Want to Try Continuous Glucose Monitoring?

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Eliza Skoler and Albert Cai

The Hello Dexcom 10-day sample kit includes a Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitor, instructions for set up, and guidance for getting the most out of your glucose data. Ask your healthcare team to order the device for you in the US or Canada.

Have you heard about continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for people with diabetes, but aren’t sure if it’s right for you? Dexcom’s new CGM sample program, Hello Dexcom, allows people with diabetes who take insulin to try out the Dexcom G6 CGM for 10 days in the US or Canada. Through Hello Dexcom, healthcare professionals can provide people with a free one-time sample of the technology, along with full instructions for set up and information on using and understanding their glucose data. All packaged in one small box, the program is designed so that people can start using the technology and interpreting their glucose levels on their own and from their home.

Continuous glucose monitors measure the body’s glucose (or sugar) levels in real-time by sensing the glucose present in tissue fluid under the skin. The Dexcom G6 CGM measures glucose levels every five minutes – this means that you can get 288 glucose readings a day without fingerstick blood sugar checks.

Dexcom G6

Image source: diaTribe

We got a sample in the mail and checked it out for you. Here’s what the Hello Dexcom kit includes:

  • A G6 CGM sensor, transmitter, and applicator
  • Easy-to-follow instructions on how to insert the sensor
  • Simple instructions for downloading the Dexcom G6 and Dexcom Clarity apps
  • An online portal with support and Frequently Asked Questions
  • A digital “10-day journey of empowerment” to teach you about the features of the G6 and to help you interpret CGM data. The 10-day course involves:
    • logging events and becoming familiar with the G6 and Clarity apps
    • adjusting alert settings
    • learning from meals
    • reviewing data through Dexcom Clarity
  • A printed guide to using your G6, with information alarms, treatment decisions, troubleshooting, and more
  • Note: the kit does not include a separate sensor reader, so only people with a smartphone (Apple or Android) can use this program.
Dexcom G6

Image source: diaTribe

Eliza got to try out the new product – here’s what she thought: All in all, I opened the box, read the instructions, and activated the online portal in less than ten minutes. The step-by-step set up instructions were straightforward and included illustrations, and I felt quite comfortable going through the process on my own. After I downloaded the Dexcom G6 app and made a Dexcom account, there were videos to help me insert the sensor and activate the transmitter.

If you’re curious about CGM, ask your healthcare professional if you can get Hello Dexcom – you can send our article their way. Healthcare professionals can learn more about the program and order Hello Dexcom sample kits here. To learn more about CGM – how it works, its benefits and considerations, what the data means, and stories from user – check out this CGM pocket guide.

For more try-before-you-buy diabetes technology, learn about the free Omnipod DASH insulin pump trial.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

New Dexcom Update: Your G7 Questions Answered

Last month, we chatted with Jake Leach, Dexcom’s chief technology officer (CTO) to get the latest scoop on the release timeline and new features of the Dexcom G7 continuous glucose monitor (CGM), a highly-anticipated diabetes technology that will be released in 2021. Many follow-up questions from our readers prompted us to follow-up further.

Without further adieu, here are your questions about the G7 answered:

There is no calibration, correct?

“This is correct.”

What about pharmacy vs. supplier distribution for the G7?

“We continue to focus on making CGM more accessible and easier to obtain for patients. Pharmacy is our preferred distribution channel and we have expanded pharmacy access for Dexcom CGM by nearly 80% since December 2018. This strategy will not change for G7.”

Now that the product is disposable, would this no longer be considered durable medical equipment (DME) and thus covered differently by insurance companies?

“The disposable aspect of the product has no impact on reimbursement.”

Do you anticipate working on integration with all the major pump companies?

“As the first iCGM on the market, and still the only one indicated for use with automated insulin delivery systems, Dexcom G6 is the forerunner in the category of interoperability and are advocates of patient choice in insulin delivery. G7 will be no different. With Insulet’s Omnipod 5 preparing for a first half of 2021 launch, we feel that our leadership in this category will result in us having integrations with the leading tethered pump on the market in Tandem’s Control.IQ, and the leading tubeless pump in Omnipod 5.

We are also very excited about the development progress that Lilly and Novo Nordisk are making in their Bluetooth connected smart pen technology and we continue to believe that the solutions we’re working on with those two teams will enable significant improvements in the user experience and ease the burden of diabetes in the MDI population, which represents the vast majority of intensive insulin users across the world.

Two years ago we stated that we believe that by 2023, 50% of our insulin intensive customer base will be using a connected insulin delivery device in combination with our CGM, and we believe that we are on track to hit that mark. Connected systems are truly the future of diabetes technology and we are working to extend our leadership in the category with these key partners and the tools that we have created to support these integrations, including our Dexcom artificial pancreas algorithm technology.”

Is there any evolution with the readout frequency (to be more frequent than every 5 minutes)?

“Patients and [providers] both tell us there isn’t a need for CGM systems to provide a glucose readout more frequently than every five minutes. This is especially true since Dexcom CGM has an Urgent Low Soon predictive alert that can warn users 20 minutes in advance of a severe hypoglycemic event (55 mg/dL), which helps give them time to take appropriate action before an event occurs.

Will G7 be approved for different wear locations (besides the abdomen)?

“We are conducting pivotal trials with the G7 in multiple wear locations, including abdomen and upper arm.”

Dexcom G7

Image source: Dexcom

In addition, Jake Leach had the following to say, highlighting his enthusiasm for the new developments:

“With G7, we’ve taken all of the great features that we’ve established with G6, features that have resulted in market-leading patient satisfaction scores, and have made them even better. G7 is a real time, factory calibrated continuous glucose monitor with iCGM level performance, a simplified application and start-up process, and a faster sensor warm-up time. We’ve packaged all of this into a fully disposable form-factor that is 60% smaller than our current G6 wearable and introduces significant cost reductions across the manufacturing process. This G7 wearable technology is paired with a brand-new app experience that includes real time glucose information combined with personalized insights designed to further enhance the unique value users get from Dexcom CGM. Take all of these features together and you can understand why we are so excited about G7 as a key driver of the growth story that we’ve laid out today.”

