Hypoglycemia Preparedness: How to Know Before You Go Low

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Lorena Bergstrom

A new awareness campaign helps people with diabetes recognize and plan for low blood sugar with emergency toolkits, discussion prompts, journaling, and a support network  

Low blood sugar can be a scary thing – it often sneaks up when people least expect it, quickly shifting from a minor annoyance to a potentially dangerous situation. In fact, a Canadian study found that people with diabetes (type 1 and type 2) experience severe hypoglycemia an average of 2.5 times each year. While type 2 diabetes typically presents a lower hypoglycemic risk than type 1, insulin and oral medications can still cause low blood sugar. However, you can take many steps to protect yourself.

We spoke with endocrinologist Dr. Gregory Dodell (with Mount Sinai in New York) and singer Crystal Bowersox about Lilly’s new Know Before the Low campaign, an important initiative to raise awareness about hypoglycemia. Bowersox and Dr. Dodell hope this program will empower people with diabetes to recognize signs of low blood sugar, start conversations with their peers, and prepare for emergencies before they happen.

Dodell

Image source: diaTribe

Know Before the Low offers information about managing hypoglycemia; it includes a chart of physical and cognitive symptoms, a tip list for emergency planning, and a guide for building a support network. Dr. Dodell said that unfortunately most diabetes literature focuses on controlling high blood sugar – even though low blood sugar can be more dangerous. He said that the campaign aims to address this information gap by “helping people and healthcare professionals talk about low blood sugar and prevent future episodes.”

To start, every person with diabetes should build an emergency toolkit, including:

  • Glucose tablets or sugary snacks
  • Glucagon – read about emergency nasal glucagon (Baqsimi) and ready-to-use autoinjector pens (Gvoke)
  • Glucose monitor (continuous glucose monitor or fingerstick blood glucose meter)
  • Emergency contact information

Bowersox makes her emergency pouch easily accessible to her friends and family: “My family, including my 11-year-old son, knows what to do if I have a hypoglycemic episode or emergency. I think it’s important for an individual’s entire support network to be aware of this.” Of course, it may seem inconvenient to carry around an entire toolkit when going out, but many of the new glucagons (like Gvoke and Baqsimi) are much more portable and easier to use than the glucagon previously available.

Keep in mind that for many people with diabetes, nighttime is both the most dangerous and the most common time to experience hypoglycemia. Dr. Dodell shared some useful advice: “If you see a downward trend before bed, you should eat a snack. It’s better to wake up high and correct during the day than have a low blood sugar episode overnight, which could cause many more complications and inconveniences. It’s also important for people with diabetes to know the triggers that can cause lows at night.” In short: check blood glucose before bed, play it safe, and know your risk factors. Additionally, daily routines have changed during COVID-19; you may be eating different foods, exercising more or less, and experiencing higher stress. All these factors may affect your blood sugar, especially at night.

Everyone’s body is different, but common risk factors for hypoglycemia include:

  • Exercise
  • Too much insulin
  • Fasting or low carbohydrate intake
  • Alcohol
  • Medications
  • Stress
  • Hormonal fluctuations
  • Illness

For a full list, check out Adam Brown and diaTribe’s 42 factors that affect blood glucose from his book Bright Spots & Landmines.

Hypoglycemia is different for everyone, so it is essential to be aware of your own body. Try to observe the symptoms you experience, and make note of potential triggers. Bowersox recommended keeping track of patterns: “Keeping a log or journal of things such as physical or emotional activity and comparing it to your blood sugar data could be a good way to see if there are trends that are causing you to go low. Ultimately, it’s important to share that information with your support network.” Know yourself – there are many factors that can lead to hypoglycemia, so it’s important to learn your own patterns of low blood sugar so that you can avoid these experiences.

KBTL

Image source: diaTribe

Perhaps the most critical part of Know Before the Low is its emphasis on connecting with your support network – family, friends, coworkers, teachers, and others. Bowersox said that she once had to ask her audience for candy to raise her blood sugar; fans were supportive and thanked her for raising awareness about diabetes. However, it can sometimes be difficult or uncomfortable to start conversations about diabetes and hypoglycemia with the people around us. Dr. Dodell explained that keeping the dialogue casual yet informative can be an opportunity to teach people something new: “You’re not putting a burden on them, but just explaining how diabetes affects your life. By broaching the topic casually, you can treat the conversation as more of a heads up than bestowing a responsibility. Just make sure to explain that you are carefully managing your diabetes, but there is a chance of an emergency. Not everyone has met someone with diabetes, but just explaining it and educating them can be a great preventive step.”

By sharing information about hypoglycemia signs, symptoms, and treatments, you can empower your peers to step in during an emergency. As Bowersox said, “Knowledge is power! When your network has information, they are empowered to help you, especially with low blood sugar. When I travel, my quality of life is improved by just educating and speaking up. Practice with your mirror, practice with your pet, but make sure your support network is there for you.”

As this project raises awareness of hypoglycemia, we hope it encourages people with diabetes, their healthcare professionals, and their support networks to engage in valuable discussions. As Dr. Dodell so perfectly concluded, “This campaign is one of the first to address the dangers of hypoglycemia. It is groundbreaking, and allows people to get needed resources. Diabetes experts and endocrinologists know that high blood sugar can sometimes be better than low blood sugar.”

For more information, read diaTribe’s article on hypoglycemia unawareness.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

10 Ways to Reduce the Sugar in Your Diet

Eating too much sugar is known to contribute to heart disease, obesity, tooth decay, cancer and numerous other health problems. Yet, the average American eats 22 teaspoons of added sugar per day, according to the American Heart Association. Many studies have linked high-sugar intake to an increase in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality due to CVD.  As people living with diabetes, we must be especially mindful of the amount of sugar we take in. Limiting our added sugar can help us manage our blood sugar, avoid weight gain and improve our overall health.

Here are some realistic and manageable ways to cut back on your sugar intake. Making these small changes can lead to a healthier version of you!

1. Step Back and Re-evaluate

Make healthy changes in other areas of your life. For instance, make sure to get adequate sleep so you’re not relying on coffee laden with sugar to get you through the day. Also, adding some structure to your day can help you avoid making last-minute food choices that are usually out of convenience and less healthy than those snacks and meals we eat at home. Being prepared means less haphazard choices that may not be the best for your overall health.

2. Don’t Fall for the Low-Fat Trick

Many food companies love to boast their low-fat products but what they don’t tell you is that these foods often contain more sugar and calories than their low-fat alternatives. When fat is removed from a food, it takes away from the natural flavor, therefore they add sugar to sweeten it up. Opt for full-fat versions, and keep in mind that there are also plenty of benefits of adding fat to our diet!

