Toddler Changes His Own Dexcom on TikTok: Advice From His Mom

TikTok has become more than just a place to dance along to the latest trend; it has become a platform for advocacy for many issues, and diabetes has received increased exposure thanks to this social media app. I couldn’t believe my eyes when I saw a TikTok of a very young boy putting on his own Dexcom G6! And he did it with confidence, bravery, and pride. I wanted to share Daxon’s story in the hopes that it inspires others as well. I reached out to his mom who was gladly happy to chat.

Hi Cassie, thank you so much for taking the time to answer my questions! I would love for our community to get to know Daxon a little better! He is such a great role model for other children living with type 1 diabetes (T1D)!

At what age was Daxon diagnosed and what were the symptoms?

Daxon was diagnosed exactly 1 month from his second birthday at 23 months old.

He started to get a bad temper spring of 2019 and we never understood why. He would get so upset so easily and we just thought it was because of terrible twos. In July, he threw up twice one morning for no reason and out of the blue. He started throwing up at nighttime multiple nights in a row and only at night. I took him to his pediatrician, and they told me “it’s probably the stomach bug, it’ll pass” but I told him “but randomly like that? It doesn’t make sense”.

After about two weeks, it stopped until August. He threw up one more time in the morning and then stopped. Once again, we had no idea why. At the end of August he started drinking and peeing excessively. What really gave it away was that he was drenched from head to toe in pee after a 2-hour nap period one day and that was it. I checked his sugar and it was 461 mg/dL (borderline DKA).

How did you as a family adapt to your new normal?

Honestly, we are still trying to adapt. We take it day by day because it is always changing. The one thing about diabetes is that no matter what, it is different each day. Even if you do the same exact thing, sugars will change.

Did you change Daxon’s and/or your family’s diet at all? What are his favorite go-to foods that don’t wreak havoc on his blood sugars? I’m sure lots of moms could use some tips!

I did not completely change his diet, but I do swap stuff out for healthier carbs and a lower glycemic index. He does low-carb bread, cheese, and crackers instead of mac-n-cheese, Go-Gurts, Two Good yogurts instead of the higher-carb ones, chicken meatballs instead of chicken nuggets, Fairlife milk instead of others  (because of his milk allergy, but it is better carb-wise also), keto-friendly cereal because others spike so much that I cannot get it down for hours, keto-friendly bread only because the GI level is so much better. There are some other changes, but the family has not changed any really. He does still eat candy, it is just more in moderation than before.

His go-to foods are pork rinds eggs, a brownie bar called “Good to Go”, keto-friendly ice cream, yellow bell peppers, broccoli, really any vegetable, cheese sticks, pepperoni, lollipop suckers. Any time we are out Chik-fil-A, grilled chicken and fruit are a must. That is all I can think of right now.

Photo credit: Cassie Daniels

At what point did you start using the Omnipod and Dexcom G6? How did Daxon handle that? 

The Dexcom was a month after being diagnosed and he did not handle it well at first. We would have to hold him down to get him to let me put it on. It was a nightmare but once he watched a friend of ours put her’s on and she told him “you have a robot just like me” he got used to it and now it is normal. When his phone tells us it’s time to change it, he’ll tell me “robot needs changed” and he will 100% do it solo now which is amazing.

The Omnipod was a little different. His first endo wouldn’t approve it because they thought he would take it off, so we had to wait but once we switched to a different hospital, they got him on it right away; so, he was about 7 months in when he was able to get the pod. At first, once again — NOT a fan and it was horrible — but once he learned it meant “no more shots” he was perfectly fine with it (sometimes). We will scream — and I mean scream  — the song “Baby Shark” so he will not hear the clicking for the needle and that seems to help also. He is currently working on putting the insulin in his pod so he is super excited about that.

I know I personally prefer shots, but am often intrigued by the control some pumpers get. Do you find using the pump helps make blood sugar management easier?

The pump for us personally is a lot better for different reasons. Omnipod allows such a small dose, so even 1 gram of carbs he would get some insulin, but with shots, we would have to round up or down, which meant [more fluctuations for him]. Also, in the middle of the night, being able to give him insulin without even touching him has been great. I hated waking him up to poke him with a needle. Also, when on the go we can dose from the front seat of the car. However, if he ever decides that he wants to stop the pump and go back to shots I will support him and what he wants 100%.

@cdaniels2015

95% completely solo 💙💙💙💙 He’s get the hang of this soooo quickly 😭🙏💙 #typeonediabadass #BigBoy

♬ Bang! – AJR

I couldn’t believe my eyes when my diabestie, Hillary Emmons,  sent me this TikTok of Daxon changing his own Dexcom! I am so impressed and inspired! At what point did he express interest in doing that?

After about six months of being a type 1, he has always been curious about everything. He has been checking his own sugar with the meter since about 6 months in when needed to be checked. And recently he was really showing interest in the Dexcom and doing it solo. He did half of it one day and then the next change he did it completely on his own, all I did was hold it and help place it. I never asked him to do it because I didn’t think he was ready for that task yet but that day he told me “I do it” and that was it. Now he is showing interest in some of the Omnipod stuff, which is amazing because he feels in control.

I give you credit as a parent for letting him own his management and giving him the confidence to know he can manage his disease! What would you like to tell other parents about how to get children to want to be a part of their daily care?

Make it positive, make it fun, and make it normal. We have the JDRF bear and we practiced on that since being diagnosed. At first, we used it so he could understand more of it. We also got his big brother and all the other family members involved since day one. We check everyone’s sugars, so it is normal for everyone. All the children in our family (our boys and our 3 nieces) have been very curious about it since day one.

I see you are using TikTok as a platform for awareness and this one video alone got over 103,000 likes! Kudos! What would you like people to take away from your videos?

I want people to know the signs of T1D and to normalize it. I hate when I see people hide that they check their sugar or even giving their self insulin. I want to help parents have a voice for their children because doctors sometimes do not listen, and we need to be loud for our children and to follow their gut. I have a lot of people say that he encouraged their children to try putting the Dexcom on solo and I love that it is helping other children also. One of my TikToks potentially saved a child from dying. Her sugar was almost 1000 mg/dL and she was in DKA and doctors were surprised she wasn’t in a coma. Children should not die for people [not being able] to figure out what is wrong!

Does Daxon enjoy making the TikTok videos? I think “injecting” some humor and fun is the best medicine of all! And one you can all do together as a family!

Daxon loves showing people his stuff. He knows it makes him unique and he loves seeing others who are like him. So, when people duet his videos and they show their Dex or pod it’s helpful for him also to see that there are others like him.

Photo credit: Cassie Daniels

What else does Daxon like to do with his free time when he’s not managing his diabetes and TikTok’ing?

Daxon is a typical boy and I mean ALL boy. He rough houses with his brother, loves to color, help with dishes, cooking, loves to read books, play outside, ride his 4-wheeler, and absolutely loves cuddling with me. I think him being a T1D made our bond even stronger.

How does Daxon feel about being a TikTok sensation and knowing that he is helping to inspire many other children just like himself!

I have told him many times that he is helping other children and I don’t think he really understands what it means yet, but he always smiles and says “they have a robot like me” or he’ll go “yay that makes me happy”. I ask him “do you want to make a video?” and normally he’ll tell me “yessss let’s make a video”. I will never make him make TikToks so if he tells me no then I’ll leave it alone.

