COVID-19 Preparedness: Tips for Obtaining Extra Diabetes Supplies

As the Coronavirus (COVID-19) cases continue to grow, with many alarming reports in the news, the CDC has recently advised for at-risk populations (including those with diabetes) to prepare and to stay home as much as possible. For someone with a medical condition that often requires constant care and a supply of medicine, preparing for potential quarantine may also mean stocking up on extra medical supplies. Of course, this also means an additional financial expense, placing an additional burden on this patient population.

Here are some basic tips to consider for anyone with diabetes who is preparing get started on obtaining some extra supplies without incurring very high costs:

  • Contact your healthcare provider and ask them for samples of the medication(s) that you need.
  • Reach out to your health insurance company to determine if they will authorize a payment for an extra supply (sometimes called a “vacation” supply) of the medication(s) you need.
  • If needed, discuss with your healthcare provider any alternative medication(s) that may be cheaper than the ones you currently use, in case you decide to pay out-of-pocket for an extra supply. There are insulin preparations that can be purchased over-the-counter at a very reasonable price, but be sure to discuss the ins and outs of using these preparations with your provider, as they have different activity profiles than prescription insulin formulations.
  • See if you qualify for insulin savings through the manufacturer. Reach out to the company that makes your specific insulin(s) and/or visit their website(s) to determine which program(s) they offer and what you may be eligible for.
  • Consider purchasing the ReliOn brand of blood glucose testing supplies from Walmart, which tend to be much more affordable than if you were to pay out-of-pocket for an extra supply by another brand.
  • Look into using a service like DiaThrive or Livongo, which can allow you to obtain unlimited blood glucose testing supplies at a fixed price.
  • Consider using a mail-order pharmacy, so that you can minimize leaving your residence to obtain medical supplies.

Also, have a look at this checklist form the Diabetes Disaster Response Coalition to keep you on track as far as being prepared with diabetes essentials during an emergency situation.

Do you have any advice for people with diabetes who are trying to make sure they are prepared with enough medical supplies for an extended amount of time? Please share this article and your thoughts in the comments below.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Insulin Co-Payment Cap Bills

America has a unique problem: prescription drug prices are too expensive for many people. In 2018 alone, 1 in 5 Americans (or 37 million non-elderly adults) went without a prescription drug due to cost. One of the most egregious examples of the high cost of prescription drugs is the rising cost of insulin in the United States. There are over 34 million Americans with diabetes, and at least 8 million are dependent on insulin to live. The list price of insulin has nearly tripled since 2002 and the average price of the drug has increased by 64% since 2014 alone. Most tellingly, a pivotal Yale study recently reported that as many as 1 in 4 people with diabetes have rationed their insulin due to cost. So, what are lawmakers doing about the problem?

Insulin co-payment caps have become a wildly popular idea by state lawmakers to curb the price of insulin for some insured patients in their states. Notably, Colorado was the first state in the nation to pass such legislation, making national news in May 2019. The bill, which caps monthly co-payments (for some insured patients) at $100, went into effect on January 1, 2020.

The main bill sponsor, Representative Dylan Roberts, said, “Colorado is leading the way with this measure, but this is just a first step. We won’t stop until all the pharmaceutical companies and drug middlemen start taking more accountability and stop gouging patients with their high costs.”

Other states have followed suit. The Illinois Governor signed into law similar legislation this past January (although the law doesn’t take effect until January 1, 2021), and there are currently similar bills pending in 36 other states.

insulin sensitivity

The average cost of a vial of insulin in America is over $300. | Photo credit: Adobe Stock

This is great news for many people with diabetes. The average cost of a vial of insulin in America is over $300, and people with insulin-dependent diabetes often require multiple types and vials of insulin per month, which can drive up the price (to live!) into the thousands. Capping co-payments, or essentially “carving” out a $100 co-payment (especially for people on high-deductible health plans who are paying the full list price of insulin until they hit their deductible, which can sometimes be in the high-thousands) can save people thousands of dollars and will undoubtedly help save lives.

Some people may think this solves the insulin pricing crisis, but it doesn’t. These bills are a great start to bring attention to the exorbitant cost of prescription insulin, but there are many people who don’t qualify under these new laws. State legislatures only have jurisdiction over state-regulated health plans, and thus cannot determine pricing on ERISA plans, or health insurance plans that are fully or partially managed by the federal government, such as Medicare, Medicaid, or the Veteran’s Health Administration. Additionally, any large, private employer plans would not fall under the law. Most importantly, anyone who’s uninsured does not receive protection under this law, and must still pay the full list price of insulin at the pharmacy counter.

For states that have expanded Medicaid, this doesn’t pose as much of a problem, as more people are covered by some sort of insurance (Medicaid co-payments are usually set between $1-3). States with robust exchange programs also benefit more under these laws, as by definition these are state-regulated plans that are subject to the co-payment caps. But for people who don’t qualify for Medicaid, cannot afford a health exchange plan, and find themselves without insurance, they’re still stuck paying these outrageous prices, which is sometimes a matter of life or death.

And the problem isn’t going away. The Health Care Cost Institute reported that the price of insulin doubled in a span of four years, between 2012 and 2016. According to their report, the average price a patient with type 1 diabetes paid for insulin in 2012 was $2,864 but that doubled to $5,705 by 2016.

