Mommy Beeps: Parenting with Type 1 Diabetes

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Kim Baillieul

A few years ago, I sat at a park while my then two-year-old son played on the playground. A wave of dizziness fell over me right as I felt my continuous glucose monitor (CGM) start beeping. One, two, three – three beeps, confirming the low blood sugar I suspected.

Instinctively, I reached into my purse and grabbed the juice box floating among the loose change and used test strips. Of course, my son’s innate ability to sense whenever I have a sweet treat also kicked in, and next thing I saw were his big, blue eyes fixated on my hand.

“Mommy, can I have your juice box?”

Sure, my sugar had dropped in front of my son before, but this was the first time I had no distraction for him – no alternative snack, no books to read. Most importantly, it was the first time he asked me to share. I shook my head and told him no, but he persisted.

“Mommy, pretty please, can I have your juice box?”

My mind went blank.

How do you explain to a toddler that your juice box is literally keeping you alive?

What I Was Told

For years – even when I was still a child myself – I was cautioned about pregnancy. At 16 years old, my endocrinologist painted daunting pictures of a hypothetical future high-risk pregnancy: weekly doctor’s visits, insanely tight control, constant monitoring. A massive list of things that could go wrong. All of this became my reality over a decade later when I became pregnant with my son.

My high-risk pregnancy with him had overall, gone well, partially thanks to the hard work I put in to maintain a 5.1% average A1C, and partially thanks to luck. I was prepared for the extra scans. I was prepared for the drastic insulin changes. I was prepared for the constant vigilance. I was prepared for what could go wrong.

However, nothing prepared me for how to explain my type 1 diabetes (T1D) to my child. Or why suddenly, at this moment, I couldn’t share a simple juice box. Frankly, I was so dizzy, I couldn’t even get up off the bench.

“I’m sorry sweetheart, I can’t share. This juice box is mommy’s medicine.”

Later, after my sugars were stable, I thought about how to talk to my child about my chronic illness and the scope of what he needed to know. I wanted to achieve a balance – somewhere between knowing enough to be empowered but not so much that he’d become anxious; enough for him to understand what I was doing, but not enough for him to feel responsible for it himself.

All my life I had worked to overcome and ‘beat’ my diabetes, to not let it stop me, you know, upholding the usual mantras of strength. However, as I pondered how to talk to my kids about my type 1, I had to set that all aside. Pride had no place here.

The conversation remained informal, but honest.

Understand that mama’s body doesn’t work the way most other people’s do… I’m not sick, but it can make me feel sick sometimes… This is my insulin pump… This lancet is sharp, please don’t ever touch it.

He had a lot of questions.

Yes, Mommy beeps!… No, you won’t get it when I cough… Yes, even if I forget to cover my mouth… Yes, I can eat most anything as long as I’m careful… Yes, even ketchup… Yes, even ice cream… Yes, even ketchup ice cream – wait, that’s gross!

We both erupted in giggles.

A Universal Struggle

One of the beautiful things about the type 1 community is knowing you’re not alone. As I reflected on this intentional conversation, one of the first ‘growing up’ discussions I had with my son, I realized I’m not likely alone in facing this. Turns out, I wasn’t – the parents with type 1 community was peppered with struggling T1D parents facing the same hurdle. When I looked for resources, I didn’t find anything quite suitable for a type 1 parent.

Throughout my son’s toddlerhood, I captured my efforts in a children’s book I wrote called “Mommy Beeps: A book for children who love a type 1 diabetic.” It was a passion project of mine to provide a resource that didn’t otherwise exist, and hopefully help another family lessen the mental gymnastics of explaining type 1 diabetes to a child who doesn’t have it themselves. Every page is personal – down to the angry T1D on the phone dealing with a denied insurance claim. Because that is reality. Diabetes isn’t just about the finger pricks and injections – the medical and insurance logistics can be just as heavy. Extra doctor’s appointments, tracking of supplies, prescription refills – it all took time away from playing with blocks, giggling on the floor, or reading “Goodnight Moon” for the third time on a given evening.

