Paleo Breakfast Casserole Egg Bake

This content originally appeared on Low Carb Yum. Republished with permission.

This super flavorful breakfast casserole is one of my favorite ways to enjoy eggs.

For a long time, my go-to was an omelette filled with cheese and vegetables. However, I discovered that dairy causes inflammation for me, so I’ve been trying to eat less cheese.

Simply eliminating the cheese from my omelette felt unsatisfying, though. I needed a new favorite breakfast. And that’s when the idea of a paleo breakfast casserole came to mind!

This is the kind of hearty breakfast that keeps you full and happy for hours. The sausage gives it amazing flavor, plus it’s packed with veggies. To be honest, I didn’t even miss the cheese in this dish.

It’s also a fantastic way to meal prep for the week. If you’ve been searching for healthy, budget-friendly meal prep ideas, this paleo egg casserole is the perfect solution. It will keep well in the fridge for a week, or you can freeze slices for later!

Easy Paleo Breakfast Casserole with Sausage

An easy paleo breakfast casserole with sausage and vegetables. Make ahead on the weekend for a full week of low-carb breakfasts or freeze some for later.

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil (or avocado oil)
  • 1 pound nitrate-free paleo sausage ( no casing (or other ground meat))
  • 2 cloves garlic (minced)
  • 1/2 teaspoon dry minced onion flakes (optional)
  • 3 cups yellow summer squash (cubed)
  • 12 ounces broccoli (chopped)
  • 12 eggs
  • 1/2 cup almond milk (or coconut milk)
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  1. Cook sausage, garlic, and onion flakes (if using) in oil over medium-high heat until sausage is browned.

  2. Add squash and broccoli and cook until vegetables are tender.
  3. Spread sausage and vegetable mix into a 9×13 casserole dish.
  4. In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, almond or coconut milk, salt, and pepper.

  5. Pour egg mixture over sausage mix.
  6. Bake at 375°F for 30-35 minutes or until eggs are set and the top has started to brown.

Feel free to change up the recipe by using different vegetables, different meat, or adding in cheese (for non-Paleo).

Paleo Breakfast Casserole Egg Bake Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Recipe Roundup: 5 Veggie-Loaded Dish Recommendations from Nutritionists

The key to living longer is not top-secret. When researchers found out this natural way of reducing health risks such as heart disease and stroke, it wasn’t a discovery. It was just a confirmation of an age-old health tip: Eat your fruits and vegetables!

Now it’s easy to devour fruits on their own, but vegetables— let’s admit many of us haven’t fully come to terms with their bitterness. Thankfully, the nutritionists we have reached out to have thought of tasty ways to make this challenge easier to overcome.

creamy roaster purple cauliflower soup

Photo credit: Jackie Newgent

Creamy Roasted Purple Cauliflower Soup

The two main ingredients Jackie Newgent, a natural culinary nutritionist, used for this recipe are cauliflower and chickpeas. She suggests using not just the cauliflower florets but also the stem and the leaves for another layer of flavor. The half can of drained organic chickpeas “punch up protein and create extra creaminess when pureeing the soup.” Apart from sliced scallions, Jackie garnished this with roasted chickpeas, but you may skip this or substitute it with anything low-carb like bacon tidbits or shredded chicken.

Photo credit: Lizzie

Veggie-Loaded Slow Cooker Mexican Shredded Chicken

What makes this recipe of Lizzie Streit, the registered dietitian at It’s a Veg World After All, perfect for those always on the go but still want healthy and tasty homemade food? Three things. First, it’s super quick to prepare, and with a slow cooker as your primary equipment, you can run errands while the ingredients simmer in the pot. Second, you can “batch cook” this as it freezes well. It’s ideal to have lean protein on hand. Third, this dish is quite versatile. You can eat it on salads, sandwiches, tacos, or rice, etc., but we suggest giving it a try with some low-carb bread.

Photo credit: Rosemary Squires

Kale and Shaved Brussels Sprouts Salad

Reading the ingredients of this salad, you’d know that Rosemary Squires, a registered dietitian nutritionist, created a “power dish.” Kale and Brussels sprouts are rich in vitamins and minerals. Quinoa and parmesan cheese are excellent sources of protein. Grapes and sunflower seeds are loaded with antioxidants. Almonds give you healthy fats. Mix her tangy dressing with the salad ingredients, and you have a delicious, complete meal.

