Five Reasons Why I Choose Multiple Daily Injections

Since the day I was diagnosed, I have had people telling me I should consider an insulin pump. Seven and a half years later, I still say no. My A1c has always been in a healthy range, and I am fine with only having one device, the Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitor (CGM), on my body. I know pumpers rave about their tight control and I am truly amazed by the pump’s capabilities, even more so now with the new features on the Medtronic 670G. However, I prefer a KwikPen, which is true to its word — it is quick and easy and just the way I like it!

Here are my five top reasons for being on team MDI (multiple daily injections):

1. No Kinks or Knots

I constantly hear stories of people waking up with a blood sugar in the 300s, and they had no idea. This is because there was a kink or knot in their tubing and the insulin wasn’t getting into their body all night long. Yes, if they are wearing a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), it should have alerted them, but that sounds like a pain you don’t get from the poke of a pen!

2. Fewer Bruises and Scar Tissue

Don’t get me wrong, the pokes of 6-8 injections a day does add up, and I do have bruises on my body. But have you seen the needle on those pump infusion sets? They are a lot longer and thicker than my Humalog pen. Also, the cannula stays in your body, therefore, leaving much larger holes. This means more bumps and bruises and also means more scar tissue.

3. No Crazy Calculations

As I mentioned above, I am amazed at what a pump can do. It can give you a precise amount of insulin right down to the decimal point. It can also tell you what your insulin on board (IOB) is. My pen can’t do either of these things! However, I do use Humalog Luxura, which is a half-unit pen so I can get more accurate dosing. Also, I mostly eat low-carb, so my dose is usually between 1-3 units. I prefer not having to count every carb I consume; math is not my strong suit!

4. Quick and Easy

KwikPens are quick and easy and take one second to use! I compare these seconds of my day to a lifetime of walking around with another device attached to me, tubing included, and that’s just not for me. Between CrossFit and being a mom, the tubing would not be kind to me.

5. I Don’t Have to Carry Around My Pancreas

When people first recommended the pump, I really only focused on not wanting to wear something else attached to my body. What I didn’t consider was the fact that I would have to actually carry around my new pancreas! When I went to my first type one weightlifting event, Bolus & Barbells, I was so surprised to see everyone with their phones in one hand and their stand-in organ in the other. I imagine that showering and going to the bathroom is a little more challenging than it is for the average Joe!

Photo by Allison Caggia

While I know there are many benefits to wearing a pump; it is just not something I am considering at this time. For me, the fewer reminders of this disease, the better. And with another device attached to me, especially with tubing, I would feel tethered. If I were to consider a pump, it would be the Omnipod since it is tubeless. For now, I will remain loyal to team MDI.

Are you someone who is on multiple daily injections and won’t have it any other way? Or are you someone who was MDI and made the switch to a pump and are glad you did? Share your story!

A previous version of this post has been updated.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Be Prepared: Surviving Natural Disasters with Diabetes

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By: Amber Clour

Amber Clour was born and raised in Norman, Oklahoma. Twenty-one days after her eighth birthday, she was rushed to Children’s Hospital where she spent two weeks learning how to live her new life with type 1 diabetes. In 2015 she co-founded DiabetesDailyGrind.com and the Real Life Diabetes Podcast.

It may not be possible to anticipate every emergency, but for those with diabetes, it’s especially important to prepare for the unexpected. Hear how people with diabetes survived natural disasters, what they learned about planning ahead, and the advice they have for others.

Susan Hoagland, 70, who lives with type 1 diabetes, worked up until the day before Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in August 2005. Then like most people in the path of the hurricane, she headed out of town.

“In my mind, I was only heading to Austin [Texas] in anticipation of Katrina for a long weekend and didn’t pack all of my medications and supplies,” she said. Hoagland didn’t have a prepared container of supplies, including medications, food, hypo treatments, glucose monitoring devices packed and ready to go – something she would later regret.

