Making the Most of CGM: Uncover the Magic of Your Ambulatory Glucose Profile

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Cindy Takigawa and Frida Velcani

What’s an AGP report, and what does it show? Why does my AGP matter? How can I use an AGP report to improve my blood glucose levels and time in range?

Having diabetes is a full-time job: you have to simultaneously monitor your diet, activity, stress, and even sleep. On top of that, you need to calculate and manage the number of carbs you consume in each meal, and keep careful tabs on your blood sugar levels. The Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP) report, developed by the International Diabetes Center, is a tool that provides a simplified way to look at data on your blood glucose patterns and trends. It has been recognized as a standard of care for reporting continuous glucose monitor (CGM) data by the American Diabetes Association. In this article, we explain what an AGP report is and how you can use the information to help you navigate your diabetes management.

CGM App

Image source: diaTribe

What is an ambulatory glucose profile report?

An AGP report is a standardized, single-page report that includes glucose statistics like time in range, a summary glucose profile, and daily glucose graphs. It converts blood glucose readings from a CGM device into a detailed picture, allowing you to quickly visualize the time you spend above and below your target range. The report is based on at least seven days of CGM data, with 14 days of data (or more) considered ideal. Currently, many CGMs include a version of the AGP report in their devices and reporting software.

An AGP report that summarizes data provided by self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is currently being developed. This article focuses on CGM AGP reports.

Why does my ambulatory glucose profile matter?

The AGP report is the same no matter what device you use – it allows your healthcare team to assess blood glucose levels and trends in a standard way for everyone they see. Below you’ll find sample AGP reports from Abbott, Dexcom, and Senseonics.

The AGP report shows patterns in a user-friendly way so that people with diabetes can easily identify the times of day when glucose levels are consistently low, high, or fluctuating. The general goal for people with diabetes is to have their glucose levels stay within the target range of 70 to 180 mg/dL for at least 70% of the day, spending less than 4% of their time in hypoglycemia (under 70 mg/dL). The information from an AGP report can help you have a discussion with your healthcare team about goals for your diabetes management and ways you can achieve them. The data offered by this report can help make your care far more precise and effective.

What exactly does your AGP show?

The standard AGP (designed by the International Diabetes Center and shown above) will show your data like this:

  • Glucose Statistics and Targets: This section displays metrics including average glucose, glucose variability, and Glucose Management Indicator (GMI), which can be thought of as your predicted A1C. It also includes the dates and number of days in the report, as well as the percent of time that the CGM was used to collect data. While time in range goals can be individualized, the expert-defined goals for various groups of people with diabetes can be found in this section. You can read more about time in range targets here.
  • Time in Ranges: This color-coded bar chart helps you visualize the percentage of time spent above and below your target range.
  • Ambulatory Glucose Profile: This graph combines all of your glucose readings over time to display your trends across a 24-hour period. At the end of this article you can find examples of what this will look like for your specific CGM.
    • Black line: the median of all the readings. Half of your glucose values are above the middle black line and half are below.
    • Green lines: this is your target glucose range.
    • Dark blue area: 50% of glucose values lie in this area.
    • Light blue area: 90% of glucose values lie in this area. This percentage may differ between AGP reports. The International Diabetes Center report includes 90% of glucose values, while the Eversense report shows 80% of glucose values.
    • Dotted blue lines: 5% of the highest and lowest glucose values are above and below this line, respectively.
  • Daily Glucose Profiles: Each box shows your glucose pattern from a single day.
    • Yellow area: instances of high glucose (hyperglycemia).
    • Red area: instances of low glucose (hypoglycemia).

How can I interpret an ambulatory glucose profile report?

An AGP report combines several days of blood glucose readings into one snapshot. Once you have identified daily patterns, you can work with your healthcare team to adjust your medications and insulin dosing to spend more time in range. You may also discuss timing of food or physical activity, what you are eating, or ways to reduce stress. Here are some steps you can take to understand your data:

1.     Look at your time in range. The goal is to shift the numbers into the 70 – 180 mg/dl target range while having fewer lows and extreme highs. Each AGP report includes a bar chart of your time in range; one way to see this goal in action is to aim for more “green” and less “red” on the bar chart.

2.    Keep track of the usual times you wake up, go to sleep, eat meals and snacks, and are physically active. Food, activity, medication doses, and dozens of other factors can affect your blood glucose levels. Recording these activities and their timing will help you understand your AGP report and the patterns you see.

3.    Identify times when your glucose levels are lowest and highest, and look for times of more variability. Speak with your healthcare professional about what factors may be causing highs, lows, and variability in your AGP and how you can reduce them. The wider the shaded blue areas on your report, the more variability there is in your glucose levels.

4.    If you can, compare your current and past AGP reports, and create an action plan with your healthcare team. What strategies did you use previously to make changes? Identify a few steps to improve your glucose patterns moving forward.

To learn more about how people with diabetes and healthcare professionals can use AGP, click here. For more resources on time in range, check out diaTribe’s comprehensive library here.

