How to Advocate for Yourself: Making Employer-Sponsored Health Plans Work for Your Diabetes Care

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Julia Kenney

The therapies, devices, and care that people with diabetes need can be expensive without adequate insurance coverage. For those with employer-sponsored health insurance, there are steps you can take to improve your insurance options and advocate for yourself.

Over 45 percent of Americans have diabetes or prediabetes and roughly half of US adults receive health insurance through their employer. Unfortunately, not all employer-sponsored health plans meet the needs of people with diabetes. According to a study of 65,000 people with type 1 diabetes on employer-sponsored health insurance, the average annual out-of-pocket cost of diabetes care was $2,500. Eight percent of study participants had annual costs well over $5,000. Since diabetes is most prevalent in low- and middle-income households, these costs, in addition to paying for premiums and non-diabetes healthcare, are unaffordable for many people.

If your health insurance does not cover a component of your diabetes healthcare, or if your diabetes care is covered but still unaffordable, you can work with your employer to get better coverage. Here is an overview of the different types of health insurance, who to go to for help, and how to advocate for better diabetes health coverage.

What are the different types of health insurance?

You will have expenses no matter what health insurance you have, but some plans can be more affordable for diabetes care. These are the expenses you will typically encounter with your health insurance plan:

  • Premium – Similar to paying rent, a premium is a fixed amount that you pay every month to keep your health insurance active. It’s common for employers to pay about half of your monthly premium, and sometimes more. In 2019, people with employer-sponsored insurance paid an annual average of $1,242 for health insurance premiums.
  • Deductible – The deductible is the amount you pay out-of-pocket before your insurance provider covers expenses. For example, if you have a $1,000 deductible, your insurance coverage will not kick in until you’ve paid $1,000 in healthcare expenses for that year.
  • Copays – Copays are a fixed amount that you pay for a health service or medication, and your insurance provider covers the rest of the cost. Copays are a helpful way to pay for diabetes care because they are fixed, predictable costs that people can plan for.
  • Coinsurance – Unlike fixed-price copays, coinsurance costs are a percentage of the total price of a health service or medication. These expenses are less predictable because medication prices can fluctuate.

There are three main types of health insurance – health maintenance organizations (HMO), preferred provider organizations (PPO), and high deductible health plans (HDHP). Here is an overview of the different types of health plans and what they might cost:

  • HMO – Health maintenance organizations have high premiums and low deductibles. An HMO plan covers healthcare within a network of hospitals and healthcare professionals. Your providers must be in-network in order to get your diabetes care covered. If your diabetes care professionals are in-network, this is often the most cost-effective healthcare option for people with diabetes.
  • PPO – Preferred provider organizations also have high premiums and low deductibles than HDHPs. PPOs are more flexible than HMOs because you are able to see providers out-of-network and you can see specialists without a referral. Because of this, PPOs typically have higher premiums and out-of-pocket costs than HMO plans.
  • HDHP – High deductible health plans typically have low monthly premiums and high deductibles. In 2020, the IRS defined a HDHP as any plan with a deductible of at least $1,400 for an individual and $2,800 for a family. If you have a high deductible health plan, you can open a health savings account where you set aside money to pay for medical expenses tax-free. These health plans are good for people who don’t anticipate needing regular healthcare; paying for diabetes care can be difficult with this type of plan because you will have high out-of-pocket costs upfront before you meet your deductible.
Advocacy

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Keeping these different types of health insurance and related expenses in mind, here are some things people with diabetes should think about when reviewing an employer-sponsored health plan:

  • What are my diabetes-related costs? Make a list of your diabetes healthcare costs including medications, devices, supplies, healthcare visits, and lab tests.
  • What are the health insurance costs? Look at the premium, deductible, and whatever cost sharing method (copay or coinsurance) is used for the health plan.
  • Are my medications and devices covered? Refer to your health plan’s Summary of Benefits and Coverage to see what is included in your insurance coverage. If a therapy or device is not covered, you may have to switch to one that is or submit a request to get it covered. Getting a new medication or device covered under your health plan can be a challenging and time-consuming process.
  • Is insulin covered pre-deductible? Some health plans cover insulin before you reach your deductible because it is considered preventive medicine. This can make insulin considerably more affordable, especially for people on high deductible health plans.
  • Are my healthcare professionals in-network? Accessing in-network healthcare is more affordable than out-of-network care. You should choose a health plan where your current providers are in-network or one that has good in-network options.
  • Can I access a flexible spending account (FSA) or health savings account (HSA) to save money? FSAs and HSAs are used to put aside money that is not taxed to help pay for medical expenses. HSAs are paired with high deductible health plans. FSAs can be used for any kind of health insurance and all FSA funds must be used in the same calendar year. Learn more about FSAs and HSAs here.

