Back to School with Diabetes Amidst the COVID-19 Variants

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Lala Jackson

This article was published on August 13, 2021. As of Monday, August 23, the FDA has granted the Pfizer and BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine full approval for ages 16 and up, with the Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) still in effect for ages 12-15 and for booster doses for immunocompromised individuals. Full approval for other COVID-19 vaccines currently under EUA is expected soon.

While hopes were high that we could head back to school for the 2021 school year as though we were closer to “normal,” the development of COVID-19 variants amidst low vaccination rates has thrown a wrench in plans. But when kids need to get back to in-person schooling for quality of life, quality of learning, and socialization, how can we best keep them safe?

To help answer this and other questions about going back to school safely, JDRF—in collaboration with American Diabetes Association and Sansum Diabetes Research Institute—hosted a conversation with doctors and experts from the CDC, ADA, and the Fairfax County Health Department (Virginia).

Moderator Dr. Kristin Castorino, senior research physician at Sansum Diabetes Research Institute, kicked off the event with the most pressing question—is it even safe for students and their teachers who have diabetes to return to in person schooling, particularly for those under 12 who cannot be vaccinated yet?

“I’d change the question from ‘is it safe?’ to ‘is it appropriate?’ and I think it is,” answered Dr. Fran Kaufman, pediatric endocrinologist and chief medical officer at Senseonics. “There aren’t known answers as things change… but we need to get our kids back to school, not only for learning but for socialization.”

Dr. Kaufman stressed that the best way to make school safe is for everyone who can get vaccinated to do so. Dr. Christa-Marie Singleton, MD, MPH, senior medical advisor at the CDC later elaborated, “Vaccines protect folks against serious symptoms, hospitalization, and death. The best way to protect ourselves, our families, and our youngest people is for the adults and kids over the age of 12 around them to get vaccinated.”

“We also know about the importance of masking,” continued Dr. Kaufman. “It’s important to follow the CDC’s recommendation that all children and adults should be masked in the indoor school environment.”

What About the Legal Rights of Kids With Diabetes?

Particularly as some states ban school districts from being able to require masks in indoor learning environments, what legal protections do kids with diabetes have to stay safe in school? Crystal Woodward, MPS, director of the ADA’s Safe at School campaign, stressed “the rights of students with diabetes do not go away during a pandemic. They have legal protections under federal and state laws. Those accommodations may look a little different, but they do not go away.”

Similarly to how the Americans with Disabilities Act protects people with diabetes in the workplace, section 504 of The Rehabilitation Act protects the education of children with disabilities like diabetes. This law allows children with diabetes and their families to create what are known as 504 plans, which clearly outline agreed upon accommodations for students with disabilities at school.

While parents cannot dictate the actions of other students, they can include directives for their own children to stay safer from COVID-19 in 504 Plans, like instructions that their student must always wear a mask or will need extra physical distance in a classroom setting.

“It’s imperative that [children with diabetes] have a section 504 plan,” Crystal explained. “Everyone needs to be clear on what accommodations will be provided and by whom, like the student having the ability to take an exam at an alternate time if blood glucose levels are out of range during the scheduled test time.” Ensuring the student also knows what is in their own 504 plan can help them feel more empowered and comfortable asking for what they need.

For distance learning, 504 plans can dictate that children with diabetes can take snack or meal breaks at times best for the student, or have an agreed upon communication method with the teacher if the student needs to take a break to attend to a low or high blood sugar.

“Bottom line: the rights of students do not go away,” Crystal reiterated. “Students with diabetes and their families should work with schools and everyone needs to understand their role and responsibilities, and the plan should be updated as needed. It’s always better to get it in writing. Put the 504 plan in place while everything is going well—you never know if a principal or a nurse or a teacher is going to be there throughout the year.” Panel members stressed that families who don’t speak English, particularly in public schools, have a legal right to translators who can help establish 504 plans.

Jacqueline McManemin, RN, BSN, certified diabetes education and care specialist (CDECS) and assistant nurse manager for the health services division of Fairfax County Health Department in Virginia, spoke about what they’re continuing to do in their school district (one of the 15 largest in the nation) to keep students safe. “Parents should expect to see much of the same precautions this year that were in place last year. Particularly when students are inside, they should be masked.”

School administrators across the country can work to make schools more safe for all children, particularly those with chronic illnesses like asthma and diabetes, by putting in protective measures like establishing two different health clinics—one for people exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19 or other communicable illnesses and a separate clinic for routine care and injury treatment.  Meals can be eaten outside as weather permits and student interaction in hallways can be minimized by teachers rotating between classrooms rather than groups of students switching classrooms every period. Protocol also needs to be clearly communicated with all staff and parents about what to do if a student starts showing symptoms of COVID-19 while at school.

Getting Kids Mentally Ready for in-Person School

Back to school doesn’t just mean a change of location, it’s a change in schedules, types of interaction and stimulation, and levels of distraction that can also impact diabetes care. Psychologist Cynthia E. Muñoz, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of clinical pediatrics at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine and president of healthcare and education for the American Diabetes Association, reminded the community that the impact of the pandemic on each individual has been unique and therefore approaches to regain a sense of normalcy must be unique too.

“For parents and guardians, be aware of how you’ve been impacted. Seek support, through family, through primary care, through a therapist. Find ways to talk about your fears or concerns,” encouraged Dr. Muñoz. She went on to suggest ways to get kids mentally and physically ready for school again.

“Now that schools are starting to open, it’s time to start looking at sleep schedules, screen time, and start shifting routines and schedules to get children ready for the new routine,” she noted. “Many people watch a lot of content on social media or television—not just kids, everyone—but it’s a passive interaction with others. Shifting to a more active form of communication with others can be another way to help people ease into the change of a lot more interaction than people have had in the last year or so.”

Helping Kids Who Feel Singled Out

Kids with diabetes often deal with feelings of being the odd kid out, having to visit the school nurse, having to deal with special routines. When COVID-19 is added, kids with diabetes may feel like they’re the only ones taking special precautions, which can be additionally isolating. How can parents help children dealing with these feelings?

“I like to approach this question around the concept of support, building layers of support around the student,” Dr. Muñoz explained. “One level should be ensuring that someone at the school should know that the child has diabetes and knows what kind of support they need. Another category is who could know [the student has diabetes], but doesn’t necessarily have to, like friends. For the student with diabetes, getting support from a friend or classmate they trust could go a long way. If the student feels like they’re going to be the only one wearing a mask, they can ask a friend to wear it with them.”

“I think it’s important for adults to be sensitive to this,” Dr. Muñoz continued. “Saying “everyone has something different” might minimize how a student feels. Acknowledging their feelings and taking the time to ask them what will help goes a long way.”

To get advice from other parents and guardians or to help your student with diabetes find other kids who understand, be sure to join the Beyond Type 1 community.

Learn more about the JDRF – Beyond Type 1 Alliance here.

You Can Watch the Entire Conversation Here:

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Rush for COVID Vaccine Hinders Diabetes Tech Advancements

Modern science is amazing. The COVID-19 pandemic, which is still shaking the world as we know it, is quickly getting controlled due to fast scientific progress and the vaccine rollout (in the United States, at least).

Having an effective vaccine come to market within a year of the appearance of a novel disease is unheard of; most medicines take decades for adequate approval processes within the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be completed. This feat is incredible.

That being said, with all of the rush to get a vaccine to the masses, the FDA pushed the Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines literally to the front of the approval line, delaying other important medical and technological advancements, including those related to diabetes.

While the vaccine did (and should!) take precedent here, the delays have been tough for people with diabetes in many ways. 

The head of the FDA’s device center, Jeff Shuren, described a “tsunami” of product applications from companies hoping to join the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic.

Those applications include over 1,200 submissions for products like diagnostic tests, ventilators, and digital technology, all of which have slowed their work in other diseases, including diabetes.

Shuren went on to say that review times had begun to increase amid growing backlogs due to the high volume. 

The agency is trying to make as much space as possible to approve COVID-19 related vaccines, medicine, and technology quickly to end the pandemic, which has taken precedence over almost everything else. Experts suspect that the FDA may not be able to meet its own timelines going forward.

In addition, lockdowns and social distancing regulations halted clinical trials and product releases. It’s been a tough year for diabetes tech firms to get much done.

The following products, and their release dates, have been most affected by the pandemic:

Senseonics’ 180-Day Eversense Glucose Monitor

The Eversense continuous glucose monitor (CGM) is a device implanted under the skin that lasts for 90 days. The newest version of their CGM system aims to double its lifespan to 180 days without changing a sensor.

What was supposed to be released in early 2021 now faces delays of up to two months for its application to the FDA while the agency tasks its staff with emergency reviews of coronavirus tests and other medical devices. The new release date of the model is scheduled for mid-2021.

The Omnipod 5 (Originally “Horizon”)

Insulet’s Omnipod 5 system, which utilizes CGM data to make automated adjustments to basal insulin throughout the day, will be the company’s first hybrid-closed loop system.

Similar to the T-slim Control IQ system, this insulin pump will provide mobile app control and insulin dosing from a smartphone, eliminating the need to carry their hallmark Personal Diabetes Manager (PDM) around to control the release of insulin.

While significantly delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Insulet said during its Nov. 4, 2020 investor update call that it had recently finished its clinical trial and was finalizing its FDA submission.

They hope to launch their product by June of 2021.

Medtronic 780G

Also known as the Advanced Hybrid-Closed Loop (AHCL) system, this system will improve upon its first iterations of the hybrid-closed loop system, the 670g and 770g. Hoping to seek approval for adults and children as young as two, this system includes:

  • A CGM sensor that will require just one calibration on the first day of wear and no further calibrations after that
  • Automatic correction bolus delivery every 5 minutes, in conjunction with CGM readings, that can automatically bolus for missed meal doses.
  • A lower glucose target range, adjustable between 100-120 mg/dL
  • Different insulin duration times, to adjust for the “tail” of your insulin (eg, Fiasp vs. Humalog)
  • Built-in Bluetooth to share data and provide remote software updates

Due to the pandemic, the approval for this device has been delayed, but Medtronic confirmed that it had submitted its application for review to the FDA in February, 2021.

