe is turnips. It’s the perfect low-carb veggie to replicate the size of potatoes as well as the color. If you’ve never tried turnips, I highly suggest this recipe!

If you dislike turnips, check out the original recipe to see what other low-carb vegetables you can use.

turnips au gratin

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Low-Carb Turnips Au Gratin

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This creamy and cheesy low-carb recipe will bring you all the comfort of potatoes au gratin with half the carbs!
Course Side Dish
Cuisine French
Keyword au gratin, turnips
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 25 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 45 minutes
Servings 8 servings
Calories 319kcal

Equipment

  • oven

Ingredients

  • 2.25 pounds turnips about 6 medium
  • 1.5 cups heavy cream
  • 2 garlic cloves minced
  • 2 tbsp butter melted
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 2.5 cups shredded mozzarella cheese divided
  • 2 tbsp fresh thyme

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease a 9 by 9 baking dish or 1.5 quart dish.
  • Peel the turnips and slice thinly about an 1/8th of an inch or use a mandolin.
  • Whisk together the cream, garlic, melted butter, salt and pepper.
  • Layer one third of the turnip slices on the bottom of the dish. Pour one third of the cream mixture over the turnips. Sprinkle a half cup of mozzarella over that. Repeat this process for the second and third layers. You will have 1 cup of mozzarella remaining.
  • Cover and bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes or until turnips are soft. Remove cover, sprinkle remaining cheese over the top and bake 10-15 minutes until cheese is melted and bubbling.

Notes

Net carbs: 7g

Nutrition

Calories: 319kcal | Carbohydrates: 10g | Protein: 9g | Fat: 26g | Saturated Fat: 17g | Cholesterol: 35mg | Sodium: 621mg | Potassium: 281mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 407IU | Vitamin C: 30mg | Calcium: 223mg | Iron: 1mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

 

Low-Carb Turnips Au Gratin Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Realistic Goal-Setting and Avoiding Stigma: One Mom’s Perspective

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Bonnie O’Neil

The title of the article arrests my attention, compelling me to read further. The Numbers of Shame and Blame: How Stigma Affects Patients and Diabetes Management. I shudder as I read the results of a study by the diaTribe Foundation. “Diabetes stigma affects 76% of people living with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and 83% of parents raising a child with T1D.” The statistics are so high.

Stigma. The word itself sounds uncomfortable on my lips. Diabetes stigma means carrying a sense of disgrace or shame because of having T1D, an unpreventable auto-immune disease.

I continue reading. “The majority of respondents who believe T1D is associated with social stigma identified the top three drivers of diabetes stigma — a perception of failure of personal responsibility, a perception of being a burden on society, and a perception of having a character flaw.”

I cringe as I read these findings. Does my son feel like he’s a failure when his blood sugars don’t cooperate and do what he wants them to do? Maybe he does. I know as his parent and caregiver I feel like a failure when his A1c isn’t what I had hoped it would be. Does he feel like he’s a burden on society? On his school? On his family? Oh, I hope not. I can hardly even reread that last driver of stigma on the list. Does he feel like he has a character flaw simply because he has T1D? My heart rises up to my throat.

How can I help my son navigate living with T1D in such a way that he doesn’t fall prey to the shame and failure associated with disease stigma? Rereading the statistics, I pause and ask myself another question. How do I as his parent carry disease stigma? The survey tells me 83 percent of us parents raising a child with T1D are affected by it. Am I a part of that 83 percent? When his physician suggests we make some changes to achieve better outcomes, do my reactions model for my son my own feelings of failure, guilt, or shame?

Whether overtly stated or simply implied, we all have goals in mind for our child’s T1D management. While I never announced my goals as clearly as I would my New Year’s resolutions, my son and I both knew what they were.

  • A1c at 7.0 or below
  • Blood sugars between 80-150
  • Not too many juice boxes in a day

Setting goals is important; it’s what keeps us moving forward as humans. During certain times of the year we’re especially focused on goal setting. Whether it’s January’s hopes for the new year, September’s back-to-school focus, or our birth month marking one more circuit around the sun, we can’t escape the human drive to set goals.

But in our best efforts to keep our child healthy and safe, how can we set reasonable goals that serve more as guard rails than leave us feeling stigmatized if the goals are left unmet?

Set Realistic Goals

It’s easy to slip from the hope and optimism of setting a new goal to feeling shame if those goals aren’t attained. Start small when setting new goals. Remember your child lives with this disease 24/7. Your eagerness to try a new approach to glucose management might feel like the addition of one more heavy weight placed on top of what your child is already carrying. Check in with your child. How does he feel about your goals? There’s a fine line between maintaining glucose control and contributing to diabetes burnout.

Hold Your Goals Loosely

Beware of the trap of stigma when we don’t hit our goals. Commit to living in the no-shame zone. The statistics reveal that 83% of parents raising a child with T1D struggle with stigma, meaning we parents struggle more with shame than even our children with T1D do. The next time you find yourself stressing over an unmet goal you have for your child’s care, recognize that the 83% is you. And it’s me. Let’s break the power of stigma in our own lives so we don’t model it and pass it along to our children. Offer grace to yourself and your child if the goals go out the window for a period of time. You can always get back on track once this season is over, so don’t buy into the failure narrative. Be good to yourself and to your child.

