100 Things You Can Do This Year for a Better Life with Diabetes

The New Year is here and many of us are hoping to make those resolutions stick. Keep in mind that there are many ways you can influence change, and some steps you can take may seem small but are very effective nonetheless. Please note that anytime you make changes to your diet or exercise routine, it’s also a good idea to check in with your doctor and plan ahead for any necessary medication adjustments.

Without further ado, check out this list of 100 simple things you can try to do this year for a better life with diabetes:

  1. Change your lancet.
  2. Eat lower carb.
  3. Take the stairs.
  4. Join a gym.
  5. See your eye doctor.
  6. Try a new vegetable recipe.
  7. Pack your lunch.
  8. Cut back on alcohol.
  9. Quit smoking.
  10. Invest in comfortable shoes.
  11. Buy a scale to keep accountable.
  12. Check your blood pressure.
  13. Stand while working.
  14. Go for a walk after lunch.
  15. Give gardening a try.
  16. Grocery shop the perimeter.
  17. Stretch.
  18. Keep a blood sugar log.
  19. Try a new diabetes app.
  20. Consider a continuous glucose monitor (CGM).
  21. Check your blood sugar more often.
  22. Don’t reuse your needle/syringe.
  23. Use alcohol swabs for injections and site changes.
  24. Read a book about diabetes.
  25. Join a diabetes support group.
  26. Choose green veggies over starches.
  27. Visit your endocrinologist.
  28. Do basal testing.
  29. Track your cycle.
  30. Count carbohydrates accurately.
  31. Try a half-unit syringe or pen.
  32. Consider trying an insulin pump.
  33. Ride a bike.
  34. Consider getting a pet.
  35. Eat more real food.
  36. Cut back on dessert.
  37. Try a flour substitute.
  38. Try a sugar substitute.
  39. Track your macronutrients.
  40. Track your steps.
  41. Educate about diabetes.
  42. Start a fundraiser.
  43. Attend a diabetes event.
  44. Sign up for our newsletter.
  45. Participate in diabetes surveys.
  46. Treat lows only with glucose.
  47. Eat consistent meals.
  48. Consider intermittent fasting.
  49. Ditch the foods that don’t work well.
  50. Invest in quality proteins.
  51. Eat more plants.
  52. Eat less processed foods.
  53. Ice skate.
  54. Try canoeing.
  55. Go hiking.
  56. Spend more time in nature.
  57. Shovel snow.
  58. Go swimming.
  59. Try ziplining or tree-to-tree.
  60. Get your A1c checked.
  61. Lower the high alert on your CGM.
  62. Eat more probiotics.
  63. Get more fiber.
  64. Swap juice and soda for more water.
  65. Sign up for a “couch to 5k” program.
  66. Jog.
  67. Go rock-climbing.
  68. Rotate your injection sites.
  69. Change your pump-site regularly.
  70. Change your CGM sensor regularly.
  71. Wear your CGM more.
  72. Review your CGM report regularly.
  73. Get a primary care physician.
  74. Get your flu shot.
  75. Figure out if you’re a moderator or abstainer.
  76. Jump rope.
  77. Meditate.
  78. Start a journal.
  79. Keep a food log.
  80. Create a 504 plan for your child.
  81. Speak with your child’s school about non-food related celebrations.
  82. Advocate for yourself or your child better.
  83. Ditch the scale if you’re obsessing.
  84. Take before photos (you will want them!).
  85. Figure out what self-care means to you and practice it daily.
  86. Seek out a friend or therapist if you feel you need help.
  87. Give back to the community by volunteering your time.
  88. Try a sport or activity you never tried before.
  89. Have more grace with yourself.
  90. Surround yourself with positive influences.
  91. Try to see the big picture more often.
  92. Create a healthy work/life balance.
  93. Appreciate the little things.
  94. Don’t be so hard on yourself.
  95. Check in with friends who may need it.
  96. Spend more time with family.
  97. Take the time to thank others and let them know they are appreciated.
  98. Take more deep breaths.
  99. Target things you feel you can change and start with those.
  100. Remember to be grateful for another year around the sun.

