Recipe Roundup: 4 Zucchini Dishes for Summer

Zucchini is popular among people with diabetes for a good reason. For every 100 g of this vegetable, you get loads of vitamins and minerals, and just 3.11g of carbs, 1g of which is dietary fiber! 

Now summer is just around the corner, which means we can enjoy in-season produce zucchini soon. The next few months would be the best time to include this vegetable in your mean plan as they are fresher, more flavorful, and more affordable. If you need meal ideas, here are options you can try:

Keto Zucchini Nachos Baked with Chili

Photo credit: Lisa MarcAurele

Zucchini Nachos Baked with Chili

Nachos as snacks are always a hit for both kids and adults. Whether you serve them as a daytime snack, as an appetizer, or as your dinner, this Mexican food will disappear from the table in no time. To make it diabetes-friendly, you can use low-carb tortillas or, better yet, replace the tortillas with thin slices of zucchini, just like what this recipe recommends. 

Photo credit: Jennifer Shun

Zucchini Lasagna

Using strips of zucchini in place of lasagna noodles isn’t new, but this recipe uses homemade sun-dried tomato marinara sauce and swiss chard leaves, two ingredients that give this comfort food more flavor and excellent texture. You can make this dish in duplicate as it’s a guarantee you or your family will want to eat the leftovers. 

Photo credit: Sarah Severance

Deconstructed Veggie “Lasagna”

If you find the traditional preparation of lasagna a hassle, this recipe will save you from all the legwork. Toss your broccoli florets, chopped cauliflower, and zucchini chunks into a tray, pour over some sauce, top with goat cheese, and then put it in the oven. After 20 minutes, you can satisfy your lasagna craving and enjoy the health benefits from your veggies. 

Photo credit: Brenda Bennett

Keto Halloumi Zucchini Balls

You can use zucchini to make your veggie balls, though you have to grate, drain and squeeze them until they’re almost dry. You can find many zucchini ball recipes online, but this one uses halloumi cheese, a fantastic alternative for those who are sensitive to cow’s milk. Serve the balls as a main, starter, or snack with your choice of low-carb dipping sauce. 

What zucchini recipes do you recommend for the diabetes community? Please share them in the comments below.

Recipe Roundup_ 4 Zucchini Dishes for Summer

Source: diabetesdaily.com

The Truth About Diet Soda

Living with diabetes comes with many challenges; we need to constantly know what and how much we eat and drink, and continuously calibrate our medications, like metformin or insulin, accordingly. It can be exhausting. One shining beacon of light (and a delicious thirst-quencher) is diet soda. It’s sweet, it’s refreshing, and it has zero carbohydrates! But recently, more and more research has been released linking diet soda to a plethora of GI issues and health problems (including, surprisingly enough, obesity). So, what’s the deal? Is diet soda a harmless, carbohydrate freebie treat or a danger to one’s health and well-being? Read more to get the scoop.

Many people with diabetes yearn to have a refreshing beverage that won’t affect their blood sugars, and sometimes water just won’t cut it. On days when it feels as though the wind will cause hyperglycemia, nothing is crisper or more enjoyable than enjoying a diet soda–and they’re typically known as “free” food–meaning they don’t require an insulin dose, nor do they raise one’s blood sugar. Seems innocent enough, right? About 1 in 5 Americans drink at least one diet soda per day, according to the CDC, but few can figure out if they’re good or bad for us. What gives?

The Problem

Unfortunately, diet sodas are full of artificial flavors and chemicals, as well as artificial sweeteners, like aspartame and saccharin. A growing body of research links consumption with an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, dementia, stroke, and non-fatty liver disease.

On the other hand, many studies correlating diet soda consumption with chronic health issues have failed to control for other risk factors, like lifestyle (sedentary vs. active) and body mass index (BMI). This causes a selection bias, as the type of person that may be more likely to drink diet soda may already be trying to lose weight (higher BMI) or better control their type 2 diabetes (chronic inflammation from higher glucose numbers). On the whole, no studies have proven causation between diet soda consumption and cancer.

Does Diet Soda Make You Gain Weight?