They hope to have a commercial launch sometime in 2021.

Dexcom G7

The much-anticipated Dexcom G7 continuous glucose monitor (CGM) was also delayed due to the pandemic, but it should be worth the wait. You’ll no longer need to buy separate transmitters; each sensor is a complete and disposable transmitter/sensor integrated system. Some other great features include:

  • No calibrations, much like the G6
  • At the start, wear time will be 10 days, but eventual use will include a 14-15 day feature, also without any calibrations
  • Smaller and thinner: the newest CGM will be 60% smaller than the G6
  • One hour warm-up period

Dexcom CEO Kevin Sayer said that the company eventually plans to have different versions of the G7 for different people.

For example, people with type 2 diabetes who don’t use insulin (or even the general public) might opt for a much simpler interface than people with type 1 diabetes, who will want all of the alarms and settings.

Abbott Freestyle Libre 3

For years, the FreeStyle Libre from Abbott Diabetes was a considered Flash Glucose Monitor (FGM), because it only reported blood sugar levels whenever a user scanned their sensor with a receiver or smartphone.

That will change with the new edition: The Freestyle Libre 3 will function as a real-time CGM, because it won’t require sensor scanning to get a “flash” of blood glucose data. It will instead provide trends and graphs to track blood sugars throughout the day.

The Libre 3 generates real-time blood sugar readings every minute (as opposed to Dexcom’s every 5 minutes), displaying the result on a mobile app on your smartphone. This version also has optional high and low blood sugar alarms, a feature introduced with the Libre 2 in 2020.

Additionally, the sensor is much smaller and thinner (a 70% size reduction), and is kinder to the earth, using 41% less plastic overall.

The Libre 3 received global approval in September 2020. The timeline in the US has been pushed backwards, but with clinical trials now complete, we’ll likely see the Libre 3 applications submitted to the FDA mid-2021.

While the hustle for an effective COVID-19 vaccine has been nothing short of miraculous, people with diabetes don’t want to wait any longer!

Hopefully, with the hastened release of the vaccine, we can see more diabetes technology hit the market in 2021. 

Source: diabetesdaily.com

So You Got a CGM – Now What?

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Katie Mahoney, Hanna Gutow, and Diana Isaacs

If you just got a continuous glucose monitoring system, you may be wondering how to use it most effectively and how to understand your glucose data. Read our tips, tricks, and things to consider.

Congratulations – you got a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), an excellent tool to support diabetes management. Hopefully you’re feeling optimistic and excited that you have the opportunity to use this technology.

It’s most likely that you and your healthcare team decided that using a CGM is the optimal way for you to manage your diabetes. Perhaps you were given a prescription for a personal CGM. Or maybe you’re trying CGM as part of Dexcom’s Hello Dexcom program (a free ten-day trial), through Abbott’s MyFreestyle program (a free 14-day trial), or as part of Medtronic’s CGM Discount Access program. You might also be trying professional CGM, which is owned by your healthcare clinic and worn on a short-term basis.

If you haven’t yet been able to get CGM, ask your healthcare team if you can get a trial device or get a prescription. CGM is recommended for anyone with diabetes who takes mealtime insulin. While many people with diabetes currently don’t have access to CGM, we’re hopeful that more and more individuals will be able to use this technology in the future. Regardless of what brings you to using a CGM, we’ve created a three-part guide to help you get started, including tips, tricks, and considerations.

Click to jump down to a section:

Part 1: Before you apply your CGM

Learn the basics.

Before you start using your CGM, it can be helpful to understand its basic features. Continuous glucose monitors (CGM) measure the body’s glucose (or sugar) levels by sensing the glucose present in tissue fluid (also called interstitial fluid). While a blood glucose meter (BGM) provides a measurement of the blood glucose level at a specific moment in time (when you prick your finger), CGMs provide a new glucose level every one to five minutes – depending on the device, that’s 288 to 1,440 times per day. A CGM provides a constant stream of information on glucose levels, trends, and patterns.

A CGM can either be transcutaneous (it goes through your skin) or implanted (it lies under your skin). CGMs require three basic parts:

  1. A sensor that monitors real-time glucose levels under your skin.
  2. A transmitter that sits on top of the sensor and sends glucose information to a smartphone app, reader, or receiver. In transcutaneous systems, the sensor and transmitter are connected as one small on-body device. Some transmitters are disposable with the sensor while others require an additional step to attach. In implanted systems, the transmitter is attached to the skin and can be removed without harming the sensor below the skin.
  3. A smartphone app, reader, or receiver to collect and display your data.

CGMs have a variety of features that differ by brand and model, including the amount of time the CGM needs to “warm up” before glucose readings are available, how long you can wear a CGM sensor before needing to replace it, and alarms that alert you to highs and lows. You can learn more about CGM devices here. For brand-specific resources and information, click here to jump down.

Personal CGM vs. Professional CGM

The CGMs that we just described are called personal CGMs – they are owned by the person with diabetes and used for a long period of time. They are available as real-time CGMs, where the data can be continuously viewed, or as intermittently-scanned CGMs, where information is recorded all of the time, but you need to scan the sensor to view the data.

Another type of CGM is called “professional CGM.” Professional CGMs are given to someone with diabetes for a short session (usually one to two weeks) to better understand that person’s glucose levels. After the wear period, the person will review the data with their healthcare professional. This can provide insights that inform the person’s diabetes treatment, and it can help healthcare professionals recommend therapy and lifestyle recommendations that lead to better glucose management.

Some professional CGMs have a real-time mode, meaning that the user can see their glucose levels while wearing the device. Other professional CGMs have a “blinded” mode. Blinded CGM means that you cannot look at their glucose values on-demand; instead, all of your glucose data is stored and shared with your healthcare professional. This can help your healthcare team identify hypoglycemia (or low blood sugar levels). If you get a blinded professional CGM, your healthcare team will analyze the data and discuss it with you once your wear period is complete.

While long-term, real-time CGM is most effective for day-to-day diabetes management, especially for insulin users, professional CGM can be an important tool for people who are not using personal CGM. Periodic use of CGM can help people learn the effects of food and physical activity on glucose levels, even for those not taking any diabetes medications.

Reflect on your goals, know your targets, and make a plan to respond to highs and lows.

It can be helpful to reflect on your CGM goals, set your glucose targets, make plans for responding to your glucose readings, and decide with whom you want to share your data:

  • Reflect on your CGM goals. Perhaps you want to use CGM to prevent hypoglycemia using its alert system, or to prevent hyperglycemia and increase your Time in Range, or to manage glucose during exercise. Or, maybe you and your healthcare team are going to use professional CGM for two weeks to explore how your lifestyle habits affects your glucose levels. Regardless, the ultimate goal of CGM is to improve your diabetes management.
  • Know your personal glucose targets and make a plan with your healthcare team for how you’ll respond to hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. Knowing your target glucose range is important for responding to your real-time glucose values. For most people with diabetes the target range is 70-180mg/dl – learn more about Time in Range goals here. Make a plan that incorporates glucose trend arrows from your CGM to help you prevent big spikes out of range. Here are some prompts for you to discuss with your healthcare team:
    • What is my glucose target when I wake up and before meals?
    • What should my glucose level be two hours after a meal? If it is above that value, what actions should I take to bring my glucose levels down?
    • What is my glucose target before bed?
    • What high glucose level should I try to avoid? What should I do if my glucose gets that high?
    • What low glucose level should I try to avoid? What should I do if my glucose gets that low? What should I do if my glucose levels are trending down?

Part 2: Applying your CGM

Connect the CGM to the app and set the system up.

Download the mobile app associated with your CGM system if available. If you’re using a receiver (Dexcom device) or reader (Libre device), make sure it’s charged daily. The CGM should come with instructions for applying the sensor (every seven, ten, or 14 days) and pairing the app, reader, or receiver with your sensor and transmitter. If you have an implanted CGM, it will be applied by a healthcare professional and can last up to 90 days. To jump to brand-specific instructions and tutorials, click here. To learn about CGM adhesives and tips for keeping your CGM on, check out Adam Brown’s suggestions on the topic.

Once your system is set up, your CGM will need to “warm up” before you can see your data. Different models have different warm-up periods, but this will generally take one to two hours, after which your data will be accessible either directly (Dexcom, Guardian, Eversense) or by scanning your sensor (FreeStyle Libre). The warm up period for the implantable Eversense system is 24 hours.

For many people starting to use a CGM, video tutorials can be quite helpful. If you have the opportunity, it’s good to meet with a diabetes care and education specialist or your local pharmacist (if picking up your CGM from a pharmacy). Here are set-up and application tips and tutorials for your CGM:

Part 3: Understanding your CGM data

Once you’re set up with your CGM and the warm up period is complete, you can access your data. There are two types of data you’ll want to pay attention to: real-time data and past data.

Interpret your real-time data.

Depending on the CGM brand you’re using, you can either access your glucose data at any time by looking at an app on your phone, your smart watch, or your receiver. For those using an intermittently-scanned CGM, you can view your glucose levels by scanning your sensor with your smart phone or reader. Looking at your data can feel overwhelming at first, so we recommend focusing on two aspects of your real-time data:

  • First, look at your CGM glucose value. Is it in your target range? If your glucose level is out of range, which steps of your plan should you follow?

If you’re experiencing hypoglycemia in particular, make sure you act right away to increase your glucose levels.

  • Second, look at the trend arrow. Your CGM provides a “trend arrow,” to tell you the direction and speed with which your glucose values are changing. The trend arrow is helpful for understanding what’s going on and how you can respond. For example, if your glucose value is 90 mg/dl and your trend arrow shows that your glucose levels are going down, you may need to take action to prevent hypoglycemia; if your glucose value is 90 mg/dl and your trend arrow shows your glucose levels are increasing, you are likely not going to develop hypoglycemia.