***

Dealing with diabetes management every day takes considerable effort, and even when we’re on our A-game, things can at times get overlooked. It’s important to anticipate what might be needed in the case of a natural disaster, so that the fight or flight response due to an adrenaline rush doesn’t get the better or you and your health.

Growing up in Tornado Alley (Oklahoma) means long ago I developed a game plan for emergencies, so that an impending tornado, and the need to leave my home, would not imperil my diabetes management.

I wanted to reach out to others who have been in this situation, and to Carol Atkinson, an expert at the Diabetes Disaster Response Coalition, to hear more about surviving natural disasters and the tips and tricks they have found helpful. The bottom line is that everyone should be prepared to leave their home in case of an emergency with everything they need to make it through the crisis. Being prepared and having everything ready to grab and go means when a natural disaster strikes, you don’t have to face making layers of decisions, delay your departure, or augment your flight or fight response.

To be prepared, think about all the supplies you will need:

  • Medications: Put a supply of all your medications in separate containers to last a week or longer, and think about how to keep insulin at the right temperature, such as an instant cool pack.
  • Injection supplies: syringes, your insulin pens, extra pump supplies
  • Food, a source of glucose, water to stay hydrated: a supply of glucose tabs works really well, some bottles of water, and some food that doesn’t spoil
  • Monitoring supplies – like my CGM, a backup blood glucose meter and strips, and a way to measure ketones
  • Copies of prescriptions
  • An emergency contact list contact in case of an emergency
  • Cellphone charger
  • Batteries, an ID, and cash

***

The morning before Hurricane Katrina hit the banks of New Orleans, Hoagland was in a panic ­– not a good mindset when it comes to making sure she would have everything she would need to survive the catastrophic storm. As she gathered her things in a hurry, she realized she had nowhere to go. She called her son and daughter-in-law, who called friends until they found a place in Austin where she could stay. Despite the fact that it takes eight hours to drive to Austin from New Orleans, she left unprepared.

“I drove straight for two days because you couldn’t stop; there was nowhere to stay,” she recalled. “The rest areas were packed and I had to keep moving. I was fearful for my life and my animals – we had to make it to Austin. It was a nightmare and I wasn’t prepared. In retrospect, I was in survival mode, fueled by adrenaline and weathering high blood sugars.”

One of the many things we might forget as people living with diabetes is how much of an effect adrenaline and stress can have on our blood sugar. It is in our best interest to take the necessary precautions well in advance to lessen the burden on our health when disaster strikes. That includes having the technology you need to test your blood sugar, the medications you need to manage your glucose or other conditions, and back-up emergency supplies like food, batteries, and water.

I reached out to Atkinson, co-chair of the Diabetes Disaster Response Coalition (of which diaTribe is a member) and director of Insulin for Life USA, to find out what advice she has for how to survive the unexpected. She emphasized the importance of preparedness, especially for people living with a chronic illness.

“Always be prepared by building your preparedness kit well before disaster hits and make it customizable to your needs,” Atkinson said. “Be sure to check your kit every quarter to make sure nothing has expired. Other things to consider when packing your preparedness kit ­– a laminated copy of your prescriptions, photo identification, and cash.”

Atkinson suggests leaving the checklist to the experts so you don’t have to worry about making a list yourself. The Diabetes Disaster Resource Coalition makes it easy by providing a downloadable preparedness plan checklist. And you can find even more resources from the coalition here.

Natural disaster

Image source: Cynthia Celt

In 2016, Cynthia Celt and her husband, Mike, set off on an adventure in Costa Rica. After a four hour van ride in the middle of the night in heavy rain, the road was almost a foot deep with mud, and they found themselves stuck in a landslide.

Rescue trucks soon arrived to extract them from the sea of mud. Before Celt knew what was happening, her bag containing all her diabetes supplies was placed into a truck and took off into the dark hills of the unknown country without her. She rode in the back of another truck back to the now powerless resort safely, but without her bag.

