Book Review: Diabetes Essentials

Diabetes Essentials: Tips & Recipes to Manage Type 2 Diabetes, is a brief, easy-to-understand, illustrated introduction and guide to living with type 2 diabetes, that was recently published by registered dietitian and diabetes educator Karen Graham, and endocrinologist Dr. Mansur Shomali. I received the book for review at no charge and all opinions are my own.

My Review

When a person is newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes it can feel isolating and overwhelming, especially for those who were previously unfamiliar with the condition and what diabetes management entails. This short, easy-to-understand, illustrated guide covers the main concepts and provides concrete advice to help set new patients on the right path to healthy living with diabetes.

The information in the book is organized in easy-to-read “top-ten” lists and focuses on many categories that are relevant to life with diabetes, including diet, exercise, blood sugar management, healthy lifestyle choices, weight loss, mental health, planning for pregnancy, and much more. The information covers the basics, without going into detail, and is in line with the commonly prescribed medical advice that is typically offered to patients with diabetes.

Throughout, the book offers helpful and specific tips that aim to help people with diabetes better understand their condition and improve their health. From advice on mindful eating to smoking cessation to preventing and identifying complications, this book covers so many aspects of living well with diabetes. I particularly liked the list with advice for getting through the first 10 days after a diabetes diagnosis, as well as the guide to different doctors’ appointments.

A considerable section of the book is dedicated solely to “diabetes-friendly” recipes, including a sample ten-day meal plan, along with ideas for salads, soups, dinners, snacks, and desserts. Most of the recipes are moderate in carbohydrates, high in fiber, and low in fat. Detailed nutritional information is provided alongside each recommendation.

One section I liked, in particular, discussed trending research and recent diabetes advancements. These included a discussion of continuous glucose monitoring technology, as well as newer insulins and diabetes medications. The authors also cited some relevant information from the national Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). I thought this section was particularly useful to help new patients understand how recent advances in care (even if not yet practiced in the mainstream) can help people with diabetes better manage their condition.

The last section of the book consists of quizzes on various topics to help readers reinforce their understanding of the educational materials. This also provides a fun way to learn about some common misconceptions. Finally, the detailed index at the end makes it easy to quickly find a specific topic of interest.

Summary

Overall, this text provides a competent and easy-to-understand overview of type 2 diabetes basics and advice for newly diagnosed patients. It informs without overwhelming the reader with too many details and provides concrete strategies to help manage the condition and related health issues.

Diabetes Essentials costs $24.95 and can be purchased online here.

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Have you purchased this book already? Please share your thoughts with us in the comments below.

Also, check out this comprehensive list: The Best Books About Diabetes.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

100 Things You Can Do This Year for a Better Life with Diabetes

The New Year is here and many of us are hoping to make those resolutions stick. Keep in mind that there are many ways you can influence change, and some steps you can take may seem small but are very effective nonetheless. Please note that anytime you make changes to your diet or exercise routine, it’s also a good idea to check in with your doctor and plan ahead for any necessary medication adjustments.

Without further ado, check out this list of 100 simple things you can try to do this year for a better life with diabetes:

  1. Change your lancet.
  2. Eat lower carb.
  3. Take the stairs.
  4. Join a gym.
  5. See your eye doctor.
  6. Try a new vegetable recipe.
  7. Pack your lunch.
  8. Cut back on alcohol.
  9. Quit smoking.
  10. Invest in comfortable shoes.
  11. Buy a scale to keep accountable.
  12. Check your blood pressure.
  13. Stand while working.
  14. Go for a walk after lunch.
  15. Give gardening a try.
  16. Grocery shop the perimeter.
  17. Stretch.
  18. Keep a blood sugar log.
  19. Try a new diabetes app.
  20. Consider a continuous glucose monitor (CGM).
  21. Check your blood sugar more often.
  22. Don’t reuse your needle/syringe.
  23. Use alcohol swabs for injections and site changes.
  24. Read a book about diabetes.
  25. Join a diabetes support group.
  26. Choose green veggies over starches.
  27. Visit your endocrinologist.
  28. Do basal testing.
  29. Track your cycle.
  30. Count carbohydrates accurately.
  31. Try a half-unit syringe or pen.
  32. Consider trying an insulin pump.
  33. Ride a bike.
  34. Consider getting a pet.
  35. Eat more real food.
  36. Cut back on dessert.
  37. Try a flour substitute.
  38. Try a sugar substitute.
  39. Track your macronutrients.
  40. Track your steps.
  41. Educate about diabetes.
  42. Start a fundraiser.
  43. Attend a diabetes event.
  44. Sign up for our newsletter.
  45. Participate in diabetes surveys.
  46. Treat lows only with glucose.
  47. Eat consistent meals.
  48. Consider intermittent fasting.
  49. Ditch the foods that don’t work well.
  50. Invest in quality proteins.
  51. Eat more plants.
  52. Eat less processed foods.
  53. Ice skate.
  54. Try canoeing.
  55. Go hiking.
  56. Spend more time in nature.
  57. Shovel snow.
  58. Go swimming.
  59. Try ziplining or tree-to-tree.
  60. Get your A1c checked.
  61. Lower the high alert on your CGM.
  62. Eat more probiotics.
  63. Get more fiber.
  64. Swap juice and soda for more water.
  65. Sign up for a “couch to 5k” program.
  66. Jog.
  67. Go rock-climbing.
  68. Rotate your injection sites.
  69. Change your pump-site regularly.
  70. Change your CGM sensor regularly.
  71. Wear your CGM more.
  72. Review your CGM report regularly.
  73. Get a primary care physician.
  74. Get your flu shot.
  75. Figure out if you’re a moderator or abstainer.
  76. Jump rope.
  77. Meditate.
  78. Start a journal.
  79. Keep a food log.
  80. Create a 504 plan for your child.
  81. Speak with your child’s school about non-food related celebrations.
  82. Advocate for yourself or your child better.
  83. Ditch the scale if you’re obsessing.
  84. Take before photos (you will want them!).
  85. Figure out what self-care means to you and practice it daily.
  86. Seek out a friend or therapist if you feel you need help.
  87. Give back to the community by volunteering your time.
  88. Try a sport or activity you never tried before.
  89. Have more grace with yourself.
  90. Surround yourself with positive influences.
  91. Try to see the big picture more often.
  92. Create a healthy work/life balance.
  93. Appreciate the little things.
  94. Don’t be so hard on yourself.
  95. Check in with friends who may need it.
  96. Spend more time with family.
  97. Take the time to thank others and let them know they are appreciated.
  98. Take more deep breaths.
  99. Target things you feel you can change and start with those.
  100. Remember to be grateful for another year around the sun.

Do you want to add anything that has worked well for you? Please share your tips in the comments below.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Dining Out Tips for the Low-Carb Lifestyle

If you are carefully watching your carbohydrate intake, or sticking to a strict low-carbohydrate diet, dining out can present a unique set of challenges. I have been eating low-carb to optimize my type 1 diabetes management for almost four years now and have learned a lot about my best practices as well as pitfalls when […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Low-Carb Legend Dr. Bernstein Explains Why Normal Blood Sugar Is Critical

Dr. Richard K. Bernstein has lived with type 1 diabetes since age 11. At nearly 85 years old he remains busy treating people with diabetes, which he has done since 1983. Did you know Dr. Bernstein invented blood sugar self-monitoring and the use of a basal-bolus insulin dosing? Dr. Bernstein not only lives with and […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Is it Possible to Control Type 1 Diabetes?

We’ve talked about him before: Andrew Koutnik has type 1 diabetes and is in the early stages of becoming a scientist as a researcher at the University of Florida State. (See his TEDx talk here.) He has written well-documented and articulate papers on the topic of type 1 diabetes. In part 3 of a series, […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Food Delivery Review: Healthy Meals Supreme

We’ve reviewed various food delivery services but they’ve mostly been catered to those wanting very low-carb options. Readers have asked, “can you also write about alternatives to very low-carb?” Healthy Meals Supreme may be up your alley if you are looking for balanced macronutrients like moderate to low fat, moderate carbohydrates, and moderate protein. These […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes is Not Unpredictable: A Troubleshooting Guide

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for over a decade and have experienced my fair share of learning experiences in diabetes management. One tenet that I often come across in the diabetes online community is, “diabetes is just so unpredictable!” In my early years of diabetes management, I somewhat sympathized with the sentiment. […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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