Trend arrows can help with premeal insulin dosing, before and after exercise, before bed, and to understand where your glucose will be trending in the next 30 minutes. Trend arrows are particularly beneficial when used with insulin on board (short-acting insulin that was recently taken for food or to correct a high glucose level and is still working in the body). For example, if your trend arrows are going down and you have insulin on board from an insulin dose given two hours previously, your risk of hypoglycemia is even greater.

For those not using insulin, trend arrows can help understand how different foods and activities affect glucose levels. For example, if a person sees that the arrow is rising rapidly after a certain meal or snack, they can go for a walk to try to bring it down. It may also signal that next time you should consider a smaller portion size or try to add protein or fat to prevent glucose levels from rising as quickly.

Each CGM has a slightly different interpretation of the arrows, but here’s a general idea of what the trend arrows can tell you.

data

Image source: diaTribe

We recommend working with your healthcare team to decide how often to check your glucose levels. Many people benefit from checking glucose when waking up, before meals, before physical activity, and at bedtime. Some people benefit from checking one to two hours after meals. A person should also check their CGM any time they feel symptoms of high or low glucose. CGM alarms are especially helpful for monitoring glucose levels as they change – more on this below.

Interpret your past data.

Once you’ve used your CGM for a few days, you can see your recent daily trends and the amount of time you’re spending in the target range (70-180 mg/dl). This is also called retrospective data. It is beneficial to review your glucose data regularly to understand how your lifestyle – like the food you eat, your exercise habits, your stress levels, and medications you use – affects your glucose levels. Look at your glucose levels over the past two weeks, one month, and three months; talk with your healthcare team about trends that you are noticing and how they might be addressed. Learn about the many factors that affect glucose here.

During diabetes care appointments, your healthcare team can view this data in an Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP) report and use it to talk with you about how your diabetes management is going and any potential adjustments to your care plan. This should be a collaborative discussion between you and your healthcare team about how your diabetes data compares to your management goals and what changes could be made.

Each CGM system offers a standardized one-page report, called an ambulatory glucose profile (AGP). The AGP includes three important components:

  1. CGM key metrics
  2. 24-hour profile
  3. Daily glucose patterns

Although there are many ways to view your glucose data, the AGP report often has all of the information that you need. We’ll explain the three main pieces below. To learn more, read our in-depth piece on understanding your AGP report: “Making the Most of CGM: Uncover the Magic of Your Ambulatory Glucose Profile.”

CGM key metrics

More green, less red.

The time in range bar shows the percentage of time you spend in five glycemic ranges:

  • data

    Image source: diaTribe

    Time in Range: glucose levels between 70-180 mg/dl

  • Time Below Range: glucose levels below 70 mg/dl
  • Time in severe hypoglycemia: glucose levels below 54 mg/dl
  • Time Above Range: glucose levels above 180 mg/dl
  • Time in severe hyperglycemia: glucose levels above 250 mg/dl

Your goal is to grow the green bar and shrink the red bars – in other words, increase Time in Range and decrease time Below Range and time in severe hypoglycemia. See more on Time in Range goals and standard targets.

24-hour profile, also known as Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP).

chart

Image source: diaTribe

How do you figure out how to change your diabetes management to increase your Time in Range and decrease your Time Below and Above Range? That’s where the 24-hour profile is helpful, which shows your daily glucose trends across the full 24-hour day.

  • Understanding what the 24-hour profile shows: The black line represents your median glucose level throughout the day based on data from a set period of your CGM use (e.g., the last two weeks). The blue shaded areas help show how much your glucose levels vary at different points in the day.
  • Using the data: Compare different times of day to see what might be influencing your glucose numbers. For example, while the person shown above has glucose readings that vary greatly at 3pm (indicated by a very wide shaded area), their 8am glucose numbers are much more consistent (the shaded area at 8am is narrower), despite being higher. This person also regularly sees a spike in sensor glucose readings at around 9am. What’s causing that increase? Maybe it’s a higher carbohydrate breakfast choice, forgetting to bolus, not bolusing early enough, or not accounting for all the carbs in breakfast. Reflecting on what is causing a spike or valley can help you make behavior changes to reduce fluctuations and increase your Time in Range.
  • chart

    Image source: diaTribe

    The goal: The overall goal is to keep your glucose levels in your target range without big spikes or valleys, sometimes called “flat, narrow, in range” (FNIR). In the AGP above, the green box represents the user’s target sensor glucose range (70-180 mg/dl). While the user stays in range overnight and in the afternoon, they tend to see spikes in the morning and evening. With the goal of FNIR in mind, you can look at your long-term data and ask, what’s making it possible for me to stay in range? What is making my glucose spike or fall?

  • The good news is the goal for most people is to spend 70% or more Time in Range. However, increasing your Time in Range by even 5% (an extra hour per day in range!) can be helpful. You don’t have to reach perfection to improve clinical outcomes.

Daily glucose profiles.

With your trend data, you also can see your daily 24-hour glucose profiles from the last two weeks. The figures show the target range (70-180 mg/dl) in gray, spikes above 180 mg/dl (hyperglycemia) in yellow, and valleys below 70 mg/dl (hypoglycemia) in red. Viewing the data day by day can help you evaluate how specific factors and behaviors impacted your glucose values on a certain day.

data

Image source: diaTribe

To make the most out of your daily glucose profiles, it can be helpful to log your daily food and exercise to compare with your glucose profile and see which behaviors help you stay in range and which ones tend to make you go out of range.

A helpful tool when reviewing your data with your healthcare team is called DATAA. Which stands for:

  • Data – look at your diabetes data together
  • Assess Safety – Look for and try to solve Time Below Range (hypoglycemia) first
  • Time in Range – Discuss what’s working and how to replicate that by looking for the times of day or the days of the week when Time in Range was the highest
  • Areas to Improve – Note when you spent more Time Above Range (hyperglycemia) and discuss ways to reduce this
  • Action Plan – Develop an action plan together

Other Tips, Tricks, and Considerations

1. Exercise & your CGM

To learn about how to use your CGM before, during, and after exercise, check out our article “Exercise Well with Your CGM – Recommendations, Glucose Trends, and Strategies.”

An important note about exercising with a CGM: There can be a difference between CGM glucose measurements and BGM glucose measurements due to what we call a “lag.” Changes in glucose levels in interstitial fluid are not seen as quickly as they are in the blood. At rest, the interstitial glucose lags about five minutes behind the blood glucose; in situations when glucose changes rapidly, such as during exercise, lag time can increase up to 24 minutes. This means that your CGM readings aren’t always going to be accurate during exercise. This lag can also occur outside of exercise, any time your glucose levels are rising or falling quickly.

2. How to make CGM alarms your friend

Adam Brown has written about how it can be helpful to think about your CGM as a partner in your diabetes management, rather than a nag that points out when you’re not in range. Alarms can be useful tools. By alerting you to current or predicted highs and lows, as well as rate of change, you can increase your Time in Range and see your 24-hour glucose profile become flatter, narrower, and more in range. You can personalize your CGM alarm settings to your preferred thresholds or turn them off completely (though some devices won’t let you turn off an urgent low alarm at 55 mg/dl). It’s helpful to work with your diabetes care team to determine your individualized alarm settings.

3. Sharing data with friends, family, and care-partners

The ability to share your real-time glucose data with your care-partners and loved ones is a huge plus of using CGM – your support network can help you track your glucose levels and keep them in range. At the same time, sharing your data with others makes some people nervous and self-conscious. Decide who you want to share your data with and talk with that person about boundaries and how you want to communicate about your data. For more on how to approach these conversations, check out Kerri Sparling’s “To Share or Not to Share: My Approach to Diabetes Data,” and “How to Coach Your Care-Partner on CGM Data.”

4. How to talk to your healthcare team about your CGM

Now that you’re using a CGM, talking with your healthcare team about your CGM data should become a key part of every visit.

Ahead of the visit: To help visits go smoothly, many healthcare professionals will ask you to upload your CGM data before you come into the office (or before your telehealth appointment) so they can review the data and be prepared to talk with you. Learn about uploading your data here. Note: some CGM systems upload automatically once connected to the clinic’s data portal. It’s also helpful to look over your data – like your AGP report – and come up with questions to ask your healthcare professional ahead of the visit. You may have questions about parts of your daily glucose profile that you don’t understand, areas where you’re having a hard time staying in range, or just general questions to help you navigate your data.

During the visit: To make sure that you and your healthcare professional are on the same page, it can be helpful to take a few minutes at the beginning of your appointment to explain your interpretation of your data in your own words. This may be a good time to start a conversation on any questions you may have prepared ahead of your visit. It is also important to take time with your care team to develop an action plan based on your CGM data with a few straightforward priorities for you to focus on before your next visit.

Brand-Specific Resources

While any CGM can help improve your diabetes management, there are some differences between the currently available systems that you may want to consider or talk about with your healthcare team – see our chart comparing different CGMs here. Specifically, we recommend asking your healthcare professional about how alarms may be able to alert you to times of hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, what it means if you have to calibrate your CGM, and how to use your CGM with smart insulin pens, mobile apps, or even insulin pumps in an automated insulin delivery (AID) system.

To reach out to CGM companies for product support, contact their customer service departments:

  • Abbott: +1-855-632-8658
  • Dexcom: +1-888-738-3646
  • Medtronic: +1-800-646-4633
  • Senseonics: +1-844-736-7348

This article is part of a series on Time in Range.

The diaTribe Foundation, in concert with the Time in Range Coalition, is committed to helping people with diabetes and their caregivers understand Time in Range to maximize patients’ health. Learn more about the Time in Range Coalition here.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

What You Should Know About COVID-19 Vaccines and Diabetes

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Eliza Skoler and Dr. Francine Kaufman

Last updated: March 22, 2021

COVID-19 vaccines have been authorized for use in the United States and in many parts of the world. We’re here to answer questions for people with diabetes. Are the vaccines safe? How do the vaccines work and does it matter which one I get? What are the side effects, and how will the vaccine affect my blood sugar? What can I do after I am vaccinated?