Are you excited to test drive the G7 CGM? Please share your thoughts in the comments!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Dexcom’s Chief Technology Officer Reveals Updates on the G7

We are almost through to the end of this year and we are all looking forward to new diabetes technologies coming out in 2021! Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology is an incredibly useful tool that can improve diabetes management, and the release of Dexcom’s new CGM, the G7 is certainly one to look out for. For me, the sheer difference in size alone (the G7 will be about the size of a quarter, certainly an improvement over the G6!) is something to get excited about. Moreover, the company has completely redesigned the product, which will now be completely disposable, as opposed to previous iterations that included a reusable transmitter.

I recently talked to Dexcom’s Chief Technology Officer, Jake Leach to get the most recent scoop on what’s to come with the release of the highly anticipated new product.

When Will the G7 be Released?

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the start of clinical trials was delayed. Leach explained that the company used that time to integrate in even more technology with the G7. Clinical studies needed to get FDA approval for the G7 are currently in the process of getting started. Although they could not disclose specific details on timing, Dexcom confirmed that will see the product come to market in 2021. A broader launch is expected to come in 2022.

What About the Accuracy?

Dexcom has taken a lot of technologies of the G6 and made improvements on them. It will need to meet stringent accuracy requirements to be approved by the FDA. It is expected that the product will perform well and offer improvements over existing technologies.

What About the Wear Time?

Currently, the Dexcom G6 is approved for 10-day wear. However, many users try to circumnavigate this. Dexcom’s CTO had this to say about advancements for the G7:

“The platform is designed to extend the wear beyond 10 days, so the electronics, etc. are compatible with that. We are striving for a very high level of reliability for both the sensor and the adhesive patch. [So far, early studies have shown that] the right time frame for our customers is 10 days with this product, but we do intend to continue working to expand both the sensor and adhesive performance to go beyond 10 days. We feel that our customers deserve a sensor that is highly reliable for the full wear duration, and so 10 days is where we’re at with G7.

What About the Cost?

“We know that for CGM to be accessed by many many people, we need to continue to remove cost from the general system. So, G7 is designed to be highly manufacturable in very large volumes. We have our first G7 line up and running. We are using a fully automated assembly line. The product is not only highly reliable but also lower cost to manufacture. Providing users with the product that is disposable, there were hurdles that we had to overcome in engineering, to be able to provide a product where you are throwing away more components, but we are able to do that at a cost-point equal to or lower than G6.”

What About the Sensor Insertion?

The sensor insertion will be fully automated. Dexcom stated that the product will be even easier to apply than the G6, and that the applicator will be much smaller than the G6, reducing the environmental footprint.

“We specifically designed it to be as small as possible [but still large enough to ensure a comfortable insertion process]. Definitely smaller than G6…”

What About the Adhesive?

In the diabetes online community, I have recently been hearing more reports of adhesive-related allergic skin reactions, and speculations that perhaps there was a change in the adhesive formula being used. Here is what Dexcom had to say about that:

“Some very small number of users do have issues with irritation, and there is a number of different ways that can be addressed. It’s a balance between the adhesive properties of making the sensor stay on for the full duration and there are so trade-offs with irritation. We are very focused on minimizing irritation. We have made improvements to the patch where many users are seeing their sensors last longer, but we have seen a small number of irritation complaints and we are focused on [for both the G6 and the G7] always making improvements. We are focused on investigating what possibly could be causing these irritant properties. The G7 does have a different adhesive than G6 and we are looking to ensure that [causes] very little, if any, irritation.

What About New Integration with Other Systems?

“The way that we’ve designed our system is so that it can integrate with many different types of systems.”

In addition to integration with the Tandem’s Control IQ and Insulet’s OmniPod system, integration has also been developed for Companion Medical’s InPen as well as over 25 commercially-available apps. Leach also highlighted that as of now, the Dexcom CGM is the only product that has been approved for use with hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery systems.

What About New Predictive Modeling Algorithms?

Recently, Dexcom has partnered with the University of Virginia to conduct research on a variety of automated insulin delivery models and algorithms. Dexcom has also partnered with the European company Ypsomed to further develop CGM integration for automated insulin delivery systems. In addition, Dexcom is working to investigate the use of CGM data, in general, to provide users with key insights on blood glucose trends and potential therapy optimizations.

“Our general approach is to provide many options to our users. We know diabetes is a personal disease and everyone has different opportunities to connect with different devices, and what they feel fits into their lifestyle. We try to support as many options as possible so we do that through the pump integration, as well as the digital ecosystem of the app partners.”

What About the Data Display and Device Compatibility?

“It will be compatible with both Android and iOS. One thing we are doing with the G7 app is we are integrating more insights into the app. So, G6 does a great job of showing glucose information, trends, as well as the ‘urgent low soon’ alert. G7 is taking that even farther and starting to integrate in a lot more of the some of the functionality from Clarity, some of those insights you get will be built into the G7.”

Dexcom is also working to enhance some features of their apps for data sharing with support people and clinicians. In addition, a receiver will still be a part of the new system, for those users who want an alternative to using their smartphone for data display.

Staying Ahead of the Competition

The CGM market is growing rapidly, with more and more companies coming out with competitive products. We asked Dexcom where they view themselves and what their advantages are over other systems.

“We feel that G7 is going to be a whole new level of comfort and convenience in the CGM ecosystem and the integration that we can build on with both insulin pump partners and the digital ecosystem of  apps… is a significant differentiator between [us] and some of the other competitors. We’ve been providing real-time CGM data since day 1, and we want to continue to expand and improve and provide users with new tools that enable them to take control of diabetes.

Moreover, the use of CGM technology is also expanding in the clinical setting, and Dexcom is a big player there.

“With COVID, we got approval for emergency authorization use for Dexcom CGM in the hospital. During the pandemic, since the beginning, hospitals have been acquiring the G6 from us and using the device in the hospital setting. It has performed very well. It also limited the need for interaction between healthcare providers and the patients [with COVID].”

We thank Jake Leach for taking the time to provide us with the most updated information. Sounds pretty great to us, and we look forward to learning even more and updating our readers as more details come to light!

Do you use a Dexcom CGM? What are your thoughts on the advances in CGM tech? Please share your thoughts in the comments.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

The GMI Spells A New Way to Evaluate Your Glucose Numbers

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Dr. Laurel Messer

Though A1C has long been used as the primary metric for evaluating someone’s estimated average blood sugar, the glucose management indicator (GMI) is an alternative that can provide the same insights without the need for a blood draw. It can also provide this information for much shorter time periods to evaluate lifestyle changes, illnesses, and new medications

For the past four decades, A1C and fingerstick blood sugars have been used to assess diabetes management. A1C (or hemoglobin A1C) measures how much sugar is bound to proteins in red blood cells (called glycated hemoglobin) and provides an estimated measure of glucose levels over a long period of time – the two to three months that red blood cells survive in our bodies.