I ask this in every interview! Do you think they’ll be a cure in Daxon’s lifetime?

100% honestly I do not foresee a cure ever. They make way too much money from insulin (when it should be free, but that’s another story for another time). I wish there would be a cure, but I don’t see it happening.

Daxon

Photo credit: Cassie Daniels

What advice helped you? Can you pass it along to parents of newly diagnosed children?

My advice for parents is:

  1. Take one day at a time because it is an always-changing, never-stopping, headache of a disease.
  2. Do your best and never get down on your child for their blood sugars. That is the one thing I will never do to Daxon, anytime he has “bad” sugars, I never express it to him or show it on my face because it is not his fault, so I don’t want him to feel like he is failing.
  3. Always tell your child they can still do anything they like and never change activities. Just change foods to help [manage sugars during] the activities. For example, we took Daxon and his brother to a trampoline park and I knew his sugar was going to drop. He started at 170 mg/dL and dropped to 50 mg/dL. I was prepared with milk, yogurt, chocolate, and others, so he could still have fun and be a kid.
  4. Try not to have a fight if sugars are not in range, because everything is magnified if high or low. So what I do with Daxon if he is high or low and has a temper tantrum, I ignore it and let him do what he needs to do. Once he calms down, we discuss what happened and I explain I understand he doesn’t feel good but he doesn’t need to act that way.
  5. Treat them like you would any other child because diabetes does NOT define them.

Where do you see going with your advocacy and awareness on social media or elsewhere? Do you have other plans in the future?

I would love to bring more awareness to this disease. I would love for there to be a law that pediatricians must check A1c every year or every other year. They check your iron, and they check lead so why not diabetes? [Some] pediatricians think that younger children cannot get diabetes until at least six years old which is not true. It is ridiculous because a child’s death is avoidable if people were more aware of the signs and doctors tested when they should.

Thanks again Cassie, we really appreciate you taking the time! I look forward to continuing to follow Daxon’s journey and see how many kids he inspires along the way!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

CGMs to “Hack” Your Blood Sugar? People with Diabetes Speak Up

It’s becoming more and more common: whether in a coffee shop in Silicon Valley or in a weightlifting gym in Boulder, Colorado, people without diabetes are using continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) to “hack” their blood sugars, lose weight, and hone their diets accordingly. This article will explore the use of CGMs in the non-diabetic population, what the backlash from the diabetes community has been, and what the call to action should be.

CGMs for More Than Just Diabetes Management?

According to one website that promotes the use of CGMs in a non-diabetic population,

“ Wearing a CGM can facilitate the effort for someone who wants to hack their diet, blood sugar control, and overall health. This technology can go beyond a single blood sugar reading that a blood glucose meter provides. A CGM can provide real-time insight on whether blood sugar is trending up or down.”

What may seem like an innocuous accessory for the upper-class elite has many people with diabetes enraged. CGMs are crucial in providing regular, near-constant blood glucose readings to track time spent in range (TIR), identifying patterns in blood sugars, and anticipating both low and high levels.

The Original Purpose of a Continuous Glucose Monitor

For people with diabetes, they are life-saving, and more and more often are being coupled with insulin pumps that will then increase or suspend insulin according to the blood sugar that a CGM reads. It almost entirely eliminates the need for manual finger testing and has proven to help lower HbA1c levels, reduce dangerous low blood sugars, increase time in range, prevent unnecessary emergency room (ER) visits, and save the health care system money and save many lives. It has quickly become a necessity for tight diabetes management in recent years for many people.

For something so seemingly necessary for most people with diabetes, it clearly isn’t seen that way by industry: 16 states, including California (the most populous), do not have Medicaid coverage for continuous glucose monitors at all. And while most private health insurance plans (and even Medicare) now cover CGMs, affording one without health insurance is nearly impossible: the most popular CGM and the one that most commonly connects with insulin pumps, the Dexcom CGM, costs thousands of dollars out of pocket per month without insurance.

So when someone with diabetes, who is already struggling to afford their insulin, goes to the local coffee shop and overhears two dudes from Crossfit comparing their (perfect) blood sugar readings on their respective CGMs over their non-fat decaf lattes, the inequity of the situation can be enough to make your skin crawl.

Clair from Illinois says,

“The general population using CGM devices trivializes them.”

Cate from Nebraska adds,

“It absolutely incenses me [when non-diabetics use CGMs]. There’s a local doctor in my area who treats patients for weight loss and gives everyone a free CGM; meanwhile, it’s an arm and a leg to refill my own.”

Bonnie from Minneapolis says,

“It drives me absolutely bananas.”

We Are All Just Products of the System

Managing diabetes with a continuous glucose monitor is life-changing, but it is expensive, and living with diabetes in America is anything but easy. We have the most expensive insulin prices in the world, health insurance isn’t compulsory or cheap, and even when you do have a job that has health insurance, necessary diabetes technology is sometimes not even covered or affordable under your plan.

Seeing people use technology that we need can be seen as a slap in the face, but we’re directing our anger at the wrong place. The problem with accessibility in the United States is not a supply issue. The problem with accessibility in the United States is that we use health care as a commodity when it is not. We put health care into a capitalist box when it’s something that should be treated as the human right it is. We’ve priced people out of their lives. We treat things like insulin and insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors as if they’re elastic goods when they’re 100% inelastic. We cannot negotiate our own pricing for insulin. We can’t haggle down the price or walk away. We need the drug or we die.

People without diabetes see products like continuous glucose monitors as the valuable goods they are and are willing to pay for them. No person who uses a CGM recreationally has it covered by their insurance, and it’s important to remember that.

It’s not a zero-sum game where someone’s CGM that’s paid for out of pocket in San Francisco precludes another person on Maine’s Medicaid program from accessing one of their own, but it feels like it does. Instead of taking our anger out on the gym-rat in Colorado who’s paying thousands of dollars out of pocket for their Dexcom each month (which is stupid, but why question their motives?), we should be angry at the government and systems that created this situation to begin with.

If the United States had a single-payer health care system where everyone who lives here had health coverage, we wouldn’t care what people buy on the free market. If all plans (including Medicaid!) covered CGM use for people with diabetes at 100% of the cost, it wouldn’t bother us what anyone else was doing with their blood sugar levels (diabetic or not). It’s a symptom of a system that denies people with diabetes the proper care and regular, reliable access to proper durable medical equipment that makes them covet these devices as much as we do. There’s nothing inherently wrong with people without diabetes using CGMs, but it does sure feel like there should be. 

CGM for non-diabetic population

Photo credit: iStock

Some People Support Wider Use of CGMs

In speaking with others for this story, I found several people who encourage non-diabetics to use CGMs, like Mindy, a registered dietician from Colorado,

“I am pleased that there is adequate supply for people without diabetes who can view the real-time movements and fluctuations of blood glucose. The more understanding there is in groups of non-DMs, maybe we can finally change the direction of people diagnosed with (type 2) in the future.”

Christie, from California, added,

“being mad about someone having a CGM that they bought on the free-market is similar to someone with hypertension being angry over another person having an at-home blood pressure monitor. It just doesn’t compute.”

In a country with nearly 100 million people living with prediabetes, learning to respond to blood sugar trends and figuring out which foods work best for your body can only be a good thing. And although it hasn’t happened yet, the more “mainstream” these devices become, the more affordable they’re bound to become, which would be great for everyone. Additionally, for shy diabetics, CGMs becoming more mainstream can also take away the stigma of having a visible device on your body 24/7. It’s suddenly “cool”.