As for my son, he took to my carefully crafted conversation well – and all of the impromptu ones that followed. Once, after a particularly harrowing high sugar, we planned a library visit to check out some books about the body, so he could find the “piece of Mama that doesn’t work.” We never made it to that page, though, because he was too fascinated by more amusing parts of the body (the toilet humor sure does start young).

A few years later, I braved the high-risk pregnancy world again and came out with a second little boy. The first time my type 1 diabetes interrupted our playing with trains, I talked to him, too. He shrugged it off and kept the train on its way to the station.

Later that night, he leaned into me. Pointing to my stomach, he exclaimed, “Mama’s Dexcom! I kiss it.” Clearly, something stuck in our conversation earlier that day. And I will take any win I can get.

They won’t know any other way, this will be their normal. And really, that’s a beautiful thing, because the T1D community is now just a little bigger.

Find out more about “Mommy Beeps” here.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Dating with Diabetes

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Cheryl Alkon

Dating can feel daunting when you live with diabetes. Hear about dating from others with diabetes, and learn what you can do to prepare for dates.

My now-husband David and I met at a friend’s birthday party where there was bowling and a lot of birthday cake.

Knowing I had diabetes, he was surprised by how much cake I ate at the party. I love cake, so I had calculated the carbs and increased my insulin pump dosing accordingly. That night, Dave couldn’t understand how a person with diabetes could be okay eating a lot of cake.

Couple

Image source: diaTribe

He has since learned.

The next day we talked more about what diabetes is, how food and insulin dosing intertwine, and how ongoing diabetes management requires both a daily and a long-term focus. Later on, when things got more serious, Dave asked for, and I found him, a book that covered more detail: Eve Gehling’s The Family & Friends’ Guide to Diabetes. While the book is now outdated and doesn’t cover some current medications and technologies, the focus on support is universal.

Dating with diabetes, like any dating, relies on honest communication. Supportive actions – such as keeping glucagon or sources of sugar readily available, or sympathizing with you, rather than dismissing you, when you vent about a frustrating aspect of living with diabetes – can go a long way. Whether a person with diabetes is just beginning to date, has been at it for a while, or is returning to dating after a hiatus – no matter if they are looking for a serious relationship or not – a thoughtful approach can reduce the challenges of dating with diabetes.

To Tell or Not to Tell

It’s up to you to decide when to tell someone that you have diabetes. You might feel you want to keep it quiet on a first or second date, especially if you don’t know if you’ll see that person again. Or, you may decide to be more open about diabetes from the start – especially before something like an insulin dose or treating low or high glucose levels needs to happen during the date.

It’s important to be comfortable with your diabetes yourself first, because it can be hard to open up and share it with someone else,” said Lexi Rosendahl, 21, who attends nursing school in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Rosendahl, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 11, started dating Jordan Paulsen, 24, in October 2020, after meeting him on a dating app. She said she was nervous about disclosing her diabetes.

Couple

Image source: diaTribe

“I was super up front about it, though some people said, ‘Don’t say anything right away,’ but I thought, ‘This is a part of me,’” she said. “If you are talking to someone, and they aren’t accepting or they make you feel bad, drop them. Don’t settle. Someone out there will love you for who you are.” This advice applies to anyone, with or without diabetes.

Rosendahl said Paulsen asked many questions on their first date, when they got ice cream.

“He said, ‘I want to know about this as much as possible,’” she said. “As a nursing student, I do a lot of educating, and I made a little chart he keeps on his fridge about what I look like if I am low. He is also good about throwing a bag of fruit snacks in his pocket in case I go low. I am pretty self-sufficient, but it’s nice to have someone who gets it. It’s really cool; I like to be independent but he is supportive but not smothering me.”

At the same time, many advise not overwhelming a new relationship with too many diabetes details. It’s a balance that can be tricky to strike.