The A1C does have limitations but is a number that people with diabetes and healthcare professionals are comfortable with and understand how to interpret. The purpose of this article is to show that the Glucose Management Indicator (GMI) is another measure for glycemic management and can be interpreted in a similar way to A1C. GMI is one more tool for the diabetes toolbox – click to learn about another tool, Time in Range.

GMI used to be called the “estimated A1C” or the “eA1C,” because it is meant to approximate an A1C lab value. Instead of being determined by how much sugar is attached to hemoglobin molecules on red blood cells, GMI is calculated directly from the mean (or average) glucose value from a continuous glucose monitoring device (CGM). This means that GMI is a more direct and more accurate measure of glucose levels – it can be calculated for a shorter period of time (the ideal minimum is two weeks), without the need to wait two to three months and to have a laboratory blood draw. Any person wearing a CGM can calculate their GMI in a matter of seconds if they have enough glucose values, and many CGM devices automatically do the calculation using your mean glucose; the calculator can be found here.

To be clear: A GMI can only be calculated if you have a CGM, but if you do have that device, here are the advantages of using GMI.

In addition to providing an additional assessment of glucose values, GMI eliminates misinterpretation of the variance in A1C caused by a number of factors including kidney disease, iron deficiency, sickle cell disease, the use of certain medications, and differences between racial and ethnic groups. Two people could have identical glucose data but different A1C levels depending on their rates of red blood cell survival and glucose attachment to proteins (referred to as glycation), with much more variation within races than between races. However, these same two people would have the same calculated GMI, giving them a more accurate and consistent understanding of their diabetes management and their risk of health complications.

The best feature of GMI (compared to A1C) is that you can (and should!) choose different periods of time to calculate. For example, you can calculate a GMI for the past two weeks, which you cannot do with an A1C, since A1C correlates to glucose levels over the preceding two to three months. Have you ever had an A1C level affected by one week of illness with very high glucose levels? For many people who receive an A1C level at clinical visits two to four times a year, this can be frustrating, as it highlights a time of high glucose values rather than the overall glucose management for that period. Calculating a GMI can be helpful with illness: a clinician or person with diabetes can select a period of time (for example, two weeks) before or after the illness to get a better sense of overall glycemic management that includes or eliminates the period of illness. Time in Range is another helpful metric for understanding glucose levels during a distinct (and even shorter!) time period.

GMI can also be useful to assess the impact of a lifestyle change, like a new diet or exercise regimen, or a medication adjustment. For example, a person could calculate GMI for a two-week period, change diet to lower carbohydrates, and calculate another GMI for the two weeks after the change. This would give a more accurate and immediate indicator of the effect of the change, compared to an A1C measurement drawn at a clinic that cannot focus on the time in question. Another example would be starting a new medication that affects glucose levels. In addition to assessing daily trends in glucose levels, a GMI after one to two weeks on a new medication can provide valuable information on whether medication doses need to be changed.

Finally, in the time of COVID-19 and increased telehealth, GMI is the perfect substitute for a lab-drawn A1C. No blood draw and no in-person clinic visit is required. That said, remember that your GMI may run higher or lower than your lab-drawn A1C for many reasons discussed above – like red blood cell turnover, health conditions, medications, and more.

We encourage you to discuss the use of GMI and CGM with your diabetes healthcare team. GMI can be interpreted the same way as an A1C, but for the reasons stated above, it can also be more accurate and can be used as a tool to determine the effect of illness, lifestyle changes, and medication adjustments. We also hope to help diabetes care professionals become more comfortable with GMI and other CGM-derived glucose metrics, which take in the whole picture of daily glucose control. Next step, Time in Range! (GMI can bridge A1C and Time in Range – but that is another story.)

About Dr. Messer

Dr. Laurel H. Messer, PhD, RN, CDCES, is a nurse scientist and certified diabetes educator at the Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO. She has spent the last 15 years studying how to best utilize new diabetes technologies, and remembers fondly teaching families to wrap up their corded CGM system in a plastic shower bag for bathing. Ok, not that fondly, but look how far we have come! Dr. Messer works with the Barbara Davis Center PANTHER team (Practical Advanced Therapies for diabetes), conducting clinical research trials on promising technologies to make life better for children, adolescents, and adults living with type 1 diabetes. Get in touch at Laurel.Messer@cuanschutz.edu.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

What You Need to Know If You’re Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Dr. Francine Kaufman

If you or your child was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you probably have many questions about how to manage this new condition. Dr. Fran Kaufman explains glucose levels and glucose targets, types of insulin and insulin doses, the honeymoon phase, and more

Were you recently told that you have, or your child has, type 1 diabetes? If so, you were likely filled with emotions, concerns, doubts, and questions. You were probably informed that there are many concepts you have to learn and many tasks you need to master. Hopefully, you were signed up for diabetes education sessions taught by certified diabetes care and education specialists (CDCES). You may have felt like you were on shaky ground; and despite all this, you knew that the sooner you learned how to manage diabetes, the better you would feel. Attitude matters, and the best attitude to have is a positive one – so hopefully you’re learning the tasks to successfully manage your diabetes.

Diabetes is a life-long condition. It is a marathon, not a sprint; no one day, one glucose level, or one meal makes a difference in the long run. One of the main goals of diabetes management is to balance insulin doses, food, and activity to keep your blood sugar or glucose levels in the desired or target range, as much of the time as possible. To do that, first you must know what the glucose targets are and how glucose levels are measured.  You must also understand what types of insulin are available and how they are combined for your insulin regimen. Finally, don’t forget to focus on your feelings, find support, and look to the future.

Click to jump down to a section:

  1. What are the glucose targets at diagnosis and how do they change over time?

Often when someone is first diagnosed, they are advised to keep their glucose levels between 100-200 mg/dL, to avoid hypoglycemia (low glucose) while they learn how to manage their diabetes. But after a few weeks or so, it may be time to bring glucose into the target range of 70-180 mg/dL, with pre-meal glucose between 70-130 mg/dL and post-meal glucose below 180 mg/dl. Before bed, healthcare professionals often recommend a glucose level above 100 mg/dL to help prevent hypoglycemia.