If I have a problem with my insurance, who do I go to for help?

Your employer’s human resources (HR) department should be able to address many of your insurance-related questions, since it likely helped select the health plan(s) available to you. Your HR department is your first resource for health insurance questions. If you need help selecting an insurance plan, want to see if your diabetes care is covered, need to file a claim, or are having trouble navigating your plan and understanding the costs, the HR department will support you.

For further questions, your HR department can refer you to a representative with the health insurance company or to a third-party administrator. A third-party administrator will help you understand your health plan, file health insurance claims, and navigate the appeals process if your insurance company denies coverage for a diabetes treatment. You can also apply for an exception to get treatments, medications, and devices covered if recommended by your doctor. A third-party administrator will guide you through these steps for getting important diabetes treatments covered.

Advocacy

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How can I make my employer-sponsored health coverage better for people with diabetes?

People with diabetes typically require expensive medications, devices, and regular visits with healthcare professionals to stay healthy. Robust employer-sponsored health insurance plans should make these expenses affordable and predictable. If you are trying to make permanent changes to your employer-sponsored health plan, your HR department can help you advocate for future health plans that better support diabetes needs. Employers have the power to make changes to their health coverage options every year. Here are some changes you can advocate for:

  • Add insulin and other diabetes care to the preventive medicine list.

In 2019, the IRS ruled that expenses for chronic disease management can be covered before you meet your deductible under a high deductible health plan. HMOs and PPOs also have preventive medicine lists. Diabetes care such as insulin, A1C testing, blood glucose meters, and eye screening – which are all considered preventive medicine – can be added to the preventive medicine list to reduce the copay or coinsurance costs for diabetes care. This saves employees money instead of paying full price before meeting their deductible.

  • Request to get a medication or device covered under your health plan.

If a device or medication you currently use (or want to try) is not covered under your health plan, you can ask for coverage in next year’s health plan. Diabetes devices, such as continuous glucose monitors (CGM) and insulin pumps, can help people with diabetes manage their glucose levels and increase their Time in Range, but are expensive without insurance coverage. Employers can typically negotiate to cover essential diabetes care, so request coverage for your medications and devices. Your diabetes treatment should be determined by your healthcare professional, not by what’s included in your health plan.

  • Share discounts and rebates with employees.

While list prices for diabetes medications may be high, your employer’s pharmacy benefit manager (PBM) can negotiate discounts and rebates on drug prices on behalf of the insurance plan and employer. The list price minus the negotiated discounts is called the net price. Sometimes PBMs and employers will keep the money saved; however, employers can pass discounts on to their employees to lower their out-of-pocket costs.

  • Use copayments for cost sharing instead of unpredictable coinsurance.

Coinsurance costs are unpredictable because they fluctuate as a drug’s net price changes. You can advocate for your employer to choose health plans that use copayments for healthcare cost sharing, instead of coinsurance.

More resources for accessing diabetes healthcare with your employer-sponsored health plan:

Feel free to share this article with your employer or your HR department. All people with diabetes deserve access to affordable, high-quality care. To learn more about health insurance and affording diabetes treatment, visit diaTribe.org/access.

Diabetes Series

Image source: iStock Photo

This article is part of a series on access that was made possible by support from Insulet. The diaTribe Foundation retains strict editorial independence for all content. 

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Rare Until It Happens to You: The Kycie Terry Story

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Jordan Jendricks

Jamie Terry doesn’t know what exactly it is about her daughter that resonates so deeply with people. But there’s something about the combination of her curly blond hair, striking blue eyes, and the circumstances around her unfortunate and preventable death that have incredible staying power, inspiring countless others to action.

“There have been many times that I’ve thought about that. There are sick children all over the world, why Kycie? But there’s something about her and I truly believe she was here on a mission. She’s still on a mission. I just think there’s a reason behind it all.”

