Homemade Sugar-Free Ketchup

This content originally appeared on Low Carb Yum. Republished with permission.

Ketchup is an important part of so many classic American foods. Who doesn’t enjoy this condiment with their hot dogs, burgers, or fries? Before I was eating low carb, I used to love these meals!

Now, I’m much more conscious about the impact that food has on my health. I still enjoy these classic combinations, but in ways that are much better for me. That’s why I love making this homemade sugar free ketchup!

It’s perfect for dipping my jicama fries or to slather onto one of my eggplant burgers on a keto bun. And I can enjoy it all without the guilt.

homemade sugar-free ketchup

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Homemade Sugar-Free Ketchup

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This keto sugar-free ketchup is made in minutes with just 3 main ingredients plus spices. It’s perfect for burgers, hot dogs, low-carb fries, and more!
Course Condiment
Cuisine American
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 28 people
Calories 7kcal

Ingredients

  • 28 ounces canned whole tomatoes drained
  • 2.5 ounces tomato paste 70 grams
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¼ teaspoon onion powder
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • teaspoon ground allspice
  • teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • teaspoon Spanish paprika
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt crystals or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon Sukrin Gold optional

Instructions

  • In a sauce pan over low heat, pour tomatoes, tomato paste, apple cider vinegar and spices. Stirring regularly for 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Using a stick blender (immersion blender), purée whole tomatoes. Add sea salt to taste and opt to add Sukrin Gold. Continue over low heat and stir regularly until sauce thickens, about 5 to 10 minutes.
  • Cool and transfer in an airtight container. Store in the refrigerator for 1 to 2 weeks.

Notes

It’s best to seed the tomatoes as well. You can watch a video on how to seed canned tomatoes for the process I use.

The low carb brown sweetener (Sukrin Gold) helps enhance the flavor. A small amount of any low carb sweetener can be used as well.

Nutrition

Serving: 2tbsp | Calories: 7kcal | Carbohydrates: 2g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 81mg | Potassium: 79mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 76IU | Vitamin C: 3mg | Calcium: 10mg | Iron: 1mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Homemade Sugar-Free Ketchup RECIPE

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Tech on the Horizon: Where Will Automated Insulin Delivery (AID) be in 2021?

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Albert Cai

What AID systems are currently available, what can we expect in the next year, and where is AID technology headed?

Want more information just like this?

As we enter 2021, we’re taking a look at what’s ahead for automated insulin delivery (AID) systems. Because the COVID-19 pandemic delayed many clinical trials and FDA reviews in 2020, several companies are expecting to launch new AID systems in 2021. This list covers many of the most notable upcoming products, but there are likely others on the horizon – if you know of a system you think we should track, please let us know.

Click to jump to a product, organized by expected launch date. You’ll find detailed descriptions and possible launch timelines for each, reflecting US availability.

What is automated insulin delivery (AID)?

Automated insulin delivery has many names – artificial pancreas, hybrid closed loop, bionic pancreas, predictive low-glucose suspend – but all share the same goal: combining continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) with smart algorithms to automatically adjust insulin delivery via an insulin pump. AID systems aim to reduce or eliminate hypoglycemia, improve Time in Range, and reduce hyperglycemia – especially postmeal and overnight.

When thinking about the development of AID technology, it’s often helpful to think in stages.

  • Stage 1: The most basic AID system might shut off the insulin pump whenever the user’s CGM readings drop below a certain number, such as 70 mg/dl, to reduce time spent in hypoglycemia and help prevent severe hypoglycemia.
  • Stage 2: The AID system could predict when glucose is going to go low and automatically reduce or stop insulin delivery to further help prevent hypoglycemia.
  • Stage 3: The AID system may be able to automatically adjust basal insulin delivery depending on whether the user’s glucose is trending up or down, and taking into account other factors, such as insulin on board. This adjustment of basal insulin would aim to increase Time in Range (TIR), and help prevent both high and low glucose levels. At this stage, the user would still have to manually give meal boluses and correction boluses.
  • Stage 4: The AID system will be able to deliver correction boluses when glucose values are high. These small adjustment boluses would be a further step in improving TIR, with less time with hyperglycemia.
  • Stage 5: The systems will be able to detect meals and automatically deliver a system-calculated meal bolus to reduce postmeal high blood glucose levels. With the elimination of manual meal bolusing, the system is considered to be a “fully closed loop” System.

Currently available products are in stages 3-4. By the end of 2021, we may have multiple stage 4 systems available.

Medtronic MiniMed 670G and 770G – already available 

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Now available for people over the age of two.