  1. How are glucose levels measured?

It is crucial that everyone diagnosed with type 1 diabetes learns how to perform fingerstick blood glucose measurements (referred to as BGs, fingersticks, self-monitoring of blood glucose, or SMBGs) and how to use a blood glucose meter (BGM).  When you are first diagnosed, blood glucose tests should preferably be done before each meal, 2-3 hours after each meal, before bed, in the middle of the night, before and after exercise, and before driving.  Here are a few tips for testing your blood glucose:

  • Before testing: Remember to follow the directions on your BGM. Be sure to set the date and time on your meter, have working and backup batteries, and keep all testing supplies away from extreme temperatures.
  • During testing: Make sure your hands are clean and dry. Put a new lancet in the lancing device and put the test strip in the meter. Poke the side (not the middle) of your finger with the lancing device so you maintain more feeling in your finger. Touch the blood droplet to the test strip allowing the BGM to read the glucose value.
  • After testing: Always throw away the lancet into a labeled “sharps container.” Write down the reading to keep a record of your blood sugar trends or review the stored data in the machine or on your computer; this will help you and your healthcare team recognize glucose patterns to more effectively manage your diabetes.

Continuous glucose monitoring devices (CGMs) are a more recent and convenient way to track glucose levels. A sensor that measures glucose (either through the same enzymatic reaction used by the BGM or through a fluorescent technique) is placed in the fatty tissue under the skin in the same place you give insulin shots, or where the insulin pump catheter is placed. Depending on which CGM is used, the sensor lasts either 7 days, 10 days, 14 days, or 90 days. These sensors measure glucose every five minutes and transmit the real-time glucose readings, a trend graph, and alerts to a smartphone or monitoring device. The data is stored in the monitoring device or in the data cloud so that you and your healthcare team can analyze it (if you give your healthcare professional permission to access it). CGM data can also be sent in real time to one or more care partners’ smartphones so they can help with your diabetes management. CGM is a powerful tool that many believe everyone with diabetes should be able to use, including those who are newly diagnosed; however, this technology is still not widely accessible or affordable.

The goal for using any of these devices is to assess the glucose value, and if it is not in your target range, to consider taking some action. If the glucose value is high, it might mean you should take a correction dose of insulin. If the glucose value is low, take oral glucose to bring it back up to the desired range (above 70 mg/dL). Ultimately, you’ll aim to have as many of the glucose measurements in the range of 70-180 mg/dL as possible.  With a CGM – which gets up to 288 glucose measurements a day – the goal is to have 70% of glucose levels in the target range of 70-180 mg/dL (referred to as Time in Range, or TIR). Seventy percent of glucose values is equal to about 16 or 17 hours per day spent in range.

  1. What are the types of insulins and insulin regimens?

It is essential that people with type 1 diabetes take insulin. The insulin can be taken by injection with a pen or syringe, through an insulin pump, or through inhalation. For people with type 1 diabetes, insulin is usually taken multiple times a day. There are many different types of insulin and many different ways to take insulin. Similar to how insulin would work in the body if diabetes wasn’t present, a common way to take insulin is called “basal-bolus insulin.” Basal (long-acting) insulin is considered a “background insulin,” as it is designed for 1-2 daily injections, and it helps the body balance glucose between meals and overnight. Bolus (rapid-acting) insulin acts over a much shorter time period, around 3-4 hours, and should be taken before meals and to correct high glucose levels.

Basal-bolus insulin means you take one or two injections of a basal insulin per day, and you take bolus insulin every time you eat carbohydrates or need a correction dose of insulin for a high glucose level. Some healthcare professionals have people newly diagnosed with diabetes start on a “fixed” insulin regimen – the basal insulin is taken the same way, but you eat a set amount of carbohydrate at each meal with a set dosage of insulin. The advantage of the basal-bolus regimen is flexibility in what you eat and when. The advantage of the fixed regimen is you are usually given a specific meal plan with information on how to substitute one carbohydrate choice for another – you don’t have to be an expert in carbohydrate (“carb”) counting right away, but hopefully you will master it over time. Talk to your healthcare team about which insulin regimen might be best for you and your lifestyle.

  1. How do I take insulin?

To inject insulin, you will use either a pen or a syringe. Make sure to store your insulin in the refrigerator before opening, and at room temperature after opening. Here are some best practices for administering insulin injections:

  • Wash your hands and inspect the pen or syringe. Check that you have the right type of insulin, that it is not expired, and that there are no cracks or unusual qualities to the vial or in the liquid.
  • Label the date that you open your insulin.
  • Rotate the location of injection between the arms, abdomen, legs, hips, and butt, and try not to use the exact same spot in each location. Varying the site of injection will help keep scar tissue and excess fatty tissue from developing.

Insulin pumps are small machines (the size of a deck of cards or smaller) that deliver only rapid-acting insulin; no long-acting insulin is given. The pump delivers insulin directly under your skin without the need for multiple injections each day. There are many types of insulin pumps with various features. Some can be paired with a CGM for automated insulin delivery (AID, also called closed loop or artificial pancreas). Many people are started on insulin pumps weeks or months after diagnosis, but others choose to wait much longer, or to never use an insulin pump at all. If you are interested in an insulin pump, talk with your support network and your healthcare team to determine what type of insulin pump system might be best for you.

  1. How are my basal and bolus doses determined?

In the beginning, you should have frequent contact with your healthcare team to adjust your insulin doses. At first you might need to change your doses almost on a daily basis, but later on, dose adjustment is usually not done unless a pattern lasts at least three days.

  • Basal insulin dose adjustments: Basal doses are in large part determined by your morning glucose levels before breakfast (fasting glucose). The goal of basal insulin is to allow you to wake up with a glucose level between of 80-130 mg/dL, without hypoglycemia (low glucose) or hyperglycemia (high glucose) during the night. Basal insulin also helps maintain glucose levels between meals and if you skip a meal.
  • Bolus insulin dose adjustments:
    • Insulin to Carbohydrate Ratio (ICR): Your ICR is the specific amount of insulin you take for every gram of carbohydrate you eat. In other words, how many grams of glucose are covered by one unit of insulin. You may be told to take your meal insulin at least 15 minutes before you start eating. The American Diabetes Association recommends that your glucose level be less than 180 mg/dL for 1-2 hours after your meal. You should then be back to your premeal value after four hours, without hypoglycemia.
    • Correction bolus insulin: This is taken when the glucose level is higher than the target glucose level of 180 mg/dL. Correction insulin is used to manage high glucose levels before and 3-4 hours after meals, or when hyperglycemia develops during the day or night. For most people, a correction dose of insulin should not be taken for three hours after the last insulin injection. You also need to be careful about correction insulin before exercise or bedtime unless otherwise instructed by your healthcare team.  A correction dose should bring your glucose level back to the target range within three hours, without dipping below 70 mg/dL.