In short, no, but they can lead to it. A  2012 study showed that the artificial sweeteners in diet soda may change the levels of dopamine in the brain, thus changing the way one’s brain responds to (and craves) sweet flavors. Artificial sweeteners are hundreds of times sweeter than actual sugar, and if you’re used to drinking the sweet flavor of diet soda, your brain will naturally adapt, and you may start craving sweeter foods as a result. Equal (aspartame) is 160-200 times sweeter than sugar, and Sweet’n’Low (saccharin) is 300-500 times sweeter than natural sugar. This can cause you to eat more foods made with sugar, and gain weight as a result, although these sweeteners have been deemed safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Christoper Gardner, Ph.D., Director of Nutrition Studies at the Stanford Prevention Research Center says, “You may find fruit less appealing because it’s less sweet than your soda, and vegetables may become inedible” causing people to reach for more processed foods that contain added sugar and calories.

Additionally, if you’re drinking diet soda, you may feel as though you’re doing something “healthy”, and make up for it by not being as stringent about a healthy diet. A 2014 study showed that overweight and obese people who drank a diet soda ate between 90-200 more calories per day than those who drank sugar-sweetened soda. This explains the phenomenon of patrons ordering fries with their diet soda at fast-food restaurants.

“Diet sodas may help you with weight loss if you don’t overcompensate, but that’s a big if,” Gardner adds.

What Research Is Telling Us

A 2014 study out of Japan found that men who drank diet soda were more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who didn’t. The study findings even controlled for age, BMI, family history of the disease, and other lifestyle factors. Additionally, a 2017 study of over 2,000 people showed that drinking one diet soda per day tripled one’s risk of stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.

Additionally, in 2014, a meta-analysis published in the British Journal of Nutrition revealed that one’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes rose by 13% for every 12oz can of diet soda they consumed in a day.

Moderation Is Key

While all of these artificial sweeteners are chemicals, they can be part of a healthy diet, per the American Dietetic Association. If you’re replacing sugar-sweetened soda with diet soda, it can be a remarkably easy way to cut down on sugar and calories, but try and maintain a healthy diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables as well, and don’t “treat” yourself to fast-food or sugared goodies for “being good” by having a sugar-free soda.

If you’re looking for an afternoon caffeine hit that soda normally provides, try opting for black coffee or tea to avoid the artificial sweeteners. Better yet, try weaning yourself off of soda completely and opting for a healthier, and more natural seltzer water, like La Croix, that doesn’t contain any artificial additives or chemicals.

All told, diet soda isn’t the absolute healthiest thing you can be drinking (read: that’s water), but in moderation, with a healthy diet and plenty of exercise, it can be a delightful, carb-free treat. Cheers!

What are your thoughts on diet soda? Are you addicted to the stuff, or try to avoid it at all costs? Share this post and comment below; we love hearing from our readers!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Melted Enlightened Keto Peanut Butter Cookies

I don’t know about you, but this quarantine has put me in the mood to bake all the time. Yet my inability to go to a store has pushed my creativity to the max by forcing me to make do with the ingredients I have on hand. Thankfully my pantry was well-stocked before the rush, but it’s the fresh ingredients that I’m not always able to get right now.

I wanted heavy whipping cream to create a peanut butter cookie recipe, but I didn’t have any. As I was searching around my freezer to see if I had anything good to eat, I found a hidden pint of Peanut Butter Fudge ice cream from Enlightened’s Keto Collection, and I decided it would make do as my heavy whipping cream.

Well, I’m pleased to report, it did more than ‘make do,’ and I won’t be using heavy whipping cream in this recipe once this is all over. The ice cream gave the cookies an extra rich, peanut buttery flavor. And of course I adjusted ingredient quantities to ensure I had enough ice cream leftover to make an ice cream sandwich.

Melted Enlightened Keto Peanut Butter Cookies

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Melted Enlightened Keto Peanut Butter Cookies

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Instead of heavy whipping cream, a peanut butter fudge keto ice cream was used for this delicious treat.
Course Breads and Baked Goods, Snack
Cuisine American
Keyword low carb cookies
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 18 cookies
Calories 137kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Enlightened Peanut Butter Fudge Keto ice cream melted
  • 1 cup creamy peanut butter room temperature (the only ingredients should be salt and peanuts; if yours is just peanuts, add 1/4 tsp salt to the recipe)
  • 1/3 cup almond flour
  • 1/3 cup coconut flour
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1/2 cup Swerve (plus extra Swerve to roll in – optional)

Instructions

  • Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.
  • Mix together the melted ice cream, peanut butter, almond flour, coconut flour, egg, vanilla and Swerve. Stir until a dough forms.
  • Roll dough into balls. (It can help to have some coconut oil on your fingers.)
  • If you want to, roll the balls in sweetener in a shallow bowl. (This will give them a crispier texture on the outside of the cookies and add some sweetness).
  • Line the balls on a parchment-covered cookie sheet.
  • Use a fork to make indents in the cookies. While doing this, ensure you’re flattening them, as this will pretty much be their final shape.
  • Bake for 17 minutes, or until done.
  • Remove from oven, and allow to cool fully.