Benefits for Everyone

Whether or not you have diabetes, a continuous glucose monitor can help with several things:

  • Learning how your body responds to certain foods (grapes versus crackers, for instance)
  • Identifying blood sugar patterns around mealtime and exercise
  • Diagnosing diabetes before the onset of ketoacidosis (DKA) in people at high risk (people who are overweight, obese, live with prediabetes, or who have the antibodies for type 1 diabetes)
  • Improving blood sugar to help maximize energy for a workouts
  • Helping people lose weight by managing their hunger (which is the result of fewer blood sugar fluctuations throughout the day)

In a country where over 70 million adults are obese and another 99 million are overweight, having more data regarding how our bodies respond to the foods we eat is vital. We have a type 2 diabetes epidemic on our hands that is only getting worse, and wider CGM usage may help curb that, but people need to be careful.

Using them as “wellness gimmicks” may bombard those who truly do not understand the relationship between glucose and blood sugars, leaving users overwhelmed with data and confused, while not making any dietary changes at all. In a true market economy, the greater the demand, the more competition will spring up, the more prices will fall (for both people with and without diabetes).

The real issue that people need to focus on is making sure that everyone with diabetes who wants a CGM can get one, but people without diabetes accessing CGMs on the open market will not prevent that from happening. We need to push for greater coverage for CGMs on the private and public health insurance market with our elected officials and make sure that we inch ever closer to the illustrious universal health care system that other industrialized countries enjoy. We need to make sure that everyone with diabetes has access to affordable insulin, pumps, and supplies (including CGMs), with strong grassroots advocacy to equip people with all the tools they need to thrive. If we achieve universal health care maybe someday everyone who truly needs a CGM can get one, but until then, let the Crossfit bro with his Dexcom sensor alone. Although you can let him know that the caffeine in his latte will raise his blood sugar a few points in the meantime.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Dexcom Super Bowl Ad: Did it Miss the Mark?

By Caroline Levens

 

Editor’s Note:

Nick Jonas, a music celebrity living with with type 1 diabetes (T1D) partnered with Dexcom and recorded a Super Bowl commercial for diabetes advocacy. Some in the diabetes community, however, feel that it missed the mark entirely. One of our contributors, Caroline, shared why.

***

When I first heard that Dexcom had an ad in the Super Bowl, I was quite surprised — but also really excited about the prospect of them bringing mainstream awareness to diabetes. Once I saw the ad, however, I was immediately disappointed, and I think it’s important to shed light on why the execution was so poor, in my opinion. 

First and foremost, the ad has Nick Jonas exclaim in a condescending tone “people with diabetes are still pricking their fingers…what??”

If you aren’t familiar with Dexcom, it’s a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), meaning it shares blood glucose readings every five minutes. And while it’s an amazing product, it’s not cheap — current Dexcom pricing without insurance is $4,744 per year. Insulin is an essential cost for diabetics, whereas Dexcom is a luxury. According to T1International, spending by patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) on insulin nearly doubled from 2012 to 2016, increasing from $2900 to $5700, and one of every four patients with T1D has had to ration their insulin due to cost.

It goes without saying – spending $10k+ on diabetes annually is a lot of money. When we’re in the middle of a pandemic where many people have lost their jobs and insurance, the way Dexcom comes across here is quite inconsiderate. I can’t think of a single other product category where a brand would think it’d be okay to frame a product in this context. Sure, there are many categories where the luxury price point is out of reach for the average consumer. But you don’t see them with commercials rubbing it in “what, you can’t afford us??” The analogy isn’t perfect, but it’s comparable to a luxury appliance brand with a Super Bowl ad saying, “people are still washing clothes by hand and using clotheslines, what??”

Secondly, the ad is very misleading, and they even have to have a legal disclaimer “Fingersticks required for diabetes treatment decisions if symptoms or expectations do not match readings.” I’d love to meet a Dexcom user who no longer needs ANY fingersticks. I love my Dexcom, I really do – I’ve been a loyal Dexcom user since 2008 and am extremely fortunate to have it.

That said, the accuracy, though it’s improved over the years, is still not perfect. And, accurate blood glucose values are essential for insulin dosing precision. Many endocrinologists specifically recommend not dosing off of Dexcom’s value. I can’t even count the number of times I would have died – and no I’m not exaggerating – if I had trusted the value on Dexcom. There are also many times it has error messages and doesn’t display any values and you need to use fingersticks (in the past week alone, I’ve had 20+ hours of this). There are also 2-hour warm up periods where you may need to check your blood sugar levels. No doubt in my mind, Nick Jonas pricks his finger, but of course if you pay him enough for a commercial, he’ll say what Dexcom wants him to say.

Last but not least, there’s already a big stigma associated with fingerpricks. It shouldn’t have to be something people are ashamed to do — it’s absolutely vital for survival — but I’ve experienced it before myself, especially in high school, and even still occasionally am uncomfortable checking my blood sugar in work settings, around new people etc. New technology is great, but “othering” fingersticks does not help. 

Dexcom, think about the little boy watching the Super Bowl who is already ashamed to prick his finger, knows Dexcom exists from diabetes camp (and from your lovely ad), wants it, his parents also want it for him, but it’s not a financial possibility. How do you think your ad makes him feel? Does it matter to you? Sure, the world’s not perfect. I 100% realize not everyone can get what they want. But this ad could have been approached in a completely different way that I believe would have delivered as strong as business results for Dexcom without doing any harm to the diabetes community. Dexcom had a big opportunity, and quite frankly, blew it.

Check it out for yourself and please share your thoughts in the comments:

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Tech on the Horizon: Where Will Automated Insulin Delivery (AID) be in 2021?

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Albert Cai

What AID systems are currently available, what can we expect in the next year, and where is AID technology headed?

Want more information just like this?

As we enter 2021, we’re taking a look at what’s ahead for automated insulin delivery (AID) systems. Because the COVID-19 pandemic delayed many clinical trials and FDA reviews in 2020, several companies are expecting to launch new AID systems in 2021. This list covers many of the most notable upcoming products, but there are likely others on the horizon – if you know of a system you think we should track, please let us know.

Click to jump to a product, organized by expected launch date. You’ll find detailed descriptions and possible launch timelines for each, reflecting US availability.

What is automated insulin delivery (AID)?

Automated insulin delivery has many names – artificial pancreas, hybrid closed loop, bionic pancreas, predictive low-glucose suspend – but all share the same goal: combining continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) with smart algorithms to automatically adjust insulin delivery via an insulin pump. AID systems aim to reduce or eliminate hypoglycemia, improve Time in Range, and reduce hyperglycemia – especially postmeal and overnight.

When thinking about the development of AID technology, it’s often helpful to think in stages.