Now that three COVID-19 vaccines have been authorized for use in the United States, and ten more around the world, many questions are circulating about the vaccines, their safety, and when to get vaccinated. While timing may differ by state and even between sites, people with type 2 diabetes or obesity will be eligible for early vaccination in the US in the coming months, though this may not be the case for millions of others – including those with type 1 diabetes and loved ones who are not currently recommended by CDC to receive the vaccine early. As states begin to distribute the vaccines, we’re here to answer your questions about COVID vaccination in the US; we’ll update this article as more information becomes available.

Click to jump down to a group of questions:

Why get the vaccine?
Why should I get the COVID vaccine?
How does the COVID-19 vaccine work?
How do mRNA vaccines work?​
How do viral vector vaccines work?

Vaccine Safety
Is the vaccine safe for people with diabetes?
Does it matter which vaccine you get?
Which vaccine is best for people with diabetes?​
What are the side effects? Can the vaccine be dangerous?
How will the vaccine affect my blood sugar levels?
Do diabetes medications affect the vaccine?
Should I get vaccinated if I have diabetes and other health conditions?
What is the AstraZeneca vaccine?

Getting the Vaccine
When will people with diabetes get the vaccine?
How will I know when it’s my turn to get the vaccine?
How much does the vaccine cost?
What should I expect at my vaccine appointment?
I had COVID-19 – should I still get vaccinated?
If I have symptoms of COVID-19 now should I get the vaccine?

After Receiving the Vaccine
What happens after I get the vaccine – can I still infect people with COVID?
Can I see people now that I am vaccinated?
Is one dose of the COVID vaccine effective?
Does the vaccine protect against the new variant of COVID?
Can I get COVID from the vaccine?
Are other vaccines coming?
When can I stop wearing a mask?

Why get the vaccine?

Why should I get the COVID vaccine?

The vaccine has the ability to protect you, your loved ones, and your community. It will help your body’s immune system fight off a COVID-19 infection – this means that if you are exposed to COVID, your body can protect you and significantly reduce your chances of getting sick or experiencing severe complications from the virus. Two of the vaccines that are currently authorized in the US (from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna) are almost 95% effective at preventing symptoms of COVID in adults who have been exposed, and the third vaccine (Johnson & Johnson) is 85% effective at preventing severe COVID infection. In other words, if you are vaccinated with any of the three and then come into contact with someone who has COVID, you probably won’t get sick.

To stop the global spread of COVID-19, the majority of people around the world will have to become immune to the virus. The COVID vaccine – like the many vaccines that protect us from small pox, measles, the flu, and other illnesses – will play a major role in improving the health and wellbeing of people across the globe.

How does the COVID-19 vaccine work?

There are currently three vaccines that have received emergency use authorization in the US: the Pfizer-BioNTechModerna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines. The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines are similar – both use messenger RNA (mRNA) to target the “spike proteins” on COVID-19 virus molecules. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is a viral vector vaccine that also targets the spike proteins.

How do COVID mRNA vaccines work?

mRNA contains genetic instructions (like a blueprint) for making specific proteins in cells. The mRNA in COVID vaccines was developed by scientists to trigger human cells to make harmless COVID spike proteins, and after the proteins are built the vaccine mRNA is destroyed. The body’s immune system then recognizes these foreign proteins and builds antibodies against them. This means that if you are later infected with COVID-19, you’ll have antibodies that recognize the spikes on the viral molecule and can destroy it. To learn more about this process view this detailed, interactive piece from the New York Times.

mRNA vaccines are not “live” vaccines – the live virus is not injected into a person’s body. This means that you cannot get COVID from the vaccine. Similarly, the vaccine will not alter your own genes.

How do COVID viral vector vaccines work?

Similar to an mRNA vaccine, a viral vector vaccine causes the body’s cells to make harmless COVID-19 spike proteins so that it can learn to recognize the foreign proteins and build antibodies against them. Later, if you are infected with COVID-19, your body will have antibodies ready to fight off the virus.

Instead of using mRNA, a viral vector vaccine contains the DNA for a different, harmless virus. In the case of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, it’s an adenovirus – the type of virus that normally causes a cold or a flu – that has been engineered so that it does not make you sick. Once you get the injection and the virus is inside your body, its DNA can be read by your cellular machinery to produce spike proteins. As your immune system works to fight these foreign proteins, it will learn to protect you from COVID-19. To learn more about this process view a detailed, interactive piece from the New York Times.

Vaccine Safety

Is the vaccine safe for people with diabetes?

All three currently authorized vaccines – Pfizer-BioNTechModerna, and Johnson & Johnson – appear to be safe and effective for adults with diabetes. Rigorous clinical trials tested the safety of these vaccines in adults of all ages, races, and ethnicities, as well as chronic health conditions.

  • The Pfizer-BioNtech trial included 3,150 people with diabetes (8.4% of trial participants).
  • The Moderna trial included 2,858 people with type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (9.4% of trial participants).
  • The Johnson & Johnson trial included 3,389 people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes (7.7% of trial participants).
  • In terms of racial and ethnic diversity, the trials each included more than 20% Hispanic or Latino participants, almost 10% African American participants, and almost 5% Asian participants.

These vaccines were advanced quickly thanks to the immense resources provided for COVID vaccine development – even with a speedy process, the vaccine manufacturers had to follow the typical safety steps and thorough checks. Read more from the CDC about how the vaccines work, potential side effects, and details from the human clinical trials.

Does it matter which vaccine you get?

No – all three of the vaccines will protect you and those around you. However, there are some differences between the vaccines that may be important to people with diabetes.

Clinical trials found both mRNA vaccines to be extremely effective in adults – with almost 95% efficacy overall, only one in 20 people that receives the vaccine would get sick from COVID. Among the trial participants with diabetes, the Pfizer-BioNtech was 95% effective and the Moderna vaccine was 100% effective, while the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was 53% effective. Participants were only followed for a few months, so we don’t yet know the long-term effectiveness of these vaccines. As more vaccines are administered there will be more data collected, and hopefully children will be enrolled in clinical trials soon.

What does it mean for these vaccines to be “effective?” If a vaccine is 50% effective it successfully protects half of the people who receive it from getting infected by COVID-19 if they are exposed. If a vaccine is 75% effective, it protects three out of four people from COVID-19 infection. More importantly, all three vaccines are highly effective at preventing severe COVID-19 infection. All three clinical trials found that in people who did get infected after vaccination, the infection was much milder – among people who had received one of the three authorized vaccines, there were almost no deaths or hospitalizations resulting from COVID-19. To learn more about how the three vaccines compare, watch this video.

During early vaccine distribution, you likely won’t have any choice in which vaccine is available to you because there will be a limited supply and the goal is to vaccinate people as quickly as possible. Both mRNA vaccines require two shots, meaning that they are not considered fully effective until you have received both doses, and your immune system has developed protection against the virus (after the second shot). You should receive two shots of the same vaccine (either Pfizer-BioNtech or Moderna). The Johnson & Johnson vaccine only requires one shot.

Which vaccine is best for people with diabetes?Which vaccine is best for people with diabetes?

Due to the distinct design of each clinical trial, it can be hard to directly compare the three vaccines that are currently authorized in the US. However, based on trial data and information from the vaccine manufacturers, here’s the best information we have on how the vaccines compare.

Vaccine data table

Image source: diaTribe

The data show that no matter which of the currently authorized vaccines you get, getting a COVID-19 vaccine is safe and important for people with diabetes. All three vaccines are highly protective against severe COVID illness and death. Click here to watch an in-depth video explaining how the vaccines compare.

What are the side effects? Can the vaccine be dangerous?

When you receive a vaccine for a particular virus, your immune system builds protection against it. Because your body is creating antibodies and learning how to fight the virus or bacteria targeted by the vaccine, you may experience normal side effects for a day or two – this is similar to getting a flu shot, and people with diabetes should monitor their blood sugar levels and have a sick day management plan ready.

According to the CDC, these are the common side effects of the COVID vaccines – they are similar for people with and without diabetes:

  • Pain, swelling, or redness in the vaccinated arm
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Muscle pain

These side effects are a result of your immune system preparing to combat a future viral infection – they do not mean that you have gotten sick from the vaccine itself. If your side effects don’t go away, contact your healthcare team.

Severe allergic reactions to the COVID vaccine are rare – you can learn more from the CDC here. If you have ever had an allergic reaction to any vaccine, ask your healthcare professional if you should get the COVID vaccine. If you experience a severe allergic reaction to the first dose of the COVID vaccine, do not get the second dose.

How will the vaccine affect my blood sugar levels?

Because the vaccine can cause symptoms of illness that can lead to high glucose levels, it’s important to carefully monitor your blood sugar levels for 48 hours after you receive your vaccination. Stay hydrated, and make sure to have your sick day plan ready in case you feel ill. So far, people with diabetes seem to be experiencing few side effects and minimal effect on blood sugar levels.

Do diabetes medications affect the vaccine?

At this time there is no information available on drug interactions between the authorized COVID vaccines and other medications – this has not yet been studied. However, it is not anticipated that the vaccine itself would interact with insulin or other standard diabetes medications. Note: it may be helpful to avoid injecting insulin or placing a glucose sensor or pump infusion set in your vaccine injection site for several days after vaccination.

Should I get vaccinated if I have diabetes and other health conditions?

People with complications of diabetes (including heart disease and kidney disease) are at much higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19. If you have other health conditions in addition to diabetes, getting the vaccine is especially important.

What is the AstraZeneca vaccine?

New results from the US clinical trial of the AstraZeneca viral vector vaccine show that the vaccine was 79% effective at preventing symptoms of COVID-19 infection, and fully prevented severe illness and hospitalization in more than 32,000 participants. The two-dose AstraZeneca vaccine is currently authorized in Europe and in other countries, but has not yet been authorized for use in the US. The latest clinical trial results show the vaccine to be both safe and effective.