What is it? Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G has been available since spring 2017 and was the first stage 3 AID system to be cleared by the FDA. Prior to the 670G, Medtronic released stage 1 and stage 2 systems (Medtronic MiniMed 530Gand 630G, respectively). More recently, the MiniMed 770G system was cleared in the US in September 2020. Both the MiniMed 670G and 770G systems use the same insulin adjustment algorithm, which adjusts basal insulin delivery every five minutes based on CGM readings, targeting 120 mg/dl. The target glucose level can be temporarily raised to 150 mg/dl when low blood sugar (is a concern, such as during exercise or sleepovers for children. Both systems come with Medtronic’s Guardian Sensor 3 CGM, which has seven-day wear and requires two fingerstick calibrations per day (although four are recommended). See our article from 2016 for a full breakdown on the MiniMed 670G and from September for more on the 770G.

What’s the difference between the MiniMed 670G and 770G? As mentioned, both the MiniMed 670G and 770G systems use the same insulin adjustment algorithm and the same CGM. However, the newer MiniMed 770G has an improved pump: the 770G pump includes Bluetooth connectivity and can be paired to the MiniMed Mobile smartphone app (available for the iOS and Android) for users to view their CGM and pump information without pulling out their pumps. The app also allows users to share their data with others in real-time. Note: users can only view information but cannot control the pump (e.g., deliver a bolus, adjust basal rates) from the app. Bluetooth connectivity also means the system’s insulin adjustment algorithm can be updated. Medtronic has promised current MiniMed 770G users a free upgrade to the MiniMed 780G when that system becomes available (more below). Finally, the MiniMed 670G is only cleared in the US for people over the age of seven, while the MiniMed 770G is cleared for people over the age of two.

Medtronic management recently shared that algorithms will become an increasingly important part of the diabetes ecosystem, and presumably, a key differentiator for companies – lots of exciting times ahead with AID, that is for certain.

Tandem Control-IQ – already available in US

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Now available for people six years and older.

What is it? The Control-IQ system from Tandem was cleared by the FDA at the end of 2019 and launched to customers in January 2020. It’s precursor – Basal-IQ – was cleared in 2018. The Control-IQ system uses Tandem’s t:slim X2 pump, Dexcom’s G6 CGM which requires no fingerstick calibrations, and the Control-IQ insulin adjustment algorithm. In addition to automatic basal rate adjustments and predictive insulin suspension, the Control-IQ system is the only AID system with automatic correction boluses: when it predicts glucose to be above 180 mg/dL in 30 minutes, the system will deliver 60% of the correction bolus needed to reach a target of 110 mg/dL. Control-IQ targets glucose values between 112.5 and 160 mg/dL, though users can turn on or schedule “Sleep Activity” mode to achieve 112.5-120 mg/dL by the morning. This past summer, Tandem launched the t:connect smartphone app (for iOS and Android), which allows users to check their pump and CGM data on their phones.

What’s next? With the current t:connect smartphone app, users can view information but cannot control the pump (e.g., deliver a bolus, adjust basal rates). Tandem has already submitted an updated app with pump control to the FDA and expects to launch that functionality in 2021. Tandem has also mentioned enhancements to the Control-IQ algorithm that are expected in 2021. While we haven’t heard many specifics, we believe it’s likely that these enhancements will focus on improving glycemic outcomes, personalization, and usability of the system.

Insulet Omnipod 5 – expected early-to-mid-2021 

AID

Image source: diaTribe

FDA submission is likely coming soon (if it hasn’t occurred already), and Insulet aims for a “limited” launch in early-to-mid 2021. Insulet has completed the clinical trial for Omnipod 5 but has not shared the results.

What’s new? Omnipod 5 is Insulet’s AID for its popular Omnipod disposable pumps, also called patch pumps. If you’ve been following the field, you’ll know that Insulet previously called the new system Horizon – same system, new name. Omnipod 5 uses Dexcom’s G6 CGM, and Insulet expects to launch the system with smartphone control capability; users can still opt for a dedicated controller device, since smartphone control will be available for Android users first. Insulet is working on an iPhone version for Omnipod 5, though that will not be available at launch. Insulet is also working with Tidepool (more below) on an iPhone-based AID system. Omnipod 5 will have adjustable targets between 100 to 150 mg/dl. Because the Omnipod pump will store the algorithm and communicate directly with Dexcom G6, the system will work even without the smartphone or pump controller nearby.

Medtronic MiniMed 780G – expected mid-2021

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Pivotal trial completed for 780G and presented at ADA 2020. Medtronic aims to submit the system to the FDA by January 2021 with launch coming around mid-2021 for adults (either ages 14+ or 18+).