  • Stage 1: The most basic AID system might shut off the insulin pump whenever the user’s CGM readings drop below a certain number, such as 70 mg/dl, to reduce time spent in hypoglycemia and help prevent severe hypoglycemia.
  • Stage 2: The AID system could predict when glucose is going to go low and automatically reduce or stop insulin delivery to further help prevent hypoglycemia.
  • Stage 3: The AID system may be able to automatically adjust basal insulin delivery depending on whether the user’s glucose is trending up or down, and taking into account other factors, such as insulin on board. This adjustment of basal insulin would aim to increase Time in Range (TIR), and help prevent both high and low glucose levels. At this stage, the user would still have to manually give meal boluses and correction boluses.
  • Stage 4: The AID system will be able to deliver correction boluses when glucose values are high. These small adjustment boluses would be a further step in improving TIR, with less time with hyperglycemia.
  • Stage 5: The systems will be able to detect meals and automatically deliver a system-calculated meal bolus to reduce postmeal high blood glucose levels. With the elimination of manual meal bolusing, the system is considered to be a “fully closed loop” System.

Currently available products are in stages 3-4. By the end of 2021, we may have multiple stage 4 systems available.

Medtronic MiniMed 670G and 770G – already available 

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Now available for people over the age of two.

What is it? Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G has been available since spring 2017 and was the first stage 3 AID system to be cleared by the FDA. Prior to the 670G, Medtronic released stage 1 and stage 2 systems (Medtronic MiniMed 530Gand 630G, respectively). More recently, the MiniMed 770G system was cleared in the US in September 2020. Both the MiniMed 670G and 770G systems use the same insulin adjustment algorithm, which adjusts basal insulin delivery every five minutes based on CGM readings, targeting 120 mg/dl. The target glucose level can be temporarily raised to 150 mg/dl when low blood sugar (is a concern, such as during exercise or sleepovers for children. Both systems come with Medtronic’s Guardian Sensor 3 CGM, which has seven-day wear and requires two fingerstick calibrations per day (although four are recommended). See our article from 2016 for a full breakdown on the MiniMed 670G and from September for more on the 770G.

What’s the difference between the MiniMed 670G and 770G? As mentioned, both the MiniMed 670G and 770G systems use the same insulin adjustment algorithm and the same CGM. However, the newer MiniMed 770G has an improved pump: the 770G pump includes Bluetooth connectivity and can be paired to the MiniMed Mobile smartphone app (available for the iOS and Android) for users to view their CGM and pump information without pulling out their pumps. The app also allows users to share their data with others in real-time. Note: users can only view information but cannot control the pump (e.g., deliver a bolus, adjust basal rates) from the app. Bluetooth connectivity also means the system’s insulin adjustment algorithm can be updated. Medtronic has promised current MiniMed 770G users a free upgrade to the MiniMed 780G when that system becomes available (more below). Finally, the MiniMed 670G is only cleared in the US for people over the age of seven, while the MiniMed 770G is cleared for people over the age of two.

Medtronic management recently shared that algorithms will become an increasingly important part of the diabetes ecosystem, and presumably, a key differentiator for companies – lots of exciting times ahead with AID, that is for certain.

Tandem Control-IQ – already available in US

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Now available for people six years and older.

What is it? The Control-IQ system from Tandem was cleared by the FDA at the end of 2019 and launched to customers in January 2020. It’s precursor – Basal-IQ – was cleared in 2018. The Control-IQ system uses Tandem’s t:slim X2 pump, Dexcom’s G6 CGM which requires no fingerstick calibrations, and the Control-IQ insulin adjustment algorithm. In addition to automatic basal rate adjustments and predictive insulin suspension, the Control-IQ system is the only AID system with automatic correction boluses: when it predicts glucose to be above 180 mg/dL in 30 minutes, the system will deliver 60% of the correction bolus needed to reach a target of 110 mg/dL. Control-IQ targets glucose values between 112.5 and 160 mg/dL, though users can turn on or schedule “Sleep Activity” mode to achieve 112.5-120 mg/dL by the morning. This past summer, Tandem launched the t:connect smartphone app (for iOS and Android), which allows users to check their pump and CGM data on their phones.

What’s next? With the current t:connect smartphone app, users can view information but cannot control the pump (e.g., deliver a bolus, adjust basal rates). Tandem has already submitted an updated app with pump control to the FDA and expects to launch that functionality in 2021. Tandem has also mentioned enhancements to the Control-IQ algorithm that are expected in 2021. While we haven’t heard many specifics, we believe it’s likely that these enhancements will focus on improving glycemic outcomes, personalization, and usability of the system.

Insulet Omnipod 5 – expected early-to-mid-2021 

AID

Image source: diaTribe

FDA submission is likely coming soon (if it hasn’t occurred already), and Insulet aims for a “limited” launch in early-to-mid 2021. Insulet has completed the clinical trial for Omnipod 5 but has not shared the results.

What’s new? Omnipod 5 is Insulet’s AID for its popular Omnipod disposable pumps, also called patch pumps. If you’ve been following the field, you’ll know that Insulet previously called the new system Horizon – same system, new name. Omnipod 5 uses Dexcom’s G6 CGM, and Insulet expects to launch the system with smartphone control capability; users can still opt for a dedicated controller device, since smartphone control will be available for Android users first. Insulet is working on an iPhone version for Omnipod 5, though that will not be available at launch. Insulet is also working with Tidepool (more below) on an iPhone-based AID system. Omnipod 5 will have adjustable targets between 100 to 150 mg/dl. Because the Omnipod pump will store the algorithm and communicate directly with Dexcom G6, the system will work even without the smartphone or pump controller nearby.

Medtronic MiniMed 780G – expected mid-2021

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Pivotal trial completed for 780G and presented at ADA 2020. Medtronic aims to submit the system to the FDA by January 2021 with launch coming around mid-2021 for adults (either ages 14+ or 18+).

What’s new? The MiniMed 780G will be Medtronic’s second AID algorithm and a significant upgrade over the MiniMed 670G and 770G systems. In addition to automatic basal rate adjustments, the MiniMed 780G will include automatic correction boluses and an adjustable glucose target down to 100 mg/dl. The system will also have fewer alarms and simpler operation with the goal of further increasing Time in Range. The MiniMed 770G and MiniMed 780G pumps are identical, meaning MiniMed 780G users will also be able to use the MiniMed Mobile smartphone app for viewing pump data, uploading pump data wirelessly, and updating their pump wirelessly. As the pumps are identical, Medtronic has promised that those who purchase the MiniMed 770G now will be able to wirelessly upgrade to the MiniMed 780G for free when 780G does become available. Finally, the MiniMed 780G will use the same Guardian Sensor 3 CGM as the 670G and 770G, which requires two fingerstick calibrations per day and has a seven-day wear time. As a sidenote, an improved CGM sensor is in development by Medtronic, but isn’t expected to be available when MiniMed 780G launches.

The MiniMed 780G is already available in many countries in Europe, and data from a clinical trial was presented at the ADA 2020 conference. On average, the 157 participants in the study (ages 14-75) saw their Time in Range improve by 1.4 hours per day (69% to 75%) while using the system – that’s particularly notable given the low baseline of the A1C. Speaking of A1C, the A1C improved by 0.5% (7.5% to 7%) after using the system.

Beta Bionics insulin-only iLet – expected mid-to-late-2021

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Pivotal trial underway with completion expected in the first half of 2021. Launch expected mid-to-late-2021, though this is subject to change.