In early March, several countries briefly paused giving people the AstraZeneca COVID vaccine due to concerns about possible rare side effects, including severe blood clots. However, since the data does not show that the vaccine increases the risk of blood clots, the World Health Organization determined that it is safe and that the benefits of the vaccine outweigh any risks. We look forward to updating this article if the AstraZeneca vaccine receives FDA authorized in the US.

Getting the Vaccine

When will people with diabetes get the vaccine?

In most places across the US, people with type 2 diabetes and obesity will be prioritized in the third group of early vaccination (Phase 1c) – this has already begun in some parts of the country. Type 1 diabetes is not currently considered a high-risk medical condition for this phase. Some diabetes experts believe that if you have type 1 diabetes and any evidence of kidney damageheart disease, or obesity with high insulin doses, it’s a good idea to seek vaccination as soon as possible because you may be at high risk for severe illness if you are infected with COVID-19. To learn about the CDC’s recommended stages of vaccination and where you fall in the vaccine line, read Dr. Francine Kaufman’s “When Can I Get the COVID Vaccine if I Have Diabetes?

How will I know when it’s my turn to get the vaccine?

The distribution of vaccines is the responsibility of each state, and states have different plans for vaccinating people. Most states will use networks within hospitals, healthcare offices, and pharmacies to distribute vaccines to residents. Depending on where you live, you may be asked to get on a vaccine waiting list. Click here to see the state by state report from the Kaiser Family Foundation, including who is currently eligible for vaccination in your state. To learn more about your place in the vaccination line, read Dr. Kaufman’s “When Can I Get the COVID Vaccine if I Have Diabetes?” If you have type 2 diabetes or obesity (a body mass index above 30 – check here), contact your healthcare office to ask when and how you can get vaccinated.

How much does the vaccine cost?

You will not have to pay for the COVID vaccine in the US; it will be given to all US residents for free. That said, some vaccination providers may charge an administration fee for delivering the injection. Ask your healthcare office if there will be any costs associated with your vaccination.

What should I expect at my vaccine appointment?

When you get your COVID vaccine, you’ll receive a paper card that says which vaccine you received, and when and where you received it. You’ll also get a fact sheet (paper or electronic) with more information about the vaccine, its benefits, and its side effects. After you get your injection, you’ll be asked to stay on-site for a short period of time so that healthcare professionals can monitor your body’s reaction.

I had COVID-19 – should I still get vaccinated?

Yes – though you can wait up to 90 days after initial onset of your COVID-19 infection. Researchers don’t know how long immunity against the virus can last after natural infection, though evidence suggests that you’re not likely to get sick with COVID again for the first 90 days. You should still get vaccinated for longer-term protection, and the CDC says that you can wait 90 days after the infection before getting your vaccine.

If I have symptoms of COVID-19 now, should I get the vaccine?

If you recently tested positive for COVID-19, are currently experiencing symptoms, or were exposed to someone with COVID, please stay away from other people.

  • If you test positive for COVID, wait until you’ve recovered (as early as 14 days from infection) and up to 90 days before getting the vaccine.
  • If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID, self-isolate and get tested.
  • If you were exposed to someone with COVID, quarantine for 14 days and monitor yourself for symptoms. Get a COVID test. If you do not get sick and your test is negative, get vaccinated once your quarantine period is over.

After Receiving the Vaccine

What happens after I get the vaccine – can I still infect people with COVID?

Once you have received both doses of the vaccine, it should protect you from getting sick with COVID. However, researchers don’t know whether you may be able to carry the virus (without symptoms) and pass it on to others. That’s why it’s still important to maintain safety measures even after receiving the vaccine: wear a face mask that fits you well if you’re in public, avoid contact with people not in your household, social distance from others, wash your hands, and monitor your health. Continuing to follow these measures will help you protect others and your community.

Can I see people now that I am vaccinated?

Two weeks after your final vaccine dose (one dose for Johnson & Johnson, two doses for Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) you are considered to be fully vaccinated and protected against severe COVID-19 infection. According to new CDC guidelines, people who are fully vaccinated:

  • Can gather indoors with others who are fully vaccinated, with no need to wear a mask.
  • Do not need to quarantine, stay away from others, or get tested if exposed to someone with COVID – unless you begin to show symptoms of illness.

The CDC also says that people who are fully vaccinated can “visit with unvaccinated people from a single household who are at low risk for severe COVID-19 disease indoors without wearing masks or physical distancing.” However, people with diabetes have a higher risk of getting severely ill from COVID-19 (though there’s no greater chance of being infected). For this reason, even if you are vaccinated, please continue to be cautious.

Is one dose of the COVID vaccine effective?

For the Johnson and Johnson vaccine, yes.

For the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, not entirely. Results from the clinical trials (Pfizer-BioNTechModerna) show that one dose of the vaccine can offer some protection, but two doses of both authorized vaccines are required for full efficacy.

Does the vaccine protect against the new variant of COVID?

Probably, but not certainly. Researchers are still studying the newest variants of COVID-19 to determine how effective current vaccines are at protecting against them. So far, much of the virus structure is unchanged in the variants and the currently-authorized vaccines seem to produce antibodies that recognize variants of COVID-19. Other strains of COVID will likely develop with time (similarly to the flu), and the vaccines can then be tweaked to match the changed threat. Click here to learn more about COVID variants, how they work, and what you can do to protect yourself.

Can I get COVID from the vaccine?

No. The vaccines do not contain the live virus, so they cannot infect you with COVID-19. Side effects that appear after you receive the vaccine occur because your immune system is activating and building antibodies – they are not signs of infection.

After vaccination it takes time for your body to develop full immunity to the virus, so it is still possible to get infected with COVID in the days before or after your vaccination. This does not mean the vaccine did not work; rather, it means that your immune system did not have enough time to build full immunity from the vaccine before coming into contact with the virus.

Are other vaccines coming?

To date, 13 vaccines have been approved for full or limited use around the world. Seventy-eight vaccines are currently in different stages of human clinical trials: 55 are in the early stages and 23 are in the final stages of testing. Hopefully, some of these vaccines will be found to effectively protect against COVID, opening up more vaccination options for people around the world. To track global vaccine development, view the New York Times Coronavirus Vaccine Tracker.

When can I stop wearing a mask?

Even after you get the vaccine you should still wear a face mask whenever you are in public places. Masks will continue helping to shield you from the virus and new variants of COVID (since no vaccine is perfect), and will reduce your chances of spreading COVID-19 to people around you (if you are carrying the virus and don’t have symptoms). As more people get vaccinated, the number of people carrying the virus in your community will decrease, bringing the risk of infection down. Public health authorities will make announcements about this, which may vary from place to place and even with the season.

If you are fully vaccinated, you can begin spending time with others who are fully vaccinated without wearing face masks.

While we await further information and research on COVID vaccines, protect yourself and those around you. For more information, read “Staying Safe – And Staying Well – During a Pandemic Winter” and “COVID Variants, Double Masks, Diabetes, Oh My!

Editor’s note: This article was first published on January 8, 2021, and last updated on March 22.

Dr. Francine Kaufman is Chief Medical Officer at Senseonics, a diabetes device company and Distinguished Professor Emerita of Pediatrics and Communications at the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

What You Need to Know If You’re Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Dr. Francine Kaufman

If you or your child was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you probably have many questions about how to manage this new condition. Dr. Fran Kaufman explains glucose levels and glucose targets, types of insulin and insulin doses, the honeymoon phase, and more

Were you recently told that you have, or your child has, type 1 diabetes? If so, you were likely filled with emotions, concerns, doubts, and questions. You were probably informed that there are many concepts you have to learn and many tasks you need to master. Hopefully, you were signed up for diabetes education sessions taught by certified diabetes care and education specialists (CDCES). You may have felt like you were on shaky ground; and despite all this, you knew that the sooner you learned how to manage diabetes, the better you would feel. Attitude matters, and the best attitude to have is a positive one – so hopefully you’re learning the tasks to successfully manage your diabetes.

Diabetes is a life-long condition. It is a marathon, not a sprint; no one day, one glucose level, or one meal makes a difference in the long run. One of the main goals of diabetes management is to balance insulin doses, food, and activity to keep your blood sugar or glucose levels in the desired or target range, as much of the time as possible. To do that, first you must know what the glucose targets are and how glucose levels are measured.  You must also understand what types of insulin are available and how they are combined for your insulin regimen. Finally, don’t forget to focus on your feelings, find support, and look to the future.

Click to jump down to a section:

  1. What are the glucose targets at diagnosis and how do they change over time?

Often when someone is first diagnosed, they are advised to keep their glucose levels between 100-200 mg/dL, to avoid hypoglycemia (low glucose) while they learn how to manage their diabetes. But after a few weeks or so, it may be time to bring glucose into the target range of 70-180 mg/dL, with pre-meal glucose between 70-130 mg/dL and post-meal glucose below 180 mg/dl. Before bed, healthcare professionals often recommend a glucose level above 100 mg/dL to help prevent hypoglycemia.

  1. How are glucose levels measured?

It is crucial that everyone diagnosed with type 1 diabetes learns how to perform fingerstick blood glucose measurements (referred to as BGs, fingersticks, self-monitoring of blood glucose, or SMBGs) and how to use a blood glucose meter (BGM).  When you are first diagnosed, blood glucose tests should preferably be done before each meal, 2-3 hours after each meal, before bed, in the middle of the night, before and after exercise, and before driving.  Here are a few tips for testing your blood glucose:

  • Before testing: Remember to follow the directions on your BGM. Be sure to set the date and time on your meter, have working and backup batteries, and keep all testing supplies away from extreme temperatures.
  • During testing: Make sure your hands are clean and dry. Put a new lancet in the lancing device and put the test strip in the meter. Poke the side (not the middle) of your finger with the lancing device so you maintain more feeling in your finger. Touch the blood droplet to the test strip allowing the BGM to read the glucose value.
  • After testing: Always throw away the lancet into a labeled “sharps container.” Write down the reading to keep a record of your blood sugar trends or review the stored data in the machine or on your computer; this will help you and your healthcare team recognize glucose patterns to more effectively manage your diabetes.