3. Cut Back on Sugar-Filled Drinks

Thankfully, there are so many healthy beverage options now on the market. With options like Vitamin Water, Kevita probiotic drinks, a host of flavored sparkling seltzers, and many more, it is a lot easier to avoid those more sugary drinks that can quickly lead to both weight gain and high blood sugars. If you are a fan of coffee and/or tea, its best to keep it black or use a natural sweetener such as Lakanto’s Monkfruit Sweetener.

4. Experiment with Rubs Instead of Sauces

Condiments like ketchup and barbecue sauce are commonly used but come loaded with sugar. One tablespoon of ketchup usually contains about 1 teaspoon of sugar. Check for reduced-sugar or sugar-free versions which still pack the flavor. Also, when cooking your own food, try using dry rubs of flavorful herbs and spices instead of sauces. Some other low sugar options to consider are pesto sauce, mayonnaise and even avocado. They are absolutely delicious and can spice up any meal, even a slice of bread!

Pesto sauce is a low-carb option. Photo credit: Adobe Stock

5. Consider Diet-Friendly Sugar Substitutes

While some people can take their coffee black others may cringe at the thought. Thankfully there are plenty of healthy sugar substitutes that you can use in place of the real deal. This doesn’t only go for your morning coffee but for your cooking and baking needs too. You can easily take a high sugar dessert and replace it with one of these flavorful and healthier options. And the best news is we longer have to be tempted by sugar-free treats that contain sorbitol or maltitol and are known for causing stomach upset.

6. Change Your Mindset When It Comes to Snacks

We are all quick to grab packaged goods when we need something quick to eat. Processed foods are loaded with sugar so are not the best choice for a snack to help fuel you. Consider opting for cheese, nuts, hard-boiled eggs, and beef jerky to name a few. And if you are hosting a get-together or need an idea to bring elsewhere, consider healthy options that are low in sugar such as hummus and vegetables, shrimp skewers and meat and cheese charcuterie boards.

7. Moderation

It is important to remember that some sugar in moderation is okay. And some people may be able to better manage eating sugar in moderation than others. Listen to your body and do what works for you. Having a healthy mindset when talking about any type of food group will help to avoid any negative feelings or emotions that could come along with eliminating something altogether.

8. Technology Is Your Friend

Some like to take advantage of apps like Myfitnesspal to track their calories and track macros. It is eye-opening to track a day of eating and see how much you are really consuming. For example, when I did this exercise I learned that I wasn’t taking in nearly enough fiber so I was able to adjust my daily intake. Another great app is by Companion Medical for the use of InPen. Here you will be able to enter the number of carbs and it will tell you exactly how much insulin you need based on your doctor recommended settings. Use technology as your guide and keep the sugar to the amount that you are comfortable with while still feeling in control.

9. Increase Your Protein Intake

The benefits of protein in your diet are endless, and it is vital in helping fuel our body and give us energy. It also helps us build muscle mass, helps keep our bones strong, and helps keep us satiated. By adding more protein to your diet you can avoid those sugar-laden snacks since you will be fuller for longer. Try making all meals protein-dominant, with a small portion of any foods that may spike your sugar or add on pounds if you are weight conscious.

10. Know What to Look for on the Label

Back in 2016, the FDA changed their rules so that companies would have to disclose how much added sugar was in their products along with the % of the daily value. This is helpful but there are over 50 other names for added sugars, making it even more difficult to detect. Check out the nutritional label and be sure to pay attention to the order of ingredients as they are listed with the highest % first. Some of the common names to look out for are: high-fructose corn syrup, cane sugar or juice, maltose, dextrose, molasses, rice syrup and caramel.

If you are looking to get better control of your blood sugar or are looking to lose or maintain your weight, cutting back on sugar is an easy way to better your health. Taking the steps above will ensure you much success in your diabetes and weight management efforts.

Have you tried cutting back on your sugar intake? What measures did you take and what were the results? Comment and share below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How Telemedicine Improves Diabetes Care

How Telemedicine Improves Diabetes Care

By Heather Nelson

Rapid advances in telehealth have provided doctors a level of convenience (1) that lends itself to well-rounded patient care. In this article, we will highlight some benefits of telemedicine relating to diabetes management.

Rise of Diabetes Distance Care

Telemedicine is the use of technology in delivering medical care to patients from a distance (2). Once considered necessary for rural or underserved communities, telemedicine has transformed over the past 50 years into a vibrant, integrated service utilized by hospitals and physicians around the globe (3).

Diabetes telemedicine has combined the wonders of technology and the necessity of recurring specialty care to enable providers to be more proactive. One effect of telemedicine on the management of diabetes is that providers are able to help their patients see improved HbA1c levels (4).

As always, in the grand scheme of diabetes therapy solutions, the measuring stick has always been the almighty HbA1c. As technology improves, doctors are seeing the added benefits of reading telehealth data from sensors to measure Time-In-Range as well (TIR) (5).With both of these in mind, a new treatment option can succeed or fail based on the ability to improve HbA1c ranges consistently or provide greater time in optimal blood glucose range. This seems to be no struggle for telemedicine.

The benefits of telemedicine in diabetes distance care are so promising that the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) ran a 2-year study in rural Alabama and Georgia (6). The outcome showed decreased hemoglobin A1c as well as average reduced travel time of over 78 minutes per visit. Based on their findings, the CDC declared that “diabetes care delivered via telemedicine was safe and was associated with time savings, cost savings, high appointment adherence rates, and high patient satisfaction.”

Additionally, another study found lower HbA1c levels as well as improved blood pressure and cholesterol levels after just one year of telemedicine (7).

These studies might seem great on paper, but you might be asking yourself…

“How can telemedicine help me manage my diabetes?”

Well, I’m so glad you asked. Welcome to “Telediabetes”!

We all know that diabetes is a chronic disease that requires regular and constant monitoring. Some providers wish to see their patients bi-annually, while others request quarterly or even monthly check-ups. The practical challenges of regular office visits can sometimes prove challenging, and in the gap of in-office care and at-home management, the person with diabetes flounders. This gap is precisely where telemedicine shines.