What’s new? Beta Bionics is a Massachusetts-based startup developing an AID pump and algorithm called iLet. iLet will work with Dexcom and Senseonics’ CGMs (and possibly others in the future) and is designed to be especially user-friendly. diaTribe founder Kelly Close participated in an early Beta Bionics trial (2013!) and raved about the system and how easy the pump seems. At set up, users only need to enter body weight (no insulin-to-carb ratio, sensitivity factor, basal rates, etc.), and the system will learn more over time. To bolus, users will use icons to describe meals as containing more, less, or the same amount of carbs as usual (no carb counting). The insulin-only clinical trial for iLet began in the summer of 2020 and is expected to wrap up in the first half of 2021. Beta Bionics aims to launch iLet mid-to-late-2021, though this could be delayed as the FDA continues to prioritize COVID-19-related devices.

What’s next? Beta Bionics’ iLet is unique from the other pumps on this list, because it is designed to work in either insulin-only or insulin-and-glucagon configurations. With glucagon, Beta Bionics believes the system can reduce hypoglycemia while maintaining stable glucose levels and potentially even better-than-average, lower glucose levels due to availability of glucagon. Currently, there are different views on using glucagon in an AID system – in addition to the potential for improved glycemic management, there are uncertainties around glucagon pricing and availability. Regardless, the insulin-and-glucagon version of iLet is still a few years away.

Tidepool Loop – launch timing unclear

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Online observational study completed, and launch timeline depends on FDA progress.

What’s new? Unlike the others in this list, Tidepool is a non-profit and is working on the AID algorithm only; Tidepool does not have its own insulin pump or its own pump and CGM combination (like Medtronic). About two years ago, Tidepool announced plans to submit the do-it-yourself (DIY) Loop app to the FDA to become an officially supported app available on the Apple App Store, compatible with in-warranty, commercially available pumps and CGMs. For now, DIY Loop is a free, publicly available, open-source, non-FDA-approved AID system that works with Dexcom and Medtronic CGMs and old Medtronic and Insulet pumps. Read about Adam Brown’s experience using DIY Loop here. For those who are very interested in the project, there is a great deal to learn from notes that Tidepool shares about its communications with FDA – the latest notes are from a mid-2020 meeting.

Initially, Tidepool plans to launch with Insulet Omnipod and Dexcom G6 compatibility. To set it apart from the DIY-version, Tidepool Loop will have different colors, guardrails around certain settings, and a built-in tutorial for new users. A 12-month, completely virtual study was performed with Loop users and will support Tidepool’s submission of Loop to the FDA. The six-month data was presented at ATTD 2020 showing a Time in Range increase of about 1.4 hours per day (67% to 73%) with Loop. Tidepool also announced in November, 2020 that its human factors study had also been completed – this is another required step of the FDA submission. Much of what Tidepool is doing is unprecedented, so the launch timing is unclear.  In an update on January 8th, Tidepool shared that it has now completed FDA submission of Loop.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

New Tech: College Graduate Invents Glucose-Sensing Earring

Tyra K, a 22-year-old graduate from the University of Huddersfield, surpassed thousands of entries and became a finalist in the 2020 Global Grad Show. Tyra, a  product design graduate, created a discreet earring that can monitor blood glucose levels in real-time.  

I found her story to be quite fascinating along with her reason for creating this device, being that Tyra herself does not live with diabetes. I thought it would be nice to hear from Tyra on how this idea came to life.

Hi Tyra, thank you so much for taking the time to talk to me. I understand you do not live with diabetes. What gave you the inspiration to work on such a project?

Hi, thank you for having me! I was inspired to create a product that helped with type 1 diabetes (T1D) management after an incident that happened with a neighbor of mine. In summer 2019, my neighbor who is a male that lives independently had an unexpected hypoglycemic attack. Fortunately for him, the windows were open, which allowed me and my family members to hear a faint shout for help.

After realizing our neighbor needed assistance, we were able to gain access to his house and immediately called for the ambulance. After my neighbor had received medical assistance and the situation was resolved, it came to light that his hypoglycaemic attack developed thought-out the night, which almost triggered a diabetic coma. Due to this unfortunate circumstance, I was inspired to create a product that can prevent potentially fatal situations and support T1Ds.

What were the first steps you took once you had the idea? I know so many people have ideas but do not know how to execute them.

Once I decided to investigate diabetes management, my initial plan was to conduct and collect as much research as possible. As I am not a person with T1D, nor did I have much knowledge on the subject, [so] it was very important to me to learn as much as possible.

I set up focus groups, interviews, and questionnaires, to pinpoint the main areas of concern. Thanks to the help of the participating parents whose children have type 1 diabetes, I was able to create a focus group. This highlighted the main concerns among children/teenagers, such as the insecurities of managing diabetes in the presence of other people. I thought this was upsetting; no child should be embarrassed to monitor and control their health, especially as it is no fault of their own.

After processing all this information, I decided to create a product that would reduce the stigma of diabetes management and encourage younger type 1s to monitor their condition in a manner that caters to their needs.

I live with type 1 diabetes and wear the Dexcom G6 and find the technology to be life-saving. What makes your Sense Glucose Earring better than the big names like Dexcom and Freestyle Libre?

Products from brands such as Dexcom and Freestyle are revolutionary. The progress in diabetes management over the last 10 years is remarkable as the technology within existing products has helped many diabetics worldwide. Various CGMs seen on the market will cater to different consumer needs. Every consumer is different and will want different things from a product.

The Sense Glucose Earring is different from the leading brands as it focuses on making glucose monitoring discreet, quick and simple. It is designed to look like a piece of wearable tech, similar to wireless earphones, which aims to make monitoring in social situations more appealing and less distressing.

Sense Glucose Earring

Image credit: Tyra Kozlow

I think the earring idea is a fascinating one. How exactly does it measure your blood through your earlobe? Is insertion painful? Do you need finger prick calibrations?

Thank you! I am unable to give the full details on the technology at this stage, as the product is still being developed. However, I can tell you that inserting the device would not be painful, as it will fit into standard lobe piercing, so the only slightly painful part would be getting your ear pierced!

How often will you have to change the sensor? Or is it rechargeable?

The great thing about the Sense earring is that it is rechargeable. The device does not contain any disposable plastic components, the earring can be wiped clean and used as and when required. The life span of the product is yet to be confirmed, but the product is designed to last substantially longer than current invasive sensors.

I understand that once the Sense detects blood sugar levels, it then transmits the information to an app. What features does this app have other than displaying your blood sugar?

The app, like the earring, is still under development, but I hope that it will provide a personal experience for T1Ds, by providing the option for T1Ds share their glucose data with trusted family and friends, which creates a personal support network for the users who require it.

Since the inspiration for this device came from you chairing a focus group of parents who all had the same sentiments of their child not wanting to manage their condition in public due to the stigma, have you reconnected with these families to show them what you have created? What was their reaction? I’d imagine they were touched and humbled by your success!

Yes! I recently spoke to the chairwoman of the support group, who informed me that the group responded positively towards the Sense Glucose Earring and was excited to see how the product progresses in the Global Grad Show.

Sense Glucose Earring

Image credit: Tyra Kozlow

What are the next steps to bring this product to the public?

The next steps are to secure funding and build the right team to get the product on the market.

What enhancements can you see making to this device down the road?

At this moment in time, the focus is getting the earring onto the market, but I hope in the future we can produce variants of the product to further improve the lives of T1Ds.

Since you have already had such great success with such an important device that can help so many, what do you see yourself working on next? In ten years?

Personally, I hope to see the Sense Earring through to market implementation, and I desire to continue developing productions that have a positive impact on people’s lives.