Know that your insulin needs will likely change over time after you are first diagnosed with diabetes. Your basal amount, your insulin to carbohydrate ratio, and the amount you take for correction boluses will all change first with the “honeymoon” or remission phase of diabetes. After that they will change with growth, illness, weight change, aging, or a variety of other factors that can affect how sensitive your body is to insulin.

  1. What is the remission or honeymoon phase of diabetes?

Often after diagnosis and the initiation of insulin therapy, people with type 1 diabetes enter a honeymoon period. This occurs because some insulin-producing cells in the pancreas begin to function again – and make insulin. This means that you’ll be able to decrease the basal and bolus doses of insulin you are taking. Occasionally, someone can get down to a very low dose of insulin each day. It is best not to stop taking insulin altogether, even if it means you only take a very small amount of basal insulin. Unfortunately, the honeymoon period does not last forever, and glucose levels begin to rise again, at which time insulin doses may need to be increased.

There has been a national effort to identify newly diagnosed individuals with type 1 diabetes and tell them about studies designed for people with new onset, including the National Institutes of Health TrialNet study. diaTribe writes about clinical trials here. Please look into research being done and discuss this with your healthcare team if you are interested in being part of the effort to better understand type 1 diabetes and ways to try to preserve insulin-producing cells.

  1. How can I take charge and best support my health? 
  • Focus on how you are feeling – mentally and physically. Identify your challenges, find helpful resources, and get answers to your questions.
  • Put together your team of supporters – your healthcare team, your family and friends, and your co-workers.
  • Think of the overall mission – to successfully manage your diabetes and realize all your life dreams and goals. Master the day-to-day tasks, like how to check your glucose levels, take insulin, balance glucose levels, food, and activity, return to school or work, and stay healthy today and into the future. This is a marathon – give yourself time to adjust, learn, and thrive.

Reach out when you need help, and encourage your support team to do the same – there is a world of resources: doctors, nurses, nutritionists, mental health professionals, coaches, articles, books, videos, websites, associations, and organizations all waiting to help you. diaTribe is one of them.

About Fran

Dr. Fran Kaufman is the Chief Medical Officer of Senseonics, Inc. She is a Distinguished Professor Emerita of Pediatrics and Communications at the Keck School of Medicine and the Annenberg School of Communications at the University of Southern California.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes Life Hacks: Tools to Help You Thrive

Living with diabetes is a full-time job and one we never applied for. It can be mentally exhausting and emotionally and physically draining. I know I am always looking for any tips or tip-offs that can help me with my diabetes management–whether it be technology, travel perks, or even a new app that tells me to get my act together.

I asked the diabetes online community to share any and all fun tips and tip-offs that can help make our lives a little bit easier and enjoyable.

Here are the top 9 diabetes hacks that the diabetes online community shared:

Dexcom G6 Sensor

1. Restarting Dexcom Sensors

Did you know that you can extend your Dexcom G6 sensors beyond the 10-day cut off? There are quite a few ways to go about it depending on your transmitter code. You can find the right method to use here. This will save you a few pricks and pokes and some money too.

2. Free Admission to National Parks

People living with diabetes (or any other condition that falls under disability) can apply for free lifetime access to US national parks. You can obtain your pass through the mail which involves a $10 dollar processing fee, or you can get it in person to avoid the extra charge. This is a great perk that everyone should take advantage of at some point in their lifetime!

Sulli the Diabetes Guru

3. Sulli the Diabetes Guru

Roche Diabetes Care created a voice-activated assistant in the homes of people living with diabetes. This virtual source of support and information is available around the clock and free of charge on Amazon Alexa and on Google Assistant. Sulli the Diabetes Guru responds to important questions like “What is high blood sugar?”, “Is it okay to eat before my blood test?” as well as sets reminders to take medication and can even tell you where to find the closest blood monitor retailer!

Medal from Lilly Diabetes

Photo credit: Clare Fishman

4. Lilly Diabetes Journey Awards

Did you know you could receive a medal for your valiant effort of managing your diabetes? This program recognizes people who have managed their type 1 diabetes successfully with insulin for 10, 25, 50 and 75 years. Each recipient receives a beautiful award, engraved with their name, along with a signed letter from Lilly’s CEO, Dave Ricks, acknowledging and encouraging their continued dedication. This program helps celebrate each other’s victories and hopes to inspire others living with diabetes.

People living with type 1 diabetes or parents of children with type 1 diabetes in the United States can complete and submit the Lilly Diabetes Journey Awards application here. If you are outside the United States and are interested in learning more about Lilly programs in your country, please contact your local Lilly affiliate for more information.

Lilly also offers other programs such as their Lilly Camp Care Package program, which provides diabetes educational kits, inspirational speakers, insulin, and other supplies to camps for children with diabetes. Lilly also offers college resources after partnering with The College Diabetes Network. CDN realizes that campus life and independence can be hard enough without diabetes. They created a community for young adults living with diabetes through its national network of campus-based chapters and their resources available on their website.

5. Ask Siri for Your Glucose Reading

If you are using a Dexcom CGM, you can take advantage of Siri and ask her any time of the day, “What is my blood sugar?” and she will take the reading from your Dexcom and say it out loud. This has become incredibly useful when I’m driving or don’t have the time to unlock my phone and go to the Dexcom app.

6. Happy Bob App

This app takes mundane diabetes data and turns it into an engaging and positive experience for the user. You can switch between Happy Bob and Snarky Bob to get a different dose of entertainment. Both of which will help ease the stress of this disease and leave you with a smile!

7. Dexcom Overlay

Did you know that Dexcom offers free over-patches to help reinforce the adhesive? There are plenty of great companies out there that offer this as well but be sure to take advantage of this free offer and see how it works for you and/or your child. You can submit a request using this form.