What’s new? The MiniMed 780G will be Medtronic’s second AID algorithm and a significant upgrade over the MiniMed 670G and 770G systems. In addition to automatic basal rate adjustments, the MiniMed 780G will include automatic correction boluses and an adjustable glucose target down to 100 mg/dl. The system will also have fewer alarms and simpler operation with the goal of further increasing Time in Range. The MiniMed 770G and MiniMed 780G pumps are identical, meaning MiniMed 780G users will also be able to use the MiniMed Mobile smartphone app for viewing pump data, uploading pump data wirelessly, and updating their pump wirelessly. As the pumps are identical, Medtronic has promised that those who purchase the MiniMed 770G now will be able to wirelessly upgrade to the MiniMed 780G for free when 780G does become available. Finally, the MiniMed 780G will use the same Guardian Sensor 3 CGM as the 670G and 770G, which requires two fingerstick calibrations per day and has a seven-day wear time. As a sidenote, an improved CGM sensor is in development by Medtronic, but isn’t expected to be available when MiniMed 780G launches.

The MiniMed 780G is already available in many countries in Europe, and data from a clinical trial was presented at the ADA 2020 conference. On average, the 157 participants in the study (ages 14-75) saw their Time in Range improve by 1.4 hours per day (69% to 75%) while using the system – that’s particularly notable given the low baseline of the A1C. Speaking of A1C, the A1C improved by 0.5% (7.5% to 7%) after using the system.

Beta Bionics insulin-only iLet – expected mid-to-late-2021

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Pivotal trial underway with completion expected in the first half of 2021. Launch expected mid-to-late-2021, though this is subject to change.

What’s new? Beta Bionics is a Massachusetts-based startup developing an AID pump and algorithm called iLet. iLet will work with Dexcom and Senseonics’ CGMs (and possibly others in the future) and is designed to be especially user-friendly. diaTribe founder Kelly Close participated in an early Beta Bionics trial (2013!) and raved about the system and how easy the pump seems. At set up, users only need to enter body weight (no insulin-to-carb ratio, sensitivity factor, basal rates, etc.), and the system will learn more over time. To bolus, users will use icons to describe meals as containing more, less, or the same amount of carbs as usual (no carb counting). The insulin-only clinical trial for iLet began in the summer of 2020 and is expected to wrap up in the first half of 2021. Beta Bionics aims to launch iLet mid-to-late-2021, though this could be delayed as the FDA continues to prioritize COVID-19-related devices.

What’s next? Beta Bionics’ iLet is unique from the other pumps on this list, because it is designed to work in either insulin-only or insulin-and-glucagon configurations. With glucagon, Beta Bionics believes the system can reduce hypoglycemia while maintaining stable glucose levels and potentially even better-than-average, lower glucose levels due to availability of glucagon. Currently, there are different views on using glucagon in an AID system – in addition to the potential for improved glycemic management, there are uncertainties around glucagon pricing and availability. Regardless, the insulin-and-glucagon version of iLet is still a few years away.

Tidepool Loop – launch timing unclear

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Online observational study completed, and launch timeline depends on FDA progress.

What’s new? Unlike the others in this list, Tidepool is a non-profit and is working on the AID algorithm only; Tidepool does not have its own insulin pump or its own pump and CGM combination (like Medtronic). About two years ago, Tidepool announced plans to submit the do-it-yourself (DIY) Loop app to the FDA to become an officially supported app available on the Apple App Store, compatible with in-warranty, commercially available pumps and CGMs. For now, DIY Loop is a free, publicly available, open-source, non-FDA-approved AID system that works with Dexcom and Medtronic CGMs and old Medtronic and Insulet pumps. Read about Adam Brown’s experience using DIY Loop here. For those who are very interested in the project, there is a great deal to learn from notes that Tidepool shares about its communications with FDA – the latest notes are from a mid-2020 meeting.

Initially, Tidepool plans to launch with Insulet Omnipod and Dexcom G6 compatibility. To set it apart from the DIY-version, Tidepool Loop will have different colors, guardrails around certain settings, and a built-in tutorial for new users. A 12-month, completely virtual study was performed with Loop users and will support Tidepool’s submission of Loop to the FDA. The six-month data was presented at ATTD 2020 showing a Time in Range increase of about 1.4 hours per day (67% to 73%) with Loop. Tidepool also announced in November, 2020 that its human factors study had also been completed – this is another required step of the FDA submission. Much of what Tidepool is doing is unprecedented, so the launch timing is unclear.  In an update on January 8th, Tidepool shared that it has now completed FDA submission of Loop.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Teenager Builds T1D1 App After Diagnosis with Type 1 Diabetes

T1D1 (which stands for type 1 diabetes from day 1) is an app that was created by a newly diagnosed 13-year-old, Drew M, to help people better manage their condition. Determination coupled with being well-versed in coding led Drew to create this app almost immediately after diagnosis.

I thought it would be nice to hear Drew’s story and how he took his new diagnosis as an opportunity to help others.

Hi Drew, thank you for taking the time to speak with me. I know you were just diagnosed in September of this year. What signs were you showing and what made you see your doctor?

The only reason I went to my doctor was because we noticed I was losing weight while growing. I had lost more than 10 pounds and had grown over an inch over a three month period. I went to my pediatrician and they drew some blood. We left the office and before we even got home, my mom got a call from them and they said, “pack a bag and go to the ER at Children’s National right now!” My blood sugar level was 529 mg/dL and I apparently had large ketones in my urine test.