Thanks so much for taking the time to speak with us, Tyra. We look forward to following your journey and wish you continued success!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Want to Try Continuous Glucose Monitoring?

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Eliza Skoler and Albert Cai

The Hello Dexcom 10-day sample kit includes a Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitor, instructions for set up, and guidance for getting the most out of your glucose data. Ask your healthcare team to order the device for you in the US or Canada.

Have you heard about continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for people with diabetes, but aren’t sure if it’s right for you? Dexcom’s new CGM sample program, Hello Dexcom, allows people with diabetes who take insulin to try out the Dexcom G6 CGM for 10 days in the US or Canada. Through Hello Dexcom, healthcare professionals can provide people with a free one-time sample of the technology, along with full instructions for set up and information on using and understanding their glucose data. All packaged in one small box, the program is designed so that people can start using the technology and interpreting their glucose levels on their own and from their home.

Continuous glucose monitors measure the body’s glucose (or sugar) levels in real-time by sensing the glucose present in tissue fluid under the skin. The Dexcom G6 CGM measures glucose levels every five minutes – this means that you can get 288 glucose readings a day without fingerstick blood sugar checks.

Dexcom G6

Image source: diaTribe

We got a sample in the mail and checked it out for you. Here’s what the Hello Dexcom kit includes:

  • A G6 CGM sensor, transmitter, and applicator
  • Easy-to-follow instructions on how to insert the sensor
  • Simple instructions for downloading the Dexcom G6 and Dexcom Clarity apps
  • An online portal with support and Frequently Asked Questions
  • A digital “10-day journey of empowerment” to teach you about the features of the G6 and to help you interpret CGM data. The 10-day course involves:
    • logging events and becoming familiar with the G6 and Clarity apps
    • adjusting alert settings
    • learning from meals
    • reviewing data through Dexcom Clarity
  • A printed guide to using your G6, with information alarms, treatment decisions, troubleshooting, and more
  • Note: the kit does not include a separate sensor reader, so only people with a smartphone (Apple or Android) can use this program.
Dexcom G6

Image source: diaTribe

Eliza got to try out the new product – here’s what she thought: All in all, I opened the box, read the instructions, and activated the online portal in less than ten minutes. The step-by-step set up instructions were straightforward and included illustrations, and I felt quite comfortable going through the process on my own. After I downloaded the Dexcom G6 app and made a Dexcom account, there were videos to help me insert the sensor and activate the transmitter.

If you’re curious about CGM, ask your healthcare professional if you can get Hello Dexcom – you can send our article their way. Healthcare professionals can learn more about the program and order Hello Dexcom sample kits here. To learn more about CGM – how it works, its benefits and considerations, what the data means, and stories from user – check out this CGM pocket guide.

For more try-before-you-buy diabetes technology, learn about the free Omnipod DASH insulin pump trial.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

New Dexcom Update: Your G7 Questions Answered

Last month, we chatted with Jake Leach, Dexcom’s chief technology officer (CTO) to get the latest scoop on the release timeline and new features of the Dexcom G7 continuous glucose monitor (CGM), a highly-anticipated diabetes technology that will be released in 2021. Many follow-up questions from our readers prompted us to follow-up further.

Without further adieu, here are your questions about the G7 answered:

There is no calibration, correct?

“This is correct.”

What about pharmacy vs. supplier distribution for the G7?

“We continue to focus on making CGM more accessible and easier to obtain for patients. Pharmacy is our preferred distribution channel and we have expanded pharmacy access for Dexcom CGM by nearly 80% since December 2018. This strategy will not change for G7.”

Now that the product is disposable, would this no longer be considered durable medical equipment (DME) and thus covered differently by insurance companies?

“The disposable aspect of the product has no impact on reimbursement.”

Do you anticipate working on integration with all the major pump companies?

“As the first iCGM on the market, and still the only one indicated for use with automated insulin delivery systems, Dexcom G6 is the forerunner in the category of interoperability and are advocates of patient choice in insulin delivery. G7 will be no different. With Insulet’s Omnipod 5 preparing for a first half of 2021 launch, we feel that our leadership in this category will result in us having integrations with the leading tethered pump on the market in Tandem’s Control.IQ, and the leading tubeless pump in Omnipod 5.

We are also very excited about the development progress that Lilly and Novo Nordisk are making in their Bluetooth connected smart pen technology and we continue to believe that the solutions we’re working on with those two teams will enable significant improvements in the user experience and ease the burden of diabetes in the MDI population, which represents the vast majority of intensive insulin users across the world.

Two years ago we stated that we believe that by 2023, 50% of our insulin intensive customer base will be using a connected insulin delivery device in combination with our CGM, and we believe that we are on track to hit that mark. Connected systems are truly the future of diabetes technology and we are working to extend our leadership in the category with these key partners and the tools that we have created to support these integrations, including our Dexcom artificial pancreas algorithm technology.”

Is there any evolution with the readout frequency (to be more frequent than every 5 minutes)?

“Patients and [providers] both tell us there isn’t a need for CGM systems to provide a glucose readout more frequently than every five minutes. This is especially true since Dexcom CGM has an Urgent Low Soon predictive alert that can warn users 20 minutes in advance of a severe hypoglycemic event (55 mg/dL), which helps give them time to take appropriate action before an event occurs.

Will G7 be approved for different wear locations (besides the abdomen)?

“We are conducting pivotal trials with the G7 in multiple wear locations, including abdomen and upper arm.”

Dexcom G7

Image source: Dexcom

In addition, Jake Leach had the following to say, highlighting his enthusiasm for the new developments:

“With G7, we’ve taken all of the great features that we’ve established with G6, features that have resulted in market-leading patient satisfaction scores, and have made them even better. G7 is a real time, factory calibrated continuous glucose monitor with iCGM level performance, a simplified application and start-up process, and a faster sensor warm-up time. We’ve packaged all of this into a fully disposable form-factor that is 60% smaller than our current G6 wearable and introduces significant cost reductions across the manufacturing process. This G7 wearable technology is paired with a brand-new app experience that includes real time glucose information combined with personalized insights designed to further enhance the unique value users get from Dexcom CGM. Take all of these features together and you can understand why we are so excited about G7 as a key driver of the growth story that we’ve laid out today.”

Are you excited to test drive the G7 CGM? Please share your thoughts in the comments!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Dexcom’s Chief Technology Officer Reveals Updates on the G7

We are almost through to the end of this year and we are all looking forward to new diabetes technologies coming out in 2021! Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology is an incredibly useful tool that can improve diabetes management, and the release of Dexcom’s new CGM, the G7 is certainly one to look out for. For me, the sheer difference in size alone (the G7 will be about the size of a quarter, certainly an improvement over the G6!) is something to get excited about. Moreover, the company has completely redesigned the product, which will now be completely disposable, as opposed to previous iterations that included a reusable transmitter.

I recently talked to Dexcom’s Chief Technology Officer, Jake Leach to get the most recent scoop on what’s to come with the release of the highly anticipated new product.

When Will the G7 be Released?

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the start of clinical trials was delayed. Leach explained that the company used that time to integrate in even more technology with the G7. Clinical studies needed to get FDA approval for the G7 are currently in the process of getting started. Although they could not disclose specific details on timing, Dexcom confirmed that will see the product come to market in 2021. A broader launch is expected to come in 2022.

What About the Accuracy?