“You don’t have to give a full dissertation on diabetes during your first date,” notes Stephanie Watson in an article for Healthline.com. Also, she writes, “be open about your condition but don’t dwell on it. Try to keep the conversation light. You don’t want to worry your date by talking about [long-term complications], especially if you’ve just met.”

Anyone who would be frightened away or otherwise dismissive of someone’s diabetes doesn’t deserve a moment of your time. If nothing else, someone who has a problem with your diabetes, cites inaccuracies or myths about it and isn’t open to learning why those myths are wrong, is sending indications that spending time with them will likely be more of a burden than bliss. Learning this makes it easier to move on to someone who will be so much better for you.

Ultimately, you already deal with the day-to-day aspects of diabetes. You want to be with someone who supports and promotes you during that journey – not someone who will make it harder.

Dating Logistics

Whether you’re having a date over a meal, an activity like hiking, or something low-key like watching a movie, plan ahead so you have what you need to keep your focus on the date, not on your diabetes.

Like anything else with diabetes, preparation is key.

  • If you are eating at a restaurant, look at the menu ahead of time to figure out what would be a good choice and what the carbohydrate count would be for that meal.
  • If you are drinking alcohol, know how alcohol affects your blood glucose numbers before the date. Sweet drinks will cause increases, while less-sweet drinks can cause your blood sugar to drop, especially if you aren’t eating at the same time.
  • If you take insulin, ensure you have a source of fast-acting carbohydrates on you (in a purse or pocket) so you can treat a low blood sugar early on, rather than needing to rush to find something to treat in the middle of your date.
  • If you’re planning an activity for the date, adjust your insulin if necessary to avoid low blood sugar, and eat a snack either ahead of time or carry one on the date to manage your glucose numbers.
  • If you use a glucose meter, take it with you and make sure you have enough strips, working batteries, and anything else you need to make it work correctly. If you use a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), make sure the sensor is functioning properly.
  • If you wear an insulin pump make sure it is working properly before the date; fill the pump ahead of time if it’s almost time for a site change or the insulin is running low.
  • If you use syringes or insulin pens, make sure you have them handy so you can take your medication easily before a meal or in case the date is going well and continues longer than you anticipated.
  • If you wear an insulin pump and it malfunctions, carrying a syringe and a vial of fast-acting insulin in a glucose meter kit can help you have access to your insulin immediately, instead of needing to end the date.

Finding out a partner is flexible when things happen can be reassuring, said Rosendahl. “We were ice skating when my Dexcom CGM failed,” she said. “We had to run back home so I could change the sensor out, and Jordan said, ‘No judgment, whatever you need,’ It was a nice sign of unconditional love.”

Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes helped Liz Cambron identify some of the things she valued both in life and in a partner. Cambron, 29, who has a PhD in cellular and molecular biology and manages a research lab in State College, Pennsylvania, described herself as “a partier and drinker who ate a lot of fast food” before she was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes seven years ago. After her diagnosis, she changed her eating patterns, drank far less alcohol, and began working out each day. She now runs in half marathons, lifts weights, and is a partner in an on-demand online exercise program.

“It helped me re-evaluate my priorities and what type of life I wanted to live,” she said. “If I was dating a person who ate a lot of junk food or was a heavy partier, if I took the drinking or the partying away, the relationship didn’t last long and there wasn’t a lot there.”

Couple

Image source: diaTribe

She met her fiancé, James Kopco, four years ago when both attended a group counseling program for graduate students at North Dakota State University. “I would vent about frustrations about having to deal with low blood sugar events in the lab,” she said. As they began dating, they would keep each other accountable by eating healthy meals and exercising together. “Voice what your needs are,” she said. She offered other advice:

  • “Many first dates are going out for a meal or a drink, and if you say you can’t, the person will expect an explanation. There is stigma around type 2 diabetes – that people are overweight – and it can be a challenging first impression. But diabetes is not something to be embarrassed by. You are not a stereotype and don’t be embarrassed to have open communication.”
  • “Be open with your healthcare team about your medications and any side effects. A lot of medications can affect your libido and that can affect your relationship. If that is putting stress on your relationship, don’t feel like you’re stuck on that medication.”