Caesar Kale Salad

Photo credit: Meredith Stone Wellman

Caesar Kale Salad

If you want to add more kale in your weekly meal plan because you’re amazed at how much nutrients you can take in with this superfood, check out this recipe from another registered dietitian, Meredith Stone Wellman. She uses croutons made with whole-grain (rich in fiber!) bread here, but if this causes unpleasant sugar spikes, you can reduce the amount of servings or look around the web for a low-carb version. She also suggests consuming the greens with a piece of fish or chicken for an extra boost of protein.

Sheet Pan Cauliflower Fried Rice 2

Photo credit: Jessica Beacom

Sheet Pan Cauliflower Fried Rice

A cup of rice has about 50 grams of carbohydrates, a considerable number for any person with diabetes. So if you’re craving Chinese takeout but worried about sugar intake, try this healthy and tasty alternative. Jessica Beacom, a registered dietitian at The Real Food Dietitians, says this is quick to prepare and endlessly adaptable too. You can toss in your favorite veggies, leave out the egg if you prefer a plant-based meal, or add your favorite fish, pork, shrimp, or other protein to the pan.

What vegetable-packed recipes have you recently tried? Share them with us ⁠— they might be our new favorite!

Recipe Roundup_ 5 Veggie-Loaded Dish Recommendations from Nutritionists

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Traveling with Type 1 Diabetes: Hanoi, Vietnam

Dr. Jody Stanislaw has had type 1 diabetes (T1D) for 40 years this June and is on an inspiring mission to inspire T1Ds everywhere that living a healthy and adventurous life with T1D is 100% possible.

She’s been traveling the world for the past 5 months and this month she is living in Hanoi, Vietnam. Watch this video to hear about the challenges she is facing.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Mediterranean Chicken of Love

This content originally appeared on TCOYD: Taking Control of Your Diabetes. Republished with permission.

By Chef Robert Lewis

You will find joy in serving this hearty dish. It’s rich in protein, packed with vegetables, and flavored with herbs.

Mediterranean Chicken of Love

Tender, juicy chicken infused with garlic and herbs is blended with tomatoes and beans for a rich and full-flavored nod to Greek cuisine.

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon garlic
  • 2 white button mushrooms (large, sliced)
  • ½ red bell pepper (sliced)
  • ½ green bell pepper (sliced)
  • 1 Roma tomato (diced)
  • ½ red onion (sliced)
  • 1/4 cup vegetable broth
  • 5-6 stalks asparagus
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1 teaspoon rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon basil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh garlic
  • 8 oz skinless chicken (sliced, precooked )
  • 10 black olives (pitted )
  • 1 can white Italian beans (15 oz., drained)
  • black pepper (to taste)
  • ½ fresh lime
  1. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
  2. Add the mushrooms, bell peppers, onions and asparagus and sauté for 3 minutes.
  3. Add the cooked chicken and garlic.
  4. Lower heat. Add vegetable broth, oregano, rosemary, basil, diced tomatoes, beans, olives, and simmer for about 5 minutes.
  5. Cook over low heat until chicken is nice and hot.
  6. Season with pepper to taste and a squeeze of lime.

Mediterranean Chicken of Love RECIPE

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Recipe Roundup: 4 Protein-Rich Recipes from Dietitians

Many people with diabetes follow a high-protein diet for good reasons. It’s low glycemic, which means it doesn’t cause abrupt sugar spikes. It also makes you feel fuller for a longer time, which can help you sustain your energy until your next meal. Studies have also proven it’s good for weight loss, building muscles, and bone health.

All these health benefits made us think of reaching out to dietitians and nutritionists for recipes that are not only protein-rich but also palatable. Here are their suggestions:

Pizza Chicken Foil Packet

pizza chicken foil pack

Photo credit: Abbey Sharp

Insulin dosing for pizza can be tricky, due to its combination of high carbohydrates and high fats, so if you’re craving for some but want to ditch the carbs, this savory meal can be a good substitute. Registered dietitian, Abbey Sharp, says it’s easy to pull this off and can be readily modified depending on what’s in your fridge or what you or your family like on your pizza. To ensure that it’s low in carbs, be sure to use sugar-free sauce.