Be Aware of What You Reward

When my son was young, I would often take him to buy a small toy or gift after his appointments with his endocrinologist. It was a few years before I realized that I only bought him a treat when his A1c was at a level that met or surpassed the goal I had in mind. What message was I sending to my son? That I only reward what makes me proud? That my pride in him was linked to his A1c? Even well-intentioned gestures can leave our children feeling shame when they don’t reach our goals. Instead of rewarding only those times when the numbers match our goals, why not celebrate our child’s hard work and the joy of sharing life together after every appointment?

Watch Your Words

Goals like “Let’s do better with blood sugar control next year” imply a judgment that the past year was less than stellar. Your child (or you) may receive this message as a judgment that they (or you) were less than stellar last year. Words like better, good, and bad, which we use all too frequently when talking about blood sugars, are qualitative and can leave our child feeling stigmatized. Blood sugars and A1c’s are just numbers that provide us valuable information from which to make future decisions. Being careful with our language can help protect our child from carrying a sense of stigma.

Remember above all, our goal isn’t really about reaching blood sugar goals. Our goal is to build a healthy lifelong relationship with our child based on respect, encouragement, and love.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Dexcom Super Bowl Ad: Did it Miss the Mark?

By Caroline Levens

 

Editor’s Note:

Nick Jonas, a music celebrity living with with type 1 diabetes (T1D) partnered with Dexcom and recorded a Super Bowl commercial for diabetes advocacy. Some in the diabetes community, however, feel that it missed the mark entirely. One of our contributors, Caroline, shared why.

***

When I first heard that Dexcom had an ad in the Super Bowl, I was quite surprised — but also really excited about the prospect of them bringing mainstream awareness to diabetes. Once I saw the ad, however, I was immediately disappointed, and I think it’s important to shed light on why the execution was so poor, in my opinion. 

First and foremost, the ad has Nick Jonas exclaim in a condescending tone “people with diabetes are still pricking their fingers…what??”

If you aren’t familiar with Dexcom, it’s a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), meaning it shares blood glucose readings every five minutes. And while it’s an amazing product, it’s not cheap — current Dexcom pricing without insurance is $4,744 per year. Insulin is an essential cost for diabetics, whereas Dexcom is a luxury. According to T1International, spending by patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) on insulin nearly doubled from 2012 to 2016, increasing from $2900 to $5700, and one of every four patients with T1D has had to ration their insulin due to cost.

It goes without saying – spending $10k+ on diabetes annually is a lot of money. When we’re in the middle of a pandemic where many people have lost their jobs and insurance, the way Dexcom comes across here is quite inconsiderate. I can’t think of a single other product category where a brand would think it’d be okay to frame a product in this context. Sure, there are many categories where the luxury price point is out of reach for the average consumer. But you don’t see them with commercials rubbing it in “what, you can’t afford us??” The analogy isn’t perfect, but it’s comparable to a luxury appliance brand with a Super Bowl ad saying, “people are still washing clothes by hand and using clotheslines, what??”

Secondly, the ad is very misleading, and they even have to have a legal disclaimer “Fingersticks required for diabetes treatment decisions if symptoms or expectations do not match readings.” I’d love to meet a Dexcom user who no longer needs ANY fingersticks. I love my Dexcom, I really do – I’ve been a loyal Dexcom user since 2008 and am extremely fortunate to have it.

That said, the accuracy, though it’s improved over the years, is still not perfect. And, accurate blood glucose values are essential for insulin dosing precision. Many endocrinologists specifically recommend not dosing off of Dexcom’s value. I can’t even count the number of times I would have died – and no I’m not exaggerating – if I had trusted the value on Dexcom. There are also many times it has error messages and doesn’t display any values and you need to use fingersticks (in the past week alone, I’ve had 20+ hours of this). There are also 2-hour warm up periods where you may need to check your blood sugar levels. No doubt in my mind, Nick Jonas pricks his finger, but of course if you pay him enough for a commercial, he’ll say what Dexcom wants him to say.

Last but not least, there’s already a big stigma associated with fingerpricks. It shouldn’t have to be something people are ashamed to do — it’s absolutely vital for survival — but I’ve experienced it before myself, especially in high school, and even still occasionally am uncomfortable checking my blood sugar in work settings, around new people etc. New technology is great, but “othering” fingersticks does not help. 

Dexcom, think about the little boy watching the Super Bowl who is already ashamed to prick his finger, knows Dexcom exists from diabetes camp (and from your lovely ad), wants it, his parents also want it for him, but it’s not a financial possibility. How do you think your ad makes him feel? Does it matter to you? Sure, the world’s not perfect. I 100% realize not everyone can get what they want. But this ad could have been approached in a completely different way that I believe would have delivered as strong as business results for Dexcom without doing any harm to the diabetes community. Dexcom had a big opportunity, and quite frankly, blew it.

Check it out for yourself and please share your thoughts in the comments:

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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