Because even now, five years after her tragic passing, strangers from around the world still reach out to the Terry family about their little girl. They remember Kycie and her story, which has reached thousands and saved an untold number of lives. Kycie’s father, Josh, has lost count of how many other parents have thanked him, explaining they, too, might have lost a child if not for his daughter’s story.

“I don’t know why it went as viral as it did. I think she just has a face, too. And you can see how heartbreaking it was and how hard she worked to try and get back. If you lose a child or you lose a family member, to think that they died for nothing, it’s that much harder. To know that she’s made a difference in other people’s lives and helped save other people’s lives, and saved a lot of heartache and struggles, it’s more doable.”

Kycie Jai Terry was the second youngest of six children and the only girl. After four boys, Jamie remembers crying tears of joy over her fifth ultrasound and the realization she would finally have a little girl. She remembers her daughter as a vibrant child, who loved to dress up, ride bikes and catch lizards; who was a little bit of everything and unique, as her name suggests.

“I don’t think I realized at that time, but now I think there’s a reason that she has this unique name because you Google her and she pops up and it’s because she needed to make a difference in the world.”

Where Things Went Wrong

Kycie

Image source: Beyond Type 1

Kycie was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes on January 30th, 2015 while in DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis). Where her story differs from many who live with undiagnosed type 1 and go into DKA is that she ultimately experienced cerebral edema, a condition where fluid builds up around the brain, causing pressure and swelling. This complication was occurring unbeknownst to the healthcare providers treating her at the time, wreaking havoc on Kycie’s brain and nervous system as she slept in her ER room bed. Less than 1% of pediatric patients in DKA experience cerebral edema, making it rare, though this statistic was of little comfort to the Terry family. As Josh puts it, “It’s always rare until it happens to you.”

As he recalls, Kycie’s initial symptoms started with a headache, then a stomachache. It seemed like she might have had a stomach flu, then strep. But she didn’t get better with antibiotics; in fact, she worsened. She didn’t want to eat, she only wanted fluids, and she was suddenly remarkably skinny. The Terrys felt an urgency to take their daughter to the hospital as her condition only seemed to get worse. She was extremely lethargic once there, and Josh recalls her fruity breath, a tell-tale sign of ketones. Sure enough, the doctor quickly revealed the cause of the problem: “She has type 1 diabetes.”

But Kycie’s blood sugar was difficult to control. Later, the Terrys would learn that during this time in the ER, doctors were focusing solely on treating her diabetes without realizing that she had experienced any brain damage, or that it was growing worse. With blood sugar readings over 1,100 mg/dl (61 mmol/L), Kycie was in severe DKA and needed to be life-flighted to a children’s hospital five hours away. After landing, she suffered a seizure on the ambulance ride from the airport to the hospital. Four hours later, she was intubated, on a ventilator, unresponsive and in a diabetic coma.

An MRI was completed after Kycie was in a coma for over 24 hours, revealing for the first time the cerebral edema. Doctors told the Terrys that they didn’t expect her to live, but Kycie fought, ultimately coming to breathe again on her own before waking up. She spent the next 111 days in the hospital to relearn basic functions, after which she was able to go home and live with her family for another month and a half, though her life was entirely different. It was suddenly a feat for the five-year-old to hold her own head up, smile, or roll over by herself. Josh remembers feeling torn and heartbroken to see his daughter’s life suddenly so difficult.

“I remember sitting up there and thinking what a horrible situation she was in – a situation I wouldn’t want to be in. If I was in that place, I wouldn’t want to live that life,” he shares. “At the same time, she’s my little girl and it’s my job to protect her and my job to be there for her. It was a really hard place to be.”

Kycie

Image source: Beyond Type 1

The family continued on, taking care of their daughter and treasuring the few good times during otherwise long days. They documented their new normal, sharing feel-good moments and milestones on social media.

Kycie then caught a virus that led to pneumonia and another hospitalization, setting back some of her progress and making her less responsive. Though she was able to return home after growing stronger, in the early morning hours of July 11th, her oxygen levels were extremely low and her parents were poised to take her to the hospital yet again. Before they could leave the house, the second youngest Terry passed away peacefully in her father’s arms. She was a few months shy of her sixth birthday.