Dating Another with Diabetes

Some people go looking to date another person with diabetes and some just find each other. Shanna Walker, 42, is a recruiter at her local fire department in Spotsylvania, Pennsylvania. She dated someone for about a year; they met through an online dating site and lived about 40 minutes from each other.

“As we were talking, I mentioned I was a diabetic, and he was like, ‘Me too!’” Walker has lived with type 1 diabetes since age 16, while her boyfriend was diagnosed with type 1.5 diabetes (also known as LADA) at age 35, six years ago. “It was very convenient, to be honest. We both had a Dexcom continuous glucose monitor, and we gave each other supplies. We know about highs and lows, so it was nice not to have someone freak out when an alarm went off. We would kid and show each other our numbers to see whose were ‘better.’”

There’s at least one Facebook group devoted to single people with type 1 diabetes: T1der. Launched in 2019, the group exists for people to “Meet other single type 1 diabetics, complain about the struggles of dating as a type 1, post memes and more.”

Couple

Image source: diaTribe

The group was started by Nathan Elmen, 24, who met his girlfriend, Heather Chambers, soon after the group began when she commented on his photo in a group post. Besides diabetes, they share career goals: Elmen is a registered nurse and Chambers is enrolled in the nursing program that he graduated from. The couple lives together in West Melbourne, Florida.

Regardless of diabetes, dating should evolve naturally, Elmen says.

“My advice is to not force yourself into a relationship,” he said. “It can be like winning the Lotto sometimes, and you really just need to bump into the right person – that was how Heather and I met.”

Ultimately, diabetes is just one aspect about you, and when looking for a new relationship, it’s important to focus on all your positive traits. “Just be yourself,” said Walker. “Diabetes doesn’t define you.”

About Cheryl

Cheryl Alkon is a seasoned writer and the author of the book Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby. The book has been called “Hands down, the best book on type 1 diabetes and pregnancy, covering all the major issues that women with type 1 face. It provides excellent tips and secrets for achieving the best management” by Gary Scheiner, the author of Think Like A Pancreas. Since 2010, the book has helped countless women around the world conceive, grow and deliver healthy babies while also dealing with diabetes.

Cheryl covers diabetes and other health and medical topics for various print and online clients. She lives in Massachusetts with her family and holds an undergraduate degree from Brandeis University and a graduate degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

She has lived with type 1 diabetes for more than four decades, since being diagnosed in 1977 at age seven.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

What You Need to Know If You’re Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Dr. Francine Kaufman

If you or your child was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you probably have many questions about how to manage this new condition. Dr. Fran Kaufman explains glucose levels and glucose targets, types of insulin and insulin doses, the honeymoon phase, and more

Were you recently told that you have, or your child has, type 1 diabetes? If so, you were likely filled with emotions, concerns, doubts, and questions. You were probably informed that there are many concepts you have to learn and many tasks you need to master. Hopefully, you were signed up for diabetes education sessions taught by certified diabetes care and education specialists (CDCES). You may have felt like you were on shaky ground; and despite all this, you knew that the sooner you learned how to manage diabetes, the better you would feel. Attitude matters, and the best attitude to have is a positive one – so hopefully you’re learning the tasks to successfully manage your diabetes.

Diabetes is a life-long condition. It is a marathon, not a sprint; no one day, one glucose level, or one meal makes a difference in the long run. One of the main goals of diabetes management is to balance insulin doses, food, and activity to keep your blood sugar or glucose levels in the desired or target range, as much of the time as possible. To do that, first you must know what the glucose targets are and how glucose levels are measured.  You must also understand what types of insulin are available and how they are combined for your insulin regimen. Finally, don’t forget to focus on your feelings, find support, and look to the future.