4 Reasons Why Real-time Feedback No Longer Requires Face-Time Appointments

  • Is the driving distance to your endocrinologist office making those quarterly visits hard to squeeze into your lunch hour? Transmit your health records and let telemedicine connect you for guidance in basal rates adjustments or dosing tweaks with less time off work.
  • Is prohibitive weather keeping you from talking with your mental health practitioner about diabetes challenges? Log into a portal and send a message detailing your snow-day concerns straight away. They can respond via email or video conference to provide real-time support and encouragement.
  • Are school absences piling-up making it hard for your child to miss another half-day for their monthly appointment? Simply log-in, upload the latest chart data you’ve been keeping, and let their doctor analyze the trends and suggest small changes. These tweaks can make a big impact in keeping them at optimal health while keeping them in school and learning (8).
  • Have travel challenges made your food dosing questionable? Send a message to your certified diabetic educator (CDE) and let them guide you to healthier solutions and safer swagging.

Whatever reason you have to miss out on those essential office visits, telemedicine doesn’t judge. Telemedicine understands.

With Great Tech, Comes Great Responsibility

The rapid advances of tracking devices and sensors mean we can readily gather reliable glucose data in a fairly simple manner. But that’s not the full picture your healthcare team will need. We all know that taming the diabetes monster requires a multi-faceted approach. The rise of newer and better diabetes management technology has perfectly poised the diabetic community to benefit from telemedicine and all it has to offer including lifestyle modifications, mental health checks, and more. But we must have solid data to reap those benefits.

The best way to take advantage of all the rewards of telemedicine is to provide good and useful data. The more data you can afford, in a succinct and readable format, the better distance care your provider can give. Utilizing technology means you should be able to provide food records, insulin doses, basal and bolus rates (for our pump-loving friends) as well as activity, health events, and other biometrics like Ketones, HbA1c readings, weight and body measurements.

Beyond the tracking of data itself, presentation also matters. Clearly you can’t courier-pigeon over a stack of origami-worthy paper logs and in this day and age, you shouldn’t have to. Organize your logs into a format that is easily accessible for your healthcare provider. If they need CSV, Excel sheets, or PDFs, provide what they can read.

How mySugr PDF Reports Makes Data Sharing Easy

If you are reading this and genuinely shocked to learn that you need to log things like insulin dosing and food intake, allow us to usher you out from under your rock and into the age of technology by introducing the reporting feature in the mySugr app! Indeed we believe you are the captain of your pancreas. As such, the ability to harness all your well-tracked data into usable information for you and your doctor is a key focus of our app. Using the reports feature you can quickly:

  • View your own data at a glance, anytime, to see trends.
  • Select your own time period to see only the data you wish to discuss. No more information overload or sifting through months of records needlessly.
  • Send preferred data to your doctor via email for quick communication about necessary formula changes. Even select from one of our three output formats for optimal communication.
  • Stay in constant communication and more!

Using the data in these reports, you can truly be the master of your own fate. The reports are meant to empower you as you discuss your treatment decisions with your provider, making the conversation more constructive and putting you back in the driver’s seat of your care.


And for our US friends in the diabetic online community (DOC), we still have our fabulous bundle! mySugr has over 2 million registered users to-date and a 4.6+ rating on the App Store and Google Play. The mySugr Coaching service is second-to-none and utilizing our monthly subscription gets you:

  • Blood glucose meter
  • Lancing device (with a box of refills…so that’ll last you basically forever, amiright)
  • Unlimited test strips (new shipments arrive before you even run out!)
  • The mySugr Pro App (that includes the ability to estimate the HbA1c!)
  • Diabetes coaching (with a pretty top-notch team)
  • Free shipping

And all the tech-support a person could need!

Indeed, we believe telemedicine is here to stay (9) and with good reason!

People living with diabetes can find more freedom and a better quality of life with the rising accessibility of a healthcare team armed and ready to interpret and predetermine the many responses to all the data we track.

As always, mySugr stands on the edge of change ready to help usher in this new age with open arms and glucometers for all Rise up mighty warriors and embrace the freedom of “telediabetes”!


(1) Wicklund E. Leveraging Primary Care Telehealth for Convenience and Quality. https://mhealthintelligence.com/features/leveraging-primary-care-telehealth-for-convenience-and-quality(2) White LA, Krousel-Wood MA, Mather F. Technology meets healthcare: distance learning and telehealth. Jan. 2001. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3116779/

(3) eVisit: The Ultimate Telemedicine Guide | What Is Telemedicine? 2018. https://evisit.com/resources/what-is-telemedicine/

(4) Hompesch M, Kalcher K, Debong F, Morrow L. Significant improvement of blood sugar control in a high risk population of type 1 diabetes using a mobile health app – A retrospective observational study. Poster presentation at ATTD 2017, Paris, France.

(5) Beck R, Bergenstal R, Riddlesworth T, Kollman C, Li Z, Brown A, Close K. Validation of Time in Range as an Outcome Measure for Diabetes Clinical Trials. March 2019.

(6) Xu T, Pujara S, Sutton S, Rhee M. Telemedicine in the Management of Type 1 Diabetes. 2018. http://dx.doi.org/10.5888/pcd15.170168

(7) Steven Shea, MD, Ruth S. Weinstock, MD, PhD, Justin Starren, MD, PhD, Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD, Walter Palmas, MD, Lesley Field, RN, MSN, Philip Morin, MS, Robin Goland, MD, Roberto E. Izquierdo, MD, L. Thomas Wolff, MD, Mohammed Ashraf, BA, Charlyn Hilliman, MPA, Stephanie Silver, MPH, Suzanne Meyer, RN, Douglas Holmes, PhD, Eva Petkova, PhD, Linnea Capps, MD, Rafael A. Lantigua, MD, PhD, for the IDEATel Consortium. A Randomized Trial Comparing Telemedicine Case Management with Usual Care in Older, Ethnically Diverse, Medically Underserved Patients with Diabetes Mellitus. Jan-Feb. 2006. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1380195/

(8) Please note that all mySugr products have a minimum age limit of 16 years for the mySugr Logbook and 18 years for the mySugr Bolus Calculator (for more details please read mySugr’s General Terms & Conditions).

(9) Klonoff David C., M.D. Using Telemedicine to Improve Outcomes in Diabetes—An Emerging Technology. July 2009. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2769943/

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Healthy, Tasty and Easy Salmon Recipes

Rich in protein and omega-3 fatty acids, salmon is a flexible ingredient in any healthy meal plan. From fillets to fat bombs, there are countless ideas on how to prepare it for yourself or the entire family. Here’s a list of delectable recipes we’ve gathered.

Photo credit: Lisa Marcaurele

Smoked Salmon Pate with Cream Cheese

Whether you are hosting a party or just looking for snack ideas for your kids, you can rely on this filling recipe. Even non-kitchen experts can whip this up in about five minutes. Serve this with sliced cucumbers or low-carb crackers to ditch the carbs.