Her Legacy Lives On

Kycie is well-known now in the diabetes community, her story having touched so many all over the world. Beyond Type 1’s Warning Signs Awareness Campaign, which began in 2016, was inspired by her story and the reality that both misdiagnosis and missed diagnoses are problems that can be solved through education and awareness. Josh and Jamie both can’t underscore enough the importance of being able to recognize the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

“To get an early diagnosis is so critical. If you can catch type 1 before DKA, you’ve saved yourself the possibility of brain damage,” Josh explains. “And so that early recognition is so vital, not just because of the scariness of DKA, but because of the unknown that comes with it.”

Jamie reflects on her own lack of knowledge about diabetes in general and how Kycie’s situation truly opened her eyes to a chronic illness that affects so many on a daily basis.

“I knew nothing about it. And the thing that’s crazy with Kycie is it all happened so fast. Within five days, she had a traumatic brain injury,” she explains.

Jamie sympathizes with everyone who manages type 1 diabetes, having gotten a small taste of the complexity of the disease while caring for Kycie’s type 1 diabetes (T1D) the short time she was able: “That’s what is heartbreaking to me. Anyone that ever comes up to me and tells me they have type 1, the first thing I say to them is ‘I’m so sorry’ because it’s so much to take on. And we didn’t even get to.”

The Terry family now advocates for safe and early diagnoses of type 1 diabetes, sharing about Kycie whenever they can and working with local hospitals to help improve type 1 protocols. In Josh’s practice as an optometrist, he lectures others in his field on type 1 and the importance of recognizing changes in vision as potential signs. Their family is continually touched by the outpouring of love for their little girl and all they’ve been through, the community they’ve found through their loss and the surprising amount of good that has come out of an otherwise tragic situation.

As Jamie puts it, “There’s no greater title than ‘Kycie’s mom.’ It will always be hard to live without her, but part of the healing journey has been to know that she has saved and continues to save lives.”

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Type 1 Diabetes: Advocacy 101

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Katie Doyle

If one of your resolutions for 2018 was to learn more about getting involved in advocacy, be a more effective advocate or support advocacy groups, we have a story that will get you motivated! Check out this profile for some advo inspo:

Advocacy

Image source: Beyond Type 1

Cameron Keighron, a student at National University of Ireland (NUI) Galway, is making strides in his community by standing up for his LGBT peers and people with disabilities. You may recognize Cameron’s name from our 2017 story about an NUI Galway research team’s D1 now study on the relationships young adults with type 1 have with their healthcare teams — Cameron is a member of the Young Adult Panel that advises the D1 now study. We recently picked his brain to find out what it takes for those of us looking to dive into a certain project or be a more active participant in our communities.

Become the Advocate You Need

“I was the first and only type 1 diabetic diagnosed in my family and was thrust into a world of complete confusion,” said Cameron, who was diagnosed when he was 16. “As is so common with my generation, I took to the internet to find some sort of support with this transition in my life. I found a group on a diabetes forum that would become my support group for the next number of years, juggling my diabetes with high school, university and much more.”

Cameron’s positive experience with the diabetes online community inspired him to give back when he found himself in a position to do so. “Before going to university, I asked to switch to insulin pump therapy. I became somewhat of a support for people I had met online for pump issues and transitioning from childhood to adulthood. I became the support that I so desperately needed when I was first diagnosed.”

Recognize When the Time Is Right

Cameron is currently a graduate student completing a master in Regenerative Medicine. After joining three student societies during his undergraduate years, Cameron became a disability advocate at NUI Galway and found a calling in administering to student societies as a grad student.

“I am heavily involved in LGBT and disability activism in Galway and the wider country,” he said. “When I finished up my degree it was a natural progression, really, to move from one side of societies to the other. I had been working on the development and governing committee of societies, working hard on implementing policy changes to the way societies ran themselves. With this, I found my home within my job of policy and training development. Currently, I mentor new and existing societies through their constitutions and through the training programs we design for them.”

Think Globally, Change Locally

Like many of us with type 1, Cameron has overcome other challenges through his work in the community. “I came out as a queer trans man at 19 and have been campaigning for equal rights ever since. NUI Galway strives to be inclusive of all LGBT+ students and staff. The biggest change that I have seen is the willingness to talk about these issues, to talk about what is going wrong and how can we fix it. We recently brought in gender-neutral bathrooms for all people across campus. We strive to educate both the student and staff population on LGBT+ issues and raise awareness of how people can get involved in the campaign for equality.”