Click to jump down to a section:

  1. What are the glucose targets at diagnosis and how do they change over time?

Often when someone is first diagnosed, they are advised to keep their glucose levels between 100-200 mg/dL, to avoid hypoglycemia (low glucose) while they learn how to manage their diabetes. But after a few weeks or so, it may be time to bring glucose into the target range of 70-180 mg/dL, with pre-meal glucose between 70-130 mg/dL and post-meal glucose below 180 mg/dl. Before bed, healthcare professionals often recommend a glucose level above 100 mg/dL to help prevent hypoglycemia.

  1. How are glucose levels measured?

It is crucial that everyone diagnosed with type 1 diabetes learns how to perform fingerstick blood glucose measurements (referred to as BGs, fingersticks, self-monitoring of blood glucose, or SMBGs) and how to use a blood glucose meter (BGM).  When you are first diagnosed, blood glucose tests should preferably be done before each meal, 2-3 hours after each meal, before bed, in the middle of the night, before and after exercise, and before driving.  Here are a few tips for testing your blood glucose:

  • Before testing: Remember to follow the directions on your BGM. Be sure to set the date and time on your meter, have working and backup batteries, and keep all testing supplies away from extreme temperatures.
  • During testing: Make sure your hands are clean and dry. Put a new lancet in the lancing device and put the test strip in the meter. Poke the side (not the middle) of your finger with the lancing device so you maintain more feeling in your finger. Touch the blood droplet to the test strip allowing the BGM to read the glucose value.
  • After testing: Always throw away the lancet into a labeled “sharps container.” Write down the reading to keep a record of your blood sugar trends or review the stored data in the machine or on your computer; this will help you and your healthcare team recognize glucose patterns to more effectively manage your diabetes.

Continuous glucose monitoring devices (CGMs) are a more recent and convenient way to track glucose levels. A sensor that measures glucose (either through the same enzymatic reaction used by the BGM or through a fluorescent technique) is placed in the fatty tissue under the skin in the same place you give insulin shots, or where the insulin pump catheter is placed. Depending on which CGM is used, the sensor lasts either 7 days, 10 days, 14 days, or 90 days. These sensors measure glucose every five minutes and transmit the real-time glucose readings, a trend graph, and alerts to a smartphone or monitoring device. The data is stored in the monitoring device or in the data cloud so that you and your healthcare team can analyze it (if you give your healthcare professional permission to access it). CGM data can also be sent in real time to one or more care partners’ smartphones so they can help with your diabetes management. CGM is a powerful tool that many believe everyone with diabetes should be able to use, including those who are newly diagnosed; however, this technology is still not widely accessible or affordable.

The goal for using any of these devices is to assess the glucose value, and if it is not in your target range, to consider taking some action. If the glucose value is high, it might mean you should take a correction dose of insulin. If the glucose value is low, take oral glucose to bring it back up to the desired range (above 70 mg/dL). Ultimately, you’ll aim to have as many of the glucose measurements in the range of 70-180 mg/dL as possible.  With a CGM – which gets up to 288 glucose measurements a day – the goal is to have 70% of glucose levels in the target range of 70-180 mg/dL (referred to as Time in Range, or TIR). Seventy percent of glucose values is equal to about 16 or 17 hours per day spent in range.

  1. What are the types of insulins and insulin regimens?

It is essential that people with type 1 diabetes take insulin. The insulin can be taken by injection with a pen or syringe, through an insulin pump, or through inhalation. For people with type 1 diabetes, insulin is usually taken multiple times a day. There are many different types of insulin and many different ways to take insulin. Similar to how insulin would work in the body if diabetes wasn’t present, a common way to take insulin is called “basal-bolus insulin.” Basal (long-acting) insulin is considered a “background insulin,” as it is designed for 1-2 daily injections, and it helps the body balance glucose between meals and overnight. Bolus (rapid-acting) insulin acts over a much shorter time period, around 3-4 hours, and should be taken before meals and to correct high glucose levels.