Photo credit: Laura Miner

Smoked Salmon and Eggs Breakfast Platter

This recipe gives you another smart idea for entertaining guests (and by smart, we mean stress-free preparation of a nutritious meal). Apart from salmon and eggs, this platter comes with colorful veggies, so it’s a complete meal if you decide to have this for dinner on a lazy night. This platter goes well with Everything Bagel seasoning, which you can make or buy pre-made at your grocery store.

Photo credit: Jennifer Shun

Salmon Cakes with Lemon Herb Aioli

If you need an easy main course, this is your go-to recipe. The salmon cakes do not frustrate with its flavor and nutrition. You can have it with some green salad, use it as a replacement for your meat-loaded patty, or add to your sandwich filling. If you’re on the go, you can double the ingredients and store the leftovers in a refrigerated airtight container until served.

Photo credit: Brenda Bennett

Smoked Salmon Fat Bombs

Fat bombs are like energy balls made from high-fat low-carb ingredients, but adding some protein into the mix makes it tastier and heartier too. Case in point, these salmon fat bombs. To make this, combine the ingredients, roll them into balls, and coat with bagel seasoning.

Photo credit: Georgina Bomer

Salmon Gratin

If you’re looking for another meatless replacement for the classic potato gratin, this recipe is worth giving a try. It uses a trick that makes the salmon so soft it melts in your mouth. All the ingredients complement well, and they come together for a creamy, satisfying dish.

Salmon Party Rolls

Smoked salmon, avocado and herb cream cheese — if this recipe’s three main ingredients don’t make you drool, wait until you see how pretty these rolls look. They taste better if served chill, so make them in advance and refrigerate them in a tightly sealed container for up to three days before serving. Garnish with dill for better flavor.

What’s your favorite salmon dish? Share your recipe with us in the comments.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

What It’s Like as a High-Risk Individual Six Months into the COVID-19 Pandemic

Let’s face it: type 1 diabetes has always been a huge annoyance. There’s nothing fun about always living on your toes, and there’s nothing normal about eating in your bed in the middle of the night. But the good news is that type 1 hasn’t stopped me from doing anything in life. I went to college thousands of miles away from home, traveled to numerous countries alone, and have held a successful career at Google for nearly five and a half years now. And even the things I worried about most as a young teen – like how it’d affect friendships and relationships – turned out to be a non-issue. The right people have always been by my side and supportive.

Type 1 has shaped me and even improved my life in such significant ways – and while of course, I’d get rid of it in a second if I could – I’m very appreciative of the personal growth, responsibility, and resilience it’s instigated. I’ve always tried focusing on the positives of type 1 – if I’m “stuck with it,” I might as well own it, control it to the very best of my ability and determine a way to thrive. And for over 12 years with this mentality, I’m fortunate that I have thrived with type 1.

While I naturally have a cautious personality, I’m a firm believer that it’s useless to worry about things out of your control. But what about things that are in your control? When COVID-19 first started earlier this year, it was clear that if I stayed home, stayed away from people, got deliveries versus going shopping myself, etc., I’d have a very low likelihood of contracting COVID-19. I’m very fortunate that I have a job that allows me to work from home, complete control over my home environment, and no responsibilities such as children right now, where their wellbeing would also be a key factor in my decisions. So yes, while I knew I was in control, I didn’t know what great expense that would come at, nor that it would last so long.

Photo credit: Caroline Levens

I’ll admit I had a heightened sense of concern early on in COVID-19. I bought an N95 before COVID-19 was even known to be spreading in the US and was self-quarantined by the first week of March. And up until recently, I felt my COVID-19 experience was probably one collectively shared by nearly everyone – of course, everyone had cabin fever, and COVID had affected their plans, friendships and relationships in unexpected and unfortunate ways.

Then COVID fatigue seemingly blanketed the nation – myself included. The mentality that “well, if this is seemingly going to go on forever, I’ve got to start living my life again. I can’t stay inside forever. The death rate is extremely low anyway. I’d probably be fine. Or whatever I’d experience has got to be better than a year or so cooped up inside.”

And just like that, for the very first time in my life, type 1 felt like it was limiting what I could do. My thoughts and COVID-19 exhaustion was shared with mass America, but I didn’t have the privilege to act on them. And somehow it made it much harder when I felt like the only one still sheltering in place – which, of course, I’m not. There are millions of high-risk individuals – and loved ones of high-risk individuals – experiencing the same thing. But it sure doesn’t help seeing pictures of friends on social media living a life I long for so much right now. I recognize that it is my decision how to respond to COVID-19, but to me, it feels practically synonymous to my immune system declining all invites on my behalf.

To be fair, there are many type 1’s who have largely resumed their normal lives, though many of them are children and have a lower likelihood of experiencing severe complications, or are in lower-risk areas. But at this point in COVID-19 – I personally feel I can’t let up. Health is one of my very top personal priorities, and the truth is, I don’t know what kind of experience I’d have if I were to contract COVID-19, both short term and long term. And to clarify, it’s not just type 1 that has me on my guard – I’m also immunocompromised and have several other autoimmune diseases.

There’s a heavy emotional toll that comes with being part of a high-risk community. Early on in the pandemic, I questioned where type 1 fit in the picture when they said diabetes was a high-risk factor. It was also known that obesity was a huge risk factor, so I was skeptical if it was diabetes in itself that was the risk or intertwined with the risk posed by obesity, which is strongly correlated to type 2. Then came a study out of the UK with thousands of diabetics that showed actually type 1s had significantly higher death rates than type 2s. I personally lost a type 1 friend from my teens, and he was 26, one year younger than me. I’ve read about countless stories that range from minor cold-like symptoms to months of enduring fatigue to permanent lung damage and more.

Riding out sheltering in place is hard – but if I were to have a severe case of COVID-19 that damaged my health, I’d never be able to forgive myself. So I continue doing the best I can. And no doubt it’s come with sacrifices – I couldn’t attend my grandma’s funeral, it put a strain on a relationship I was in, l didn’t get to say a proper goodbye to friends who moved away for good, and even though I’m a total homebody and introvert at heart, I’ve experienced loneliness for the first time.

I know long-term this is just another part of the type 1 journey in life. The level of gratitude I’ll have for the most simple things will be immeasurable post-COVID-19… hugging a grandparent, going grocery shopping, having lunch with a friend. With any luck, I won’t have any future experiences where I feel type 1 is stopping me again, but if I do, I’ll be better equipped to handle it.

