Keys to Long Term Success and Preventing Complications

Contrary to popular belief, you can live a long, healthy life with type 2 diabetes, without developing complications. In its 2010 report, Diabetes UK found that someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to have a reduced life expectancy by up to 10 years, and someone living with type 1 diabetes is likely to have a reduced life expectancy by up to 20 years.

However, with advanced technologies and therapies, people are living longer and healthier than ever. Results from the University of Pittsburgh after a 30-year longitudinal study found that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years — longer than any study had ever previously found.

In part four of our four-part series on living well with type 2 diabetes, we will dive into the keys to long term success managing your condition, and how to prevent complications over the long term.

What Causes Complications?

It’s important to know what causes complications in people with type 2 diabetes. Not everyone living with diabetes will develop complications, but the occurrence of chronic hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, can lead to heart disease, kidney failure, nerve damage, and retinopathy (the most common complications of diabetes). It’s important to keep your blood sugars in range as much as possible to help prevent the onset of these complications.

Keys to Long Term Success

A number of factors have been shown to help slow the progression of (or completely prevent) complications in people with diabetes:

  • Keep HbA1c in range – Studies have shown that keeping your HbA1c lower than 7% can prevent the onset of complications, and closely monitoring your blood sugar (testing regularly) can help tighten your control. Talk with your doctor about the ideal number of times she would like you to test per day, and make sure you always test before and after meals.
  • Take your medications as prescribed – Some people think that insulin is “bad” or they just don’t like the thought of taking a pill every day. You’re prescribed your medicine for a reason, and you should follow all doctors’ orders to take them as prescribed. Rationing or skipping doses can quickly lead to complications or even premature death.
  • Follow a sensible diet – You don’t need to go completely paleo or keto to have better blood sugars, but speaking with your doctor or seeing a nutritionist can help you develop an eating plan that will work for you that you can sustain. Be sure to include plenty of fresh vegetables, protein, and water. Eating similar foods, eating a low carbohydrate lunch (of 20 grams or fewer) and limiting meals at restaurants has also been shown to help improve blood sugar management in people with diabetes.
  • ExerciseExercise is one of the most important things you can do to prevent complications. Not only does it lower blood sugars, but it gets the heart working and the blood pumping, increasing circulation and strengthening your whole cardiovascular system. Exercise boosts your immune system, and increases serotonin in the brain, making you feel good and helping to prevent the onset of depression. According to our Thrivable Insights study, people with type 2 diabetes who have an HbA1c <6.5% are more likely (20% vs 8%) to exercise 4-6 times per week than people living with type 2 diabetes who have an HbA1c of 8% or higher.
  • Surround yourself with support – Diabetes is a marathon, not a sprint, and the journey can be lonely at times. A study from the University Hospital in Denmark found that loneliness may actually cause premature death by damaging the blood vessels of the heart, which can be compounded with a diagnosis of diabetes. Long term success with your diabetes care is much more likely if you surround yourself with supportive family and friends, or if you can find a community who will understand. Sharing your thoughts, worries, and feelings will help lighten your load, and you may just learn a thing or two that you didn’t previously know about diabetes and how to better care for yourself!

Have you had diabetes for a long time, and are thriving without complications? What are some of the best strategies you’ve employed to achieve success? Share this post and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

A Focus on Emotional Well-being with Type 2 Diabetes

Maintaining sound mental health can be difficult if you live with diabetes, and many people know that diabetes and depression are comorbidities. The stressors of managing a chronic condition put you at higher risk for depression, and depression can put one at higher risk for type 2 diabetes. Scientists are still not completely sure why there’s such a strong link between the two conditions, but some studies have shown that diabetes doubles your risk of depression.