8. Preboarding Before a Flight

As people living with diabetes, we are allowed to preboard all flights. This is helpful to get your luggage in a safe space and make sure you have time to access any supplies or snacks before the plane gets crowded and it’s more difficult to move around. This will help set you up for a comfortable and relaxing flight. Read here for more information on air travel and what you need to know.

9. Sugarmate App

Sugarmate is a companion app for those using Dexcom G5/G6 and boasts many great features such as apple watch integration, will call you if your CGM goes low, and is ignored, even if it is in the Do Not Disturb mode. The newest feature if you own a car with CarPlay and connect your phone, your blood sugar will automatically display on your screen.

Make sure to take advantage of these above diabetes hacks to make living life with diabetes a little easier. Many of the above tips can help change your mindset, improve your mood, and give you a little motivation to keep on thriving.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

FreeStyle Libre 3 Cleared in Europe – Smaller, Thinner, and No More Scanning!

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Matthew Garza and Katie Mahoney

The FreeStyle Libre 3 has been cleared in Europe for anyone ages four and older. The new continuous glucose monitor is as small as two stacked US pennies, provides real-time readings directly to the mobile app via Bluetooth, and has the same low list price

Abbott announced that the new FreeStyle Libre 3 has been cleared in Europe – see 40-second video here. This third-generation continuous glucose monitor (CGM) has many of the same features that make the FreeStyle Libre 2 so popular, including optional alarms, 14-day wear, and high accuracy. The FreeStyle Libre 3 also adds several new features:

  • Real-time, minute-by-minute readings are sent directly to the FreeStyle Libre 3 app via Bluetooth – moving this CGM from “on-demand” to “always-on,” so there is no need to scan the sensor every eight hours.
  • It is 70% smaller than previous models, making it the “smallest and thinnest” CGM sensor yet – it’s said to be about the size of two stacked pennies. Importantly, this new model will reduce the amount of plastic and carbon paper used, improving the production of the device significantly from an environmental perspective.
  • It is cleared for people with diabetes as young as four years old.
  • It is cleared for use in gestational diabetes and pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. We suggest that everyone who is pregnant and has type 1 diabetes try to get CGM, and that everyone else who is pregnant be tested for gestational diabetes as early on as possible.
  • It is cleared as an iCGM, meaning it can be used for automated insulin delivery (AID) development in Europe.
  • The new FreeStyle Libre 3 app, available for both iOS and Android devices, will contain many of the same features as the FreeStyle Libre 2 app (Libre View) including the all-important time in range graphs and ambulatory glucose profile (AGP). You can learn all about the AGP here.

Currently the FreeStyle Libre 3 is cleared for upper-arm wear, though we imagine people may try to use it “off-label” on their abdomen or other spots. There is no separate reader for collecting and monitoring sensor data, so people will use smartphones with the FreeStyle Libre 3 app in order to connect to the sensor.

The FreeStyle Libre 3 will be available at the same price as previous versions of the CGM ($109 for a one-month’s supply, without insurance); Abbott will continue to offer the FreeStyle Libre 2 at the same price for people who prefer the to scan their CGM. The FreeStyle Libre 3 is expected to launch in the coming months in Europe, and though we don’t yet know where it will first launch, we expect it may be Germany, like Abbott’s other CGM launches. In the US, Abbott has not announced any potential timeline for FDA submission or clearance. With the recent Libre Sense clearance in Europe, there is lots happening with this brand – stay tuned for more. Readers in European countries, we’d love to hear your early thoughts once you try the FreeStyle Libre 3!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Making the Most of CGM: Uncover the Magic of Your Ambulatory Glucose Profile

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Cindy Takigawa and Frida Velcani

What’s an AGP report, and what does it show? Why does my AGP matter? How can I use an AGP report to improve my blood glucose levels and time in range?

Having diabetes is a full-time job: you have to simultaneously monitor your diet, activity, stress, and even sleep. On top of that, you need to calculate and manage the number of carbs you consume in each meal, and keep careful tabs on your blood sugar levels. The Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP) report, developed by the International Diabetes Center, is a tool that provides a simplified way to look at data on your blood glucose patterns and trends. It has been recognized as a standard of care for reporting continuous glucose monitor (CGM) data by the American Diabetes Association. In this article, we explain what an AGP report is and how you can use the information to help you navigate your diabetes management.

CGM App

Image source: diaTribe

What is an ambulatory glucose profile report?

An AGP report is a standardized, single-page report that includes glucose statistics like time in range, a summary glucose profile, and daily glucose graphs. It converts blood glucose readings from a CGM device into a detailed picture, allowing you to quickly visualize the time you spend above and below your target range. The report is based on at least seven days of CGM data, with 14 days of data (or more) considered ideal. Currently, many CGMs include a version of the AGP report in their devices and reporting software.

An AGP report that summarizes data provided by self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is currently being developed. This article focuses on CGM AGP reports.

Why does my ambulatory glucose profile matter?

The AGP report is the same no matter what device you use – it allows your healthcare team to assess blood glucose levels and trends in a standard way for everyone they see. Below you’ll find sample AGP reports from Abbott, Dexcom, and Senseonics.

The AGP report shows patterns in a user-friendly way so that people with diabetes can easily identify the times of day when glucose levels are consistently low, high, or fluctuating. The general goal for people with diabetes is to have their glucose levels stay within the target range of 70 to 180 mg/dL for at least 70% of the day, spending less than 4% of their time in hypoglycemia (under 70 mg/dL). The information from an AGP report can help you have a discussion with your healthcare team about goals for your diabetes management and ways you can achieve them. The data offered by this report can help make your care far more precise and effective.

What exactly does your AGP show?