Do you want to add anything that has worked well for you? Please share your tips in the comments below.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Review: Genteel Lancing Device

Regularly checking blood glucose levels is an integral part of optimizing diabetes management, and in particular for patients who use insulin. However, frequent finger pricks can be uncomfortable and even painful for some, especially for children, which may be a deterrent to regular blood glucose testing. Genteel is the only currently-available lancing device on the market that is FDA-approved for both finger and alternative site testing and uses a unique technology to minimize the pain of finger pricks for blood sample collection.

Who They Are

Genteel was founded by Dr. Christoher Jacobs, a biomedical engineer. A friend of his was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and expressed the challenges of the condition, including the pain he experienced from frequent testing. As a result, Dr. Jacobs set out to develop a device that would minimize the pain of obtaining a blood sample, and the Genteel device was born.

What It Is

The Genteel lancing products make use of several ways to minimize the pain of fingersticks. They allow users to select a variable “contact tip” size to minimize the penetration of the lancet under the skin. Also, the products make use of vacuum technology to help draw out a drop of blood for testing automatically, instead of having to squeeze the site.

Image by Genteel

There are two products available — the Genteel Lancing Device and the Genteel Plus Lancing Device. The basic lancing device is only compatible with the provided “butterfly touch” lancets, whereas the upgraded version is compatible with many other lancet types.

Check out the video below that explains exactly how the device works:

My Review

Personally, I found the device to be a bit elaborate and not very practical in terms of ease of use. When the product was first brought to the market, it was reviewed by Ginger Vieira, and I agree with much of her commentary regarding the product size, appearance, and lack of discreteness in use.

However, I can confirm that obtaining a blood sample was not painful for me, whether sampling from the fingertip or from the alternate site (my palm). While I still felt the contact of the lancet, it was definitely not painful and was certainly much more comfortable than many of the fingersticks I have experienced in almost 13 years of testing my blood sugar on a daily basis.

I can see that for some patients, for example, small children, this device may help to eliminate the fear and discomfort of checking blood sugar levels, and hopefully help the user achieve more frequent tests, and as a result, better glycemic control. The stickers included for decorating the lancing device are sure to be a hit with the kids, too.

The products aren’t cheap though! The base model costs $49.99 and the upgraded version $99.99.

Where to Buy

Both the basic and plus models can be purchased directly from the Genteel website. You can read more about each device before making the decision here:

Conclusions

While the Genteel lancing device may not be everyone’s favorite choice, it certainly helps with comfortably and painlessly obtaining a blood sample for testing, which might be a huge consideration for some patients, and in particular, for small children.

Have you tried Genteel products? Please share your thoughts and experiences in the comments.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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Source: diabetesdaily.com

10 Dos and Don’ts of the Sensor & Site Life

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Source: diabetesdaily.com

What Do “Healthy” Blood Glucose Levels Really Look Like?

What is normal blood glucose? In children and adults, ideally, blood sugar levels are tightly-regulated to stay in a narrow range that’s optimal for physiological function. What are these levels, and how much of a glucose excursion is “normal”? Notably, there are some transient exceptions to the accepted “normal range”. In particular, women tend to […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Best Apps to Manage Blood Sugar

With everyone going high-tech these days, it seems almost intuitive that our blood sugar management would make its way to a screen (remember the days of pen and paper log books?!). Measuring and tracking your blood sugar is easier than ever with the help of apps, right on your smartphone. Here are our top picks […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes is Not Unpredictable: A Troubleshooting Guide

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for over a decade and have experienced my fair share of learning experiences in diabetes management. One tenet that I often come across in the diabetes online community is, “diabetes is just so unpredictable!” In my early years of diabetes management, I somewhat sympathized with the sentiment. […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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