Drew recovery

Photo credit: Laura Mendelow

I know you were hospitalized, did you get a good education on how to manage this condition?

Yes – I think the diabetes team at Children’s National Hospital was awesome! They had a whole team of people that kept coming in to visit with me. Because of COVID, all group classes were now given one-on-one, so I got a great education.

Although I missed school when I was in the hospital, I still felt like I had math class because there was so much to learn about calculating my numbers and carbs. It felt like a lot to take in, but they did a great job explaining it to me. They taught me how to calculate my insulin doses and count carbs and I practiced on a sponge.

My grandma was diagnosed with type 1 about 10 years ago, when she was 61, so I was pretty familiar with seeing her managing it. That also helped me a lot knowing someone who has T1D so I wasn’t as scared when they told me that I had this disease.

I know you have a passion for coding and had just finished taking a summer course. At what point did it dawn on you that you were fully capable of creating something like this?

We were joking around about it with the nutritionist, Alex, that morning in the hospital. She was showing us some apps to help us out and said it was annoying that there wasn’t one app that did everything. My dad said jokingly, “Don’t worry, Drew will build you one.” When we got home I started looking at different ways to build apps and there are so many platforms now to choose from. I started playing around with it that same day and realized I had enough knowledge of coding that I could actually do it!

The stuff I was doing over the summer was just for fun because my soccer camp and my overnight camp got canceled because of COVID. Basically, I was bored and taught myself how to code using YouTube videos and a few classes that my dad shared with me. I learned how to code video games using Unity, but nothing like this app! I figured I knew enough about how to code that I could figure out how to build an app. It was like a cool challenge to take on.

My dad is a programmer but he had never built an app before either. But I figured if I got stuck, he could help me out. But, he really didn’t know anything about the program I was using, so a few times I got stuck and my dad was like, “I have no idea how to help you with that one, you’ll just have to google it.” So I did.

The platform I was using was limiting, like I couldn’t create a drop-down menu so I would have to learn how to go around the system to create some of the functions I wanted. I just kept teaching myself new things online until I found things that worked.

Drew with his father in the hospital. Photo credit: Laura Mendelow

I know the doctors at the Children’s hospital expressed a desire to create an app that was different than those that already existed. What was their wish list?

Well, they wanted a few things. First, it had to be simple and easy to use. And, it had to be something that a person could use from day one of diagnosis. There are so many apps out there but they may require you to have a CGM or a pump or they’re just too much for someone who is recently diagnosed and too complicated for kids to use. They wanted an easy way to calculate your insulin dose and also log your glucose levels.

People who are newly diagnosed are asked to call in every day after diagnosis for about 2 weeks and report their numbers from the last day (e.g. blood sugar, carb count, insulin taken for every meal, snack and at 2 am). So having a feature where you could email your logs straight to your doctor was a big request as well.

Then, they had more detailed ideas like the option to round to the nearest half or whole number. I didn’t even know some pens have half units and others only have whole units. The doctors knew what people needed, and I knew what I wanted as a person who was newly diagnosed, I just had to figure out how to program it on the app.

Your app has become quite a success! Now available on Android and iPhone, T1D1 has over 9,000 downloads already. What sets your app apart from the rest?

I think people like that the app is simple, yet does everything that they need right from the beginning of being diagnosed and has some cool features (like different settings for different meals) that other apps don’t have. Plus it’s completely free and has no annoying ads or any kind of in-app purchases.

Also, I think they like that it was created by a kid and not a big company, so they know I’m not out to make money or collect their data. I’m new to the T1D community but I can already see that people get annoyed when they see companies using their disease to make money off of them.

How long did it take to create this app and can you tell us a little bit about the beta testing process?

The first version took only about a week, but it was super simple. It was basically just a calculator with a few changeable settings. We then showed it to Dr. Marks and the diabetes team at Children’s and they came up with some suggested features. I would build in the features and then send it back to them for review.

Once we had a few features like a bolus calculator and an insulin log, we then reached out to online diabetes communities to see if anyone would volunteer to help us test the app. My dad reached out to groups on Facebook and Reddit and asked for volunteers. I remember that night, my dad was overwhelmed with how many people wrote back offering their help.

At that time, it was only being tested for Apple and we had about 70 beta testers. After a lot of testing, the app got published in the Apple Store on Halloween. So, that was about a month and a half after I started working on it. Then, a few weeks later we were able to get it published in the Android Google Play store.

I know you have received both national and international attention (Fox News, NPR and the Jerusalem Post to name a few!), how does that make you feel?