Salmon Burgers

salmon burger

Photo credit: Alexis Joseph

Packed with omega-3 fatty acids, this salmon recipe is a sure hit for everyone in the family. Hummusapien registered dietitian, Alexis Joseph, offers options to keep the carbs low. Instead of using breadcrumbs to keep the patties together, you can use almond flour. Instead of serving it in a bun with greens, you can chop it up and devour it in a loaded salad. The best part is that these burgers freeze well, making your dinner on busy days a breeze.

Easy Blackened Shrimp

blackened shrimp

Photo credit: Kaleigh McMordie

Is it possible to cook something healthy within 5 minutes? Yes, Kaleigh McMordie, the registered dietitian at Lively Table, proves this with this shrimp recipe. Just place the shrimp in a bowl, toss some lemon juice and blackening seasoning, and cook the shrimp in a non-stick skillet for 2-3 minutes each side. You will have extra blackening seasoning from this recipe, so be sure to store it in an air-tight container for future use.

Miso Chicken – One Pan Meal

miso chicken

Photo credit: Natalie Brady

Baked chicken and vegetables can be boring, but using a delicious dressing or sauce can make a huge difference in your meal. Registered Clinical Nutritionist, Natalie Brady offers her miso sauce as one of your options. Miso, a thick Japanese paste made from fermented soybeans, is rich in protein and nutrients.

What protein-rich recipe do you serve at home regularly? Share them in the comments – we would like to know and try them out!

Recipe Roundup_ 4 Protein-Rich Recipes from Dietitians

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Food Shaming: Changing How We Talk About Food

This content originally appeared here. Republished with permission.

By Brenda Manzanarez, MS, RD, and Cynthia Muñoz, Ph.D., MPH

You know you shouldn’t be eating that kind of stuff, right?

If you’d just eat better, you wouldn’t have to take so many medications.

I know someone who cut out all carbs and cured their diabetes; have you tried that?

Do any of these comments sound familiar? Maybe someone else has said them to you, maybe you’ve said them to someone, or maybe you’ve thought them about yourself. Either way, comments like this, even if they have good intentions, often come off as judgmental and shaming. This type of “advice” can cause confusion, anxiety, frustration, and an unhealthy relationship with food.

Our Relationship with Food

Food is important when it comes to keeping blood sugar in range, but managing diabetes is not just about glycemic control—we also need to juggle lifestyles, health goals, and mental health.

There are so many factors that influence our food choices, and you cannot see those factors by just glancing at a plate. Food is an important part of our lives, and it can have so many meanings to different people. It can mean health, love, sense of community, or pleasure, but for others, especially people with diabetes, it might cause feelings of anxiety and fear.

Changing the way you eat is a major lifestyle change, and major lifestyle changes always take time.

While you are on this journey, unsolicited advice from strangers and even loved ones can feel more like judgment and might cause you to question yourself or feel guilty about your own choices.

Changing the way you eat is a major lifestyle change, and major lifestyle changes always take time. There are a lot of things to juggle when managing diabetes, so be patient with yourself and with others.

Unintended Consequences

Food shaming often happens when someone’s own preferences and opinions don’t line up with others’. Judgmental comments like “you shouldn’t eat that” may be a projection of their own frustrations or a reflection of their misconceptions about diabetes.

As clinicians who work with children, teens, and young adults with diabetes and obesity, we know that talking about food can be very difficult. We also know that negative comments, pictures, and memes on social media can have a harmful impact on someone’s emotional well-being, especially people with diabetes.

No one should be shamed about their food choices.

No one should be shamed about their food choices. Shame leads to negative feelings about food, which can lead to anxiety, depression, and even disordered eating. And these conditions can cause more damage to physical health than poor diet.

Rethink the Role of Food and Your Health

Instead of thinking of food as “good” or “bad,” or judging people (or yourself) by the way you eat, picture food and eating as being neutral and adopt a non-judgmental way of thinking. The food you put on your plate, is just food that will provide energy and nutrients to fuel your body.

Unlearning what we have been exposed to takes time but being aware of those negative thoughts is a start.

Instead of thinking of food as “good” or “bad,” picture food and eating as being neutral.

