How to Extend the Dexcom G6 Sensor Beyond the Ten Day Hard Stop

Some clever technologists have discovered how to restart a Dexcom sensor to extend its life beyond ten days. The process works by exploiting a bug in the sensor pairing process.

Katie DiSimone walked us through the process. Katie is involved in the community of people who are building homemade automated insulin delivery systems using current insulin pumps and continuous glucose meters. Since the original article was written, Katie has joined the Tidepool organization which is dedicated to making diabetes data more accessible, actionable, and meaningful for people with diabetes, their caretakers and for researchers as well.

Since our last update, new transmitters have been released. These newer models are more stubborn and are more challenging to “hack”. The specific transmitter ID  will dictate which restart sensor method you should use.

Please see Katie’s instructions to determine which is the preferred method for your transmitter ID.

The method that seems to be working amongst the diabetes online community (and myself; I currently have the transmitter starting with “8G”) is the “pop-out method.” This means you need to physically pop out the transmitter, which can be a little tricky but doable. Here is a video on how to do it, I have had luck with an old credit card.

For this method you will need to:

  • Stop session (it does not matter if the sensor expires on its own first or not)
  • Pop out the transmitter (Some people cover the site during the 30 min period or even insert an old transmitter to prevent stuff from getting in there/ also the wire moving, as the transmitter holds it in place)
  • Set a timer for 30 minutes (I’ve heard that 15-20 minutes works, but have not tried this)
  • Pop the transmitter back in
  • Restart the sensor (make sure to save the previously used code; I snap a picture of it so this way you will not have to calibrate)

There are instructions on how to restart the sensor using the receiver so that you continue to receive current glucose values throughout the 2-hour wait. Here are the instructions on how to do so.

Caveats

The Dexcom G6 has not been tested or approved by the FDA for restarting sensors. There is no guarantee of sensor accuracy. Extend the sensor life only at your own risk.

A previous version of this post has been updated.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Another CGM Approved in Europe for Pregnancy: Dexcom G6 Joins Freestyle Libre

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Divya Gopisetty

In Europe, the Dexcom G6 CGM received approval for pregnant women with diabetes

Dexcom’s G6 continuous glucose monitor (CGMreceived European approval (“CE Mark”) to be used by women with diabetes during pregnancy. This official label is set to launch in spring of 2020 and will apply to women with type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes. The Dexcom G6 is already approved for people with diabetes over the age of two.

CGM can help provide awareness of blood glucose trends, which is especially important for pregnant women and their babies. The 2019 ADA Standards of Care recommend that pregnant women with gestational, type 1, or type 2 diabetes spend the majority of the day in the tighter blood sugar range of 63-140 mg/dl. CGM can allow people with diabetes to work with their healthcare team to better understand their time in range and improve their diabetes management by reducing hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

During pregnancy, insulin (the hormone that helps the body use glucose for energy and lowers blood sugar) may not be able to perform its typical role due to interference from other hormones produced by the developing baby. With gestational diabetes, the body’s insulin can’t keep blood sugar levels in the target range. This leads to higher blood sugar levels that can cause health risks for both the mother and baby.

You can learn more about diabetes during pregnancy here. The late gestational diabetes guru Dr. Lois Jovanovic also shared a few pieces of advice for pregnant women with diabetes. We encourage you to consider these tips as you communicate with your support system and healthcare professional.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes Tech Updates: Spring 2019

This content originally appeared on Type 1 Writes. Republished with permission.A couple of Saturdays ago, I was lucky enough to attend the Type 1 Tech Summit in Perth, where I had the opportunity to catch up with some of the reps from the diabetes device companies to find out what’s new. Mylife Diabetescare Last May, […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Dexcom G6: Giving it a Whirl

This content originally appeared on There’s More to the Story. Republished with permission.My delay in this post? I haven’t been in a blog writing or social media mood (more on that to come!) Well. I did it–I did in fact switch to the Dexcom G6! I can just hear the gasps and see the shocked faces. […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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