Basal-bolus insulin means you take one or two injections of a basal insulin per day, and you take bolus insulin every time you eat carbohydrates or need a correction dose of insulin for a high glucose level. Some healthcare professionals have people newly diagnosed with diabetes start on a “fixed” insulin regimen – the basal insulin is taken the same way, but you eat a set amount of carbohydrate at each meal with a set dosage of insulin. The advantage of the basal-bolus regimen is flexibility in what you eat and when. The advantage of the fixed regimen is you are usually given a specific meal plan with information on how to substitute one carbohydrate choice for another – you don’t have to be an expert in carbohydrate (“carb”) counting right away, but hopefully you will master it over time. Talk to your healthcare team about which insulin regimen might be best for you and your lifestyle.

  1. How do I take insulin?

To inject insulin, you will use either a pen or a syringe. Make sure to store your insulin in the refrigerator before opening, and at room temperature after opening. Here are some best practices for administering insulin injections:

  • Wash your hands and inspect the pen or syringe. Check that you have the right type of insulin, that it is not expired, and that there are no cracks or unusual qualities to the vial or in the liquid.
  • Label the date that you open your insulin.
  • Rotate the location of injection between the arms, abdomen, legs, hips, and butt, and try not to use the exact same spot in each location. Varying the site of injection will help keep scar tissue and excess fatty tissue from developing.

Insulin pumps are small machines (the size of a deck of cards or smaller) that deliver only rapid-acting insulin; no long-acting insulin is given. The pump delivers insulin directly under your skin without the need for multiple injections each day. There are many types of insulin pumps with various features. Some can be paired with a CGM for automated insulin delivery (AID, also called closed loop or artificial pancreas). Many people are started on insulin pumps weeks or months after diagnosis, but others choose to wait much longer, or to never use an insulin pump at all. If you are interested in an insulin pump, talk with your support network and your healthcare team to determine what type of insulin pump system might be best for you.

  1. How are my basal and bolus doses determined?

In the beginning, you should have frequent contact with your healthcare team to adjust your insulin doses. At first you might need to change your doses almost on a daily basis, but later on, dose adjustment is usually not done unless a pattern lasts at least three days.

  • Basal insulin dose adjustments: Basal doses are in large part determined by your morning glucose levels before breakfast (fasting glucose). The goal of basal insulin is to allow you to wake up with a glucose level between of 80-130 mg/dL, without hypoglycemia (low glucose) or hyperglycemia (high glucose) during the night. Basal insulin also helps maintain glucose levels between meals and if you skip a meal.
  • Bolus insulin dose adjustments:
    • Insulin to Carbohydrate Ratio (ICR): Your ICR is the specific amount of insulin you take for every gram of carbohydrate you eat. In other words, how many grams of glucose are covered by one unit of insulin. You may be told to take your meal insulin at least 15 minutes before you start eating. The American Diabetes Association recommends that your glucose level be less than 180 mg/dL for 1-2 hours after your meal. You should then be back to your premeal value after four hours, without hypoglycemia.
    • Correction bolus insulin: This is taken when the glucose level is higher than the target glucose level of 180 mg/dL. Correction insulin is used to manage high glucose levels before and 3-4 hours after meals, or when hyperglycemia develops during the day or night. For most people, a correction dose of insulin should not be taken for three hours after the last insulin injection. You also need to be careful about correction insulin before exercise or bedtime unless otherwise instructed by your healthcare team.  A correction dose should bring your glucose level back to the target range within three hours, without dipping below 70 mg/dL.

Know that your insulin needs will likely change over time after you are first diagnosed with diabetes. Your basal amount, your insulin to carbohydrate ratio, and the amount you take for correction boluses will all change first with the “honeymoon” or remission phase of diabetes. After that they will change with growth, illness, weight change, aging, or a variety of other factors that can affect how sensitive your body is to insulin.

