Book Review: Actually, I Can.: Growing Up with Type 1 Diabetes, A Story of Unexpected Empowerment

Morgan J. Panzirer is 19 years old and is a student at Villanova University, majoring in biology and minoring in Spanish. She was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age six and is now working towards her goals of attending medical school and becoming a pediatric endocrinologist.

She recently published a book called “Actually, I Can.: Growing Up with Type 1 Diabetes, A Story of Unexpected Empowerment”. As with all our book reviews, I received a copy of the text at no charge, and I did not receive any additional compensation for my review.

There are many short chapters, as the author walks us through her life with diabetes, highlighting the highs and the lows of her experience in relatable and vivid ways. She shares her positive revelations, as well as frustrations. I think this text is a good read for young people with type 1 diabetes, and especially those who are newly diagnosed. Morgan’s story is really a wonderful example of making lemonade out of lemons, and will sure be inspirational to many.

The title of the book, “Actually, I can” refers to the common assumption that people with diabetes cannot eat sugar. The author explains,

“I can eat anything I want and it doesn’t have to be sugar-free as long as I give myself the proper amount of insulin. There is no special diet I have to follow. I can eat literally anything I want to. Sorry, that sounds super aggressive but I can’t tell you how many times people assume everything I eat has to be sugar-free. It is incredibly frustrating.”

Morgan writes with great candor and a sense of humor, and I can’t imagine her stories wouldn’t be relatable to almost any young person with type 1 diabetes. The author’s upbeat attitude about living with the chronic and challenging health condition comes across throughout the entirety of the text. While she is very honest about the gravity of the disease and the difficulties of living with something so relentless day in and day out, she is also incredibly optimistic.

“The, “Oh my life sucks because I have this disease” attitude is not the one to live by. It is so much more empowering to think about it this way: “Yes this disease sucks, it is such a pain in the ass, and has had such an impact on my everyday life, but look at the kind of person it’s made me.” Make it into a positive. Not everything in your life has to be negative all of the time. This was something I had to learn because I was, like most, only seeing the negative. Just remember: there’s always a positive. No matter how deep it’s buried, I promise you it’s there. There is a reason that you’re in the situation you are right now. Whether it’s to better yourself or educate others, there is reasoning behind it. You may not understand why your life is hell now, but you will later. You have to trust me on that.”

In short, Panzirer’s book is honest and relatable about growing up with type 1 diabetes. It strikes the right balance of acknowledging the gravity and hardships of the condition with a great optimism and empowerment.

What has been your experience with type 1 diabetes? Please share your thoughts below, we love hearing from our readers.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

The World’s Worst Diabetes Mom: A Book Review

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Alexi Melvin

Familiar Face

If you have been an active (or even not so active) follower of the type 1 diabetes (T1D) online community in the past few years, you have likely heard of Stacey Simms. Stacey is a radio host, T1D mom and blogger turned host of the popular podcast Diabetes Connections.

But recently, she’s added a new title to her repertoire: author. Her new book, “The World’s Worst Diabetes Mom,” is currently available for pre-order.

“This isn’t the book I set out to write,” Stacey immediately notes in the introduction. What was initially intended to be a book based on past blog posts turned into something much more unique when measured against other diabetes-related books that came before this one. After an offensive comment made against her parenting skills on social media, Stacey realized that she needed to write a book that acknowledges not just the T1D successes in life, but perhaps moments of pure screw-up that all who deal with diabetes know too well.

This is exactly what Stacey’s book does — and beautifully so. “The World’s Worst Diabetes Mom” does not glamorize the life of a parent of a child with type 1 diabetes or the struggles of a child. The book, in a way, celebrates that the idea of perfection is simply not a “thing” that can be attained while managing type 1 diabetes. Stacey is unapologetic and honest about the lessons she has learned as a T1D parent in a way that makes the reader — whether a parent themselves or a person with type 1 recalling their own early experiences — feel a lot less alone.

Book Review

Image source: Beyond Type 1

Stacey’s charmingly relatable book is organized into chapters based on type 1 milestones in her family’s life and other applicable issues such as: The First Night Home, Pump Start, On-the-Road Adventures, Summer Camp and Social Media Support. The T1D mom takes good care to emphasize that her opinions and experiences are not to be taken as medical advice, and she even includes “Ask your doctor” sections with helpful tips for what to address with your doctor with regard to each preceding chapter.

What Makes It Enjoyable

Although there are many stories and perspectives from people who have been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes available to us today, this book is an important window into the somewhat unexplored life of a T1D caregiver.

Every parent with a child who has type 1 diabetes will undoubtedly remember instances exactly like, or at least very similar to, the ones that Stacey recalls in each of these chapters about learning to manage her son Benny’s T1D, who was diagnosed just before he turned 2. And, even if the reader’s child was diagnosed at a much later age, the emotions that tie into each story – i.e. feelings of inadequacy or failure but ultimately becoming stronger for it – will resonate hugely.

Although the book is written by a T1D parent, people who have type 1 themselves will likely relate to the many moments of confusion and frustration, and will appreciate Stacey’s consistent ability to laugh along the way while always taking the topics seriously.

In this day and age where social media status reigns supreme even in the T1D realm, it is refreshing to read a book that encourages parents, caregivers and T1Ds themselves to resist the pressure to get it right every time. Stacey’s book is hinged on the idea that life is a journey, and that there will be bumps, and that regardless of how many bumps, it is your road to navigate. It’s about the journey.

About the Author:

Stacey Simms hosts the award‐winning podcast “Diabetes Connections,” after having hosted “Charlotte’s Morning News” radio show for many years. She has been named one of Diabetes Forecast’s People to Know, the Charlotte Business Journal’s 40 Under 40, and Mecklenburg Times’ 50 Most Influential Women. She lives near Charlotte, North Carolina, with her husband, two children, and their dog, Freckles.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Tested: Book to Inspire People With Type 1 Diabetes into Action

Tim Hoy, an author of several books, has written a book for people with diabetes called Tested. He was diagnosed in 1976 and has lived with type 1 diabetes for 43 years. Tim grew up in a small rural community in New Zealand and in his own words has “gone on to enjoy an amazing […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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