Dexcom has taken a lot of technologies of the G6 and made improvements on them. It will need to meet stringent accuracy requirements to be approved by the FDA. It is expected that the product will perform well and offer improvements over existing technologies.

What About the Wear Time?

Currently, the Dexcom G6 is approved for 10-day wear. However, many users try to circumnavigate this. Dexcom’s CTO had this to say about advancements for the G7:

“The platform is designed to extend the wear beyond 10 days, so the electronics, etc. are compatible with that. We are striving for a very high level of reliability for both the sensor and the adhesive patch. [So far, early studies have shown that] the right time frame for our customers is 10 days with this product, but we do intend to continue working to expand both the sensor and adhesive performance to go beyond 10 days. We feel that our customers deserve a sensor that is highly reliable for the full wear duration, and so 10 days is where we’re at with G7.

What About the Cost?

“We know that for CGM to be accessed by many many people, we need to continue to remove cost from the general system. So, G7 is designed to be highly manufacturable in very large volumes. We have our first G7 line up and running. We are using a fully automated assembly line. The product is not only highly reliable but also lower cost to manufacture. Providing users with the product that is disposable, there were hurdles that we had to overcome in engineering, to be able to provide a product where you are throwing away more components, but we are able to do that at a cost-point equal to or lower than G6.”

What About the Sensor Insertion?

The sensor insertion will be fully automated. Dexcom stated that the product will be even easier to apply than the G6, and that the applicator will be much smaller than the G6, reducing the environmental footprint.

“We specifically designed it to be as small as possible [but still large enough to ensure a comfortable insertion process]. Definitely smaller than G6…”

What About the Adhesive?

In the diabetes online community, I have recently been hearing more reports of adhesive-related allergic skin reactions, and speculations that perhaps there was a change in the adhesive formula being used. Here is what Dexcom had to say about that:

“Some very small number of users do have issues with irritation, and there is a number of different ways that can be addressed. It’s a balance between the adhesive properties of making the sensor stay on for the full duration and there are so trade-offs with irritation. We are very focused on minimizing irritation. We have made improvements to the patch where many users are seeing their sensors last longer, but we have seen a small number of irritation complaints and we are focused on [for both the G6 and the G7] always making improvements. We are focused on investigating what possibly could be causing these irritant properties. The G7 does have a different adhesive than G6 and we are looking to ensure that [causes] very little, if any, irritation.

What About New Integration with Other Systems?

“The way that we’ve designed our system is so that it can integrate with many different types of systems.”

In addition to integration with the Tandem’s Control IQ and Insulet’s OmniPod system, integration has also been developed for Companion Medical’s InPen as well as over 25 commercially-available apps. Leach also highlighted that as of now, the Dexcom CGM is the only product that has been approved for use with hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery systems.

What About New Predictive Modeling Algorithms?

Recently, Dexcom has partnered with the University of Virginia to conduct research on a variety of automated insulin delivery models and algorithms. Dexcom has also partnered with the European company Ypsomed to further develop CGM integration for automated insulin delivery systems. In addition, Dexcom is working to investigate the use of CGM data, in general, to provide users with key insights on blood glucose trends and potential therapy optimizations.

“Our general approach is to provide many options to our users. We know diabetes is a personal disease and everyone has different opportunities to connect with different devices, and what they feel fits into their lifestyle. We try to support as many options as possible so we do that through the pump integration, as well as the digital ecosystem of the app partners.”

What About the Data Display and Device Compatibility?

“It will be compatible with both Android and iOS. One thing we are doing with the G7 app is we are integrating more insights into the app. So, G6 does a great job of showing glucose information, trends, as well as the ‘urgent low soon’ alert. G7 is taking that even farther and starting to integrate in a lot more of the some of the functionality from Clarity, some of those insights you get will be built into the G7.”

Dexcom is also working to enhance some features of their apps for data sharing with support people and clinicians. In addition, a receiver will still be a part of the new system, for those users who want an alternative to using their smartphone for data display.

Staying Ahead of the Competition

The CGM market is growing rapidly, with more and more companies coming out with competitive products. We asked Dexcom where they view themselves and what their advantages are over other systems.

“We feel that G7 is going to be a whole new level of comfort and convenience in the CGM ecosystem and the integration that we can build on with both insulin pump partners and the digital ecosystem of  apps… is a significant differentiator between [us] and some of the other competitors. We’ve been providing real-time CGM data since day 1, and we want to continue to expand and improve and provide users with new tools that enable them to take control of diabetes.

Moreover, the use of CGM technology is also expanding in the clinical setting, and Dexcom is a big player there.

“With COVID, we got approval for emergency authorization use for Dexcom CGM in the hospital. During the pandemic, since the beginning, hospitals have been acquiring the G6 from us and using the device in the hospital setting. It has performed very well. It also limited the need for interaction between healthcare providers and the patients [with COVID].”

We thank Jake Leach for taking the time to provide us with the most updated information. Sounds pretty great to us, and we look forward to learning even more and updating our readers as more details come to light!

Do you use a Dexcom CGM? What are your thoughts on the advances in CGM tech? Please share your thoughts in the comments.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes Life Hacks: Tools to Help You Thrive

Living with diabetes is a full-time job and one we never applied for. It can be mentally exhausting and emotionally and physically draining. I know I am always looking for any tips or tip-offs that can help me with my diabetes management–whether it be technology, travel perks, or even a new app that tells me to get my act together.

I asked the diabetes online community to share any and all fun tips and tip-offs that can help make our lives a little bit easier and enjoyable.

Here are the top 9 diabetes hacks that the diabetes online community shared:

Dexcom G6 Sensor

1. Restarting Dexcom Sensors

Did you know that you can extend your Dexcom G6 sensors beyond the 10-day cut off? There are quite a few ways to go about it depending on your transmitter code. You can find the right method to use here. This will save you a few pricks and pokes and some money too.

2. Free Admission to National Parks

People living with diabetes (or any other condition that falls under disability) can apply for free lifetime access to US national parks. You can obtain your pass through the mail which involves a $10 dollar processing fee, or you can get it in person to avoid the extra charge. This is a great perk that everyone should take advantage of at some point in their lifetime!

Sulli the Diabetes Guru

3. Sulli the Diabetes Guru

Roche Diabetes Care created a voice-activated assistant in the homes of people living with diabetes. This virtual source of support and information is available around the clock and free of charge on Amazon Alexa and on Google Assistant. Sulli the Diabetes Guru responds to important questions like “What is high blood sugar?”, “Is it okay to eat before my blood test?” as well as sets reminders to take medication and can even tell you where to find the closest blood monitor retailer!

Medal from Lilly Diabetes

Photo credit: Clare Fishman

4. Lilly Diabetes Journey Awards

Did you know you could receive a medal for your valiant effort of managing your diabetes? This program recognizes people who have managed their type 1 diabetes successfully with insulin for 10, 25, 50 and 75 years. Each recipient receives a beautiful award, engraved with their name, along with a signed letter from Lilly’s CEO, Dave Ricks, acknowledging and encouraging their continued dedication. This program helps celebrate each other’s victories and hopes to inspire others living with diabetes.

People living with type 1 diabetes or parents of children with type 1 diabetes in the United States can complete and submit the Lilly Diabetes Journey Awards application here. If you are outside the United States and are interested in learning more about Lilly programs in your country, please contact your local Lilly affiliate for more information.