“My phone was dead, so I didn’t have my Dexcom readings,” Celt said. “My meter, chargers, and cables were in the back of another truck, which didn’t matter because I had no electricity to charge them. I had little bits of all my diabetes supplies with me, but not nearly enough to sustain me for the entire trip. I was scared to dose as I couldn’t check and had just a candy or two that remained in my purse to treat possible lows.”

Not having access to your diabetes supplies is scary, but Celt said she learned some valuable lessons from this unfortunate experience, including:

  • Always have a blood glucose meter and plenty of strips. “I had somehow failed to bring a meter,” she said. “Lesson learned 100 times over. I now carry a meter and more strips than I will need with me in my purse, even if only headed out for just a few hours!” Make sure that you have all the diabetes supplies you need to manage high or low blood sugar – including your medications and insulin, emergency glucagon, glucose tablets or small snacks, and a blood ketone meter.
  • Having a cell phone battery charger can come in handy. “What saved me when I did get our bags was a 72-hour backup phone charger,” she said. “It allowed me to finally see my blood glucose digits in real time again!” Make sure you have emergency backup batteries and chargers.
  • Research what services will be available to you in the event of an emergency (hospitals, pharmacies, stores to pick up low supplies, etc.). Though this was not her first diabetes travel fumble, being stuck in the dark in a landslide rattled her enough that she now packs back-up diabetes supplies for her back-ups!
  • Don’t be afraid to cause a “fuss” or make a scene if it means having access to the things you need to stay alive. “I should have held onto my bag and helped them understand my life depends on these supplies,” she said. “I was afraid and embarrassed to make an already challenging situation difficult.”

Atkinson stressed that same point, “When evacuating or during any emergency situation,” she said, “define yourself as an insulin dependent person living with diabetes, if you are one. Speak up for yourself.”

In April 2021, Celt was thrown into yet another natural disaster scenario – one that that she had no way to prepare for.

She and her family were camping with friends in the sand dunes not far from their home in Boise, Idaho. They’re fairly seasoned campers, and this was supposed to be just a quick weekend getaway, nothing extreme as far as adventure goes.

She was cruising along in their kayak with her young daughter Madeline and her friend while her husband was in another boat fishing with the others.

“I began to feel the air change and heard sirens from a nearby air base,” Celt recalled. “I saw picnickers scrambling on the shore and then I looked up. What I saw was something I can hardly detail with words. The largest, most sky covering, thunderous sounding wall of sand was charging towards us. It was picking up trees and boats, tossing around bikes and pieces of campers on the land.”

Natural disaster

Image source: Cynthia Celt

Later they learned the storm had overturned semi-trucks and vehicles along the highway. It was what is known as a Haboob, a desert sandstorm common on the Arabian peninsula.

Thankfully before it hit, they were able to make it to shore. Celt grabbed the two small children and slung the dry bag carrying all her diabetes “gear” over her arm.

When out on the water all of her diabetes supplies are always stashed together in a single dry bag. That makes it easy for her to “grab and go”.

“I ran for the hopeful safety of our SUV perched on a shore ridge,” she said. “We piled in and watched as it thundered toward us.”

After several hours they were able to drive to their camper, only to find it ravaged by the storm. The winds did not let up for three days, and they slept in their SUV overnight. However, this time they were a bit more prepared. Celt said, “We always keep an emergency/hidden stash of low supplies, food, and water in the vehicle when camping.”

This scenario was a stark reminder of how quickly disaster can hit. Celt’s words of advice: “It’s impossible to be prepared at all times when living with diabetes. But having your supplies organized, and easy to access and grab on the way out, is incredibly valuable.”

Natural disaster

Image source: Amber Clour

In a different kind of emergency earlier this year, when the pandemic was raging, I packed my bags and relocated to San Antonio, Texas. My casita was the perfect isolation get away, until disaster struck. An unexpected cold front lingered in areas of central Texas where the people and the infrastructure were not equipped to handle below zero temperatures and power outages.

I lost power for days, but fortunately had a gas stove and access to a wood burning fireplace. I also was able to connect with neighbors, and we pooled our resources.