Nutrition

Calories: 137kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 11g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 20mg | Sodium: 56mg | Potassium: 4mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 1g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Melted Enlightened Keto Peanut Butter Cookies Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Healthy Asparagus Stuffed Chicken Breasts

This content originally appeared on Low Carb Yum. Republished with permission.

Love asparagus? You’ll want to give this easy stuffed chicken breast recipe a try. It’s a simple recipe for busy people or those just getting started on a low-carb diet.

Stuffed chicken may sound complicated, but it isn’t. It’s just a flattened piece of meat wrapped around a filling. To make this recipe, I just wrap seasoned chicken breasts around a few spears of asparagus. Then, I just bake it with homemade vinegar and oil dressing. That’s it!

asparagus stuffed chicken

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Asparagus Stuffed Chicken Breasts

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A healthy asparagus stuffed chicken breast recipe baked in olive oil and balsamic vinegar. This easy dish makes a wonderful keto meal.
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Keyword asparagus, Chicken
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 384kcal

Equipment

  • oven

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds chicken breasts skinless and boneless (4 breasts)
  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons vinegar balsamic or red wine
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 12 spears asparagus

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 375°F.
  • In a small bowl, combine the olive oil, vinegar, garlic, and salt. Set aside.
  • Pound each chicken breast with a mallet to about 1/4 inch thickness.
  • Season chicken breasts with salt and pepper to taste.
  • Place 3 asparagus spears in the middle of each flattened chicken breast. Wrap chicken meat around the asparagus and secure with toothpicks. Arrange stuffed chicken in a baking pan then olive oil mixture evenly over the stuffed chicken.
  • Bake at 375°F for 25-30 minutes until chicken is fully cooked. Remove toothpicks prior to serving.

Notes

A few ways to change up the recipe:

  • Chicken can be topped with cream cheese or provolone cheese before wrapping around asparagus.
  • A low-carb “breading” made with seasoned almond flour or crushed pork rinds can be used to coat the chicken.
  • Each piece can be wrapped in bacon slices.
  • Marinara sauce can be used in place of the dressing and then topped with mozzarella cheese.

Nutrition

Calories: 384kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 48g | Fat: 19g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 145mg | Sodium: 409mg | Potassium: 848mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 140IU | Vitamin C: 5mg | Calcium: 19mg | Iron: 1.2mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Healthy Asparagus Stuffed Chicken Breasts Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Legendary Low-Carb Toaster Pastry

It is often very hard to find healthy food that also meets my expectations taste-wise. Many of the products offered boast great flavor but wind up falling short. Add in finding foods that don’t mess with your blood sugars and it isn’t an easy feat! Thankfully, Legendary Foods has some fantastic-tasting options that appeal to all ages!

Their latest Low-Carb Toaster Pastry does not disappoint! Not only is it a great snack for busy adults on the go, but it is also a healthy option for growing children as well.

About

At Legendary Foods, they believe nutritious foods are important but they also believe great taste matters, too. Co-founders Mike and Ron noticed that it was a challenge to find healthy food that also satisfied their taste buds.  They started Legendary Foods to create good-tasting food that could also help to keep people on track with their nutritional and health goals.

What are Low-Carb Toaster Pastries and What are They Made Out Of?

Legendary successfully attempted to recreate a very well-loved snack that is typically full of sugar by using almond flour and erythritol as its two main ingredients. With only 3 g net carbs and 170 calories, compared to a regular toaster pastry at 35 g net carbs and 210 calories, this is a great breakfast or snack option for someone who is health-conscious and who wants to avoid blood sugar spikes. It also is packed with 9 grams of protein, which you can’t get from any other kind of morning pastry!