Remind yourself that there is no one right way to eat with diabetes— it has to be tailored to your own unique needs— like your budget, taste preferences/favorite foods, cultural norms, cooking skill, time, etc. And you don’t have to feel guilty about enjoying a treat every now and then.

Break the cycle and be nice to yourself and to others. Instead of criticizing people, ask them how they feel about the changes they’ve made and have them decide how they feel about it. If appropriate, provide encouragement.

If you are concerned about a loved one, privately ask how they are doing, and don’t offer advice unless they ask for it. Ask if there is anything you can do to support them, and/or seek information about healthy food choices and incorporate this in your own life as a form of support for your loved one.

If you feel this is a big issue in your own life, don’t be afraid to seek out help—talk to your primary doctor or with a therapist. If you don’t have a therapist ask for a referral from your doctor. To find a mental health provider with knowledge about diabetes, check this directory.

Bottom Line

Food is meant to be nourishment for our bodies and to be enjoyed; find a balance that works for your health, be confident in your choices, and be accepting of other people’s choices.

If you find yourself wanting to criticize someone else’s food choices or appearance, don’t! This is generally not helpful and can have a negative emotional impact.

A neutral and non-judgmental way of thinking is best when talking about food and diabetes; there are no “good” and “bad” foods. The key is to balance what you eat to get the nutrients you need.

If you receive a negative comment from a stranger on social media or in person, remember that person doesn’t know you and how you take care of yourself. Don’t beat yourself up and continue to focus on ways to be the healthiest version of yourself.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Sun-Dried Tomato Marinara

This content originally appeared on ForGoodMeasure. Republished with permission.

Raw food followers believe heat kills food’s nutrients & natural enzymes. For those of us who like high temperatures, cooking changes a lot of things, most significantly … flavor. This sauce is no exception. A classic marinara with the combination of tomatoes, onion, garlic, and herbs, however, the addition of sun-dried tomatoes and lack of heat, elevate the intensity to something altogether unexpected.

Sun-Dried Tomato Marinara

This recipe works great as sauce for your homemade pizza, poured over zucchini linguini or as an accompaniment to your morning fried eggs.

  • 4 cups tomatoes (chopped)
  • 1 cup sun-dried tomatoes (drained if in oil)
  • 1 cup basil
  • ½ cup parsley (chopped)
  • ¼ cup red onion (chopped)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons garlic (minced)
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon chili flakes
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper
  1. Using the processor, combine tomatoes, sun-dried tomatoes, basil, parsley, onion, olive oil, garlic, vinegar, chili flakes, syrup, oregano, salt and pepper, until thick and creamy.

Naturally low-carb and gluten-free.

Net carbs: 6g

Sun-Dried Tomato Marinara Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Low-Carb Keto Italian Lemon Cream Cake

This content originally appeared on Sugar-Free Mom. Republished with permission.

Have you ever wondered what the difference is between an Italian Cream Cake and an Italian Lemon Cream Cake? I’m an Italian American born in the States and my father is from Sicily. He and I both, and my mother, an Italian American, have never heard of or tried an Italian Cream Cake. My Nonna, my father’s mother, born and raised in Italy all her life, never once made an Italian Cream Cake. How it got the name Italian in front of this cake, we shall never know.

The origin of an Italian Cream Cake seems to be from the Southern American states. It starts with a yellow cake mix, buttermilk and also includes pecans and coconut. As I said, my father, nonna, mother and I have never seen it when in Italy or have tried it so it wasn’t on my top foodie list to recreate a keto version. But this Italian Lemon Cream Cake I’m sharing today was my birthday cake a few months ago and it did not disappoint my Italian family!

An Italian Lemon Cream Cake has no resemblance to the Southern Italian cream cake, except for the fact you have a yellow cake as the base. When my parents would take us to Olive Garden, they discovered this Italian Lemon Cream Cake and then for every holiday or family party, would purchase one to enjoy together. The origin of this Italian Lemon Cream Cake is also not one found in Italy, but with a lemon mascarpone filling, lemon-flavored yellow cake and butter crumb topping, this is more Italian than any other version you’ll try.

Keto Nut-Free Italian Lemon Cream Cake

This Low-Carb Keto Italian Lemon Cream Cake is nut-free, gluten-free, and perfect for any celebration with your family and friends.