Continuous glucose monitoring devices (CGMs) are a more recent and convenient way to track glucose levels. A sensor that measures glucose (either through the same enzymatic reaction used by the BGM or through a fluorescent technique) is placed in the fatty tissue under the skin in the same place you give insulin shots, or where the insulin pump catheter is placed. Depending on which CGM is used, the sensor lasts either 7 days, 10 days, 14 days, or 90 days. These sensors measure glucose every five minutes and transmit the real-time glucose readings, a trend graph, and alerts to a smartphone or monitoring device. The data is stored in the monitoring device or in the data cloud so that you and your healthcare team can analyze it (if you give your healthcare professional permission to access it). CGM data can also be sent in real time to one or more care partners’ smartphones so they can help with your diabetes management. CGM is a powerful tool that many believe everyone with diabetes should be able to use, including those who are newly diagnosed; however, this technology is still not widely accessible or affordable.

The goal for using any of these devices is to assess the glucose value, and if it is not in your target range, to consider taking some action. If the glucose value is high, it might mean you should take a correction dose of insulin. If the glucose value is low, take oral glucose to bring it back up to the desired range (above 70 mg/dL). Ultimately, you’ll aim to have as many of the glucose measurements in the range of 70-180 mg/dL as possible.  With a CGM – which gets up to 288 glucose measurements a day – the goal is to have 70% of glucose levels in the target range of 70-180 mg/dL (referred to as Time in Range, or TIR). Seventy percent of glucose values is equal to about 16 or 17 hours per day spent in range.

  1. What are the types of insulins and insulin regimens?

It is essential that people with type 1 diabetes take insulin. The insulin can be taken by injection with a pen or syringe, through an insulin pump, or through inhalation. For people with type 1 diabetes, insulin is usually taken multiple times a day. There are many different types of insulin and many different ways to take insulin. Similar to how insulin would work in the body if diabetes wasn’t present, a common way to take insulin is called “basal-bolus insulin.” Basal (long-acting) insulin is considered a “background insulin,” as it is designed for 1-2 daily injections, and it helps the body balance glucose between meals and overnight. Bolus (rapid-acting) insulin acts over a much shorter time period, around 3-4 hours, and should be taken before meals and to correct high glucose levels.

Basal-bolus insulin means you take one or two injections of a basal insulin per day, and you take bolus insulin every time you eat carbohydrates or need a correction dose of insulin for a high glucose level. Some healthcare professionals have people newly diagnosed with diabetes start on a “fixed” insulin regimen – the basal insulin is taken the same way, but you eat a set amount of carbohydrate at each meal with a set dosage of insulin. The advantage of the basal-bolus regimen is flexibility in what you eat and when. The advantage of the fixed regimen is you are usually given a specific meal plan with information on how to substitute one carbohydrate choice for another – you don’t have to be an expert in carbohydrate (“carb”) counting right away, but hopefully you will master it over time. Talk to your healthcare team about which insulin regimen might be best for you and your lifestyle.

  1. How do I take insulin?

To inject insulin, you will use either a pen or a syringe. Make sure to store your insulin in the refrigerator before opening, and at room temperature after opening. Here are some best practices for administering insulin injections:

  • Wash your hands and inspect the pen or syringe. Check that you have the right type of insulin, that it is not expired, and that there are no cracks or unusual qualities to the vial or in the liquid.
  • Label the date that you open your insulin.
  • Rotate the location of injection between the arms, abdomen, legs, hips, and butt, and try not to use the exact same spot in each location. Varying the site of injection will help keep scar tissue and excess fatty tissue from developing.

Insulin pumps are small machines (the size of a deck of cards or smaller) that deliver only rapid-acting insulin; no long-acting insulin is given. The pump delivers insulin directly under your skin without the need for multiple injections each day. There are many types of insulin pumps with various features. Some can be paired with a CGM for automated insulin delivery (AID, also called closed loop or artificial pancreas). Many people are started on insulin pumps weeks or months after diagnosis, but others choose to wait much longer, or to never use an insulin pump at all. If you are interested in an insulin pump, talk with your support network and your healthcare team to determine what type of insulin pump system might be best for you.

  1. How are my basal and bolus doses determined?

In the beginning, you should have frequent contact with your healthcare team to adjust your insulin doses. At first you might need to change your doses almost on a daily basis, but later on, dose adjustment is usually not done unless a pattern lasts at least three days.

  • Basal insulin dose adjustments: Basal doses are in large part determined by your morning glucose levels before breakfast (fasting glucose). The goal of basal insulin is to allow you to wake up with a glucose level between of 80-130 mg/dL, without hypoglycemia (low glucose) or hyperglycemia (high glucose) during the night. Basal insulin also helps maintain glucose levels between meals and if you skip a meal.
  • Bolus insulin dose adjustments:
    • Insulin to Carbohydrate Ratio (ICR): Your ICR is the specific amount of insulin you take for every gram of carbohydrate you eat. In other words, how many grams of glucose are covered by one unit of insulin. You may be told to take your meal insulin at least 15 minutes before you start eating. The American Diabetes Association recommends that your glucose level be less than 180 mg/dL for 1-2 hours after your meal. You should then be back to your premeal value after four hours, without hypoglycemia.
    • Correction bolus insulin: This is taken when the glucose level is higher than the target glucose level of 180 mg/dL. Correction insulin is used to manage high glucose levels before and 3-4 hours after meals, or when hyperglycemia develops during the day or night. For most people, a correction dose of insulin should not be taken for three hours after the last insulin injection. You also need to be careful about correction insulin before exercise or bedtime unless otherwise instructed by your healthcare team.  A correction dose should bring your glucose level back to the target range within three hours, without dipping below 70 mg/dL.

Know that your insulin needs will likely change over time after you are first diagnosed with diabetes. Your basal amount, your insulin to carbohydrate ratio, and the amount you take for correction boluses will all change first with the “honeymoon” or remission phase of diabetes. After that they will change with growth, illness, weight change, aging, or a variety of other factors that can affect how sensitive your body is to insulin.

  1. What is the remission or honeymoon phase of diabetes?

Often after diagnosis and the initiation of insulin therapy, people with type 1 diabetes enter a honeymoon period. This occurs because some insulin-producing cells in the pancreas begin to function again – and make insulin. This means that you’ll be able to decrease the basal and bolus doses of insulin you are taking. Occasionally, someone can get down to a very low dose of insulin each day. It is best not to stop taking insulin altogether, even if it means you only take a very small amount of basal insulin. Unfortunately, the honeymoon period does not last forever, and glucose levels begin to rise again, at which time insulin doses may need to be increased.

There has been a national effort to identify newly diagnosed individuals with type 1 diabetes and tell them about studies designed for people with new onset, including the National Institutes of Health TrialNet study. diaTribe writes about clinical trials here. Please look into research being done and discuss this with your healthcare team if you are interested in being part of the effort to better understand type 1 diabetes and ways to try to preserve insulin-producing cells.

  1. How can I take charge and best support my health? 
  • Focus on how you are feeling – mentally and physically. Identify your challenges, find helpful resources, and get answers to your questions.
  • Put together your team of supporters – your healthcare team, your family and friends, and your co-workers.
  • Think of the overall mission – to successfully manage your diabetes and realize all your life dreams and goals. Master the day-to-day tasks, like how to check your glucose levels, take insulin, balance glucose levels, food, and activity, return to school or work, and stay healthy today and into the future. This is a marathon – give yourself time to adjust, learn, and thrive.

Reach out when you need help, and encourage your support team to do the same – there is a world of resources: doctors, nurses, nutritionists, mental health professionals, coaches, articles, books, videos, websites, associations, and organizations all waiting to help you. diaTribe is one of them.

About Fran

Dr. Fran Kaufman is the Chief Medical Officer of Senseonics, Inc. She is a Distinguished Professor Emerita of Pediatrics and Communications at the Keck School of Medicine and the Annenberg School of Communications at the University of Southern California.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Zoning in on Sick Day Management: Practical Tips, Strategies, and Advice

By Dr. Francine Kaufman

Pediatric endocrinologist Dr. Fran Kaufman shares tips for managing illness and diabetes: make a sick day plan, have supplies on hand, log your data, modify your insulin doses, and call your healthcare team. 

Everyone with diabetes who takes insulin needs to have a sick day plan. This is something you develop with your healthcare professional to help you manage the high and low sugar levels that can be associated with an illness. The following advice applies to people with type 1 diabetes and people with type 2 diabetes who take insulin – the advice may be different if you have type 2 diabetes and do not take insulin.

Click to jump down to a section:

When you get sick, you are at risk of becoming dehydrated from poor intake or from excessive loss of fluids due to nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever (your body may lose more water when you have a high temperature). In addition, dehydration is common in diabetes because high glucose levels (above 180-200 mg/dL) cause sugar to enter your urine, dragging an excess amount of fluid with it. Illness also puts you at risk of developing ketones, which when coupled with high glucose levels can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a very serious condition. How do you know if you have ketones? Good question, click here!

The purpose of your sick day plan is to try to keep your glucose levels in a safe range – to avoid dehydration and to prevent ketones from rising to a dangerous level. When you get sick, you should contact your healthcare team to describe your symptoms, determine if they want to evaluate you or send you to a lab (for testing), and most important, to share the numbers that you will collect as you fill in your sick day log (more on this below). It is possible that no matter what you do, you might need to go to an emergency department or be hospitalized – but acting quickly, obtaining the right data, and doing your best to manage your glucose and hydration will minimize risks.