How Do They Taste?

I wasn’t sure what to expect since this is a type of food that would normally taste very sweet. It was the perfect mix of sweet and the flavorful filling (cinnamon/strawberry) and was perfectly moist with just the right amount of bite to it. The cinnamon filling was better than I expected and tasted very rich and not artificial at all. I am less of a strawberry fan, in general, but found this one to be very tasty and it was popular amongst my friends. The icing on top could have been the sugar-laden kind, I would not have noticed the difference — that is how natural it tasted!

Where Can You Purchase?

Legendary Foods can be purchased on their website. They also offer much more than their latest toaster pastries. You can find an assortment of low-carb, keto-friendly nut butter and nut snacks as well and Diabetes Daily has reviewed these products in the past. If you are interested in checking out the reviews before purchasing, you will see the large amount of reviews each product has, which I think is a testament to this great company and their delicious products!

Conclusion

I am a big fan of Legendary Foods because they offer low-carb options that also taste great. It is very hard to find a low-carb breakfast option, which for me is extra important since I am extremely insulin resistant in the mornings and my blood sugar goes up before I even eat or drink anything. The toaster pastries come individually packed and make for a very easy and healthy meal on the go!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Emergency Changes to SNAP and WIC (Food Stamps) Adjust to Thousands of New Applicants During COVID-19

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Karena Yan

SNAP and WIC help connect millions of individuals and families to affordable, nutritious foods. Here are how these programs are evolving

Healthy food and nutrition are important not only for managing diabetes but also for the proper function of your immune system. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that people maintain a nutritious diet and limit their alcohol and sugary drink consumption to improve our bodies’ ability to fight off viruses like COVID-19.

At the Tufts’ Food and Nutrition Innovation Council (FNIC) Summit on April 16, experts in nutrition, healthcare, and policy gathered to discuss the implications of coronavirus on the affordability, accessibility, and sustainability of healthy food in our country. In addition to discussing the changes brought about by the pandemic, council members made food policy recommendations for the post-COVID future.

While coronavirus poses a challenge for the smooth operation of programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC), the USDA’S Food and Nutrition Service has implemented emergency changes to these programs to ensure access to healthy food for program recipients.

What are SNAP and WIC?

SNAP, previously referred to as food stamps, is a federal program that provides nutrition benefits for eligible, low-income individuals and families to support their ability to purchase healthy foods. These benefits are provided via an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card, which acts as a debit card at authorized retail food stores.

Similarly, WIC provides federal grants to low-income pregnant, breastfeeding, and non-breastfeeding postpartum women, and to infants and children up to age five who are found to be at nutritional risk. WIC serves about half of all infants in the United States, and these grants supplement the purchase of foods, health care referrals, and nutrition education.

How has coronavirus impacted SNAP and WIC?

As unemployment has reached nearly unprecedented levels , enrollment for SNAP and WIC has seen a marked increase. In California, application volume to receive CalFresh, the state’s version of SNAP, has seen a 350 percent increase since the crisis began. More than 57 percent of these applicants reported that they lost a job within the previous 30 days, compared to 16 percent in January.

Graphs

Image source: diaTribe

Moreover, panic buying and stockpiling during the epidemic have made the availability of SNAP- and WIC-eligible products scarcer. This is particularly true for WIC recipients, who may only use their funds on a limited list of products that have been selected as low-cost and nutritious. For those who do not receive WIC benefits, the National WIC Association asks shoppers that if they are choosing between two items, one of which is WIC-eligible, to avoid buying or hoarding WIC-eligible products, including infant formula.

What emergency changes have been implemented to support SNAP and WIC?

The USDA has implemented a 40 percent increase in overall SNAP benefits, which amounts to a $2 billion monthly allotment in addition to the usual $4.5 billion that goes toward monthly SNAP benefits. WIC has also received $500 million in additional funding to cover increases in program participation.

Additionally, while SNAP and WIC have some requirements that are challenging to meet during COVID-19, such as mandatory in-person visits to enroll or re-enroll in the programs, the USDA has offered many accommodations to these requirements. However, the USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service has offered many accommodations to these requirements, in addition to providing extra funding to both programs. Several of these program changes are highlighted below. To see the full list of changes, please see here.