Honestly, I was so surprised at how it took off. It makes me feel really good knowing that the app will now reach so many more people. One of my main goals is to make the app accessible to as many people as possible and this publicity really helps me achieve that goal. Anyone who has T1D knows how tough it can be to manage this disease 24/7. Hearing stories about how I’ve really helped others, makes me feel so happy and helps me get through the tough moments. And, these stories keep me motivated to continue working on the app to make it the best I can.

Drew with family. Photo credit: Laura Mendelow

I know you are hoping to keep this app payment-free and ad-free. How can people help support you?

If people want to support the app, they can donate on the “support us” page on the IOS version of T1D1 or through the website T1D1.org. All donations are used to keep the app live and make enhancements. All profits get donated straight to JDRF. Another huge way to support us is to spread the word to their diabetes team and by posting about it on social media!

You are clearly an ambitious young man with a ton of determination! Do you see yourself doing more things with coding and diabetes? What do you think you would like to do when you are all grown up?

This opportunity to make an app really helped me to see the possibilities of being a programmer or developer when I grow up. It’s been really cool to talk with other organizations like Tidepool to learn how they integrate technology into improving people’s lives with diabetes. It’s awesome to think that I can use my coding skills to continue to help others with T1D. I now have a pump and am amazed by the pump technology. Who knows what others will create in the future. I’d love to take part in creating that new technology with them to help make all of our lives easier.

Thank you so much for taking the time to speak to me. You are a perfect example of someone who took an unfortunate situation and took the opportunity to help others.

I wish you much success and look forward to watching you thrive in both your future professional endeavors and managing your type 1 diabetes!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Want to Try Continuous Glucose Monitoring?

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Eliza Skoler and Albert Cai

The Hello Dexcom 10-day sample kit includes a Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitor, instructions for set up, and guidance for getting the most out of your glucose data. Ask your healthcare team to order the device for you in the US or Canada.

Have you heard about continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for people with diabetes, but aren’t sure if it’s right for you? Dexcom’s new CGM sample program, Hello Dexcom, allows people with diabetes who take insulin to try out the Dexcom G6 CGM for 10 days in the US or Canada. Through Hello Dexcom, healthcare professionals can provide people with a free one-time sample of the technology, along with full instructions for set up and information on using and understanding their glucose data. All packaged in one small box, the program is designed so that people can start using the technology and interpreting their glucose levels on their own and from their home.

Continuous glucose monitors measure the body’s glucose (or sugar) levels in real-time by sensing the glucose present in tissue fluid under the skin. The Dexcom G6 CGM measures glucose levels every five minutes – this means that you can get 288 glucose readings a day without fingerstick blood sugar checks.

Dexcom G6

Image source: diaTribe

We got a sample in the mail and checked it out for you. Here’s what the Hello Dexcom kit includes:

  • A G6 CGM sensor, transmitter, and applicator
  • Easy-to-follow instructions on how to insert the sensor
  • Simple instructions for downloading the Dexcom G6 and Dexcom Clarity apps
  • An online portal with support and Frequently Asked Questions
  • A digital “10-day journey of empowerment” to teach you about the features of the G6 and to help you interpret CGM data. The 10-day course involves:
    • logging events and becoming familiar with the G6 and Clarity apps
    • adjusting alert settings
    • learning from meals
    • reviewing data through Dexcom Clarity
  • A printed guide to using your G6, with information alarms, treatment decisions, troubleshooting, and more
  • Note: the kit does not include a separate sensor reader, so only people with a smartphone (Apple or Android) can use this program.
Dexcom G6

Image source: diaTribe

Eliza got to try out the new product – here’s what she thought: All in all, I opened the box, read the instructions, and activated the online portal in less than ten minutes. The step-by-step set up instructions were straightforward and included illustrations, and I felt quite comfortable going through the process on my own. After I downloaded the Dexcom G6 app and made a Dexcom account, there were videos to help me insert the sensor and activate the transmitter.

If you’re curious about CGM, ask your healthcare professional if you can get Hello Dexcom – you can send our article their way. Healthcare professionals can learn more about the program and order Hello Dexcom sample kits here. To learn more about CGM – how it works, its benefits and considerations, what the data means, and stories from user – check out this CGM pocket guide.

For more try-before-you-buy diabetes technology, learn about the free Omnipod DASH insulin pump trial.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Caramel Apple Cider Mimosa

This content originally appeared on TCOYD: Taking Control of Your Diabetes. Republished with permission.

By Sarah Severance

This is a fun twist on a traditional mimosa, but keep in mind it does have about 22 grams of carb and 10 grams of sugar per serving. To keep the carbs and sugar lower, you can make sugar free spiced apple cider and chill it before adding it to the champagne.

* Always drink responsibly.

