Research Trends with Dr. Maria: Cholesterol Benefits & More

Dr. Maria Muccioli holds degrees in Biochemistry and Molecular and Cell Biology and has over 10 years of research experience in the immunology field. She is currently a professor of biology at Stratford University and a science writer at Diabetes Daily. Dr. Maria has been living well with type 1 diabetes since 2008 and is passionate about diabetes research and outreach.

In this recurring article series, Dr. Maria will present some snapshots of recent diabetes research, and especially interesting studies than may fly under the mainstream media radar. Check out our first-ever installment of “Research Trends with Dr. Maria”!

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Allergen in Diabetes Tech Adhesives

Diabetes technologies, like insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors, are steadily gaining popularity, especially among patients with type 1 diabetes. While the technological advances have shown considerable benefit in improving patient outcomes and quality of life, one common issue is the unfavorable reactions to adhesives. A recent study published in Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics identified that a common culprit of these allergic reactions to adhesives may be a chemical called colophonium, a commonly-used adhesive, which was shown to be an allergen in over 40% of patients in the small study. Read more about the study and the use of this adhesive in medical products here.

Bariatric Surgery May Worsen Retinopathy

Retinopathy (eye disease) is a common complication of diabetes, and can be serious, leading to severe visual impairment and even blindness, especially when left untreated. A recent study published in Acta Ophthalmologica has uncovered a potential link between patients who undergo weight loss surgery and worsening retinopathy. Researchers adjusted for confounding variables, including glycemic control (A1c) and found that those who underwent bariatric surgery experienced worse retinopathy outcomes. Although the sample size was small, the data showed a significant worsening of eye disease in those who underwent surgery as compared to controls. Learn more about the study and outcomes here.

Super Healthy Probiotic Fermented Food Sources

Photo credit: Adobe Stock

Benefits of Probiotics for Type 2 Diabetes

The relevance of the gut microbiome in various health conditions, including diabetes, is gaining more and more attention. A recently published meta-analysis in The Journal of Translational Medicine discusses what we currently know about the effects of probiotic supplementation in patients with type 2 diabetes. Excitingly, probiotics can improve insulin resistance and even lower A1c! Learn more about exactly what the clinical trials have shown here.

Herbal Therapies Gaining Attention

With most modern medicines derived from plant compounds, it is not surprising that more research is being geared toward examining the effects of various herbal remedies on blood glucose levels and insulin sensitivity. A recent review published in The World Journal of Current Medical and Pharmaceutical Research summarizes the effects of some medicinal plants with potential anti-diabetic properties. Learn more about what is known about commons herbs and how they may be beneficial for glycemic control here.

Low HDL Cholesterol Linked to Beta Cell Decline

Research has previously suggested that higher HDL cholesterol levels may be protective of beta-cell function. A longitudinal study recently published in Diabetes Metabolism Research and Reviews indicated that patients with lower levels of HDL cholesterol were more likely to experience beta cell deterioration and develop type 2 diabetes than those with higher HDL cholesterol levels. Learn more about this study here.

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Please share your thoughts with us and stay tuned for more recent research updates!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Parenting with Diabetes: I Taught My Two-Year-Old Daughter How to Be My Caretaker

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Cherise Shockley

diaTribe Community Manager, Cherise Shockley, shares the story of her diabetes diagnosis and how that diagnosis affected her family

I was diagnosed with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (or LADA, a type of diabetes between type 1 and type 2) in July 2004, at the age of 23. I was a newlywed, my husband, Scott, was deployed, and I had just finished five-and-a-half years in the Army Reserve. I was placed on oral medication (glipizide), and I began to manage this form of diabetes with diet and exercise, knowing that someday I would require regular insulin for the rest of my life.

In March of 2005, Scott returned from deployment, and a month later we found out I was expecting our first child. Nine months into my diabetes diagnosis, I was carrying my first child; I was temporarily placed on Regular and NPH insulins, because I had to stop taking my oral diabetes medication during pregnancy. At the time, I did not have a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) – the first version of the Dexcom STS wasn’t invented until March 2006,  as my colleagues at diaTribe wrote about here.

My pregnancy was smooth-sailing aside from my diabetes, which took quite a toll on me, but I knew if I did what I could to manage the condition, my little girl would be okay.

Eight months after I gave birth to my daughter, Niya, we said our good-byes to our families and moved from Kansas City, Missouri, to our new duty station in Southern California.

From the time my daughter was one year old, until she was reached two, I was taking oral medication, and my hypoglycemic episodes were few and far between. When I did experience hypoglycemia, I was either at home or at work, and my husband or my coworkers could help me out.