SNAP:

  • Application Processing: State agencies can extend certification periods and temporarily waive periodic report form submissions for enrolled households. Additionally, in lieu of face-to-face interviews for enrollment, states are waiving the interview requirement or conducting interviews via telephone.
  • Pandemic EBT (P-EBT): States are now allowed to provide benefits (similar to SNAP or “food stamps”) to children who normally receive free or reduced-price school meals.
  • Able-bodied Adults without Dependents (ABAWDs) Time Limit Suspension: States may temporarily suspend the time limit associated with ABAWD work requirements, which ordinarily terminate an ABAWD’s SNAP benefits after three months of unemployment.

WIC:

What happens after COVID-19 is over?

At the Tufts’ FNIC Summit, council members discussed the importance of maintaining some, or all, of these measures after the crisis. Requirements such as in-person visits and lengthy renewal processes pose barriers for SNAP/WIC recipients and risk delaying or inhibiting people’s ability to access these services, regardless of the circumstances. Moreover, given the sharp uptick in SNAP/WIC enrollments, the increased efficiency and accessibility of these programs will greatly benefit recipients long after the “end” of the coronavirus crisis.

Furthermore, council members hope even further adjustments to SNAP/WIC are made in the future. While these programs have been relatively effective in facilitating access to healthy foods for low-income individuals and families, the FNIC calls for greater emphasis on nutrition within the programs, such as by providing a subsidy for fruit and vegetable purchases or removing sugar-sweetened beverages from the list of eligible purchases.

Such incentives can provide vast benefits for both individual health and healthcare costs. For example, a 30 percent fruit and vegetable incentive for SNAP participants is estimated to save $6.77 billion in healthcare costs over a lifetime. Thus, while some headway has been made to these SNAP/WIC programs, advocates must pursue not only the permanence of these adjustments but also additional changes to the programs’ health and nutrition standards and practices.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Sugar Summit Backcountry Offers Carb-Conscious Options for Outdoor Adventure

For everyone, and especially for people with diabetes, consistently making healthy food choices is vital to feeling good and staying healthy. This can be especially difficult when spending many hours or days out in nature. Unfortunately, many temperature-stable foods that are marketed for campers, hikers, and alike are often full of preservatives, artificial ingredients and sugar.

Enter Sugar Summit Backcountry, a company focused on delivering healthier and carb-conscious foods to support your outdoor adventures. I received some products to try at no charge for the review and all opinions are my own.

Who They Are

The company was founded by a husband and wife team, Christine and Kevin, and inspired by Christine’s type 1 diabetes diagnosis. The couple had always enjoyed adventuring in nature, but Christine found that there were few carb-conscious options available that she could easily bring along on their trips. So, they aspired to create products that are nutrient-dense, healthy options and are both shelf-stable and delicious:

“We make delicious, nutrient-packed meals for camping, backpacking, or wherever the trail takes you.  We create small-batch, carbohydrate-conscious and high-protein meals adaptable for omnivores and vegans alike, and support sustainable and local ingredients whenever possible.”

Available Products

The company has several different products, including trail mix and cereal, as well as larger meals, like curry chicken, sweet potato stew, and vegan chili.

I sampled the Chia Crunch “Cereal,” Torreys Trail Mix (which is vegan and gluten-free), as well as the Golden Cliffs Curry Chicken.

My favorite product was the trail mix. With only nine all-natural ingredients and plenty of fiber, it was a great combination of sweet and salty, and the high protein and fat content can help in maintaining energy levels during long-duration exercise.

I also really liked the Curry Chicken meal. It was easy to prepare (requiring only hot water to reconstitute) and contains just four wholesome ingredients (plus seasonings). It is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, and packed with plant-based protein to keep you going. I thought the spice level was perfect and both my husband and three-year-old daughter enjoyed it (OK, she just picked out the peas, but that is a big win in the toddler book)!

Also, the serving sizes were very generous, and I thought the pricing was very reasonable, given the high quality of the ingredients.

You can find the full product page and pricing information here.

Summary

I highly recommend checking out these products if you’re in search of lower-carb and more wholesome options to bring on your next outdoor adventure. Many of these products will appeal to vegetarians and vegans or anyone looking to incorporate more plant-based meals and snacks. Most products are gluten-free as well, so are also a great option for those with sensitivity to gluten and Celiac disease.

As the camping and hiking season kicks off across the country, why not try something new that is both delicious and good for you!