He has seen broad impacts in his work in the diabetes sphere as well: “After becoming involved with the Young Adult panel, my passion for diabetes advocacy grew, especially in my age group. I saw what wasn’t working with my care and helped develop innovative solutions in the hopes of correcting this. We were given the opportunity to help write papers, present at conferences and influence the project in every aspect of its development. Right now, I have signed on to be a part of the second phase of the project where we are hopefully to be recognised as co-researchers.”

Appreciate Every Victory

“My relationship with my diabetes team was essentially non-existent before the Young Adult panel. After joining the panel I started to build up a rapport with key members of the team. Since engaging with the group, I have found it a lot easier to engage with the team and that my own diabetes care improved.”

Cameron notes that advances in his college setting have improved his overall experience there. “When I started in NUI Galway no one really knew what “transgender” meant, no one had a way of relating to me and how I felt. I found a group of people who worked with me and on my behalf, lobbying for change and recognition, a fight still on going in many universities. For me, NUI Galway became a home, it adapted to its ever-changing demographic with provisions in place for people to change their student records and ID cards if needed.”

Keep an Eye on the Long-Term

For Cameron, advocating for any cause takes a lot of energy and focus. “In all the areas that I am involved with, in the positions that I hold, you generally get asked some inappropriate questions and it’s tough to find the fine line between answering their question with respect and without getting angry.”

“It’s also tough, I think, because as humans we surround ourselves with like minded people, that’s just who we are attracted to. So when we leave those bubbles and see that actually people in the world still have the crappy views on people it can be tough to keep motivated.”

Despite challenges, Cameron is hopeful about the future. “People with disabilities are becoming more and more visible on campuses across Ireland. They are given a voice to talk about their experiences and where we can do better.”

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Treating Type 1 Diabetes in Bangladesh: Dr. Kaufman and Life for a Child

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Francine R. Kaufman, M.D.

Greetings from Dhaka

Traveling over the city by air and then languishing in traffic forever to get to the hotel, I see what now seems typical of a developing country: cars, motorbikes, rickshaws, and people at a standstill jammed up in traffic with horns blaring like a discordant symphony; people living on the streets; old buildings with new structures next to them supported by cranes and rebar trying to reach for the sky.

Yesterday, I was at the main diabetes hospital all day seeing patients. I was with Graham Ogle, who runs Life for a Child and continues to deserve sainthood for his global work in bringing care, education, supplies, and life to close to 21,000 children around the world who likely would perish without his efforts. Graham is so humble and focused; he seemingly knows everyone and everything about the care of children with diabetes in Dhaka, as well as everywhere Life for a Child collaborates with local health care providers in over 40 countries.

Kid

Image source: Beyond Type 1

The diabetes hospital – called BIRDEM – is run by Dr. Bedowra Zabeen, an amazing woman and endocrinologist who is known worldwide for her work throughout Bangladesh. They follow over 7,000 children with diabetes (there are 9,000 total in all of Bangladesh); hundreds come in each day for outpatient care or to be admitted. The Life for a Child program follows 3000 children and young adults (up to age 26) and the Novo Nordisk program helps with another 3000 children. This means few can afford to buy insulin and supplies on their own since there is still insufficient support by the government or insurance programs in this country. From Life for a Child, they can only get regular and NPH insulin and 1-2 blood glucose strips per day. This is how I practiced pediatric diabetes 25-35 years ago. There are a few using newer insulins and even a few with insulin pumps, so if there are resources, families can buy better diabetes care than what is offered by these free charity programs.

Work to Be Done

The patients come through like a torrent. First, a newly-diagnosed child, so emaciated and weak, she could barely stand up. Then 4 children who seemed to be about five-to-six-years old, not adequately treated because they don’t have enough glucose strips, and as a result no chance to appropriately adjust insulin doses. School was a problem for each, either they had to miss a lunch shot or their mother had to come to administer it – most often without first doing a blood test. One was very hyperglycemic because her parents were unable to deny her anything she wanted to eat.