So what illnesses are we talking about? It turns out just about any common bacterial or viral infection – such as the flu (influenza), a cold (upper respiratory virus), tonsillitis, strep throat, an ear infection, stomach flu (gastroenteritis), a bladder infection, and even a skin infection, such as an abscess – can interfere with your diabetes management. However, right now, the greatest concern is COVID-19. An infection with COVID-19 can lead to very high glucose and ketone levels, putting someone at risk for DKA. Acting quickly to start your sick day plan, even if you end up needing to be hospitalized, is important.

When you get sick, your body needs energy to fight the infection and repair damaged tissue. The infections listed above, particularly those that lead to vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and dehydration, cause your body to release certain hormones (called stress or counterregulatory hormones) that tell your liver to release stored glucose and tell your fat cells to release free fatty acids that form ketones. In someone without diabetes, the body releases more insulin to control the rise in glucose and ketones; because you have diabetes, you have to take additional insulin to manage the high glucose and ketone levels. You want to get your sugar levels between 100-180 mg/dL. Blood sugars below 180 mg/dL will prevent excess urination that can dehydrate your body. Staying above 100 mg/dL helps keep you from dipping too low and risking severe hypoglycemia.

If your glucose level is above 180 mg/dL, you need to consider increasing basal insulin doses, using an increase in basal insulin with the temp basal feature on your insulin pump, or giving repeated corrections of bolus insulin with a syringe, pen or pump. Usually, correction doses should not be given more often than every two to three hours to avoid “stacking” insulin, which could lead to low blood sugars. By having a plan for illnesses that starts your modified care early and by keeping in touch with your healthcare team, you are more likely to keep your glucose values in the 100-180 mg/dL range.

But you also have to be concerned about hypoglycemia. Low sugar occurs, particularly in children and the elderly, if the illness affects calorie and carbohydrate intake by decreasing appetite or by causing vomiting or diarrhea. Although low glucose is usually considered to be less than 70 mg/dL, during illness there is concern if glucose levels are below 100 mg/dL. If your infection or illness leads to low glucose levels, reducing basal insulin and not taking bolus insulin doses should be considered. If suspension of insulin is required, you should not suspend or delay taking the next dose of basal insulin for more than 60 minutes, because this increases your risk of developing ketones. Start sipping a sugar-containing drink, one tablespoon at a time. If hypoglycemia continues and you cannot make it better by ingesting sugar, consider the administration of low-dose glucagon. Low-dose glucagon can increase glucose level by 50-200 mg/dL in 30 minutes. To learn about whether low-dose glucagon is right for you, and at what dose, talk with your healthcare team.

To follow what is happening in your body, it helps to start a log of your glucose levels, ketones, fluid intake, and insulin doses. This sick log can be shared with your health care team. It should show improvement from one time period to the next (see below). Note: the biggest concern is vomiting; if you vomit more than twice in a time period or across two time periods, call your healthcare team.

The log shows only two days, because you should be better after 24 hours and completely on the mend after 48 hours. If you are not getting better, call your healthcare team.

Table

Image source: diaTribe

Here’s how to keep track (and why to keep track!) of these important numbers:

1. Glucose Levels: Check glucose levels every 1-2 hours. You may have to change this and check your glucose every 30 minutes if your levels are changing quickly. CGM trend data should be looked at every 10-15 minutes. Watch for rapid changes by looking at numbers and arrows. The goal is to keep your glucose between 100-180 mg/dL and without wide swings in values.

2. Ketone Levels: Urine ketones are often detected using a urine ketone strip. A small patch on the strip changes color depending on your level of ketones, representing negative, small, moderate, large and very large levels of ketones. Moderate, large, and very large levels are of concern. Ketones can also be measured with a fingerstick and a special ketone meter. The readings for blood ketones are more accurate and range from 0.0 to 3.0 mmol/L or greater. Blood ketone levels below 0.6 mmol/L are considered normal. Between 0.6 and 1.5 mmol/L ketones are high and show that your fat has broken down to form excess ketones. This puts you at risk of DKA if glucose levels are also elevated. Ketone levels above 1.5 mmol/L are serious, and you should contact your healthcare professional. Signs of elevated ketones:

  • Nausea and vomiting (which may also be present because of the infection)
  • Shortness of breath and labored breathing (your body is trying to eliminate the ketones through your breath so you can also smell them, they make your breath smell fruity)
  • Weakness
  • Altered level of consciousness and trouble staying awake (this is most concerning; call your healthcare professional immediately if this is happening)

Ketones should be tested at the onset of an illness and then every four hours.  If ketone and glucose levels are both elevated, your healthcare team might advise you to increase correction insulin doses further, by an additional 10-15%. If ketone levels are high and glucose levels are not high (less than 150 mg/dL), oral glucose and some insulin – reduced by about 50% – will help clear your ketones. Drinking water will also help reduce ketones as they are removed in the urine. To learn more about ketones, including what they are and how to measure them, click here.

3. Temperature: High fever can help show the severity of your illness, particularly if it is persistent.  We have learned that COVID-19 is associated with persistent high fever. Use the log sheet to document any medications you take to lower fever so that you can report this to your healthcare team.

4. Fluid Intake, with and without Sugar: Consuming liquids is critical if there is risk of dehydration. Fluids with sugar should be taken if glucose levels are between 100-150 mg/dL, and fluids without sugar should be taken if glucose levels are between 150-180 mg/dL. If you have vomited, wait 30-60 minutes before trying to drink, and then start with teaspoons of water or ice chips, progressing to tablespoons and ounces. The goal is to retain 4-6 ounces of fluids (or 2-4 ounces for young children) every 30-60 minutes until you can drink without risk of vomiting and as your thirst dictates. Food is much less important after vomiting; don’t try to eat food until you are on the mend.

5. Urination: Noting frequency and amount (small, medium, or large) is important to understand the ongoing risk of dehydration. As glucose levels reach the target of 100-180 mg/dL, you should see a decrease in both frequency and amount of urination, as well as less dehydration.

6. Vomiting, Diarrhea and Dehydration:  Vomiting and diarrhea can lead to dehydration. The signs of dehydration include dry mouth, sunken eyes, weakness, loose skin, rapid heart rate, and low blood pressure. Vomiting is also of great concern because it occurs not only from the illness, but as a result of DKA. That’s why vomiting that occurs throughout one time period or spans two time periods in your log means it is time to call your healthcare professional.  However, if you feel weak after vomiting only once or twice, it is always better to call earlier than later.

7.  Insulin, Amount and Time: One of the most important things to remember is that during an illness, you still need to take insulin. Even if you are not eating or drinking at the beginning, you need to have insulin in your body. Insulin allows sugar to enter your body’s cells to be used for energy, and you need more energy to fight off an illness. Insulin also reduces ketone formation and stops excess urination by lowering glucose levels. If you have high glucose, you might need 25-50% more insulin than you usually take, due to insulin resistance created by the extra stress or counterregulatory hormones in your body. If you have low glucose, you might need to take 25-50% less insulin than you usually take, but you still need some basal or background insulin on board.

8. Medications: At the beginning of an illness, you should consider calling your healthcare team to determine if you should avoid taking any of your routine medications while sick. This includes glucose-lowering pills or injections, such as SGLT-2 and GLP-1 drugs, or medications for blood pressure and cholesterol. In addition, it is important to write down any medications you take (name, dosage, time) to treat fever, vomiting, diarrhea, or other symptoms of your illness. Anti-vomiting medications may be helpful but should only be taken after discussing with your healthcare professional.

Key Messages:  

  • Know your sick day plan before you become sick.
  • Have supplies on hand. These include supplies to measure glucose, a way to measure ketones, a thermometer, sugar-containing fluids, glucagon, extra-rapid (or short) acting insulin, and medication to treat fever. Discuss with your healthcare team whether you should have medication for diarrhea and vomiting on hand.
  • Have all the contact information for your healthcare team available, and call them sooner rather than later.
  • Before you call your healthcare team, have the data listed on your log sheet written down, plus your symptoms.
  • Take insulin at modified doses to address both high and low glucose levels. You still need to have some insulin in your body, even if you are not eating.
  • Let someone help you while you are ill. It is too big a job to be done alone.

About Fran

Dr. Fran Kaufman is the Chief Medical Officer of Senseonics, Inc. She is a Distinguished Professor Emerita of Pediatrics and Communications at the Keck School of Medicine and the Annenberg School of Communications at the University of Southern California.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Making the Most of CGM: Uncover the Magic of Your Ambulatory Glucose Profile

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Cindy Takigawa and Frida Velcani

What’s an AGP report, and what does it show? Why does my AGP matter? How can I use an AGP report to improve my blood glucose levels and time in range?

Having diabetes is a full-time job: you have to simultaneously monitor your diet, activity, stress, and even sleep. On top of that, you need to calculate and manage the number of carbs you consume in each meal, and keep careful tabs on your blood sugar levels. The Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP) report, developed by the International Diabetes Center, is a tool that provides a simplified way to look at data on your blood glucose patterns and trends. It has been recognized as a standard of care for reporting continuous glucose monitor (CGM) data by the American Diabetes Association. In this article, we explain what an AGP report is and how you can use the information to help you navigate your diabetes management.

CGM App

Image source: diaTribe

What is an ambulatory glucose profile report?

An AGP report is a standardized, single-page report that includes glucose statistics like time in range, a summary glucose profile, and daily glucose graphs. It converts blood glucose readings from a CGM device into a detailed picture, allowing you to quickly visualize the time you spend above and below your target range. The report is based on at least seven days of CGM data, with 14 days of data (or more) considered ideal. Currently, many CGMs include a version of the AGP report in their devices and reporting software.

An AGP report that summarizes data provided by self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is currently being developed. This article focuses on CGM AGP reports.

Why does my ambulatory glucose profile matter?

The AGP report is the same no matter what device you use – it allows your healthcare team to assess blood glucose levels and trends in a standard way for everyone they see. Below you’ll find sample AGP reports from Abbott, Dexcom, and Senseonics.