I didn’t fear freezing to death, but I worried my insulin might freeze. However, in the haze of stress I was feeling, I reminded myself the refrigerator wouldn’t get colder than it already was – and the insulation would keep my insulin from freezing. It wasn’t rocket science, but it was clear that my decision fatigue was in full swing. In a situation like this, when freezing your insulin is of great concern, diaTribe’s scientific and medical advisor Dr. Francine Kaufman suggested that you take out a fresh bottle of the insulin you need (basal, prandial, or both) and keep it either in a pocket or a small pack next to your skin. This way you know that you’ll have insulin that won’t freeze.

Stress, both mental and physical, can make diabetes management a nightmare. Keeping my cell phone charged for my CGM data was crucial. Luckily, my Subaru had plenty of gas, so once a day I would sit in the car parked on the street just outside my casita, crank up the heat and charge my phone.

But just when I thought we could get back to normal, our area was notified the water was not safe to drink. I’ve never been in a situation like this and was thankful to have the gas stove to boil water when needed. Not an ideal situation, but I managed.

This entire situation made me think deeply about what’s important when faced with a natural disaster and what things I can realistically do to prepare in advance. Here’s my checklist:

  • HAVE THE EMERGENCY KIT READY TO GO way before an emergency, with a list of all the supplies already in it and what you need to add before you go – like your insulin
  • If you are going to shelter in place, prepare by stocking up on your diabetes supplies and things like non-perishable food, water, batteries, toilet paper, etc., when your budget allows.
  • STAY CALM. It’s okay to be scared and worried, but having your wits about you will make it easier to focus on the items you need to pack.
  • It’s okay to ask for help whether it be for emotional support or supplies. Don’t be embarrassed to contact friends, family, neighbors, local shelters, food pantries, churches, and patient assistance programs. You can also always go to an urgent care facility or hospital if needed. Don’t hesitate in these situations and do what is best for your health and safety.

After some trial and error, I developed a system that makes chaotic situations easier for me to manage. I try to ask myself in these situations, what will I need to survive for at least the next 30 days? Below is a checklist that helps me stay focused.

  1. First, I inventory my supplies so I know what I have and where it is located.
  2. Then I locate a waterproof tub or bag (purchased well in advance) that I can pack my supplies into.
  3. Finally, I start packing my supplies, including:
    • Insulin in a refrigerated case – this is the very last thing I throw in the tub when I am headed to an emergency shelter
    • Syringes for my medication
    • A copy of all my prescriptions
    • Blood glucose meter and plenty of test strips
    • Any CGM supplies I might need including sensors, applicators, and my phone
    • Insulin pump supplies
    • Low blood sugar snacks and glucose tablets
    • Other medications I might need (such as an inhaler, blood pressure pills, glucagon pen, etc.)
    • My driver’s license, passport, cash, and credit cards
    • My diabetes bracelet or disability jewelry
    • Emergency supplies like a flashlight

No one wants to prepare for a natural disaster, but if you take the time now to make sure you have everything you need, you won’t throw your diabetes under the bus when catastrophe strikes.

Below are a few helpful sites to make your natural disaster preparation easy:

And check out some other articles you might want to visit for tips and tricks:

About Amber

Amber Clour was born and raised in Norman, Oklahoma. Twenty-one days after her eighth birthday, she was rushed to Children’s Hospital where she spent two weeks learning how to live her new life with type 1 diabetes.

Since then, her life has been filled pursuing her passion for art, advocacy, non-profit ventures and travel. In 2015 she stepped down as Executive Director for a community artspace and gallery she founded to co-found DiabetesDailyGrind.com and the Real Life Diabetes Podcast. Amber’s – no filter – approach to sharing an honest look into her daily life resonates with many in the diabetes community. She hopes her story and those of podcast guests remind ALL people living diabetes – you are NOT alone.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Injection Device Helping a Family Manage New Diabetes Diagnosis During COVID

Injection Port Device Help Family Whose Son Lives with Diabetes

Jennifer, like many others, has worried about her family’s health during the coronavirus pandemic.