Have you tried this line of foods? Please let us know what you think in the comments below and happy adventuring!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Chef’s Tips for a 5-Star Meal with 1 Pan

By Paul Kahan

Paul Kahan is a yacht chef and the founder of NRG Foods (a healthy protein bar company) who also lives with type one diabetes. For 8 years now, Paul has cooked exclusively for several families on their superyachts and private estates around the US, Caribbean, and the Bahamas. Working with very limited space on yachts has taught Paul how to apply simple techniques from common household items to create a 5-star meal.

I thought it would be helpful to hear from Paul and have him give us his best practices for creating a 5- star meal in the comfort of your own home.

Here are Paul’s top tips for you:

The Success Is in the Skillet

Invest in a well seasoned Cast Iron Skillet. I sear, saute, shallow fry, and even bake in my Lodge Cast Iron Skillet. This type of pan will also become your best friend if you hate doing dishes. I would also recommend a shallow edged non-stick pan if you’re looking to go with something a bit lighter and more conventional.

Wait Until It Sizzles

It is so important to preheat your pan (note: this should not only be with your cast iron but any type of pan you are using). Unless you want soggy vegetables, rubbery chicken, weird grey-looking steak or steamed seafood, heat up your pan for at least five minutes on medium to medium-high heat. The oil should be just barely smoking when you toss your food in; this will ensure great caramelization and a perfect sear.

Getting Started

You should preheat your oven to 175-200 degrees. Afterwards, sear and cook meat to the desired doneness and set aside. Make sure to let all meat rest 5-10 minutes to reabsorb juices and of course, fully cook chicken if that’s what you’re having that evening.  Toss in veggies, drizzle with a bit of olive oil or knob of butter and season, season, season! Set veggies aside, add more olive oil or butter, and toss in thin scalloped or diced potatoes (I usually like tossing in some red peppers and diced onions with this)…again season, season, season! Use salt, pepper, rosemary, thyme…whatever is clever that evening in your spice pantry.

One-Pan Meal

Lastly, throw everything back into the Cast Iron and place into your preheated oven for 5-10 minutes to finish cooking potatoes, and reheat the steak and vegetables. Now you have an entire meal in cast iron that will keep your meal warm for a good while until you decide to plate it up; honestly I sometimes just eat it right out of the Cast Iron!

Easy Cleanup

Congrats! You have used one pan that doesn’t require extensive cleaning to create an amazing meal. Simply wait for the Cast Iron to cool down, wipe clean with a paper towel or a regular damp towel, dry off and re-season with veggie or canola oil.

Quarantine Cooking Bonus Tip

Do yourself a favor and buy an Instantpot or Breville Pressure cooker, they are incredibly cheap on Amazon and these save my life when days just aren’t going my way and I want something easy, fast, and full of flavor. An Instantpot will cook rice in less than 15 minutes, mouthwatering shredded chicken in less than 45 minutes (add chicken breast/adobo seasoning/mojo marinade and press “on”!), and if you build up enough confidence you can bake a cake, yes a friggin’ cake in less than 35 minutes!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Chestnut Crepes with Walnuts & Cheddar

This content originally appeared on ForGoodMeasure. Republished with permission.

Chestnut flour is a hallmark of Tuscany’s culinary heritage. The nutrient-rich chestnut wrapped in it’s spiky jacket has been a dietary staple since medieval times. Naturally sweet, the flour lends itself as an excellent base for pancakes. Called Necci in Italian, chestnut flour crepes pair excellently with sharp cheddar and toasted walnuts for a decadent, flavorful breakfast or alongside a crisp salad or bowl of soup.

Photo credit: Jennifer Shun

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Chestnut Crepes with Walnuts & Cheddar

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Pair this chestnut crepe with sharp cheddar and toasted walnuts for a decadent, flavorful breakfast or serve it alongside a crisp salad or bowl of soup.
Course Breakfast, Snack
Cuisine Italian
Keyword chestnut, crepe
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 8
Calories 227kcal

Ingredients

  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup water
  • ½ cup chestnut flour
  • 2 tablespoons butter divided
  • 1 cup cheddar cheese shredded
  • 1 cup walnuts toasted*

Instructions

  • Whisk eggs, water and chestnut flour until smooth.
  • Rest for 10 minutes.
  • Heat a small non-stick skillet on medium.
  • Working in batches, melt ¼ tablespoon of butter in pan.
  • Pour ¼ cup of batter into pan, tilting to coat the bottom evenly.
  • Cook until crepe lifts easily from bottom of pan, about 2 minutes.
  • Using a spatula, flip to cook the reverse side.
  • Add 2 tablespoons of cheese & walnuts, folding the crepe in half to melt.
  • Repeat with remaining batter.