Caramel Apple Cider Mimosa

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Caramel Apple Cider Mimosa

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A fun variation on the classic mimosa, this crisp and refreshing brunch companion may be your new favorite. Pop some bubbly and find something to celebrate!
Servings 2 servings
Calories 127kcal

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp. sugar or sugar substitute
  • 2 tbsp. cinnamon
  • 2 tsp. caramel sauce
  • 1 bottle champagne
  • 4 oz. spiced cider (half a cup)

Instructions

  • Mix sugar and cinnamon together.
  • Rim each champagne flute in caramel sauce and then dip in the sugar/cinnamon mixture.
  • Fill each glass with desired amount of champagne (we did 1/2 flute).
  • Add a splash of spiced cider (we did 2 oz) per glass.

Notes

Always drink responsibly. 

Nutrition

Calories: 127kcal | Carbohydrates: 21.5g | Fat: 5g | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 10g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Caramel Apple Cider Mimosa Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups

This content originally appeared on ForGoodMeasure. Republished with permission.

In many ways, peanut butter is as American as apple pie. Truth be told, peanuts are native to South America. Ironically, Spanish & Portuguese explorers brought the legume to Spain, where it was traded to Asia and Africa, and from Africa it landed in North America in the 1700s. However, it was Dr. George Washington Carver in the early 1900s who propelled the highly, nutritious peanut into a household staple. The iconic Peanut Butter Cup followed in the roaring 20s, invented by Harry Reese, a former dairy employee of Milton S. Hershey. A hundred years later, here’s our low-carb take on the classic candy.

Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups

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Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups

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Cuisine American
Keyword Chocolate, Peanut Butter
Prep Time 20 minutes
Freezing Time 15 minutes
Calories 87kcal

Equipment

  • candy mold

Ingredients

  • 4 ounces 100% dark chocolate
  • 6 ounces 85% dark chocolate
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup peanut butter
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt

Instructions

  • Break apart chocolate into small pieces.
  • Set a double boiler over medium heat. **
  • Add chocolate pieces and coconut oil, stirring occasionally until melted.
  • Partially fill each mold cup with chocolate mixture, coating sides.
  • Freeze for 5 minutes.
  • Fill each partially frozen mold cup with ⅛ teaspoon peanut butter.
  • Finish filling each mold cup with remaining melted chocolate.
  • Freeze for 10 minutes, until set.
  • Remove candy from mold.
  • Store refrigerated in an airtight container.

Notes

Naturally low-carb & gluten-free

**If you do not have a double boiler, simmer a few inches of water in a medium saucepan, fit a glass bowl inside, ensuring water does not enter the container.

Nutrition

Calories: 87kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 2g | Trans Fat: 8g | Cholesterol: 1mg | Sodium: 42mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 1g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Keto Apple Cake

This content originally appeared on Sugar-Free Mom. Republished with permission.

The fall is here, and that means apples are in season! While some who are on a ketogenic diet are opposed to eating apples, there are plenty of people, like me, who feel that a small amount in many servings is not going to kick us out of ketosis. Maybe enjoying a whole apple yourself would kick you out of ketosis, but 1 cup in a cake with 16 servings is a very small amount. One slice is just 6 total carbs and only 3 net carbs. I believe, enjoying seasonal items makes this a lifestyle I can stick with forever, how about you?

Keto apple cake

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Keto Apple Cake

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This scrumptious keto apple cake is the perfect fall dessert for family and friends and just 3g net carbs per serving.
Course Dessert, Snack
Cuisine American
Keyword apple, fall
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Servings 16 slices
Calories 154kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 cup apple chopped
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 cup coconut flour
  • 1 cup Swerve brown sugar sub
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp apple pie spice
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp glucomannan or xanthan gum
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/2 cup butter softened or 113 grams
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tsp apple pie extract
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon stevia or vanilla
  • 6 large eggs

Optional Add-Ins

  • 1/2 cup chopped pecans or walnuts

Optional Toppings

  • sugar-free caramel sauce
  • sugar-free maple syrup
  • sugar-free butter pecan ice cream

Instructions

  • Preheat your oven to 325 degrees F. Grease a silicone 9 inch bundt pan and place on a small baking sheet pan. Set aside.
  • Place chopped apples and cinnamon together in a small bowl and stir to coat the apples. Set aside.
  • Whisk together the coconut flour, brown sugar sub, baking soda and powder, apple pie spice, salt and glucomannan and add to a stand mixer or large bowl.
  • Pour the sour cream, butter and heavy cream into the dry ingredients in the stand mixer or bowl. Blend until combined. Mix in the apple extract and stevia.
  • Add one egg at a time into the batter until combined.
  • Take half of the apples and spread them all around the bottom of the bundt pan. Spread half of the batter over the apples in the bundt pan. Spread the remaining apples over the batter and then the remaining batter over the apples.
  • Place the pan in the middle of the oven and bake for 50-60 minutes or until a toothpick in the center comes out clean. Allow to cool. Once cooled, place your serving plate over the top of the bundt pan and flip cake over. It should easily release from the silicone pan. Slice into 16 servings and enjoy with my sugar free caramel sauce or my keto butter pecan ice cream.