The AGP report shows patterns in a user-friendly way so that people with diabetes can easily identify the times of day when glucose levels are consistently low, high, or fluctuating. The general goal for people with diabetes is to have their glucose levels stay within the target range of 70 to 180 mg/dL for at least 70% of the day, spending less than 4% of their time in hypoglycemia (under 70 mg/dL). The information from an AGP report can help you have a discussion with your healthcare team about goals for your diabetes management and ways you can achieve them. The data offered by this report can help make your care far more precise and effective.

What exactly does your AGP show?

The standard AGP (designed by the International Diabetes Center and shown above) will show your data like this:

  • Glucose Statistics and Targets: This section displays metrics including average glucose, glucose variability, and Glucose Management Indicator (GMI), which can be thought of as your predicted A1C. It also includes the dates and number of days in the report, as well as the percent of time that the CGM was used to collect data. While time in range goals can be individualized, the expert-defined goals for various groups of people with diabetes can be found in this section. You can read more about time in range targets here.
  • Time in Ranges: This color-coded bar chart helps you visualize the percentage of time spent above and below your target range.
  • Ambulatory Glucose Profile: This graph combines all of your glucose readings over time to display your trends across a 24-hour period. At the end of this article you can find examples of what this will look like for your specific CGM.
    • Black line: the median of all the readings. Half of your glucose values are above the middle black line and half are below.
    • Green lines: this is your target glucose range.
    • Dark blue area: 50% of glucose values lie in this area.
    • Light blue area: 90% of glucose values lie in this area. This percentage may differ between AGP reports. The International Diabetes Center report includes 90% of glucose values, while the Eversense report shows 80% of glucose values.
    • Dotted blue lines: 5% of the highest and lowest glucose values are above and below this line, respectively.
  • Daily Glucose Profiles: Each box shows your glucose pattern from a single day.
    • Yellow area: instances of high glucose (hyperglycemia).
    • Red area: instances of low glucose (hypoglycemia).

How can I interpret an ambulatory glucose profile report?

An AGP report combines several days of blood glucose readings into one snapshot. Once you have identified daily patterns, you can work with your healthcare team to adjust your medications and insulin dosing to spend more time in range. You may also discuss timing of food or physical activity, what you are eating, or ways to reduce stress. Here are some steps you can take to understand your data:

1.     Look at your time in range. The goal is to shift the numbers into the 70 – 180 mg/dl target range while having fewer lows and extreme highs. Each AGP report includes a bar chart of your time in range; one way to see this goal in action is to aim for more “green” and less “red” on the bar chart.

2.    Keep track of the usual times you wake up, go to sleep, eat meals and snacks, and are physically active. Food, activity, medication doses, and dozens of other factors can affect your blood glucose levels. Recording these activities and their timing will help you understand your AGP report and the patterns you see.

3.    Identify times when your glucose levels are lowest and highest, and look for times of more variability. Speak with your healthcare professional about what factors may be causing highs, lows, and variability in your AGP and how you can reduce them. The wider the shaded blue areas on your report, the more variability there is in your glucose levels.

4.    If you can, compare your current and past AGP reports, and create an action plan with your healthcare team. What strategies did you use previously to make changes? Identify a few steps to improve your glucose patterns moving forward.

To learn more about how people with diabetes and healthcare professionals can use AGP, click here. For more resources on time in range, check out diaTribe’s comprehensive library here.

Abbott AGP

CGM App

Image source: diaTribe

Dexcom AGP

Dexcom

Image source: diaTribe

Eversense AGP

AGP

Image source: diaTribe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

What’s Coming and What’s Delayed in Continuous Glucose Monitoring?

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Albert Cai

Updates and delays from Abbott, Dexcom, Medtronic, and Senseonics

With several clinical trials on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re bringing you a roundup of the latest updates on future continuous glucose monitors (CGM). Understandably, the FDA also announced a few months ago that it would focus its efforts on devices related to COVID-19. With the disclaimer that it’s impossible to know exactly when the pandemic will subside, when trials might resume, and how FDA reviews might be affected, here is the latest news we’ve heard from companies.

Click to jump to a product, which are organized alphabetically.

Abbott FreeStyle Libre 2

CGM

Image source: Abbott FreeStyle

What’s new? FreeStyle Libre 2 keeps the same “scanning” feature as the original FreeStyle Libre, but adds Bluetooth connectivity. This is important because it enables optional high and low glucose alerts. Users who enable these alerts will be able to get a notification on their reader or phone whenever their glucose reading goes above or below their specified ranges. Looking ahead, the Bluetooth feature will also allow FreeStyle Libre 2 to be part of automated insulin delivery systems (AID), like Insulet’s Omnipod Horizon.

Like the original FreeStyle Libre, FreeStyle Libre 2 has 14-day wear, is factory-calibrated (no fingerstick calibrations required), and can be scanned with either a phone or a reader device (the reader for FreeStyle Libre 2 is blue, instead of black). Importantly, FreeStyle Libre 2 will be offered at the same price as the original FreeStyle Libre.

When’s it coming? The FreeStyle Libre 2 has already launched in a few European countries (we know of Germany and Norway) and will launch in others soon. In the US, FreeStyle Libre 2 has been under FDA review for over a year. In March, Abbott said that it was working through “some finishing items” and was “very confident” the device would be cleared soon.

Dexcom G7

Dexcom

Image source: Dexcom

What’s new? Dexcom’s G7 will be fully disposable (the transmitter and sensor are combined and thrown away together) and have longer wear (we believe somewhere around 14-16 days). Remember that the Dexcom G6 sensor lasts for 10 days but has a transmitter that is re-used for 90 days. The G7 will be considerably slimmer than G6 and will have a lower cost of manufacturing in bulk, though consumer pricing is not yet determined – we imagine it will be similar. The G7 will keep the same accuracy, no fingerstick calibrations, and Bluetooth connectivity as the G6.

Dexcom has been developing G7 in partnership with Verily, the division of Alphabet formerly known as Google Life Sciences. There has been mention from Verily that an accelerometer may also be built-in to the G7 device, but we aren’t sure if that feature made it into the final version of G7. Having a built-in accelerometer could allow the G7 to also track physical activity, like a Fitbit or other fitness tracker.

When’s it coming? Dexcom planned on launching G7 in “early 2021,” but with most clinics placing new trials on hold, Dexcom is expecting a “minimum delay of approximately six months.” It’s difficult to know when clinics will be able to conduct trials (and when people will feel comfortable enrolling in trials), but assuming a six-month delay, G7 could be on the US market sometime in the second half of 2021.

Medtronic “Project Zeus” CGM

Abbott FreeStyle

Image source: Medtronic

What’s new? Medtronic’s next CGM, referred to as “Project Zeus,” will reduce the number of required fingerstick calibrations and have improved accuracy (compared to its current offering, Guardian Sensor 3). The new CGM will require day-one calibration (unclear on the number of fingersticks that will be required on day one), compared to Guardian Sensor 3, which requires at least two fingerstick calibrations every day. Medtronic expects Project Zeus to launch with a “non-adjunctive” indication, meaning users will be able to bolus insulin based on CGM reading alone, and not have to perform a confirmatory fingerstick. the new CGM will keep the same seven-day wear, size and shape, and reusable transmitter component as the Guardian Sensor 3 (pictured above).

When’s it coming? The trial for Project Zeus began in June 2019 and is expected to wrap up within the next month. Medtronic expects to submit the CGM to the FDA by the “end of the summer.”

Senseonics Eversense XL (180-day)

Eversense XL

Image source: Eversense XL

What’s new? The “XL” extended life-version of Senseonics’ Eversense in the U.S. will have the same size and features as the original Eversense, but the Eversense XL is implanted for 180 days, rather than the 90-day Eversense. As a reminder, the Eversense sensor is implanted in the users’ upper arm in a clinic and remains there for the sensor duration; a silver-dollar sized on-body transmitter is worn on the outside of the arm to deliver readings to a smartphone. Senseonics is targeting reducing calibrations from 2 per day to 1 per day with same non-adjunctive indication.

When’s it coming? Eversense XL is already available in Senseonics’ European markets. The trial for Eversense XL in the US wrapped up in late March, and Senseonics has previously aimed for FDA clearance in “late” 2020. We aren’t sure whether that timeline has been pushed back due to COVID-19, but the fact that the trial has already completed is encouraging.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

New Implantable Device Gains Attention

We have seen major advancements in the world of continuous glucose monitors in recent years, including Eversense, the first implantable device. This implanted device is able to monitor blood glucose, as well as alert the person when their levels get too low or high. One issue with implantable devices is how to continuously power them. Excitingly, a new prototype was recently developed that can power itself by using our own glucose.

With implantables being the way of the future, having to remove the device to charge is counterproductive. Researchers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) created this device that is able to directly utilize the energy within our bodies. It is made up of n-type semiconducting polymer along with the enzyme glucose oxidase. When the glucose oxidase detects glucose in its surroundings, it removes electrons and transports them through the connected polymer. The device can detect glucose levels in saliva and likely other bodily fluids, while the same polymer also helps convert glucose and oxygen into electrical power, which runs the device.

While more research is needed to see if this method is practical and safe, so far it has shown to be promising. According to the recent press release,

“This fuel cell is the first demonstration of a completely plastic, enzyme-based electrocatalytic energy generation device operating in physiologically relevant media,” says Sahika Inal, principal investigator of the study. “Glucose sensing and power generation are only two examples of the applications possible when a synthetic polymer communicates effectively with a catalytic enzyme-like glucose oxidase. Our main aim was to show the versatile chemistry and novel applications of this special water-stable, polymer class, which exhibits mixed conduction (ionic and electronic).

Have you considered an implantable device? If insertions were minimal due to this new technology, would it pique your interest?

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How to Use FreeStyle Libre Trend Arrows to Adjust Insulin Doses

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.By Jimmy McDermott, Maeve Serino, and Adam Brown New Endocrine Society guidelines for FreeStyle Libre users to adjust insulin doses based on trend arrows. Plus, additional guidelines on scanning time and frequency The Endocrine Society recently published guidelines on adjusting insulin dosing based on FreeStyle Libre continuous glucose monitor […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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