In June, she was diagnosed with COVID-19. Shortly after, her 13-year old son Mason started feeling ill. Unsure if he too had contracted the virus, they visited their local emergency room. Soon after, the family was informed that Mason was living with type 1 diabetes. In this post, Jennifer discusses her family’s experience and the ways they are managing Mason’s diabetes during the global pandemic.

Mason came to me and said he didn’t feel right. Upset tummy, sinus issues, and a small headache. We took him to a local emergency room, and sure enough his rapid test was positive for COVID-19. The doctors also said that his sugar was pretty high. They asked if I could watch his levels at home over the next couple of days and if his sugars remained high, then I should call our family doctor. We left the ER on Tuesday evening. By Thursday, I called our doctor because his sugars never went below 200 mg/dL. We were put in touch with an endocrinologist, who advised us to take him to the hospital where he was diagnosed with diabetes. 

As a parent, all fears set in. I was worried that I didn’t know enough about diet and medication. I worried about if my son would ever feel normal again.

I was surprised that Mason was able to start giving his own insulin almost immediately, and he preferred it that way. In the three months since he was diagnosed, I have probably only given 10 shots! 

I was introduced to the i-Port Advance™ injection port through a Facebook page. I posted that we were having issues with him taking too much insulin before meals, and then he was too full to finish what he had dosed for. Several parents came back and suggested we try an injection port! I called my doctor’s office the next day and they were super excited to let him try it.

Almost immediately, Medtronic sent us a box of the i-Port Advance™ injection port to try at no-cost. I could not express my happiness! I was thankful the company was willing to let us try the port before we purchased. As a parent, this was such an amazing feeling and it was one of the first easy experiences we had since Mason was diagnosed! 

Mason fell in love with the injection port, and so did I! When he used the port, it was the first time since he was diagnosed that he didn’t feel like an outcast. Although he is incredibly diligent with what he eats and doesn’t take advantage of his insulin, he is a kid! He wants little treats, he wants to hang out with friends his age, and eat cupcake or have snow cones from time to time. All of which he had stopped because he hated sticking himself all the time and taking shots in front of people. Now, he can take a little extra insulin if he needs to. He can hang out with friends and not feel like an outsider because he can’t eat what they do! I’m also happy because he is building up less scar tissue with 1 stick every 3 days compared to 12-15 injections.

As a parent, I’ve been so happy to watch his outlook change. He knows that he can manage this disease and he isn’t constantly worried with taking another shot! 

Mason’s family enrolled in the 12-day evaluation program offered by Medtronic. To learn more, click below.

GET STARTED

The testimonial above relates an account of an individual’s experience using a Medtronic device. The account is genuine, typical and documented. However, this individual’s experience does not provide any indication, guide, warranty or guarantee as to the response or experience other people may have using the device. The experience other individuals have with the device could be different. Experiences can and do vary. Please talk to your doctor about your condition and the risks and benefits of Medtronic devices.

Safety Information: i-Port Advance injection port

i-Port Advance injection port is indicated for patients who administer or receive multiple daily subcutaneous injections of physician prescribed medications, including insulin. The device may remain in place for up to 72 hours to accommodate multiple injections without the discomfort of additional needle sticks. i-Port Advance injection port may be used on a wide range of patients, including adults and children. For more, please see http://www.medtronicdiabetes.com/important-safety-information.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Insulin Pump Therapy for Those Living with Type 2 Diabetes: Doris’s Story



LEARN MORE ABOUT THE MINIMED™ 630G SYSTEM

My name is Doris, and I am a wife, small business owner, volunteer and an Assistant Director at a non-profit agency. I’m always busy, which is why some are surprised that I also live with type 2 diabetes. Managing my diabetes hasn’t always been easy. In reading my story, I hope you can take away some of the lessons that it took me years to learn.