In part three of our four-part series on living well with type 2 diabetes, we’re focusing on emotional wellbeing and working to prevent depression while living with diabetes. If you’re newly diagnosed with diabetes and you’re worried about your risk for depression, check out our top ways to help prevent the onset of depression:

Find Your Tribe

Diabetes can be isolating and lonely, and finding a community that understands can make all the difference. Local support groups (in-person and online) can offer advice, encouragement, and assistance as you navigate the waters of your condition. If a support group isn’t for you, speaking honestly about what you’re going through with family or friends can be helpful as well.

Be Proactive

Instead of wallowing the loss of foods you should no longer eat, or missed opportunities you may experience, use this time to be proactive about your health. Take a cooking class to learn how to integrate more vegetables into your diet, or sign up for a yoga class or fitness challenge to jump-start your journey to health. Journaling about your feelings is helpful, and meditation can help calm an anxious mind. Filling your time with positive activities can help stave off depression and improve your blood sugars at the same time. A win-win!

Get Enough Sleep

Your mind and body need adequate sleep to rest, recover, and replenish cells nightly. Chronic sleep deprivation is harmful to both physical and mental health. Create a nightly routine, and aim to get to sleep at a predictable (and reasonable) time each night. You’ll be surprised by how rejuvenated you’ll feel after consistent, good sleep.

Treat Yourself

No one likes to live in deprivation all the time. When you meet a goal (for example, exercising 150 minutes per week, or losing 10 lbs), treat yourself. Maybe it’s movie tickets for this weekend’s show, or sleeping in on a Saturday while your spouse handles the dog and kids. Creating healthy rewards for progress not only improves your diabetes management, but triggers the “feel good” chemicals in the brain (dopamine and serotonin), so you don’t feel like your diabetes management is just constant work with no celebration.

Talk with Your Doctor

If your symptoms of depression are not improving, you need to speak with your doctor about treatment options. They may refer you to a therapist, or may prescribe medication to help manage your condition. There is no shame in seeking help to manage depressive symptoms!

How have you navigated the close relationship between diabetes and depression? What tactics have helped you to improve your mental wellbeing and live a healthier life? Share this post and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Food Shaming: Changing How We Talk About Food

This content originally appeared here. Republished with permission.

By Brenda Manzanarez, MS, RD, and Cynthia Muñoz, Ph.D., MPH

You know you shouldn’t be eating that kind of stuff, right?

If you’d just eat better, you wouldn’t have to take so many medications.

I know someone who cut out all carbs and cured their diabetes; have you tried that?

Do any of these comments sound familiar? Maybe someone else has said them to you, maybe you’ve said them to someone, or maybe you’ve thought them about yourself. Either way, comments like this, even if they have good intentions, often come off as judgmental and shaming. This type of “advice” can cause confusion, anxiety, frustration, and an unhealthy relationship with food.

Our Relationship with Food

Food is important when it comes to keeping blood sugar in range, but managing diabetes is not just about glycemic control—we also need to juggle lifestyles, health goals, and mental health.

There are so many factors that influence our food choices, and you cannot see those factors by just glancing at a plate. Food is an important part of our lives, and it can have so many meanings to different people. It can mean health, love, sense of community, or pleasure, but for others, especially people with diabetes, it might cause feelings of anxiety and fear.

Changing the way you eat is a major lifestyle change, and major lifestyle changes always take time.

While you are on this journey, unsolicited advice from strangers and even loved ones can feel more like judgment and might cause you to question yourself or feel guilty about your own choices.

Changing the way you eat is a major lifestyle change, and major lifestyle changes always take time. There are a lot of things to juggle when managing diabetes, so be patient with yourself and with others.

Unintended Consequences

Food shaming often happens when someone’s own preferences and opinions don’t line up with others’. Judgmental comments like “you shouldn’t eat that” may be a projection of their own frustrations or a reflection of their misconceptions about diabetes.

As clinicians who work with children, teens, and young adults with diabetes and obesity, we know that talking about food can be very difficult. We also know that negative comments, pictures, and memes on social media can have a harmful impact on someone’s emotional well-being, especially people with diabetes.

No one should be shamed about their food choices.