Notes

Net carbs: 3g

Nutrition

Calories: 154kcal | Carbohydrates: 6g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 13g | Saturated Fat: 8g | Cholesterol: 99mg | Sodium: 253mg | Potassium: 82mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 437IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 41mg | Iron: 1mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Keto Apple Cake Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes Life Hacks: Tools to Help You Thrive

Living with diabetes is a full-time job and one we never applied for. It can be mentally exhausting and emotionally and physically draining. I know I am always looking for any tips or tip-offs that can help me with my diabetes management–whether it be technology, travel perks, or even a new app that tells me to get my act together.

I asked the diabetes online community to share any and all fun tips and tip-offs that can help make our lives a little bit easier and enjoyable.

Here are the top 9 diabetes hacks that the diabetes online community shared:

Dexcom G6 Sensor

1. Restarting Dexcom Sensors

Did you know that you can extend your Dexcom G6 sensors beyond the 10-day cut off? There are quite a few ways to go about it depending on your transmitter code. You can find the right method to use here. This will save you a few pricks and pokes and some money too.

2. Free Admission to National Parks

People living with diabetes (or any other condition that falls under disability) can apply for free lifetime access to US national parks. You can obtain your pass through the mail which involves a $10 dollar processing fee, or you can get it in person to avoid the extra charge. This is a great perk that everyone should take advantage of at some point in their lifetime!

Sulli the Diabetes Guru

3. Sulli the Diabetes Guru

Roche Diabetes Care created a voice-activated assistant in the homes of people living with diabetes. This virtual source of support and information is available around the clock and free of charge on Amazon Alexa and on Google Assistant. Sulli the Diabetes Guru responds to important questions like “What is high blood sugar?”, “Is it okay to eat before my blood test?” as well as sets reminders to take medication and can even tell you where to find the closest blood monitor retailer!

Medal from Lilly Diabetes

Photo credit: Clare Fishman

4. Lilly Diabetes Journey Awards

Did you know you could receive a medal for your valiant effort of managing your diabetes? This program recognizes people who have managed their type 1 diabetes successfully with insulin for 10, 25, 50 and 75 years. Each recipient receives a beautiful award, engraved with their name, along with a signed letter from Lilly’s CEO, Dave Ricks, acknowledging and encouraging their continued dedication. This program helps celebrate each other’s victories and hopes to inspire others living with diabetes.

People living with type 1 diabetes or parents of children with type 1 diabetes in the United States can complete and submit the Lilly Diabetes Journey Awards application here. If you are outside the United States and are interested in learning more about Lilly programs in your country, please contact your local Lilly affiliate for more information.

Lilly also offers other programs such as their Lilly Camp Care Package program, which provides diabetes educational kits, inspirational speakers, insulin, and other supplies to camps for children with diabetes. Lilly also offers college resources after partnering with The College Diabetes Network. CDN realizes that campus life and independence can be hard enough without diabetes. They created a community for young adults living with diabetes through its national network of campus-based chapters and their resources available on their website.

5. Ask Siri for Your Glucose Reading

If you are using a Dexcom CGM, you can take advantage of Siri and ask her any time of the day, “What is my blood sugar?” and she will take the reading from your Dexcom and say it out loud. This has become incredibly useful when I’m driving or don’t have the time to unlock my phone and go to the Dexcom app.

6. Happy Bob App

This app takes mundane diabetes data and turns it into an engaging and positive experience for the user. You can switch between Happy Bob and Snarky Bob to get a different dose of entertainment. Both of which will help ease the stress of this disease and leave you with a smile!

7. Dexcom Overlay

Did you know that Dexcom offers free over-patches to help reinforce the adhesive? There are plenty of great companies out there that offer this as well but be sure to take advantage of this free offer and see how it works for you and/or your child. You can submit a request using this form.

8. Preboarding Before a Flight

As people living with diabetes, we are allowed to preboard all flights. This is helpful to get your luggage in a safe space and make sure you have time to access any supplies or snacks before the plane gets crowded and it’s more difficult to move around. This will help set you up for a comfortable and relaxing flight. Read here for more information on air travel and what you need to know.

9. Sugarmate App

Sugarmate is a companion app for those using Dexcom G5/G6 and boasts many great features such as apple watch integration, will call you if your CGM goes low, and is ignored, even if it is in the Do Not Disturb mode. The newest feature if you own a car with CarPlay and connect your phone, your blood sugar will automatically display on your screen.

Make sure to take advantage of these above diabetes hacks to make living life with diabetes a little easier. Many of the above tips can help change your mindset, improve your mood, and give you a little motivation to keep on thriving.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Low-Carb Apple Galette

This content originally appeared on ForGoodMeasure. Republished with permission.