20 years ago, I noticed that I was feeling sick each morning and it was a struggle to get myself together. One morning, I arrived at work and was extremely tired and nauseous. A co-worker took me to the emergency room where I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I was in my thirties then. At the time, I was dealing with other health challenges as well. Adding this serious disease to an already full plate was overwhelming to say the least. I knew very little about type 2 diabetes. I thought that diabetes was common and I could handle it, so I wasn’t really too worried. In my naivety, I thought if I just took the medication prescribed for me and avoided sugar, I would be just fine. Boy was I wrong! I learned very quickly that I needed to educate myself about the disease, causes, symptoms, treatments, and find a specialist.

I have been living with type 2 diabetes for over twenty years now. I have had so many changes in my drug therapy regimen, I can’t count. No matter what combination of medications and insulin I took, or changes I made to my diet or exercise, my A1C levels would not stay consistently at or below 7. I have been hospitalized twice due to elevated blood sugar levels. I even sought help from diabetes specialists, but I still wasn’t able to get control of my blood sugar the way I wanted. Throughout the years, I really struggled with always being tired and listless. Some days I couldn’t even make it out of bed. It was a struggle being able to do activities. My family and friends thought I was being lazy or anti-social because I would pass on so many events. They did not understand how I was being affected.

About 4 years ago, I had to change my primary doctor because of insurance coverage. The process of having to find a new doctor was always exasperating to me because I wanted to find someone that was truly solutions-based and took time with their patients. I ended up finding a family practice doctor near my home. I liked the fact that she was always very candid with me about my out of control blood sugar levels, high A1C, and the other medical complications I was dealing with due to type 2 diabetes. She was increasingly concerned as the test results showed that I was heading toward serious complications with my kidneys. One day, I visited her office to review my test results, and we had a serious discussion on what my prognosis looked like. She felt it was important to discuss my options. I began crying because I felt so defeated and helpless. She spoke to me about insulin pump therapy. I knew very little about it. I thought it was only offered to patients that have type 1 diabetes. She gave me some literature and told me to think about it and let her know if I wanted to pursue it further. I went home and discussed it with my husband and other family members. I was depressed about the situation because the quality of my life looked bleak. I did some research on insulin pump therapy but couldn’t find much information about it or how it was used with type 2 diabetes patients.  I called my doctor and asked her to give me some more details of what the therapy consisted of. My level of apprehension was pretty high at this point, so she scheduled some time for me to meet with a nurse who specialized in insulin pump therapy.

I spoke to Shelly, a nurse from Medtronic, who was able to give me better insight into what the therapy would involve and how I could benefit from it. Her knowledge about the therapy, the disease, and her willingness to answer what felt like a million of my questions gave me some hope. After that conversation and further research, I knew that I had to try insulin pump therapy. I put my initial skepticism away and without further hesitation, I told my doctor to sign me up.

When my MiniMedTM 630G pump arrived, I met with Shelly for my product training. I initially thought it was complicated. There were too many parts and too many steps for me to get this right! I became nervous, but I knew how important it was for me. I took a deep breath, concentrated, and with Shelly’s guidance, was able to successfully start insulin pump therapy. I still had a lot of questions concerning the pump. Shelly’s number was on speed dial for a while. The more I used the pump, the more my confidence with handling the pump grew. I was so amazed at this technology and how the device could adapt to my changing needs.

After a month of using the pump, my blood tests results came back and I was ecstatic. My A1C level had dropped and I was seeing much better blood sugar levels. I do the happy dance every time I get a blood sugar level under 100.

I have been using the pump for over 3 years, and have had such a positive experience using the pump. I can’t believe the difference it has made in my live. Most notable to me is more energy— I don’t feel tired and sluggish anymore. I’m able to be more active and participate more in daily activities. When it comes to my blood sugar levels, they are more stable now and my A1C level is at 7.1! I could have never imagined that happening before.