Cake

  • 1 cup coconut flour
  • 1/2 cup Swerve confectioners
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp glucomannan ( or xanthan gum)
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/2 cup butter softened
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tsp lemon extract
  • 1/2 tsp lemon liquid stevia
  • 6 large eggs

Filling

  • 8 ounces mascarpone cheese or cream cheese (softened)
  • 1/2 cup Swerve confectioners
  • 1/2 tsp lemon zest
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 cup heavy cream

Butter Crumb Topping

  • 1/2 cup coconut flour
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup Swerve confectioners
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla liquid stevia
  • 1 stick butter cold (cut into pieces or 1/2 cup)

Cake

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease two 9 inch springform pans and set aside.

  2. Whisk together coconut flour, Swerve, baking soda, powder, salt and glucomannan or xanthan gum. Set aside.
  3. To a stand mixer or use an electric hand mixer, add the sour cream, softened butter, heavy cream, lemon extract, and stevia and blend until combined. Add one egg at a time until combined. Pour in half the dry ingredients and blend until well combined. Add remaining dry ingredients until nicely incorporated.

  4. Pour cake batter evenly into each cake pan. Bake for 25 -30 minutes or until a toothpick in center comes out clean. Allow to cool 5 minutes then use a butter knife to loosen all around the edges of the cake. Allow to cool completely before removing the sides of the springform pan.

Filling

  1. Place all the ingredients, except the heavy cream, into a clean bowl or stand mixer and blend until smooth using the paddle attachment. Taste and adjust sweetener if needed. Pour in the heavy cream with the whisk attachment, whisk on medium-high until nice and smooth and thickened. Set aside in the refrigerator until the cake is cooked and cooled.

Butter Crumb Topping

  1. Place the dry ingredients into a food processor and process to combine. Add in cold butter. Pulse until crumbs form. Do not over process. Set aside.

Assemble

  1. Place one cake layer on your serving plate. Spread about 3/4 of the filling onto the cake, saving 1/4 of filling for the top layer. Place the second cake layer over the filling. Spread the remaining filling over the top. Carefully using your hands, sprinkle over the crumb topping over the top of the cake and sides, pushing lightly into the cake. Keep refrigerated until ready to serve.

Net carbs: 4g

Low-Carb Keto Italian Lemon Cream Cake Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Keto Mock “Little Debbie Be My Valentine Snack Cakes”

This content originally appeared on Caroline’s Keto Kitchen. Republished with permission.

I don’t know what it is about these little cakes that scream Valentine’s Day to me. They must have been at eye level at every store I went to with my mom as a kid or something, because seriously, these are the first things I picture when I think of Valentine’s Day. So when it was time to create a Valentine’s Day dessert, you bet I was going to recreate the Little Debbie Be My Valentine Snack Cakes!

For those of you who don’t know what these are, they’re basically a 2-layer vanilla cake with frosting between the layers and a pink white chocolate coating with a white chocolate drizzle. It does take a bit of work considering there’s a cake step, an icing step, and a white chocolate coating step, but I promise, it’s worth it, and none of the steps are hard.

Keto Mock "Little Debbie Be My Valentine Snack Cakes"

Share the love this Valentine's Day with this heart-shaped vanilla cake. Coated with white chocolate, this dessert is low-carb, filling, and delicious.

Cake

  • 1 cup almond flour
  • 1/4 cup coconut flour
  • 1/2 cup granular Swerve
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 cup psyllium husk powder
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 stick salted butter (melted)
  • 1 tbsp vanilla
  • 1 tsp monk fruit juice concentrate
  • 1/2 cup sour cream

Icing

  • 1 stick salted butter (softened)
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 cup powdered Swerve