No one should be shamed about their food choices. Shame leads to negative feelings about food, which can lead to anxiety, depression, and even disordered eating. And these conditions can cause more damage to physical health than poor diet.

Rethink the Role of Food and Your Health

Instead of thinking of food as “good” or “bad,” or judging people (or yourself) by the way you eat, picture food and eating as being neutral and adopt a non-judgmental way of thinking. The food you put on your plate, is just food that will provide energy and nutrients to fuel your body.

Unlearning what we have been exposed to takes time but being aware of those negative thoughts is a start.

Instead of thinking of food as “good” or “bad,” picture food and eating as being neutral.

Remind yourself that there is no one right way to eat with diabetes— it has to be tailored to your own unique needs— like your budget, taste preferences/favorite foods, cultural norms, cooking skill, time, etc. And you don’t have to feel guilty about enjoying a treat every now and then.

Break the cycle and be nice to yourself and to others. Instead of criticizing people, ask them how they feel about the changes they’ve made and have them decide how they feel about it. If appropriate, provide encouragement.

If you are concerned about a loved one, privately ask how they are doing, and don’t offer advice unless they ask for it. Ask if there is anything you can do to support them, and/or seek information about healthy food choices and incorporate this in your own life as a form of support for your loved one.

If you feel this is a big issue in your own life, don’t be afraid to seek out help—talk to your primary doctor or with a therapist. If you don’t have a therapist ask for a referral from your doctor. To find a mental health provider with knowledge about diabetes, check this directory.

Bottom Line

Food is meant to be nourishment for our bodies and to be enjoyed; find a balance that works for your health, be confident in your choices, and be accepting of other people’s choices.

If you find yourself wanting to criticize someone else’s food choices or appearance, don’t! This is generally not helpful and can have a negative emotional impact.

A neutral and non-judgmental way of thinking is best when talking about food and diabetes; there are no “good” and “bad” foods. The key is to balance what you eat to get the nutrients you need.

If you receive a negative comment from a stranger on social media or in person, remember that person doesn’t know you and how you take care of yourself. Don’t beat yourself up and continue to focus on ways to be the healthiest version of yourself.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Shadow’s Edge: Video Game Designed to Help Kids Cope With Chronic Disease

Being a kid is hard enough as it is. Add in having a chronic disease and it can make those very special years potentially very isolating ones. Shadow’s Edge is a virtual reality game that allows children to process and express their feelings about their disease — or whatever else they may be going through. This mobile game can help change the experience of a serious diagnosis, or challenging times, by combining art therapy and cognitive behavior therapy and giving children a safe place to not feel so alone.

Action video games can help reduce depression in teens and Shadow’s Edge hopes to help bring positivity and community to those who need it most. Founder and philanthropist, Sherri Sabrato Brisson, is a brain cancer survivor who initially co-wrote a book, “Digging Deep: A Journal for Young People Facing Health Challenges ” with Rose Ofner, to help kids process their chronic disease or serious illness and it had great success. She then met Rosemary Lokhorst, who is now the game producer because of how much she loved the concept and that is how Shadow’s Edge was born.

Shadow’s Edge is a free and completely donation funded, virtual city that has just been overtaken by a storm, much like our lives after being hit with a diagnosis of some kind. The storm removes all the color from the city, much like our disease has the potential to take away some of our happiness…if we let it. The object of the game is to bring back the color to the city through writing and art, which helps empower the player to take on whatever it is they are going through.

Shadow's Edge

Photo credit: Shadow’s Edge

So far, Shadow’s Edge has worked with many organizations and university clinics in the US, Brazil and in Europe, focusing on kids and teens with cancer, and has received very good feedback, especially from doctors. Currently, they are running a complex research study nearby the Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago, with more than 100 kids testing Shadow’s Edge. So far, the results have been fantastic, and the game is helping these children build up the resilience to tackle the challenges they are facing.

I was able to chat with Sherri to find out more about Shadow’s Edge and their plans for the future.