Notes

Naturally low-carb & gluten-free

* To toast walnuts, heat a non-stick skillet on medium-high. Add walnuts in a single layer. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from pan to cool.

Nutrition

Calories: 227kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 17g | Cholesterol: 74mg | Sodium: 126mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 3g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Chestnut Crepes with Walnuts & Cheddar Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How to Avoid the Quarantine 15

As most Americans approach their second full month of quarantine (with widespread shelter-in-place orders in all but a handful of states), with playgrounds, pools, recreational centers and gyms closed, many may be wondering how they can avoid the dreaded, “quarantine 15” that people have been joking about on the internet lately.

If you’ve been consumed with stress-eating and low step counts are haunting your days, take heart: there are some simple ways to get you back on track (and fitting into jeans again soon). Here are our top tips to stay healthy during this time:

Adhere to a Regular Eating Schedule

If you have kids at home that you’re trying to homeschool, pets that need attention, and competing Zoom schedules with your spouse, nothing feels normal. It’s easy to slowly slide from your regular routine of, “quick workout, small breakfast, shower” to drinking coffee and panic reading the news ‘till noon, and then storming the kitchen once mid-afternoon hits. If you can stay on a regular eating schedule for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, by the time evening (and Netflix) time hits, you won’t be starved for calories and make poor choices.

Don’t Treat Every Day Like a Friday Night

If you’re like me, you eat remarkably healthy during the week, but definitely look forward to your Friday night glass of wine, as well as relaxed eating standards during the weekend (I can never say no to a Saturday ice cream outing). Once shelter-in-place orders hit, I started treating every day like a Friday night: wine and nachos one day, a margarita and pizza the next. This wasn’t good for my blood sugars or waistline. Even though these times are not normal, if you can carve out space for little treats only once in a while to retain some sense of normalcy, you’ll feel a lot better in the long run, and your blood sugars will also thank you.

Get Movement Every Day

Gyms may be closed, but no one has canceled nature. One silver lining of this pandemic is that it’s hitting during the most beautiful time of year. Flowers are blooming, and temperatures are mild and warm. This is the perfect time to take a bike ride, go on more jogs, or take a nightly walk after dinner. There are also plenty of online options for yoga, pilates, or cardio classes on YouTube. Take advantage of time saved from no commute, and cultivate a morning exercise routine instead!

Get Creative in the Kitchen

It might be tempting to get pizza every day or order takeout (and hello, it’s way easier!), but try and take advantage of this time at home by getting creative in the kitchen. Remember that Vitamix you got as a wedding gift that’s collecting dust in the basement? Or that juicer you ordered during a cleanse phase that you’ve never really touched? Try and buy one new vegetable a week and create a brand new recipe around that. Or order a recipe book online and work your way through it with your family. Vegetables like garlic scapes, jicama, watermelon radishes, and fiddlehead ferns are just a few delicious vegetables begging to be tried that you may have never even heard of!

Photo credit: Katee Lue (Unsplash)

Find an Outlet for Your Stress

Often times when we go to snack, we’re not *actually* hungry, but bored, tired, or stressed. Try, for a few days, to respond to hunger cues, eating only when you’re hungry and stopping when you’re full. This can be hard, because as people with diabetes, we normally eat in response to a high or low blood sugar, and not to our hunger cues, but try it out. Also, supplement your outlet for stress from eating to a healthy activity like meditation, journaling, or gentle yoga. Other outlets for stress can be listening to a podcast, painting, or dancing in your kitchen. Even if you’re not looking to lose weight, your mental health will thank you. This will also become especially helpful when treating lows; if you have an existing outlet for unwanted stress, you’re less likely to over-treat them, and can prevent the blood sugar rollercoaster.

Have you noticed weight gain since the start of COVID-19, or are you healthier than ever? How has quarantine affected your lifestyle? Share this post and comment below; we love hearing from our readers!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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