So why am I writing this? There’s been so much criticism towards those still staying home, those still wearing masks in outdoor settings, those not sending their children back to school, and it’s really uncalled for and disrespectful in my opinion. You have no idea what someone else is going through, and many of the highest-risk conditions are invisible.

In summary, if you’re not high-risk and are comfortable resuming your normal life, recognize that’s a privilege many aren’t fortunate enough to have. For millions of people at home for one reason or another – be it type 1, older family members, or other medical conditions – we’re still riding out an isolating quarantine, compounded by the stressor of uncertainty and the unknown timeline. So keep in mind that everyone is experiencing COVID-19 differently, and trust that other people know what’s best for them, just as you know what’s best for you. Your pandemic may have “ended,” but others still have to be as on guard as they were months back — all while not knowing if it’s the beginning, middle or end of this wild ride.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Low-Carb Chicken Crust Pizza

This content originally appeared here. Republished with permission.

By Annie Lampella

Pizza night is back on the dinner menu with this protein-packed, gluten-free chicken crust pizza. Made from ground chicken, this pizza crust is low carb and filled with protein to help stabilize your blood sugar. Chicken pizza crust doesn’t contain any nut flours making it an ideal recipe for those with nut allergies or sensitive to nut-based flours.

A special blend of cheeses and an egg help hold the ground chicken together forming a sturdy pizza crust you can pick up with one hand. Top with your favorite pizza toppings and this dinner will be ready in less than 30 minutes. The best part – it’s a kid favorite!

keto chicken crust pizza

Print

Keto Chicken Crust Pizza

.wprm-recipe-rating .wprm-rating-star.wprm-rating-star-full svg * { fill: #343434; }

An almost zero carb pizza crust that is made without nut flours. This delicious keto chicken pizza crust is loaded with protein and healthy fats. It’s an easy keto pizza recipe the whole family will love!
Course Main Course, Snack
Cuisine Italian
Keyword pizza
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 servings
Calories 226kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 pound ground chicken
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup mozzarella cheese
  • 1/4 cup parmesan cheese
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon italian seasoning optional
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder optional

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  • Combine all ingredients in a medium bowl and mix until combined. Form chicken mixture into a ball.
  • Place a piece of parchment paper on a baking tray, pizza pan or pizza stone. Press chicken mixture out onto the parchment paper to form a pizza crust shape that is about 1/2 inch thick.
  • Bake in a 450 degree oven for 15 minutes.
  • Add your favorite pizza toppings. Broil on high to melt the cheese on the toppings until bubbly.

Nutrition

Calories: 226kcal | Carbohydrates: 0.8g | Protein: 28.4g | Fat: 16.8g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Low-Carb Chicken Crust Pizza Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes and Reality TV, with Marcus Lacour from Say I Do

By Alexi Melvin

Netflix’s “Say I Do” is a reality show about surprise dream weddings, but its first episode showcased something we don’t often see in reality TV – type 1 diabetes (T1D). In the episode, Marcus LaCour was given the chance to surprise his wife Tiffany with a magnificent wedding do-over.

Alongside planning and logistics, Marcus also spoke candidly about his life with type 1 diabetes, spurred by a conversation around how wedding catering decisions needed to take into account the food choices he makes to help manage his blood sugar levels. We caught up with Marcus to chat about his experience on the show, how he handled presenting his type 1 diabetes to the world, and where he and his family are now.

Did you ever imagine that you’d be on a TV show on Netflix?

I definitely didn’t expect it. It’s one of those things where you’re like, you know what? If it happens great, if it doesn’t, it’s great too. I don’t think it dawned on me really until we started shooting. Once we started filming, I was like, “Oh, this is it. This is legit.”

When you were talking about your T1D on the show, it came across so well. Is that something you discussed beforehand with the producers? Did you preface anything or was it organic?

It was organic. We literally were just sitting and talking about it. The subject of food came up and early on I told them, “Hey, I’m a type 1 diabetic.” We were just having a conversation of, “Hey, how’s this, how’s that? How did that happen? How were you diagnosed?” Literally, just conversation flowed from there. In my honest opinion, it was one of the most genuine conversations I’ve had with anyone about my condition, just because it was in a room and in the area where there was an open space where I could tell them everything I needed to tell them about the condition.

You touched on how much your wife did for you when you had a situation where you lost your healthcare – the rationing of food and things like that. Did that also include rationing of insulin? Were you having issues with getting supplies?

I was. I was getting samples from my doctor’s office at one point. You know when you’re trying to ration insulin or trying to pick the insulin you can afford, it’s not as effective as what you’re used to. I was getting the regular 70/30 mix insulin pens. I kept bottoming out throughout random times of the day. I was used to taking NovoLog but [at one point, my doctor] didn’t have any NovoLog samples. So I was literally just getting whatever he had.

When [my doctor] did get the NovoLog pens, I was using those thinking, okay, he should have some more samples. Well, there was a time where he didn’t, and that time for about a month maybe, we’ll say three weeks, I was rationing my insulin, because I’m trying to make sure that if I do go high, I have enough to cover the high. If I go low, just [having food] to eat, but more importantly, what you need on a daily basis [to keep your levels stable].

One day, the doc called and said they didn’t have any samples. I was down in my last 10 units. So for about an extra two and a half, almost three weeks, I was rationing 10 units of insulin.

When did that situation start getting better for you?

I ended up getting a loan from my boss because at the time I started a new position and he was like, “I don’t want to see you suffer.” At the time, NovoLog Flex Pens were $250 for the pack. So he gave me a check for $250 and said, “Hey, go get your meds.” So that was how I got through that. Then somehow, by some sort of miracle, after that pack ended, my doctor, all of a sudden, got samples again.

What is your management routine like now?

It’s the Omnipod right now. I’ve got better insurance that covers the pods altogether. It’s still an adjustment for me though, because I’m used to not having a PDM. Before, [when] I was on the injections, it was, wake up, take your long term, and then just carry the Humalog pen on me at all times. Then with the pump, [if] we’re going to work out, I forget to suspend my insulin flow. Or if the site doesn’t take, having to double check and make sure blood sugars aren’t really high. So it’s a couple of different things, but it’s not bad. It’s still an adjustment though.

Do you feel you prefer the MDI or do you feel the pump ultimately is going to be better?

I’m already seeing changes in my numbers, just from average standpoint. On the shots, the lowest my A1C was, or I could get it, with 6.9, 6.8, but now I’m seeing, that even though there are days where I may be high because the pod didn’t take, or I may run low, those days are few and far between, so I’m running normal on a lot more of a regular basis.