Sheri, the journey you went through with brain cancer must have been so traumatic. Did writing your first book, Digging Deep: A Journal for Young People Facing Health Challenges, prove to be therapeutic? What about creating this game?

As a survivor, I can tell you, I know how difficult it was for me to even know how I was feeling at the time, let alone be able to express these feelings.

On my 25th anniversary of survivorship from brain cancer, I envisioned a world where every young patient has real-time access to the tools he or she needs to build emotional resilience through their experience.

I started by co-authoring Digging Deep: A Journal for Young People Facing Health Challenges, with Rose Offner, MA. I donated 35,000 journals to hospitals across the country, but it still wasn’t enough. So, we decided to meet young people right where they are—on their phones, playing games.

Seeing the success of your book shows that there is a need for resources and tools for people who have serious illnesses or a chronic condition. How do you think Shadow’s Edge can help fill that gap for our children?

Just like the physical journal, Shadow’s Edge helps teens build their emotional endurance to tackle the challenges they face through the power of their personal narrative. There are very few resources directed at teens today. Our aim is to meet them where they are – on their phones, playing games. So this time, teens are engaged through their medium—their phones or tablets—to express themselves through writing and now, covering a city in graffiti! Through gameplay, teen players realize they needn’t stay in their confined world—they have the power to reshape their world into whatever they choose. Through their expression, they can create beauty where there was once dilapidation: There can be light; There can be color; There can be hope. And, there can be a community.

“When starting to play Shadow’s Edge, a teen may not even know how they feel or what is troubling them. As they continue through their journey, they often discover they are at a different place emotionally in the end—there may be a sense of resolution, a greater understanding, a place of peace”.

I know for me personally, when I was diagnosed with type one diabetes, finding community changed everything for me. I was so much better off mentally and emotionally and had a much better outlook on my future. How does playing this video game help children connect with others? 

Yes – connection is key to build resilience and to feel better! Teens asked us for a space that is theirs only, where they can express things for themselves, as they are not always clear or ready to connect. Interestingly, this working with oneself helps to reach out. Additionally, the game has an in-game sharing space (once you reach the new level, Disillusionment). There you receive a means to see other players’ art and provide messages of support and where you can publish your graffitis. The community aspect is one that we are focusing on to expand – it is the key ask of players to build on.

I could see how the concept can be applicable to many different obstacles a child could be facing, what other areas are you focusing on and what do you hope to accomplish?

We are expanding the content so that teens facing a variety of difficult situations can benefit from it – these can be changes in the family like a divorce or death of a family member, bullying, anxiety, stress, depression, identity questions.

Shadow’s Edge has the potential to help so many children going through hardships. Where do you see Shadow’s Edge going from here?

We are working on expanding the community aspect of the game. We want to create a community around self-expression where teens facing all kinds of challenging situations can share, collaborate to create art, find psychoeducational content and just connect with each other.

As a brain cancer survivor, what message would you like to share with people facing a health battle of some kind? 

Your challenge does not define who you are, you define this. When you are ready, take an active role in opening up–every time you tell your story you tell it a little differently, this make you integrate it and see new perspectives. Practicing this also supports you to understand you are stronger than you think, getting comfortable with your story and owning it as a part of you, but not all of you.

Shadow’s Edge is available on both IOS and Android, and available in 6 languages.

They also have a special website dedicated to helping parents and healthcare professionals who are helping a young person with illnesses, see more information at www.diggingdeep.org.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Este Haim on Burnout + Bolusing for Pizza

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Todd Boudreaux

Este Haim is the bassist of the pop group Haim, which she formed with her sisters Alana and Danielle in 2007. Este has also been living with type 1 diabetes for nearly 20 years. Last week, Haim announced the release of their new track “Hallelujah,” stating the song is for “anyone struggling with chronic illness.” Beyond Type 1 caught up with Este to ask about the genesis of the track, her life on the road with T1D, and how she faces diabetes burnout with the help of her support system.