The standard AGP (designed by the International Diabetes Center and shown above) will show your data like this:

  • Glucose Statistics and Targets: This section displays metrics including average glucose, glucose variability, and Glucose Management Indicator (GMI), which can be thought of as your predicted A1C. It also includes the dates and number of days in the report, as well as the percent of time that the CGM was used to collect data. While time in range goals can be individualized, the expert-defined goals for various groups of people with diabetes can be found in this section. You can read more about time in range targets here.
  • Time in Ranges: This color-coded bar chart helps you visualize the percentage of time spent above and below your target range.
  • Ambulatory Glucose Profile: This graph combines all of your glucose readings over time to display your trends across a 24-hour period. At the end of this article you can find examples of what this will look like for your specific CGM.
    • Black line: the median of all the readings. Half of your glucose values are above the middle black line and half are below.
    • Green lines: this is your target glucose range.
    • Dark blue area: 50% of glucose values lie in this area.
    • Light blue area: 90% of glucose values lie in this area. This percentage may differ between AGP reports. The International Diabetes Center report includes 90% of glucose values, while the Eversense report shows 80% of glucose values.
    • Dotted blue lines: 5% of the highest and lowest glucose values are above and below this line, respectively.
  • Daily Glucose Profiles: Each box shows your glucose pattern from a single day.
    • Yellow area: instances of high glucose (hyperglycemia).
    • Red area: instances of low glucose (hypoglycemia).

How can I interpret an ambulatory glucose profile report?

An AGP report combines several days of blood glucose readings into one snapshot. Once you have identified daily patterns, you can work with your healthcare team to adjust your medications and insulin dosing to spend more time in range. You may also discuss timing of food or physical activity, what you are eating, or ways to reduce stress. Here are some steps you can take to understand your data:

1.     Look at your time in range. The goal is to shift the numbers into the 70 – 180 mg/dl target range while having fewer lows and extreme highs. Each AGP report includes a bar chart of your time in range; one way to see this goal in action is to aim for more “green” and less “red” on the bar chart.

2.    Keep track of the usual times you wake up, go to sleep, eat meals and snacks, and are physically active. Food, activity, medication doses, and dozens of other factors can affect your blood glucose levels. Recording these activities and their timing will help you understand your AGP report and the patterns you see.

3.    Identify times when your glucose levels are lowest and highest, and look for times of more variability. Speak with your healthcare professional about what factors may be causing highs, lows, and variability in your AGP and how you can reduce them. The wider the shaded blue areas on your report, the more variability there is in your glucose levels.

4.    If you can, compare your current and past AGP reports, and create an action plan with your healthcare team. What strategies did you use previously to make changes? Identify a few steps to improve your glucose patterns moving forward.

To learn more about how people with diabetes and healthcare professionals can use AGP, click here. For more resources on time in range, check out diaTribe’s comprehensive library here.

Abbott AGP

CGM App

Image source: diaTribe

Dexcom AGP

Dexcom

Image source: diaTribe

Eversense AGP

AGP

Image source: diaTribe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes and Reality TV, with Marcus Lacour from Say I Do

By Alexi Melvin

Netflix’s “Say I Do” is a reality show about surprise dream weddings, but its first episode showcased something we don’t often see in reality TV – type 1 diabetes (T1D). In the episode, Marcus LaCour was given the chance to surprise his wife Tiffany with a magnificent wedding do-over.

Alongside planning and logistics, Marcus also spoke candidly about his life with type 1 diabetes, spurred by a conversation around how wedding catering decisions needed to take into account the food choices he makes to help manage his blood sugar levels. We caught up with Marcus to chat about his experience on the show, how he handled presenting his type 1 diabetes to the world, and where he and his family are now.

Did you ever imagine that you’d be on a TV show on Netflix?

I definitely didn’t expect it. It’s one of those things where you’re like, you know what? If it happens great, if it doesn’t, it’s great too. I don’t think it dawned on me really until we started shooting. Once we started filming, I was like, “Oh, this is it. This is legit.”

When you were talking about your T1D on the show, it came across so well. Is that something you discussed beforehand with the producers? Did you preface anything or was it organic?

It was organic. We literally were just sitting and talking about it. The subject of food came up and early on I told them, “Hey, I’m a type 1 diabetic.” We were just having a conversation of, “Hey, how’s this, how’s that? How did that happen? How were you diagnosed?” Literally, just conversation flowed from there. In my honest opinion, it was one of the most genuine conversations I’ve had with anyone about my condition, just because it was in a room and in the area where there was an open space where I could tell them everything I needed to tell them about the condition.

You touched on how much your wife did for you when you had a situation where you lost your healthcare – the rationing of food and things like that. Did that also include rationing of insulin? Were you having issues with getting supplies?

I was. I was getting samples from my doctor’s office at one point. You know when you’re trying to ration insulin or trying to pick the insulin you can afford, it’s not as effective as what you’re used to. I was getting the regular 70/30 mix insulin pens. I kept bottoming out throughout random times of the day. I was used to taking NovoLog but [at one point, my doctor] didn’t have any NovoLog samples. So I was literally just getting whatever he had.

When [my doctor] did get the NovoLog pens, I was using those thinking, okay, he should have some more samples. Well, there was a time where he didn’t, and that time for about a month maybe, we’ll say three weeks, I was rationing my insulin, because I’m trying to make sure that if I do go high, I have enough to cover the high. If I go low, just [having food] to eat, but more importantly, what you need on a daily basis [to keep your levels stable].

One day, the doc called and said they didn’t have any samples. I was down in my last 10 units. So for about an extra two and a half, almost three weeks, I was rationing 10 units of insulin.

When did that situation start getting better for you?

I ended up getting a loan from my boss because at the time I started a new position and he was like, “I don’t want to see you suffer.” At the time, NovoLog Flex Pens were $250 for the pack. So he gave me a check for $250 and said, “Hey, go get your meds.” So that was how I got through that. Then somehow, by some sort of miracle, after that pack ended, my doctor, all of a sudden, got samples again.

What is your management routine like now?

It’s the Omnipod right now. I’ve got better insurance that covers the pods altogether. It’s still an adjustment for me though, because I’m used to not having a PDM. Before, [when] I was on the injections, it was, wake up, take your long term, and then just carry the Humalog pen on me at all times. Then with the pump, [if] we’re going to work out, I forget to suspend my insulin flow. Or if the site doesn’t take, having to double check and make sure blood sugars aren’t really high. So it’s a couple of different things, but it’s not bad. It’s still an adjustment though.

Do you feel you prefer the MDI or do you feel the pump ultimately is going to be better?

I’m already seeing changes in my numbers, just from average standpoint. On the shots, the lowest my A1C was, or I could get it, with 6.9, 6.8, but now I’m seeing, that even though there are days where I may be high because the pod didn’t take, or I may run low, those days are few and far between, so I’m running normal on a lot more of a regular basis.

Do you use a Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM)?

I don’t. It looks we have to go four months without a CGM and track those numbers before insurance will approve it.