Do you use a Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM)?

I don’t. It looks we have to go four months without a CGM and track those numbers before insurance will approve it.

In terms of your diet, on the show, you talked about how you’re conscious of what foods are going to spike your blood sugar. Is there a specific diet you to stick to? Are there certain foods you prefer or are you getting more flexible with it because of the pump?

I am still a very conscious eater. I prefer to eat clean. Everything has to have a balance. Now I know with the pump, you have that freedom to literally eat whatever you want. But for me, when I was diagnosed, I didn’t have that option. So, it was literally sticking to that diet, sticking to that regimen. Everything has to have a fresh fruit or fresh vegetable, [there] has to be a starch. There has to be a grain and there has to be a protein. That’s the only way that I know.

I came across a comment online that said, “Well, diabetics can eat whatever they want.” It’s very true. But for me, I don’t want to run that risk. I think I’ve always done something whenever I got a new insulin, when I got my Humalog, I wanted to make sure it worked. So I got a peanut butter Twix, took it to cover it, just to see what it would do. When I got my pump, I had a chocolate chip cookie just to make sure it was working. It would work, but overall, my diet is consistent. I prefer to eat clean. It’s just because I know these things aren’t going to have a whole lot of impact on my blood sugar.

I saw on Instagram that your daughter’s been learning more about your T1D management. How’s that going?

It’s going well honestly. Before, when I was taking my shot, it was just, “Hey, Daddy’s got to take his insulin,” or, “Daddy’s got to check his blood sugar.” So she’d always been curious about it. Then one day I had to change my pod. “Are you changing your pod, Daddy?” “Yeah, Daddy’s changing his pod. you want to watch?” “Yeah, I want to watch.” So she came in and got hands on. I always want to make her aware just in case something happens. If my blood sugar goes low and I’m unresponsive, or if I’m too low and I can’t get up to get anything, I want to make sure she’s aware to say, “Oh, Daddy’s not feeling well. Daddy he needs something to eat.” Or, “Something’s going on. Let me tell Mommy.” I always want to make sure she’s aware of what my condition is, not to scare her, but to the point where she can be reactive.

Who did you have as a support system when you were first diagnosed?

My mom was my biggest supporter. I didn’t keep it from my friends, but I felt they wouldn’t be able to understand. They were used to me just being able to get up and do whatever. If we wanted to play football, it was get up and do it without having to worry about anything. They knew I had type 1 diabetes, but they didn’t know the entire scope of what it meant to take care of that condition. So it was my mom. Then over time, my friends started to get a little bit more of an understanding of it. So my friends would ask, “Hey, what’s your blood sugar like? Are you OK?” Or if I was going to the gym to work out with some of my buddies, “Hey, don’t forget your meter.” Or I’d always bring my meter with me and I’d have to check in the middle of work out, see either I’m high or low, or just to figure out where I was at. They would always ask, so they held me accountable in that regard.

Have you been getting a lot of people in the type 1 community reaching out on Instagram or social media?

I’ve gotten that. It’s always refreshing because [they’re] like, “Thank you for representing and letting the world know about your condition.” Well, it’s a part of me. I’d be foolish to hide it, like, “I don’t have a condition.”

Had you been involved in the type 1 community at all before appearing on Say I Do?

Not necessarily. I’ve always wanted to though. I’ve been at this for almost 20 years, it’ll be 20 years in November. When I first got diagnosed, there weren’t a lot of support groups. There weren’t very many places for me to go where I could vent or even if I had high blood sugars or even lows, how to combat that and deal with those. But now times have changed. I would love to be able to get out and talk to people about what our condition is and how to manage it effectively.

What’s next for you and your family?

Honestly, I am not sure. I work for a Children’s Hospital down here, so I recruit for them and it’s just more or less just going with everything at this point, just laying back and enjoying the ride while we have it.

Do you think you’re going to seek out more TV opportunities?

To be honest, I don’t know. This is all new. It’s all new to both of us. If more opportunities come, then yeah. Absolutely. But it really just depends on what comes down the pipes. I think the ultimate goal would be just for us to just enjoy this and see where it takes us.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors & Prevention

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, one’s chances of developing type 2 diabetes depend on a combination of environmental, lifestyle and genetic risk factors. Some factors, like physical activity and eating habits, are more in one’s control than factors like family history or ethnicity, but with the right planning and action, people can help reduce their odds, and sometimes completely prevent the development of type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors

  • Being overweight (having a body mass index of 25-29.9) or obese (having a body mass index of 30 or more). You can calculate your body mass index (BMI) here.
  • Being 45 or older
  • Having a family history of type 2 diabetes
  • Are African American, Alaska Native, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander
  • Living with high blood pressure
  • Having a low level of HDL cholesterol OR a high level of triglycerides
  • Previously had gestational diabetes OR gave birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more
  • Not getting regular exercise
  • Having a history of heart disease/stroke

The American Diabetes Association also has a free diabetes risk test that one can take to assess their individual risk.

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

There are some scientifically proven ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, if one is at higher risk for the disease. Mainly, losing weight if one is overweight or obese and becoming more physically active (increasing activity to at least 150 minutes per week) are the most effective ways to prevent or delay the onset of the disease.

The National Diabetes Prevention Program is an evidence-based lifestyle change program, covered by most health plans, that works with patients at risk for type 2 diabetes to prevent or delay the onset of the disease. This program has a hyper focus on everyday habits one can change and adopt to lower their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, like ways to increase physical activity and helpful tips and advice for healthier eating. Studies have proven the success of the program: participants who achieved weight loss of 5-7% of their body weight reduced their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58%.

A 10-year follow-up study, The Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study, showed that participants in the intervention group were still 30% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes a decade later than individuals in the placebo group. Participants who did develop type 2 diabetes delayed the onset of it by about four years.

Other Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

If the National Diabetes Prevention Program isn’t covered by your health plan or a program doesn’t exist in your area, there are three main ways to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes on your own (always consult your doctor before beginning any weight loss plan):

  • If you are overweight or obese, lose 5-7% of your body weight
  • Get at least 150 minutes of moderate activity a week, or aim for 30 minutes most days of the week
  • Eat smaller portions of the foods you love, and replace sugar-sweetened beverages with water

Ask your healthcare provider for additional advice about preventing or delaying the onset of diabetes, including taking or omitting certain medications to mitigate your risk of developing the disease.