A Rough Transition

Freshman year of high school is perhaps the biggest transition in any teenager’s life. For Este Haim, that transition was made all the more difficult by her diagnosis with type 1 diabetes at age 14. Este recalls how difficult it was to fit in given all that she was going through.

“Yeah, it wasn’t a great way to start my first week of high school… I was basically a social pariah for a very long time. You know, I was just the diabetic kid in school that passes out and no one knows why and the diabetic girl that smelled like orange juice all the time.”

Although some of her classmates made life difficult in high school, there are two people Este has always been able to depend on — her sisters Alana and Danielle.

“Not only are they my sisters, I’m also in business with them, so we spend so much time together. We’re on the road together 24 hours a day for weeks on end. So they’ve seen every version of me. They’ve seen me in a good place with diabetes, and in a sh*tty place with diabetes,” Este says.

“I’m lucky that I have Danielle and Alana to be my support and when I am having a bad day, a bad week, a bad month, they’re always the first people to be like, ‘Dude we got you. Whatever you need. We’re going to get through this. Let’s get you a healthy meal. Let’s not have pizza after the show tonight. Let’s go get you something good so that you don’t wake up and your blood sugar is 350.”

Real Talk

“Pizza is such a blessing but it’s also such a curse” — Este’s description of pizza is all too real for anyone who has lived with diabetes.

“After a show, I get so hungry and the only thing that’s available to me is pizza. And we all know that pizza does weird sh*t to blood sugar. It’s this unexplained thing — bread I can bolus for, tomato sauce I can bolus for, cheese I can bolus for, but for some reason when they’re all together it’s this magical thing that I can never get right. It’s insane, what is that? It’s like my favorite food. And of course, it’s the one thing that I really can never get right. It’s hard being on the road and craving food and realizing the only things that are open late are either diners that don’t really have a lot of like salad-y options, or pizza.”

Este’s sisters fully grasp the exhaustion that comes with living with diabetes and have become an amazing support system for her. Their holistic view serves to remind Este that she is more than her diagnosis.

“My sisters have this incredible attitude of, ‘If you’re going to have a bad day, have a bad day, and just live your goddamn life. Tomorrow’s a new day, you get back on the wagon, get back on taking better care of yourself, let’s make some healthier choices. Let’s take a walk around the venue for a little bit, let’s get some exercise.’ And that also takes energy on their part. So I’m thankful that I have them on the road and it’s definitely an integral part of diabetes, is having that support. I’m really lucky.”

Life on the Road

Haim

Image source: Beyond Type 1

Keeping track of blood sugars on a consistent schedule is extremely difficult, and the ups and downs of life on the road can wreak havoc on the ability to maintain glycemic control, of which Este is all too aware.

“It’s being in a different time zone and not being able to sleep and then the stress of that and the cortisol in my blood making my blood sugar rise for no reason. Often, I won’t even know that I’m stressed out, and then I’ll see on my Dexcom that the arrow just goes straight up.”

Having a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) has been a game-changer for Este, not just because it allows her sisters to follow her glucose levels remotely, but also because of what it means to others living with T1D.

“I think awareness is so important and that’s why I wear my Dexcom on my arm now because I have a way of showing people that I am a type 1 diabetic… before I didn’t really have that.”

Diabetes Burnout

Este doesn’t mince words when it comes to the importance of mental health awareness for people living with type 1 diabetes. She is candid about the very real struggles that anyone living with a chronic illness endures over the course of their life.

“I think something that I struggled with, something a lot of people with diabetes struggle with, is perfection. We were taught to look at high blood sugars as a failure. I think that leads to diabetes burnout because you’re constantly trying to be perfect. Mentally, there’s only so much of that you can take without feeling like a failure… And I think that’s been the majority of the reason that I burn out. I’m just like ‘F*ck it, fine, whatever.’”

Haim recently released a new song titled ‘Hallelujah’ and Este posted that her verse in the song was inspired by her struggles living with T1D, specifically calling out the phenomenon of diabetes burnout in her post.

