Minding Your Mental Health During COVID-19

I recently saw someone on social media refer to this as a “great pause’ and while I think it is wonderful that many people are viewing this time as an opportunity to spend more time with their family and to appreciate the simpler things that life has to offer, there are many people going through a very different, and traumatic, journey.

In just the United States alone, 1 out of every 5 people suffer from a mental illness and 1 out of every 25 people suffer from a severe mental illness. For those who are afflicted, it is oftentimes difficult to get through the average day without feelings of anxiousness, irritability, depression, etc. Add in a global pandemic and many of what they were told were “irrational” fears have now come to life. The feelings of isolation, fear, grief, loneliness, financial worry are all very real right now and we need to find a way to cope.

So how do we take care of our mental health while also acknowledging that it is a very scary time and that there is a lot that we don’t know? That is an uneasy feeling for anyone, let alone someone who struggles with mental health issues. Like all other things in life, I do believe it comes down to balance.

Routine

“The secret of your success is found in your daily routine” by John C. Maxwell is a great quote that is quite applicable at this time. I find that if I get up and get dressed, I have a more productive day than if I lie around in my pajamas. Also, keeping to a schedule (while of course allowing flexibility) for meals will not only keep you focused on what you are doing but can also make for more predictable blood sugars. Just these small steps can lead to less mental anguish.

Prescribe Yourself a Daily Dose of News

Try to limit your news consumption to a level that works for you. Many of us wind up leaving the television on and that can be very unhealthy to listen to and watch all day long. Either allow yourself a certain amount of time watching or pick a few times throughout the day to do a quick check-in. Also, make sure you pick one or two reliable sources that you trust and stick to those news mediums.

Stick with Your Mental Health Care Plan

If you are on medication, make sure you continue to take your medication as prescribed by your healthcare provider. If you are experiencing difficulty or feel the medication isn’t working properly, make sure to call your doctor as they are still available to take their patient’s phone calls and available for teletherapy. And if you haven’t sought professional help in the past but feel the need to do so, check with your health insurance to see what affordable options are available to you. There are also free hotlines that you can use:

  • Mental Health America Hotline: Text MHA to 741741. Mental Health America is a nationwide organization that provides assistance through this text line. You will be linked to someone who can guide you through a crisis or just provide information.
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline1-800-273-8255. Crisis intervention and free emotional support are available, which is helpful when you need confidential assistance during a time of emotional distress for you or a loved one. The helpline is open 24/7, and a live online chat is available as well.
  • Crisis Text Line: Text CONNECT to 741741. Specialized crisis counselors are just a text message away on this free, confidential 24-hour support line. To further protect your privacy, these messages do not appear on a phone bill. The text line also provides services and support if you are upset, scared, hurt, frustrated, or distressed.

Control What You Can

Many of us are sitting at the edge of our seat on a daily basis waiting for the next big piece of news to be released. Will there be antibody testing available soon near me? Are they opening my state sooner than I’d like? Are my children’s schools going to open back up this year? While these are all valid questions and concerns, we cannot allow them to take up too much space in our minds. Whatever the case will be, you will navigate the situation and do what is best for you and your family. A great quote to remember is “If it’s out of your hands, it deserves freedom from your mind too.” – Ivan Nuru ”

mental health

Photo credit: Sandis Helvigs (Unsplash)

Keep Your Mind and Body Active

This hasn’t been easy for any of us despite what your experience has been. Whether you’re dealing with the loss of a loved one or simply needing a ten-minute break from your toddler, your emotions are valid. Give yourself a few minutes a day to have a small pity party but then try to move on. Get active by taking a bike ride, going for a walk or take a road trip and get lost on a new adventure.  Exercise your mind by staying connected to friends and family. And when you’re alone, try out a challenging crossword puzzle or start a journal. Keeping busy will not only keep you from feeling lonely, but it will also be beneficial to your overall wellbeing.

This pandemic is affecting us all differently but there is no doubt it has been mentally and emotionally challenging for all. Make sure to acknowledge that while mental illnesses may be invisible, they are very much real and should be treated with care. You owe it to yourself and your loved ones to make yourself a priority during this challenging time.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Mental Health and Coping with Coronavirus

By Mark Heyman

I would be willing to bet that you have been feeling more anxious than usual over the past couple of weeks. It is easy to feel overwhelmed by all the news and with all changes we’ve had to make to our daily lives because of the current coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19). When you throw diabetes into this mix, things can feel even more stressful.

As a person with diabetes, taking care of your mental health is especially important when you’re feeling stressed. Here are some strategies you can use to stay emotionally healthy during these uncertain times.

Focus on What You Can Control

This situation is anything but normal, and it’s likely that you are feeling like things are out of your control. Let’s be honest – right now there are lots of things that you do not have control over and that is scary. Focusing on things you do have control over can give you a sense of stability, which can calm your mind. Not sure where to start? Here are some suggestions:

  • Stick to a routine. Get up at the same time every morning, take a shower and get dressed. Creating a structure to your day can help life to feel a bit more normal.
  • Follow public health recommendations. You have control over doing your part to stop the spread of COVID-19. Wash your hands regularly, keep up with social distancing and stay away from crowds.
  • Keep managing diabetes. No matter what is going on around you, you still have the ability to manage your diabetes. Make healthy food choices, stay active, monitor your blood sugar and take insulin. Even if you don’t have perfect control of your numbers, you will know that you’ve done everything you can to keep your blood sugars in range.

Give Yourself Space for Your Emotions

All of the uncertainty in the world right now is unsettling and scary. These are not emotions that are comfortable or fun, and your first instinct may be to try to avoid feeling them. Remember, it is okay to feel whatever it is that you are experiencing. Give yourself permission to feel whatever emotions come up for you –  you can handle it!

Be Kind to Yourself About Your Management

Stress can make blood sugars a lot more difficult to manage. Keep this in mind during these stressful times and be kind to yourself, especially if your blood sugars are not where you would like to see them. Instead of getting down on yourself for not doing “a good enough job” with diabetes, try telling yourself that you are doing the best you can in this difficult situation. Showing kindness to yourself is no different than showing kindness to others. If you get down on yourself (as a result of frustration over your diabetes, or any other reason), ask yourself what you would tell a friend who was in the same situation.

Stay Connected

We need to stay connected with the people in our lives, especially when things are rocky. Our friends and family can give us support, reassurance, and maybe even a good laugh to lighten the mood – all of which are essential to our mental health. Just because we are experiencing “social distancing” does not mean we can’t stay connected. Send an email or text, call someone on Facetime, or even pick up the phone. We are all in this together!

Caring for Others

Caregivers of people with diabetes also need to stay emotionally healthy during this time. People often think that taking care of themselves means not taking care of others, and nothing can be further from the truth. In fact if you don’t care for yourself, you’ll likely have a much more difficult time caring for others.

Dr. Heyman went live on the Beyond Type 1 Daily Instagram, answering community questions about tackling mental health in the midst of COVID-19. Watch the full video:

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Search

+