Health tip: Replace sugar-sweetened beverages with water. | Photo credit: Adobe Stock

Managing Prediabetes

Prediabetes is when one’s blood glucose is higher than normal, but not high enough to diagnose as diabetes. Prediabetes is a serious condition, because it significantly raises the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. About 1 in 3 Americans has prediabetes, and it can be hard to track and diagnose, because it often doesn’t have any symptoms, and people who have prediabetes usually feel fine. It is crucially important that all people regularly see their primary care providers for routine check-ups, as prediabetes can often be caught in the early stages and managed well when detected early. Prediabetes is often called “borderline diabetes” or “glucose intolerance” or “impaired glucose intolerance”.

One can manage their prediabetes and prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes by losing weight (if needed), becoming more physically active, and following a reduced-calorie diet plan. Consult with your doctor if you think you have prediabetes, and request a glucose test for confirmation and to make a treatment plan. With a little planning and proactive action, you can delay or completely prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.

Have you recently been diagnosed with prediabetes, and/or have you started a program to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes? What tactics and strategies have been most successful for you? Share this post and comment below; we love hearing from our readers!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Six Tips: How to Cut Sugar and Processed Foods from Your Diet

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Frida Velcani

UCSF’s Dr. Robert Lustig explains how we all can reduce our consumption of sugar and processed foods and why it’s important for promoting health

As people spend more time at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, attitudes and behaviors around food are shifting. While some people may be making healthier and more conscious food choices, others may find themselves responding to stress (prompted by work, health, unemployment, family, or communication challenges) by snacking more often and gravitating toward processed and ultra-processed foods (more on ultra-processed food from the American Heart Association here). Experts are calling what we’re in a “syndemic” – a word coined in the 1990s to mean multiple interrelated epidemics happening at the same time – in this case, COVID-19, under-nutrition, and obesity. The word was popularized most recently in an article in The Lancet. In this article, we focus on the dangers of processed foods and how to cut down on them.

One of the main ingredients in processed foods is sugar – which is shown to cause chronic diseases and inflammation in the body. As background, inflammation occurs when something damages your body’s cells and your immune system releases chemicals that increase blood flow and support to that area. While this response is essential to fighting infections, too much inflammation for a long time (chronic inflammation) can be harmful to our health.

In a compelling recent webinar hosted by the New York Times, University of California San Francisco’s Dr. Robert Lustig discussed the negative health effects of consuming too much processed food and sugar. He cut through the nutritional clutter and described helpful steps that people can take to improve their eating habits and cut unhealthy foods from their diet. While this is easier said than done, there are many benefits to eating less sugar for people with diabetes – you can increase blood glucose stability and improve your time in range.

What makes most processed food unhealthy?

Processed foods often include substances that are not found in typical home-cooked meals – substances such as dyes, artificial flavors, non-sugar sweeteners, and preservatives. Processed foods also lack many of the key nutrients that your body needs, including fiber, omega-3 fatty acids, and various vitamins and minerals. For examples of processed foods and a deeper dive into how they can affect the body, read our article.

As Dr. Lustig emphasized, about 90% of the sugar we consume comes from processed foods, and 75% of packaged items in grocery stores are spiked with sugar.

Sugar can be found in many sweeteners: table sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, maple syrup, and agave. Consuming excessive amounts of any of these sweeteners can increase your risk of weight gain and chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease. While obesity can significantly increase a person’s risk of developing these diseases, Dr. Lustig said that people who do not have overweight or obesity can still be at risk for chronic conditions, particularly if they are eating more processed foods. As if the heightened risk for complications is not bad enough, sugar consumption has also been shown to speed up aging.

Simple (but not necessarily easy) ways to cut down on sugar and processed foods

A fiber-rich diet (consisting of fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains, and nuts) can help reduce inflammation in the body by feeding helpful bacteria in your gut and keeping sugar from being absorbed into your liver. You should aim to eat at least 25 grams of fruits and vegetables per day. If you are looking for some ways to incorporate more fiber-rich foods (and fewer processed foods) into your diet, you can:

  • Shop in the fresh produce section of the grocery store and avoid shelved items if you can – we know this is not always easy with a limited budget for groceries.
    Stat

    Image source: diaTribe

    Read the nutrition facts label with an eye for added sugars, and try to avoid them.

    • There is an “added sugar” line on most labels that will show how much sugar has been added to the food during preparation.
    • If sugar (or one of sugar’s more scientific names such as “fructose,” “glucose,” or any word ending in “-ose”) is listed as one of the first three ingredients, try hard to avoid that food.
  • Include a vegetable with every meal. If you choose fruit, aim for low-carb fruits, like berries.
  • If you choose to try to quit eating sugar and cut out certain foods with sugar completely, it may help to start with eliminating it from a single meal, such as breakfast.
    • Eliminate foods high in sugar, such as cereal and pastries.
    • Try a protein-based breakfast instead of a breakfast high in carbohydrates and sugar.
  • If you’re able, purchase fresh bread from the bakery instead of from the bread aisle – and if you can, aim to limit bread as much as possible..
  • Limit yourself to one alcoholic drink (or fewer) during social events and try to avoid any alcoholic drinks with sugar.

If this article inspires you to ditch the processed foods and to start cooking more at home without sugar at all, check out our 19 low-cost, low-carb recipes from Catherine Newman!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Top Ten Myths About Peer Programs

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for almost 30 years (this October 19th marks my 30th diaversary) and I’ve worked in the diabetes industry for over 20 years. I’ve primarily focused my career on community education and peer programs and have seen time and time again how beneficial they are. But I’ve also heard, for a variety of reasons, that many are reluctant to take part in a community or join a group. And we think it might be due to some misconceptions or myths about peer programs. Here’s our list of the top ten myths about peer mentorship!

Myth #1: My healthcare team is the most important part of my diabetes management. 

YOU are the most essential part of your diabetes management. You manage your diabetes for 525,600 minutes per year. While your healthcare team is vital, research suggests that a peer community is just as important as an educated healthcare team.

Fisher et al. conducted a systematic review that analyzed data from peer support for diabetes management studies and concluded that,

“across diverse settings, including under-resourced countries and health care systems, PS [peer support] is effective in improving complex health behaviors in disease prevention and management including in diabetes.” 1

If you visit your diabetes healthcare provider (HCP) once per month for 20 mins, that’s only 240 minutes per year. Yah, it’s all you. Give yourself a high five – this is hard work! Regardless of the type of program, a peer community can help you in so many different ways. Emotional support, stress relief, guidance, learn to advocate for yourself, exposure to various management tools, techniques, devices, and medications, and the list goes on! Being around like-minded people going through the same thing – just.makes.sense.

Myth #2: I don’t need it – my diabetes is well managed. 