  1. What is the remission or honeymoon phase of diabetes?

Often after diagnosis and the initiation of insulin therapy, people with type 1 diabetes enter a honeymoon period. This occurs because some insulin-producing cells in the pancreas begin to function again – and make insulin. This means that you’ll be able to decrease the basal and bolus doses of insulin you are taking. Occasionally, someone can get down to a very low dose of insulin each day. It is best not to stop taking insulin altogether, even if it means you only take a very small amount of basal insulin. Unfortunately, the honeymoon period does not last forever, and glucose levels begin to rise again, at which time insulin doses may need to be increased.

There has been a national effort to identify newly diagnosed individuals with type 1 diabetes and tell them about studies designed for people with new onset, including the National Institutes of Health TrialNet study. diaTribe writes about clinical trials here. Please look into research being done and discuss this with your healthcare team if you are interested in being part of the effort to better understand type 1 diabetes and ways to try to preserve insulin-producing cells.

  1. How can I take charge and best support my health? 
  • Focus on how you are feeling – mentally and physically. Identify your challenges, find helpful resources, and get answers to your questions.
  • Put together your team of supporters – your healthcare team, your family and friends, and your co-workers.
  • Think of the overall mission – to successfully manage your diabetes and realize all your life dreams and goals. Master the day-to-day tasks, like how to check your glucose levels, take insulin, balance glucose levels, food, and activity, return to school or work, and stay healthy today and into the future. This is a marathon – give yourself time to adjust, learn, and thrive.

Reach out when you need help, and encourage your support team to do the same – there is a world of resources: doctors, nurses, nutritionists, mental health professionals, coaches, articles, books, videos, websites, associations, and organizations all waiting to help you. diaTribe is one of them.

About Fran

Dr. Fran Kaufman is the Chief Medical Officer of Senseonics, Inc. She is a Distinguished Professor Emerita of Pediatrics and Communications at the Keck School of Medicine and the Annenberg School of Communications at the University of Southern California.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Interpretation and Management of Hyperglycemia and Exercise

This content originally appeared on Diabetes Motion. Republished with permission.In some circumstances, elevated blood glucose levels can be indicative of medical concerns like insulin deficiency. People with type 1 diabetes are more susceptible to insulin deficiency since they have almost no ability to produce any insulin; therefore, they need to receive instruction on why and […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes, Just Tell Me!

This content originally appeared on Test Guess and Go. Republished with permission.Lately, I have been having days, well actually weeks when I am starting to question how I deal with my diabetes. I have used an insulin pump for 15 years and don’t really want to change back to injections. For me a pump is […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes Care from Parent to Child: Passing the Torch of Care

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.By Kerri Sparling Transitioning care from parent to child can be a stressful time for families with diabetes – six strategies on how to reduce the burden  Transitioning from my parents being in charge of my diabetes to assuming full care myself didn’t happen overnight. It was a […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

What Do “Healthy” Blood Glucose Levels Really Look Like?

What is normal blood glucose? In children and adults, ideally, blood sugar levels are tightly-regulated to stay in a narrow range that’s optimal for physiological function. What are these levels, and how much of a glucose excursion is “normal”? Notably, there are some transient exceptions to the accepted “normal range”. In particular, women tend to […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

How to Reduce Urinary Complications of Type 1 Diabetes

This content originally appeared on Integrated Diabetes Services. Republished with permission.Frequency, Impact and Prevention of Urologic Complications of Type 1 Diabetes There are some very widely talked about and avoided complications of type 1 diabetes (T1D) such as retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. However, there are other complications that get relatively little notice but […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Dexcom G6: Giving it a Whirl

This content originally appeared on There’s More to the Story. Republished with permission.My delay in this post? I haven’t been in a blog writing or social media mood (more on that to come!) Well. I did it–I did in fact switch to the Dexcom G6! I can just hear the gasps and see the shocked faces. […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Bolus Breakdown: Waffle Edition

This content originally appeared on Arden’s Day and the Juicebox Podcast. Republished with permission. Insulin Is About Timing and Amount… Listeners of my podcast hear me say all of the time that type 1 diabetes is about understanding how insulin works in you. With that understanding, you can make good decisions about the timing of […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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