In terms of your diet, on the show, you talked about how you’re conscious of what foods are going to spike your blood sugar. Is there a specific diet you to stick to? Are there certain foods you prefer or are you getting more flexible with it because of the pump?

I am still a very conscious eater. I prefer to eat clean. Everything has to have a balance. Now I know with the pump, you have that freedom to literally eat whatever you want. But for me, when I was diagnosed, I didn’t have that option. So, it was literally sticking to that diet, sticking to that regimen. Everything has to have a fresh fruit or fresh vegetable, [there] has to be a starch. There has to be a grain and there has to be a protein. That’s the only way that I know.

I came across a comment online that said, “Well, diabetics can eat whatever they want.” It’s very true. But for me, I don’t want to run that risk. I think I’ve always done something whenever I got a new insulin, when I got my Humalog, I wanted to make sure it worked. So I got a peanut butter Twix, took it to cover it, just to see what it would do. When I got my pump, I had a chocolate chip cookie just to make sure it was working. It would work, but overall, my diet is consistent. I prefer to eat clean. It’s just because I know these things aren’t going to have a whole lot of impact on my blood sugar.

I saw on Instagram that your daughter’s been learning more about your T1D management. How’s that going?

It’s going well honestly. Before, when I was taking my shot, it was just, “Hey, Daddy’s got to take his insulin,” or, “Daddy’s got to check his blood sugar.” So she’d always been curious about it. Then one day I had to change my pod. “Are you changing your pod, Daddy?” “Yeah, Daddy’s changing his pod. you want to watch?” “Yeah, I want to watch.” So she came in and got hands on. I always want to make her aware just in case something happens. If my blood sugar goes low and I’m unresponsive, or if I’m too low and I can’t get up to get anything, I want to make sure she’s aware to say, “Oh, Daddy’s not feeling well. Daddy he needs something to eat.” Or, “Something’s going on. Let me tell Mommy.” I always want to make sure she’s aware of what my condition is, not to scare her, but to the point where she can be reactive.

Who did you have as a support system when you were first diagnosed?

My mom was my biggest supporter. I didn’t keep it from my friends, but I felt they wouldn’t be able to understand. They were used to me just being able to get up and do whatever. If we wanted to play football, it was get up and do it without having to worry about anything. They knew I had type 1 diabetes, but they didn’t know the entire scope of what it meant to take care of that condition. So it was my mom. Then over time, my friends started to get a little bit more of an understanding of it. So my friends would ask, “Hey, what’s your blood sugar like? Are you OK?” Or if I was going to the gym to work out with some of my buddies, “Hey, don’t forget your meter.” Or I’d always bring my meter with me and I’d have to check in the middle of work out, see either I’m high or low, or just to figure out where I was at. They would always ask, so they held me accountable in that regard.

Have you been getting a lot of people in the type 1 community reaching out on Instagram or social media?

I’ve gotten that. It’s always refreshing because [they’re] like, “Thank you for representing and letting the world know about your condition.” Well, it’s a part of me. I’d be foolish to hide it, like, “I don’t have a condition.”

Had you been involved in the type 1 community at all before appearing on Say I Do?

Not necessarily. I’ve always wanted to though. I’ve been at this for almost 20 years, it’ll be 20 years in November. When I first got diagnosed, there weren’t a lot of support groups. There weren’t very many places for me to go where I could vent or even if I had high blood sugars or even lows, how to combat that and deal with those. But now times have changed. I would love to be able to get out and talk to people about what our condition is and how to manage it effectively.

What’s next for you and your family?

Honestly, I am not sure. I work for a Children’s Hospital down here, so I recruit for them and it’s just more or less just going with everything at this point, just laying back and enjoying the ride while we have it.

Do you think you’re going to seek out more TV opportunities?

To be honest, I don’t know. This is all new. It’s all new to both of us. If more opportunities come, then yeah. Absolutely. But it really just depends on what comes down the pipes. I think the ultimate goal would be just for us to just enjoy this and see where it takes us.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Are CGM Users Aware of Time in Range?

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Eliza Skoler and Rebecca Gowen

dQ&A surveyed 2,540 CGM users with type 1 or type 2 diabetes to find out how aware they are of their own time in range: 87% of respondents knew how much time they spend in range daily

Time in range is the percentage of time that a person spends in their target blood glucose range (70-180 mg/dl). This measurement of diabetes management along with time below range and time above range helps people assess patterns and trends throughout the day to inform daily treatment decisions in a way that A1C cannot. It is also becoming more well-known and accepted in the world of diabetes as a good indicator of diabetes management.

dQ&A, a market research company, wanted to measure people’s awareness of their own time in range. They surveyed 2,540 people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who use continuous glucose monitors (CGM). The following question was posed to respondents: “Do you know roughly what percentage of your day (on average) you typically spend with your blood sugar between 70-180 mg/dl?” For those people who answered yes, dQ&A then asked them what percentage of time they typically spend in the target range (70-180 mg/dl) each day. It is important to note that the majority of people included in this survey were White, had type 1 diabetes, and were using an insulin pump.

Important survey results included:

  • 87% of all respondents knew roughly how much time they spent in range each day, while 13% did not. These results were generally consistent across several factors including people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, adults and children, and people with type 2 diabetes who were or were not taking insulin.
  • 29% of respondents reported that they typically spend 71-80% of their day in range. 30% of the people surveyed reported a time in range above 80% while 41% of respondents reported a time in range lower than 71%.
  • People with type 2 diabetes who are not taking insulin are significantly more likely to report spending 91-100% of their day in range (36%), compared to adults with type 1 diabetes or people with type 2 diabetes on insulin (9% and 11%, respectively).
  • Time in range was higher in older age groups. The group with the lowest self-reported time in range was people under the age of 18: only 44% of people 18 years or younger spent more than 70% of the day in range, compared to 56% of people ages 18-44, 62% of people ages 45-65, and 68% of people over the age of 65.

Our takeaways from this data:

  • Among people who use CGM, the majority acknowledge time in range as a measurement of their glucose control. However, we believe more people can be educated on how to understand and act on their time in range data.
  • The majority of people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes report achieving the  time in range target of more than 70% and this was particularly true for those in older age groups.
  • An important focus should be placed on helping young people find strategies to improve their time in range and incorporate it into their self-management.

To learn more about time in range click here.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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