I grew up within walking distance of an abandoned apple orchard. Fall would arrive bringing crisp air, crunchy leaves, and an annual stroll through the woodlands to rows of gnarled trees laden with fruit. I would fill a basket and make the decision enroute home what the day’s bounty would yield. Apple sauce if the apples were particularly blemished … pie and cake if time was plentiful … apple butter if I felt chilled … or galette if I was looking for a snack.

Native to France, galettes can be sweet or savory, rustic or refined … in essence, a flakey crust with an exposed, caramelized filling. The Italians call it a crostata … whatever the name, it’s perfect served with a wedge of sharp cheddar and a cup of hot tea.

Apple Galette Recipe

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Low-Carb Apple Galette

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Preparing apple pie is perfect in fall, but if you prefer an easier preparation, try its cousin, the galette. It's half the work, but similar goodness: crispy crust, sweet filling, and naturally low-carb!
Course Dessert
Cuisine French
Keyword apple
Servings 8 servings
Calories 391kcal

Equipment

  • Food processor

Ingredients

  • 1 cup almond flour
  • 5 tablespoons coconut flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum
  • 1 cup butter divided
  • 1/4 cup cream cheese
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons orange zest
  • 4 cups Granny Smith apples cored, peeled and sliced
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon heavy cream

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  • Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment.
  • Blend almond flour, coconut flour, salt and xanthan gum in processor.
  • Add 6 tablespoons butter and cream cheese, pulsing until crumbly.
  • Add one egg, apple cider vinegar and zest, pulsing until dough comes together in coarse crumbs.
  • Turn out onto parchment lined sheet, patting into a round.
  • Freeze for 20 minutes.
  • Mix apples, honey, vanilla and cinnamon in a large bowl.
  • Remove dough from freezer, top with parchment and roll to ¼ inch thick.
  • Add apple mixture to center of dough, leaving a 2-inch gutter.
  • Dot with remaining two tablespoons butter, folding the rim up and over the edge of filling.
  • Whisk remaining egg with cream, brushing egg wash over the edges.
  • Bake for 35 minutes, until golden. *

Notes

  • Naturally low-carb & gluten-free
  • Nut flours are sensitive. Check after 15 minutes, if edges are browning too quickly, cover with foil or a pie crust shield for the remaining time.

Nutrition

Calories: 391kcal | Carbohydrates: 17g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 35g | Cholesterol: 112mg | Sodium: 403mg | Fiber: 5g | Sugar: 10g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Low-Carb Apple Galette Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Low-Carb Caramel Apple Cheesecake Bars

This content originally appeared on Sugar-Free Mom. Republished with permission.

It may seem like a bit of work, but it’s a pretty simple recipe with 3 easy layers of deliciousness!

The first layer is like a shortbread crust made without almond or other nuts for those who have tree nut allergies like my youngest son. The middle is all cheesecake filling and it’s topped with a crumble of apples and coconut flour mixture to make it have some fabulous texture once baked!

Of course it’s best if chilled, but you could certainly enjoy it straight from the oven. Just be sure to allow it some time to set or it will fall apart when you try cutting into it. Cheesecake and crusts without gluten are known for that, just part of the issue baking low-carb. Wait a bit and this will slice easily. Enjoy it with some of my Sugar-Free Caramel Sauce on top!

Low-Carb Apple Cheesecake Bar

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Keto Low-Carb Caramel Apple Cheesecake Bars

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Your bite of fall: Shortbread crust filled with creamy cheesecake and topped with a crumble of apples.
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Keyword apple, cheesecake
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 16 bars
Calories 229kcal

Ingredients

Shortbread Crust

  • 1/2 cup butter softened
  • 1 cup coconut flour
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp Caramel Liquid Stevia or 1/2 cup sweetener of choice

Cheesecake filling

  • 16 ounces cream cheese room temp
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tsp apple extract
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp Caramel Liquid Stevia

Topping

  • 3/4 cup apples skinless, diced
  • 1 tbsp coconut flour
  • 1/2 tsp apple pie spice
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp butter softened
  • 1/2 tsp Caramel liquid stevia

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Combine crust ingredients together in a bowl and stir well until combined. Spread onto a parchment-lined, 8-by-8-inch baking dish.
  • Combine all cheesecake ingredients in a stand mixer, or use an electric mixer on medium speed, until smooth and well incorporated. Taste and adjust stevia if needed. Spread the cheesecake filling over the crust evenly.
  • Mix the topping ingredients together in a small bowl, then sprinkle mixture over the cheesecake. Bake for 30 minutes, then chill 3-4 hours to set or overnight. Top with sugar-free caramel sauce, if desired.

Notes

Recipe Notes

  • Net carbs: 4g

Brenda’s Notes: 

 

Nutrition

Calories: 229kcal | Carbohydrates: 7g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 21g | Saturated Fat: 13g | Cholesterol: 61mg | Sodium: 324mg | Potassium: 59mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 723IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 41mg | Iron: 1mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Low-Carb Caramel Apple Cheesecake Bars Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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