That’s awesome and we’re excited to hear that! Over the years, I’ve often heard the comment, “I didn’t know I needed it until I was there.” A peer program, whether that be an event or group, can fill a gap you didn’t know existed.

We can learn things from our peers that we just can’t from our team of doctors and nurses. For example, you might not be aware of specific tips and tricks that people with diabetes use concerning their devices, medications, insurance plans, or assistance programs. Peer groups can also help us fine-tune our diabetes management in different ways than our healthcare teams can. They are there when the going gets tough, and you need someone who “gets it.”

A good friend of mine, doing well and happily managing his diabetes, had no desire to use CGM (continuous glucose monitoring) technology. He attended an event and saw his friends using one and realized he could fine-tune things even more. It was because he saw others using it and was able to speak to them about their experiences; he decided to give one a try. Six years later, he’s still using one and doing better than ever.

Myth #3: I only need a peer community or mentor when first diagnosed.

Having someone walk you through what to expect or be there with you as learn can be impactful. But diabetes is lifelong, and that means it can change over time. Life ebbs and flows, and so can our management and ability to focus on it. Having people who “get it” and you can turn to can be beneficial at any stage!

Myth #4: A peer program is all about complaining. I don’t want to be part of a pity fest. 

We hope not! I know in my peer group I can post funny anecdotes (those things that only people living with diabetes would get a laugh out of), ask questions, figure out what to make for dinner, but yes, also vent if I need to.

The way I’ve managed my diabetes has changed over time throughout my life, and my peer group has been so helpful and empowering along the way. We hope our peer mentorship program will be a source of positive relationships and interactions.

Myth #5: My diabetes will be reversed if I join a mentorship program.

We wish this were always true. According to a small study 3, people diagnosed less than four years ago with type 2 diabetes found that drastic calorie reduction normalized blood glucose and insulin resistance. Thus, stopping diabetes in its tracks. However, this study did not include anyone using medication and had strict exclusion criteria. Therefore this result may not be true for everyone. Alongside lifestyle changes (nutrition, exercise, sleep, and stress reduction), sometimes medication is needed to help the body work more effectively and efficiently. Joining a program or group can help you find the resources and support you need to make those necessary changes and stay the course.

Myth #6: I will be shamed or judged for my choices or medications I’m using or not using.

We’re sorry to hear if that’s the experience you’ve had previously! For many communities and programs (including Facebook groups), most have guidelines each person must adhere to in order to participate. In our forum, there are Community Guidelines (rules for posting). Our Peer Mentorship Program encourages empowering language and not “shoulding” each other (“You should or shouldn’t do this.”) Instead, we speak from our own experiences, what has and has not worked. Each person is on their journey, and it takes time to reach your goals. What works for one person doesn’t necessarily mean it will work for you (diabetes would be SO much easier if we could all do the exact same thing and get the same results!) Most times, you’ll need to experiment to find the combination of things that work for you, whatever those things may be. One step forward at a time.

Myth #7: It’s too much time. I don’t want to spend more time talking about diabetes.

via GIPHY

We totally get it! Joining any program involves a time commitment, but what you put in, you get out. We know that talking about our experiences creates a sense of connection and belonging, which can help us cope during difficult times. It can also be more efficient to talk about options and choices with real-life users before starting something new or making changes. Sharing what is going on, asking questions, learning from other’s challenges, and helping others can pay you back in dividends.

Myth #8: These types of programs don’t work.

We hope they do, and research shows they do work! Peer programs are an option or piece of a larger puzzle. It’s one area that can help you manage your diabetes, but you have to show up and participate. Specifically, in the Diabetes Daily peer mentorship program, we ask that you set some goals to work towards them and use the community for help. You create the goals, and they can be as small or grand as you like.

See what our previous program participants had to say:

“I really enjoyed my time chatting with others and seeing how others managed their diabetes. It [the program] gave different perspectives but I always felt very supported. I felt I also helped my mentor with their diabetes.” 

 

“I learned so much from my mentor! He had tons of knowledge and I changed a lot of my lifestyle based on information from my mentor and the group.” 

 

“I learned about diabetes technology that I would have not known about.” 

 

“I was very introverted and not ready to accept my diabetes. This program made me realize how important it is and that I can’t ignore it.” 

Myth #9: All of these programs are the same.

Every program is different and unique. Take Weight Watchers; for example, it previously focused on in-person group weigh-ins and meetings. Now, the program uses an app and online support to help members reach their weight loss goals. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is composed of in-person group meetings and a one-on-one sponsor relationship. Cancer support groups often meet in person with a social worker, mental health professional, or facilitator to discuss their experiences, feelings, and emotions. Diabetes Daily has an anonymous online forum where you can freely post your questions and answer other people’s. The re-launch of our mentorship program is more similar to AA, where you have a partner to connect one-on-one with and group sessions where you can learn from others’ experiences and stories.

Myth #10: It’s a diabetes education program.

Yes and no. It’s what we call peer support and peer education. By listening to others’ successes and their challenges, you learn about real-life experiences. For example, it’s invaluable to hear about a medication’s common side effects and address these with your doctor before trying something new. Not everyone will react the same, but we know sharing your tips and tricks can help others. Continuing to work with your healthcare team is vital as they are the ones who will address medications and any changes to those.

To learn more or join our peer mentorship for people living with type 2 diabetes, head to our Mentorship page. Registration closes August 28th, 2020, and the program begins September 1st. We hope you’ll join us!

References

1. Fisher, EB, Boothroyd, RI, Elstad, EA; “Peer support of complex health behaviors in prevention and disease management with special reference to diabetes: systematic reviews” (2017) Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology DOI: 10.1186/s40842-017-0042-3  Accessed: 8/21/2020 https://clindiabetesendo.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40842-017-0042-3  

2. Warshaw H and Edelman D; “Building Bridges Through Collaboration and Consensus: Expanding Awareness and Use of Peer Support and Peer Support Communities Among People With Diabetes, Caregivers, and Health Care Providers” (2018) Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology DOI: 10.1177/1932296818807689 Accessed: 8/21/2020 https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1932296818807689#

3. Lim, E.L., Hollingsworth, K.G., Aribisala, B.S. et al. “Reversal of type 2 diabetes: normalisation of beta cell function in association with decreased pancreas and liver triacylglycerol” (2011) Diabetologia 54 DOI: 10.1007/s00125-011-2204-7 Accessed: 8/21/2020  https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00125-011-2204-7#citeas

Source: diabetesdaily.com

1 2 3 4 5 47

Search

+