“It’s a lot easier sometimes to just ignore it and not deal with it, but we all know it always catches up with you… I feel like I’ve gone through diabetes burnout — for long periods of time — at least 10 different times in the past 20 years of being a diabetic, and like it’s tough, man. It’s tough to maintain that as a type 1 with chronic illness because there isn’t necessarily a promise that there’s a light at the end of the tunnel, and I said it in my post, it’s like a 24-hour job you can’t clock out of, that you don’t get paid for. Maintaining that mental toughness I think is exhausting for a lot of people.”

Haim

Image source: Beyond Type 1

Looking to the Future

At the end of the day, it all comes back to the support we receive from the people around us. As our discussion wrapped, Este told Beyond Type 1 how important it is to remind those that support us just how appreciated they are.

“The thing that I want to impart to people is to tell our loved ones that support us — that we do appreciate them — and to thank them for being supportive because I don’t know what I would do without my sisters, my parents, my best friends and my boyfriend for that matter… I think it’s really important to find the people that truly love and support you. I know it sounds trite and cliché, but all we can do is look to the future and try and live our best lives and have fun doing it. Enjoy every day as much as you possibly can, and don’t let diabetes get in the way of you doing and achieving everything that you want to do. Truly, that’s all we really can do.”

Source: diabetesdaily.com

A Volleyball Named Wilson and Diabetes Isolation

This content originally appeared on TCOYD: Taking Control of Your Diabetes. Republished with permission.

By David Greene

Over 23,000,000 people in the United States have been diagnosed with diabetes. That is almost 1 in every 10 people. The irony is that despite these numbers, many of us feel isolated by our diabetes. This is problematic in that we are undeniably social creatures. Our physical and emotional well-beings are dependent on social connectedness. We need human contact. This is reflected in the ways we use punishment to enforce rules. Effective parenting recommends the use of time outs to correct children’s behaviors. Communities use prisons and prisons use solitary confinement. Religious groups use ex-communication or shunning. And countries use exile. Being isolated from human contact is considered the ultimate sacrifice. Who can forget Tom Hanks’ portrayal of Chuck Noland, a FedEx executive marooned on a small Pacific island in the film Castaway? In order to survive, Noland bonded with “Wilson”, a smudged volleyball that takes on the appearance of a human face. Just a movie you say? Research has shown that people marooned are often found dead even though they had access to all the required food, water, and shelter needed for survival. They died of isolation. They died of loneliness. Our need for human interaction is essential.

Our Own Diabetes Island?

You can’t throw a rock without hitting someone with diabetes. I’m not suggesting this, living with diabetes is tough enough. Just trying to make a point. But we are everywhere. We are in Hollywood, professional sports, beauty pageants, government, and every type of business and industry. We even sit on the United States Supreme Court. Yet research suggests that people with diabetes often feel a sense of personal failure, guilt, shame, distress and embarrassment. Browne and her colleagues called diabetes “the blame and shame disease”. When surveyed, people with diabetes reported feeling rejected, discriminated against, and isolated. To make matters worse, people without diabetes are not aware that people with diabetes have these feelings. For all the same reasons that isolation isn’t good for people without diabetes, it isn’t good for people with diabetes. Add to that, social isolation directly impacts our ability to live with and manage diabetes. It has been correlated with poorer glycemic control, more complications, higher medical costs, increased cognitive impairment, impaired quality of life, and poorer self-care behaviors.

We All Need a Wilson

Some of us are lucky enough to have wonderful “Wilsons” in our lives who support and help us deal with diabetes. Others, not so much. Regardless, research has suggested that educating family, friends, and colleagues about diabetes and encouraging communication about our challenges and needs can increase support and acceptance.

Support groups have long been an effective intervention for the isolating effects of diabetes. In addition to gaining first-hand information about diabetes through other people’s experiences, they provide reciprocal support from others with diabetes, and the opportunity to feel less lonely, isolated or judged. The curative effect of “universality”, knowing that you are not alone and that there are others who are struggling with similar issues, has long been recognized.