I am no longer a home body either. I am always busy, on the go, and wanting to do more. I look at my life 3 years ago and I was facing a totally different scenario. Things that I had put on hold, I am now pursuing. Using the pump has changed my life drastically. I no longer see just dark days ahead of me— I see the chance to live my best life. I get so emotional when I speak about my experience with the pump. It’s motivated me to figure out what I could be doing to help others. I believe in the product so much that I signed up to be an Ambassador for Medtronic, so I can share my journey with others.

As I reflect on my experiences researching and ultimately using the pump, one of my major takeaways is that you must be committed and dedicated to the process. Although I have certainly grown accustomed to using the pump, it was a bit of a struggle for the first few months. Even now, I have to always remember small things like having additional batteries and pump supplies on hand. In addition, I plan my schedule to ensure that I can continuously use the therapy, even when I travel.

Another takeaway is that it’s important to talk with someone that’s living with type 2 diabetes and using insulin pump therapy. Although I received excellent information form the nurse, nothing beats speaking to someone who has firsthand knowledge.

Finally, be proactive and learn about the coverage that your medical insurance provides when it comes to the cost of the pump and the supplies.

Overall, my experience using insulin pump therapy as a diabetes management tool has definitely benefitted me and what I do in my life. Things don’t always happen the way you plan them, but when you have the right information and know where to go to find answers, your possibilities keep growing and for that I am thankful!

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE MINIMED™ 630G SYSTEM

The testimonial above relates an account of an individual’s experience with a Medtronic device. The account is genuine, typical and documented. However, this individual’s experience does not provide any indication, guide, warranty or guarantee as to the response or experience other people may have using the device. The experience other individuals have with the device could be different. Experiences can and do vary. Please talk to your doctor about your condition and the risks and benefits of Medtronic devices.

Important Safety Information: MiniMed 630G System with SmartGuard Technology

Indicated for the continuous delivery of insulin, at set and variable rates, for the management of diabetes mellitus. MiniMed™ 630G system is approved for ages 14 years or older with Guardian™ Sensor 3 and MiniMed™ 630G system is approved for ages 16 years or older with Enlite™ sensor. Both systems require a prescription. Insulin infusion pumps and associated components of insulin infusion systems are limited to sale by or on the order of a physician and should only be used under the direction of a healthcare professional familiar with the risks of insulin pump therapy. Pump therapy is not recommended for people who are unwilling or unable to perform a minimum of four blood glucose tests per day. Pump therapy is not recommended for people who are unwilling or unable to maintain contact with their healthcare professional. Pump therapy is not recommended for people whose vision or hearing does not allow recognition of pump signals and alarms. Insulin pumps use rapid-acting insulin. If your insulin delivery is interrupted for any reason, you must be prepared to replace the missed insulin immediately. Replace the infusion set every 48–72 hours, or more frequently per your healthcare professional’s instructions. Insertion of a glucose sensor may cause bleeding or irritation at the insertion site. Consult a physician immediately if you experience significant pain or if you suspect that the site is infected. The information provided by CGM systems is intended to supplement, not replace, blood glucose information obtained using a blood glucose meter. A confirmatory fingerstick using a CONTOUR®NEXT LINK 2.4 meter is required prior to making adjustments to diabetes therapy. Always check the pump display when using a CONTOUR®NEXT LINK 2.4 meter, to ensure the glucose result shown agrees with the glucose results shown on the meter. Do not calibrate your CGM device or calculate a bolus using a result taken from an Alternative Site (palm) or a result from a control solution test. If a control solution test is out of range, please note that the result may be transmitted to your pump when in the “Always” send mode. It is not recommended to calibrate your CGM device when sensor or blood glucose values are changing rapidly, e.g., following a meal or physical exercise. The MiniMed™ 630G system is not intended to be used directly for preventing or treating hypoglycemia but to suspend insulin delivery when the user is unable to respond to the Suspend on low alarm and take measures to prevent or treat hypoglycemia themselves. Therapy to prevent or treat hypoglycemia should be administered according to the recommendations of the user’s healthcare provider.