After my daughter turned two, I noticed that my medication was no longer working. With the help of my nurse practitioner, I tried everything in my power to get oral medication to work for me, but it was time to see an endocrinologist.

A few days after my first visit, I met with a nurse practitioner. He told me, “Your beta cells are still present, but we do not want to burn out what little function you have, so I recommend you start taking insulin.” I paused. Although I knew this day was coming, it was like hearing “you have diabetes” all over again.

When we began talking about pump therapy, I asked for something easy to use, knowing that my two-year-old daughter would be my primary caretaker.  I wanted Niya to be able to help me if she needed to.  With my husband working late hours and traveling, we made a decision to teach my daughter how to manage my diabetes. We taught her how to call 9-1-1, how to treat my lows with apple juice, and eventually, how to shut my pump off. In the back of my mind, I wanted her to know how to manage diabetes just in case she received her own diagnosis later in life.

Parenting

Image source: diaTribe

Many parents of children with diabetes share stories of not being able to sleep because they are worried about waking their child up in the middle of the night to check their blood glucose levels. In my family, my daughter was the person I woke up in the middle of the night when I experienced low blood glucose. Before I had a CGM, Niya was the person helping me check my glucose levels and stuffing glucose tabs or candy into my mouth in the middle of the night when my husband was not home.

From the time she was two, my daughter was my primary or secondary caretaker. Scott retired two years ago, so now Niya only helps me out when it’s just the two of us together. If she hears the alarm from my CGM, she asks if I am okay.

I never asked Niya how she felt about her role in helping me manage diabetes; I was nervous to interview my 13-year-old daughter, but I wanted to know how she felt.

Me: How did it feel growing up with a mother with diabetes?

Niya: I was a normal kid. I can eat what I want. I was able to learn how to manage your diabetes and help you when you needed help. I know how to recognize when you are okay.

Me: How old were you when you realized I had diabetes?

Niya: I was four or five. You asked me to film a diabetes video for you.  The hook in the song, “Who has diabetes? Help us stop diabetes,” made me realize that diabetes was a bigger issue. Diabetes was my normal – but the video helped me see that diabetes was also serious.

Me: Was there ever a situation that scared you?

Niya: We recently went to Disney Springs together during Friends for Life. You went really low, and I was scared that you weren’t going to be okay. I didn’t want anything to happen to you when I was with you; I didn’t want to be responsible. Diabetes is a lot of responsibility for a kid, but in some ways, I’m used to it.

Me: That was a scary moment for me, as well. It was the first time in a long time that I was not able to get my blood glucose levels to go up (with glucose tabs or candy). It was important to me to let you shop with your friend while the team at Disney Springs sat with me.

Niya: Thank you for letting me be a kid and not forcing me to live as if I had diabetes. I love you.

Me: Is there anything you would like to say to other children who have parents with diabetes?

Niya: It is sometimes difficult having a parent with diabetes. I now have two parents with diabetes, since my dad has type 2. I want other kids to know that they can navigate it – they will feel extra pressure that other kids don’t feel, but hang in there. When your mother is as special as mine, it’s worth it; diabetes is a big part of my family.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

LADA – Debunking a Common Type 2 Diabetes Misdiagnosis

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.By Kara Miecznikowski and Divya Gopisetty What is LADA? How is it diagnosed and treated? Read on to learn more and hear from people living with LADA Just like type 1 diabetes, LADA is a form of autoimmune diabetes. This means that the body’s own immune system […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Type 2 Diabetes Remission: What Is It and How Can It Be Done?

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.By Emma Ryan and Jimmy McDermott Learn about three ways that may put type 2 diabetes into remission: low-carbohydrate diets, low-calorie diets, and bariatric surgery Type 2 diabetes is traditionally described as a progressive disease – without major lifestyle changes, A1C levels will gradually increase over time, […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Should People with Type 1 Diabetes Eat Carbs with Protein to Build More Muscle?

This content originally appeared on Diabetic Muscle & Fitness. Republished with permission.Quick Summary Insulin and amino acids play an important role in assisting with muscle growth. Glucose and amino acids are both insulinogenic and have the potential to increase blood glucose. When glucose and amino acids are consumed together they require more insulin, than if […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Bionic Boy

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.By Abbie McClung What I see I see wireless life support. I see thousands of dollars in invasive medical devices that help my child survive a disease we did not cause, could not prevent, and cannot cure. I see an insulin pump and a continuous […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Is a Functional Cure for Type 1 Diabetes on the Horizon?

Have you heard about the ongoing research on cell-based therapies for type 1 diabetes? Dr. Paul Laikind is the President and CEO of ViaCyte, a company that aims to develop “a product that can free patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes from long-term insulin dependence.” Hear more about the novel research and the recent […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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