There were also two adorable 17-year-old twin girls, diagnosed within a year of each other, who had just graduated from high school and were waiting to see if they could go on with their education. Despite sleeping late, missing shots, and pretty much de-prioritizing diabetes (the universal story of adolescence and young adulthood), their A1cs were still good, mainly because they had way too many low glucose levels. There were many more routine cases: children taking only two insulin shots per day, having too few blood tests, not having refrigerators to store their insulin (they use clay pots instead), and feeling stigmatized and ostracized.

Then came the really hard cases: a child with severe insulin resistance (likely a gene defect due to too many consanguineous marriages in this country) taking 200-300 units of insulin per day, a child with dermatomyositis (a severe autoimmune disease of the skin and muscles) taking 500 units or more a day and chemotherapy and suffering the crippling joint effects of this rare disease that is most often complicated by diabetes. The fact that her hands were stiff and crippled made it all so much more amazing that she is an artist.

There were a number of pubertal children and even prepubertal children with type 2 diabetes – it’s hard to find someone who is not overweight/obese in Dhaka City, and the children appear to be the most affected. Bangladesh has one of the highest rates of diabetes: 8-10% of the population is affected and it is expected to quickly increase to 13% – and this is mainly Type 2. There are higher rates of kidney complications, but the most difficult aspect of having diabetes in Bangladesh is the stigma, the lack of education concerning its cause (children and their mothers are blamed), and the chance that anyone – particularly a child – can succeed with this disease.

Why We’re Here

Our type 1 diabetes workshop in Dhaka was sponsored by Life for a Child, the Bangladesh Diabetes Association, and ISPAD (the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes), and was organized by Dr. Zabeen. Forty-five physicians and nurses, dietitians, and psychologists from 11 cities and areas across Bangladesh attended our lectures and presentations. Some of the participants flew to Dhaka from the north, took trains for hours, and then battled the Dhaka City traffic to get to the Dhaka Club. It was a parade of brightly colored, sparkling saris since most of the attendees were women; many of the men had red hair and beards from henna staining.

Kid

Image source: Beyond Type 1

Our lectures were intermixed with lectures delivered by Dr. Zabeen, Dr. Azad (who started the field of pediatrics in Bangladesh), and a few other physicians who related the Bangladesh experience in childhood diabetes, pregnancy and diabetes, Ramadan and diabetes, and nutrition and diabetes. They discussed the struggles of managing this difficult disease in an area of our world with unimaginable poverty, very limited access to lab testing, supplies and medications (all with no way to pay for them short of a charity program, like Life for a Child), and in a culture deeply rooted in both prejudice and misunderstanding about diabetes. Schools make no concessions for the children at all, blame is placed on mothers and the children themselves, and they are often denied basic opportunities.

A young, 26-year-old woman who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) at 7 years of age came to speak to the seminar attendees. As a result of having diabetes, she was devalued so her father married her off at age 14. As usual in the villages, she went to live with her husband’s family. Since she arrived 12 years ago, her mother-in-law has not allowed her to have food unless her husband is home – and he works all day. So she fasts all day long, gets frequent and severe hypoglycemia, and often takes no insulin at all. Somehow in the midst of this all, she had a baby 5 years ago, and this little 5-year-old girl was skipping and running around, and adorable.

After our lectures each day, we took selfies with the attendees, and we even danced after my lecture on physical activity. The sway of the saris was mesmerizing and the joy and laughter totally infectious. Amidst it all, their questions and comments revealed how committed they all are to advance diabetes care for children in Bangladesh despite all of the obstacles. It was a struggle to go to the airport, but I somehow sat in the backseat and resigned myself to the stop and go traffic, the veering of cars from one lane to the other, and the constant cacophony of horns. It seemed to fit with my simultaneous feelings of despair and hope – with a great belief in Dr. Zabeen and her teams of amazing health care providers and her patients willing to share their stories.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

GivingTuesday: Donate for Diabetes

Have you heard of Giving Tuesday, a global generosity movement? Learn more and consider donating to a diabetes organization of your choice.
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Proof that Advocacy Matters

This content originally appeared on Diabetes Blog – Happy Medium. Republished with permission.Maybe you read somewhere that there was a hearing held this month by a U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee of the Energy and Commerce committee, on the issues of insulin affordability.  Maybe you watched the hearing and heard testimony from Christel Marchand […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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