WARNING: The SmartGuard™ Suspend on low feature will cause the pump to temporarily suspend insulin delivery for two hours when the sensor glucose reaches a set threshold. Under some conditions of use the pump can suspend again, resulting in very limited insulin delivery. Prolonged suspension can increase the risk of serious hyperglycemia, ketosis, and ketoacidosis. Before using the SmartGuard™ feature, it is important to read the SmartGuard™ feature information in the User Guide and discuss proper use of the feature with your healthcare provider.

See www.medtronicdiabetes.com/importantsafetyinformation and the appropriate user guides for additional important details.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How to Extend the Dexcom G6 Sensor Beyond the Ten Day Hard Stop

Some clever technologists have discovered how to restart a Dexcom sensor to extend its life beyond ten days. The process works by exploiting a bug in the sensor pairing process.

Katie DiSimone walked us through the process. Katie is involved in the community of people who are building homemade automated insulin delivery systems using current insulin pumps and continuous glucose meters. Since the original article was written, Katie has joined the Tidepool organization which is dedicated to making diabetes data more accessible, actionable, and meaningful for people with diabetes, their caretakers and for researchers as well.

Since our last update, new transmitters have been released. These newer models are more stubborn and are more challenging to “hack”. The specific transmitter ID  will dictate which restart sensor method you should use.

Please see Katie’s instructions to determine which is the preferred method for your transmitter ID.

The method that seems to be working amongst the diabetes online community (and myself; I currently have the transmitter starting with “8G”) is the “pop-out method.” This means you need to physically pop out the transmitter, which can be a little tricky but doable. Here is a video on how to do it, I have had luck with an old credit card.

For this method you will need to:

  • Stop session (it does not matter if the sensor expires on its own first or not)
  • Pop out the transmitter (Some people cover the site during the 30 min period or even insert an old transmitter to prevent stuff from getting in there/ also the wire moving, as the transmitter holds it in place)
  • Set a timer for 30 minutes (I’ve heard that 15-20 minutes works, but have not tried this)
  • Pop the transmitter back in
  • Restart the sensor (make sure to save the previously used code; I snap a picture of it so this way you will not have to calibrate)

There are instructions on how to restart the sensor using the receiver so that you continue to receive current glucose values throughout the 2-hour wait. Here are the instructions on how to do so.

Caveats

The Dexcom G6 has not been tested or approved by the FDA for restarting sensors. There is no guarantee of sensor accuracy. Extend the sensor life only at your own risk.

A previous version of this post has been updated.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

New Implantable Device Gains Attention

We have seen major advancements in the world of continuous glucose monitors in recent years, including Eversense, the first implantable device. This implanted device is able to monitor blood glucose, as well as alert the person when their levels get too low or high. One issue with implantable devices is how to continuously power them. Excitingly, a new prototype was recently developed that can power itself by using our own glucose.

With implantables being the way of the future, having to remove the device to charge is counterproductive. Researchers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) created this device that is able to directly utilize the energy within our bodies. It is made up of n-type semiconducting polymer along with the enzyme glucose oxidase. When the glucose oxidase detects glucose in its surroundings, it removes electrons and transports them through the connected polymer. The device can detect glucose levels in saliva and likely other bodily fluids, while the same polymer also helps convert glucose and oxygen into electrical power, which runs the device.

While more research is needed to see if this method is practical and safe, so far it has shown to be promising. According to the recent press release,

“This fuel cell is the first demonstration of a completely plastic, enzyme-based electrocatalytic energy generation device operating in physiologically relevant media,” says Sahika Inal, principal investigator of the study. “Glucose sensing and power generation are only two examples of the applications possible when a synthetic polymer communicates effectively with a catalytic enzyme-like glucose oxidase. Our main aim was to show the versatile chemistry and novel applications of this special water-stable, polymer class, which exhibits mixed conduction (ionic and electronic).

Have you considered an implantable device? If insertions were minimal due to this new technology, would it pique your interest?

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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