Why is the cost for a nearly 100-year-old drug continuing to rise? For one thing, there are no generic competitors, and only three companies manufacture the drug. Secondly, insulin products are protected under patent laws, which allow the manufacturer to sell a product unchallenged in the market before a generic can be introduced. Novo Nordisk, Eli Lily, and Sanofi, the three main insulin manufacturers, have continued to “tweak” their insulin products in order to extend their exclusivity rights and hold onto their patent longer, without facing competition from generics. In fact, Sanofi has filed lawsuits in the past against Merck and Mylan to prevent them from going to market with a generic version of Sanofi’s Lantus insulin. Additionally, our government (unlike most other countries in the world) does not negotiate drug pricing with pharmaceutical companies, and thus there are no regulations on how high pricing can be set.

This national crisis has even gotten the attention of current and former Presidential hopefuls: Mayor Pete Buttegieg, Senator Amy Klobuchar, Senator Elizabeth Warren, Senator Bernie Sanders, Tom Steyer, and even Vice President Joe Biden have all called out insulin specifically when talking about outrageous drug pricing.

Congress has also started paying closer attention, and H.R. 3, the Lower Drug Costs Now Act has been introduced that would allow for The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to negotiate drug prices on certain drugs (including insulin) to lower the costs, among other measures. Co-Chairs of the Congressional Diabetes Caucus, U.S. Representative Diana Degette and Representative Tom Reed, have also introduced the Insulin Price Reduction Act, which, if enacted, would decrease the price of insulin nearly 75% for Americans, to costs equal to those in 2006. These are all great first steps to addressing American’s cries for help, and to help reduce the burden millions of people with diabetes are facing every day.

Any legislation will have its pros and cons, but people with diabetes suffering due to high drug pricing don’t have to suffer in silence any longer. Politicians are taking note and action, and one day I hope we can all declare the crisis solved.

Have you been negatively affected by the high price of insulin in the United States? Share this article and post your story in the comments below, we’d love to hear from you!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Ways to Save Money on Diabetes Expenses

Diabetes is an expensive disease. According to the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), diabetes is the costliest disease in the United States. In 2017 alone, over $327 billion dollars was spent on people with diabetes and their needs, and that number has only increased since, as prevalence and incidence of the disease have risen as well.

Diabetes is also expensive, personally. Between medications, doctors’ appointments, time off work and school, buying healthy foods, and committing to an exercise routine, it can be troublesome to keep on top of all the bills and expenses. A landmark Yale study recently showed that as many as 1 in 4 people with diabetes have rationed their insulin, simply because it’s too expensive.

So, how do you prepare for the cost of a new type 2 diabetes diagnosis? In part 2 of our 4-part series, we dive into how to protect yourself from the high costs of diabetes.

Prescription Assistance Programs

Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about prescription assistance programs. They can help you get free or lower-cost drugs, especially if your income is low or you don’t have health insurance. Online resources, such as RxAssist, can also point you in the right direction towards prescription drug cost relief.  You can also get lower-cost care at a Federally Qualified Health Center, if you meet certain eligibility requirements.

Take Advantage of Your Employer’s Section 125 Plan (If They Have One)

These flexible spending arrangements let you contribute up to $2,650 per year (pre-tax!) to spend on out-of-pocket expenses for things like prescription drugs and copays for doctor visits. These plans usually adhere to a “use it or lose it” policy, so make sure you’re spending down anything left over in these accounts towards the end of your enrollment year (usually in December every year).

Enroll in Medicare

Many people 65 and older are not enrolled in Medicare, but if you’re diagnosed with diabetes, it’s highly recommended that you take advantage of this program. Medicare Part B covers a portion of bi-annual diabetes screenings, diabetes self-management education classes, insulin pumps and glucometers, and regular foot and eye exams. Medicare Part D covers insulin expenses. Learn more about the Medicare application process here.

Mail Order Your Supplies

If you’re able, use mail order to get recurring medications and supplies (you can sign up through your existing pharmacy). Oftentimes, you can buy a 90-day supply of your medicine for a single copay, instead of three separate copayments for three separate months. Mail-order supplies are bulk packaged and shipped to your home. This can be an excellent alternative if it’s hard to leave your home, and if you know you’ll need the same medication consistently, for months at a time. It’s also helpful in saving you money. Additionally, a lot of (over the counter) supplies can be bought in bulk from online retailers like Amazon for a fraction of the price you’d pay at a traditional pharmacy.

Ask Your Doctor About Generic Drugs

Although there is no generic form of insulin, many pills taken for type 2 diabetes are available in generic form. A bottle of Glucophage (60 tablets) costs around $80, but the generic form (metformin) will cost you about $10. Talk to your healthcare provider about generic options that are available to you.

Taking these small steps can add up to big savings over time, and can help you to live a long, healthy life, without the threat of complications. Plus, saving money on your diabetes supplies can help you invest in other (more fun) areas of life!

Have you found ways to better budget for your diabetes? How have you saved money for this costly condition? Share this post and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

World Diabetes Day 2019: The Most Important Issues We Face

Today is World Diabetes Day. What are the most important issues that you face as a person with diabetes? See what the online diabetes community had to say.
Source: diabetesdaily.com

How and Why People With Diabetes Stockpile Supplies

For people with diabetes, an interruption to insulin supply is quickly life-threatening. It’s also seriously problematic to endure a disruption in other diabetes necessities like glucose test strips or CGM (continuous glucose monitor) sensors or insulin pump cartridges. Many people with diabetes strive to have a small stockpile of back-up supplies because what do we do […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Search

+