White Chocolate Coating

  • 7 oz cocoa butter
  • 1/3 cup solid coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream powder (I used the Nekstella brand)
  • 1/2 cup powdered Swerve
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • food coloring
  1. Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Mix together all dry cake ingredients (almond flour, coconut flour, Swerve, baking powder, baking soda, psyllium husk powder).
  3. Add in all wet ingredients (eggs, melted butter, vanilla, monk fruit, sour cream), and stir well.
  4. Line a cookie sheet that has edges with parchment paper. (Mine was roughly 13″ x 18″).
  5. Spread the cake batter evenly on the parchment paper. (You can wet your hands with a bit of water to help spread it more easily.)
  6. Bake for around 16 minutes or until cooked. (The edges may start turning a little bit golden at this point).
  7. While the cake is in the oven, begin making your icing by mixing the softened butter with the vanilla and powdered Swerve until smooth.
  8. Remove cake from oven, and let cool completely.
  9. Using a heart cookie cutter, cut as many hearts as you can out of the cake. (I had a big heart cookie cutter (~3.5″), so mine only made 18 hearts.)
  10. Put icing between the hearts to make 2-layer heart “sandwiches.”
  11. Now it’s time for the white chocolate coating. In a large saucepan, melt the cocoa butter and coconut oil on a very low heat.
  12. Remove from heat and add the heavy whipping cream powder, powdered Swerve, vanilla and salt. Stir until smooth.
  13. Spoon some of the mixture into an icing bag (this will be the white drizzle, so you need to put some aside before you turn the rest of the white chocolate coating pink).
  14. Add pink food coloring to the white chocolate coating mixture and stir until smooth.
  15. Dunk each cake into the pink white chocolate coating. Place on wax paper after dunk and allow coat to settle (you can speed this up by refrigerating it). Once settled, repeat, dipping each cake 2-3 times total.
  16. Once final pink layer is solidified, cut the tip of the icing bag and drizzle the white chocolate on top of each cake.

The nutrition facts depend on your specific ingredients and how big your cookie cutter is. My cookie cutter was quite large (~3.5″), so each cake was 2 servings at least (very filling!).

Keto Mock “Little Debbie Be My Valentine Snack Cakes” Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Recipe Roundup: To Someone’s Heart Through Chocolates

It has long been a custom for people to give sweets to celebrate the month of love. Stats support this thoughtful gesture: People spent $1.7 billion on chocolates and candy alone in February 2017, according to the National Retail Federation.

This year, why not make your Valentine’s present extra special by preparing it yourself? If you’re up for this kitchen challenge, here are some diabetes-friendly recipes that will satisfy anyone’s sweet tooth.

Photo credit: Brenda Bennett

Sugar-Free White Chocolate Bars

These white chocolate bars are sugar-free, low-carb, and quick to prepare. You can load them with dried cranberries or chopped nuts for more flavor. Brenda of Sugar-Free Mom notes that though this healthy alternative isn’t like the typical white chocolate in the market, it doesn’t mean it tastes any less delicious.

Photo credit: Jennifer Shun

Chocolate Pistachio Bark

Without a doubt, this nutritious chocolate pistachio bark will satisfy your sweet palate. For this recipe, Jennifer of For Good Measure uses dark chocolate, which is a good source of fiber, minerals, and antioxidants. The use of hemp seeds gives you a nutty texture as well as a protein boost.

Photo credit: Caroline Levens

Chocolate Low-Carb Muffins

Can you make something tasty with just three ingredients? Yes, Caroline of Caroline’s Keto Kitchen proves that with her moist muffins. All you need is a chocolate cake mix, some canned pumpkin, and egg white, and you have a fabulous treat for your loved ones. If the taste seems too simple, you can add chocolate chips on top.

Photo credit: Lisa Marcaurele

No-Bake Keto Chocolate Peanut Butter Bars

If you plan to give some treats to someone who loves peanut butter, then look no further. These bars were inspired by a recipe Lisa of Low-Carb Yum learned how to make in middle school Home Economics class. “It’s great to be able to enjoy the same taste in a much healthier version of the no-bake peanut butter bars,” she said.

Photo credit: Lisa Marshall

Abuelita’s Chocolate Truffles

Compared to the recipes above, preparing these truffles take a longer process, but in the end, it is all worth it. Lisa of 24/7 Low-Carb Diner used cinnamon, coffee, and roasted peanuts for a distinctive bite. After making the flavorful mixture, you can roll them into balls and then wrap them up as a gift for someone who loves chocolate but does not need sugar overload. If rolling is too messy for you, you can use it as a pie filling.

Which chocolate recipes do you like baking for yourself, family or friends? We’d love to read them in the comments.

Recipe Roundup_ To Someone’s Heart Through Chocolates

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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