Lilly also offers other programs such as their Lilly Camp Care Package program, which provides diabetes educational kits, inspirational speakers, insulin, and other supplies to camps for children with diabetes. Lilly also offers college resources after partnering with The College Diabetes Network. CDN realizes that campus life and independence can be hard enough without diabetes. They created a community for young adults living with diabetes through its national network of campus-based chapters and their resources available on their website.

5. Ask Siri for Your Glucose Reading

If you are using a Dexcom CGM, you can take advantage of Siri and ask her any time of the day, “What is my blood sugar?” and she will take the reading from your Dexcom and say it out loud. This has become incredibly useful when I’m driving or don’t have the time to unlock my phone and go to the Dexcom app.

6. Happy Bob App

This app takes mundane diabetes data and turns it into an engaging and positive experience for the user. You can switch between Happy Bob and Snarky Bob to get a different dose of entertainment. Both of which will help ease the stress of this disease and leave you with a smile!

7. Dexcom Overlay

Did you know that Dexcom offers free over-patches to help reinforce the adhesive? There are plenty of great companies out there that offer this as well but be sure to take advantage of this free offer and see how it works for you and/or your child. You can submit a request using this form.

8. Preboarding Before a Flight

As people living with diabetes, we are allowed to preboard all flights. This is helpful to get your luggage in a safe space and make sure you have time to access any supplies or snacks before the plane gets crowded and it’s more difficult to move around. This will help set you up for a comfortable and relaxing flight. Read here for more information on air travel and what you need to know.

9. Sugarmate App

Sugarmate is a companion app for those using Dexcom G5/G6 and boasts many great features such as apple watch integration, will call you if your CGM goes low, and is ignored, even if it is in the Do Not Disturb mode. The newest feature if you own a car with CarPlay and connect your phone, your blood sugar will automatically display on your screen.

Make sure to take advantage of these above diabetes hacks to make living life with diabetes a little easier. Many of the above tips can help change your mindset, improve your mood, and give you a little motivation to keep on thriving.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Mark Andrews: A Tight End with Type 1 Diabetes

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Katie Doyle

The Baltimore Ravens didn’t choose just any offensive lineup during the 2018 NFL draft – a key part of their strategy is Mark Andrews, a tight end from the University of Oklahoma who has been managing his type 1 diabetes since before he started playing football and into his rookie season.

Beyond Type 1 spoke with Mark about his pre-game rituals, how technology like the Dexcom G6 helps him stay on top of type 1 on long Sunday afternoons, and why it’s important to use his high-profile career to educate and advocate with National Diabetes Awareness month coming up.

How have you managed your diabetes through major life changes, like going away to college, playing a division 1 sport, or going through the NFL draft?

I was diagnosed at 9 years old, and it was the first time I ever saw my dad cry. At that moment, I knew it was serious because it wasn’t something my dad did very often. And since then, my family has been my rock. I was lucky enough to have a dad who was also a doctor and had an understanding of diabetes when I first was diagnosed.

Personally, I wasn’t very nervous. I knew that one day I wanted to move out, play football at a Division 1 level and ultimately play in the NFL. It’s something I was always very diligent about. I wasn’t going to let my nerves or anything else get in the way of that. My mom probably worried most, but my dad was instrumental in instructing my whole family in what to expect and what to know. I rely on them a ton. Using a CGM allows them to be a part of it and know my numbers at all times. It gives them peace of mind to be able to check in on me.

Mark

Image source: Beyond Type 1

How does your family support you from across the country?

My mom will always be my mom, so she still checks on me regularly. Last week, she texted me and said, ‘Hey, I don’t think you have enough complex carbs on board, you’ve been going low and trending low a lot. Just want you to eat something that gives you more complex carbs. I love you, hope you’re having a good week; I’ll talk to you soon!”

It’s awesome to get a text message like that and know my family has my back. After that, I ate a peanut butter and jelly sandwich just to have that background complex carb and went about my day. It’s always good having people look out for you — the more eyes you have on someone with diabetes, the better.

I’ve got a teammate right now named Orlando Brown whose dad had diabetes so he’s incredibly well-informed. He was my college teammate and now he’s my NFL teammate with the Ravens. He’s always wondering what my numbers are, and I actually share my numbers with him from my Dexcom.

When did you feel comfortable enough to talk to your friends and teammates about diabetes?

At first, I remember feeling a little bit reserved and not being totally open about it. I’d go hide in a corner to test. I also remember the first time my friends saw me testing my blood sugar. I was 10 or 11 years old, and they saw blood and thought it was cool. I was kind of in the spotlight because they were so interested in what I was doing.

That opened me up to be more vocal and to share what I’m doing and how I deal with things. After that, I became really comfortable sharing what I deal with having T1D and how I deal with it and sharing with others. I was very open talking to my coaches, and I had my parents to help me out with that, and they still do that to this day. Ever since then, I’ve always wanted to talk about it and shed light on what people with diabetes have to do.

Tell us about your pre-game ritual.

I do something a little bit different: I wear a pump, so I use that for basal (25%) and I use Lantus for my other type of basal (75%) on a normal day. But on a game day, I’ll go 100% Lantus — that allows me to be off the pump for long periods of time but not have to worry.

Knowing your body is key. Knowing what I put in my body and how it will affect me is something that I feel has been instrumental for my health. I’m a big fan of complex carbs; I eat peanut butter and jellies, especially on game days or the day before a game, just allowing myself to have that complex carb to hold me over while I’m exerting a lot of energy.

Having my Dexcom, and the way it allows me to see my blood glucose trends and see what foods react a certain way has been huge for me. There’s a lot that goes into diabetes management, and I think it’s incredible that I can rely on Dexcom and not have to prick my fingers all the time. It really sets me up for success on the field.

Who are your role models?

I didn’t know anyone else with diabetes growing up, but I have my dad, who is extremely knowledgeable and always researching different things. He’s the reason I went to 100% Lantus for game days.

I can remember, at a young age, having diabetes and seeing Jay Cutler in the League, and being able to tell myself that it’s possible. I adopted a mindset that this disease is a part of who I am, but it’s not going to define me and it’s never going to stop me in achieving my dreams. Football is my passion, it’s what I love, but now it’s my job, and diabetes is something I refuse to let affect my job.

You seem like you have a ritual down for games, but how about during the NFL draft? How were you feeling then?

There’s so much work that had been put into that moment, from my mom driving me to soccer practice, to all those hard hours put in on the field, it all lead to that moment of actually playing in the NFL. It was kind of scary to know that that you’re putting your future into someone else’s hands — into 32 organizations’ hands — but this has been my dream for a very, very long time.

Why is it important for young athletes with type 1 to have role models?

To be put on this stage, I’ve always wanted to give back and for me, that’s with diabetes — that hits home for me. Helping kids with diabetes is something that I’ve found has given me the most reward: raising awareness and talking to people about how I use technology and what I do with it, it’s to help people with everyday life and share some of that.

I’m going to work as hard as I can to be the best tight end that I can be, and hopefully one of the premiers tight ends in the League. I want kids to see where I’m at today, like I saw Jay Cutler, and I hope it inspires them to go out there and play sports and be active — to follow their dreams, no matter what they may be. A professional football player? Great! Go out and achieve it. Or if anything else, you know, This guy’s playing football at the highest level, then I can do anything else!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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