Abbott AGP

CGM App

Image source: diaTribe

Dexcom AGP

Dexcom

Image source: diaTribe

Eversense AGP

AGP

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Source: diabetesdaily.com

Working with Your Healthcare Team to Achieve Your Time in Range Goals: An Interview with Cleveland Clinic’s Dr. Diana Isaacs

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Frida Velcani

Dr. Diana Isaacs on improving time in range, making the most of your data, and the barriers facing people with diabetes and their healthcare teams

Dr. Diana Isaacs is a Clinical Pharmacist and Diabetes Care and Education Specialist at the Cleveland Clinic. She works with people with diabetes on a range of issues, including medications, technology, and lifestyle changes. She also educates people every day about the benefits of time in range.

In addition, Dr. Isaacs is the coordinator for the Cleveland Clinic’s continuous glucose monitor (CGM) program. You can find more information on how to choose a CGM here. We continue to think that CGM is of the utmost importance for helping people keep their blood glucose levels in-range, assuming they have access. Dr. Isaacs meets with 200 people every month, through individual appointments, classes, phone follow-ups, and virtual visits. She also works with other healthcare providers, including nurses, nurse practitioners, dietitians, and physicians.

For this article, we spoke with her to better understand her views on the importance of time in range for people with diabetes. Here are her insights on how we can shift away from using A1C and move everyone toward better health.

Dr. Isaacs on Ways to Improve Time in Range, Setting Target Goals, and Celebrating the “Wins” 

We asked Dr. Isaacs to pinpoint the most important things that people can do to improve their time in range. “Work with your diabetes care and education specialist and healthcare team to interpret CGM data, understand patterns, and optimize medication doses,” she said. When reviewing data, it’s important to keep a positive attitude and focus on the successes. Repeat what worked well on the days when your time in range was the highest. Figure out what is causing the lows (which often lead to rebound highs) and work to prevent them.

Dr. Isaacs wants people to know that having high glucose variability is completely normal. Many people have the misconception that they should be spending 100% time in range. In reality, time-in-range goals are different for each individual depending on factors such as medication, age, and type of diabetes. Experts recommend that people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes aim to spend at least 70% of the day within 70 to 180 mg/dl, less than 4% of the day below 70 mg/dl, and less than 25% above 180 mg/dl. However, experts emphasize that even a 5% change in time in range – for example, going from 60% to 65% – is meaningful, as that translates to one more hour per day spent in-range.

“I’ve seen everything from 0% to 100% time in range,” she said. “There are differences when comparing someone who is new to our clinic compared to someone working with us for a year. It’s so individualized, and people have different challenges. The goal is to improve your personal time in range, and any increase in time in range is a win.”

Measuring Time in Range using Blood Glucose Meters, CGM, and Professional CGM

If you are using a blood glucose meter (BGM) or CGM, talk with your healthcare team about your glucose targets. The data will be more meaningful if you are working toward a specific goal.

For BGM users, paired testing can help you see the direct impact of food on your blood glucose – all you have to do is check your glucose before a meal and again two hours after the meal. To check that your basal insulin is working well, check your glucose levels before bed and first thing in the morning.

At the Cleveland Clinic, people are required to attend a two-part shared appointment to get access to professional CGM. The classes are usually two diabetes care and education specialists (pharmacist and dietitian or nurse) and 4-6 people with diabetes.

In part one, you go over glucose targets, time in range, and how to treat high and low blood sugars. In part two, you download the data and review it with your diabetes care and education specialists. You discuss what it means, find patterns, and make medication adjustments as needed. This class is offered five times per month. Dr. Isaacs says that this program has helped many people improve their A1C (an average 0.8% reduction) and diabetes self-management.

How can we make time in range accessible to people with diabetes and their healthcare teams?

Dr. Isaacs believes that everyone should have access to affordable medications, affordable technology, and a great support system. She says, “I’ve seen so much rationing of insulin and medications, especially in the Medicare and uninsured populations.” There are many people that have diabetes and haven’t connected with their healthcare team in years. We need to do a better job to help these people.

According to Dr. Isaacs, the average healthcare professional is not prepared to talk about time in range. A1C has been and continues to be widely used by most healthcare teams. While she is excited about the growing use of CGM, there are “still some hurdles to get all practices up to speed with how to download the devices and interpret the data.”

Her advice is to tackle these barriers from multiple angles:

  • In research, we need to make sure that time in range is an outcome in all clinical trials that measure glycemic management, so that we can directly measure the effect of time in range on clinical outcomes.
  • We need targeted education for busy healthcare professionals, including podcasts, webinars, and continuing education.
  • We need targeted education for people with diabetes who are often the ones bringing information to their healthcare team.
  • In practice, healthcare professionals should discuss time in range with every person with diabetes that is using CGM.
  • People with diabetes using CGM should be encouraged to bring their reports to their healthcare provider and discuss time in range.
  • Instead of only marketing CGM as a convenient way to reduce finger sticks (which is true), the real benefit is that it lets the person with diabetes be the driver, and time in range is their roadmap.

Dr. Isaacs recently spoke on a panel at the ADA post-graduate sessions about the power of time in range and CGM for all people with diabetes. She was joined by diaTribe’s medical advisory board member, Dr. Irl Hirsch, our editor-in-chief, Kelly Close, and Jane Kadohiro as the moderator, who herself has had diabetes for over 50 years. If you or your healthcare provider are interested in learning more about time in range and downloading CGM data, you can make an account and watch the session here!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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