Summer camps for people with diabetes represent a unique type of support group. Surrounded by people with similar issues, camps have been found to help people connect with others, gain confidence, reduce anger and anxiety, increase self-esteem, and feel normal again.

And social media is able to provide a wealth of opportunities, connections, and information. For resources on how to get connected to the diabetes online community, click here.

But I preach to the choir. You are reading this on Taking Control of Your Diabetes, a premier diabetes social media platform. I have never met any of the TCOYD folks in person, but I feel connected with them and supported by them.

Back on the Mainland

Ultimately changing the socially isolating nature of diabetes will require societal change. Organizations such as TCOYD, the American Diabetes Association, and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation are making great strides in connecting and organizing people with diabetes. Although the ultimate goal is to cure diabetes, an important side effect is bringing awareness and social acceptance to the disease. These organizations offer a range of opportunities for people to better understand their diabetes and connect with others. They include options such as newsletters, magazines, websites, chat rooms, forums, local chapters, marches, political advocacy, and fundraisers.

Spoiler Alert for the Three People Yet to See Castaway

In one of the more heart-wrenching scenes in Castaway, Noland loses Wilson in rough seas while escaping the island. However, with Wilson’s help, he survived. In the words of Alfred Lord Tennyson, it’s better to have loved and lost, than never to have loved at all. Okay, I admit this analogy of escaping our diabetes isolation is a bit cheesy. But I still believe we are well served by finding our Wilsons, and perhaps even pulling together a quick game of volleyball.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Omada’s Type 2 Diabetes Coaching Program Will Now Include Abbott FreeStyle Libre

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Emily Fitts

Omada Health and Abbott partner to bring FreeStyle Libre to Omada Health’s digital coaching program for people with type 2 diabetes

Under a new partnership between Omada Health and Abbott, participants in Omada Health’s type 2 diabetes program will receive the FreeStyle Libre continuous glucose monitor (CGM). Any person with type 2 diabetes who is enrolled in Omada’s program will be eligible to receive FreeStyle Libre following a personal online consultation with a doctor. The FreeStyle Libre will be delivered directly to the participant’s home.

When the FreeStyle Libre is scanned, glucose data will be sent to the Omada Health app and will be available for users to see patterns, track progress, and get personalized recommendations from their assigned coach. This technology enables coaches to give specific advice based on unique patterns and allows users better understand the way their daily decisions affect their blood sugar, as well as mood, weight, sleep, and more.

Omada’s type 2 diabetes program provides participants with an app, access to coaches, connected devices (including a wireless weight scale, blood pressure meter, glucometer, and now a FreeStyle Libre CGM), educational materials, and a peer support group, all of which aim to help people change their behavior using tailored coaching and care.

Beyond type 2 diabetes, Omada offers programs for prediabetes, hypertension, and anxiety and depression. In particular, Omada’s original program – a digital version of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) – is the largest digitally-delivered DPP in the US and has shown positive results for participants in terms of weight loss and A1C reduction.

Omada’s programs are primarily offered through employers and health plans that cover the costs of the program, although individuals can sign up independently and pay for the program themselves. Take this short survey to see if you are eligible.

To find out about other similar programs, read our article on how to get unlimited test strips and personal diabetes coaching.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Editor’s Note: Finding Solutions to Everyday Diabetes Problems

This month at Diabetes Daily, we will spend some time talking about the challenges of living with diabetes. From the social stigma to the bruises on our bodies, we must face these realities daily and it takes a certain mindset to stay positive and continue to thrive. We are so excited to partner with Marc […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

How a Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Diabetes

This content originally appeared on Integrated Diabetes Services. Republished with permission. More studies are being done on the implications of vitamin D deficiency in persons with diabetes. As much as pharmacology and medical science are unlocking the impacts of different chemicals on our bodies, the basic vitamins on the side of our Flintstones bottles still […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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