10 Diabetes-Friendly and Affordable Finds at Trader Joe’s

Trader Joe’s is a great resource for people looking for convenient and affordable food that is diabetes-friendly and healthy.

The first Trader Joe’s was opened in 1967, and the business has grown to over 500 stores across the United States. They are known for their affordable branded products and offer great customer service, with a full refund guarantee if you are not satisfied with your purchase. The atmosphere is light and friendly with store managers referred to as “captains” and employees are “crew members”. Their Hawaiian shirts and friendly service make this a place you want to go back to.

I have a Trader Joe’s in walking distance from my house but do not take advantage of it enough. There are delicious frozen meals, fresh fruit galore, and tasty desserts all that won’t put you over budget. They also offer great wine and fresh flowers, making this a great place to run in and accomplish more than just picking up dinner.

I reached out to the diabetes online community and the Diabetes Daily forum members to get their recommendations on what to try next. Here are some healthy and affordable options to check out on your next visit.

1. Turkey Burgers

These turkey burgers are made with a combination of white and dark meat, rosemary, and salt, and contain 0 carbs and a whopping 22 grams of protein. They are also extremely convenient as you can cook them without defrosting them. These burgers come in a pack of 4 (think ahead, make two and throw the second over salad for lunch) and cost only $3.29, which makes for a few cheap meals. Be sure to check out their salmon and shrimp burgers too!

2. Mexican Style Riced Cauliflower

This flavorful spicy riced cauliflower makes for a great side dish next to your favorite protein or a great base for a burrito bowl. You can get creative and add grilled shrimp and have a delicious and healthy dinner that only contains 5 grams of carbs!

Cauliflower Gnocchi

Photo credit: Trader Joe’s

3. Cauliflower Gnocchi

Don’t be fooled by the fact it is made with 75% cauliflower. This delicious entree is made for Trader Joe’s in Italy, giving it a little more clout. For 16 net carbs, you can enjoy an authentic tasting pasta-like dish.

4. Oven-Baked Cheese Bites with Summer Truffle

I debated including this one because it is a seasonal item, but keep this on your radar for next year. With only 1 carb, this delicious snack packs a great amount of flavor, with a rare hint of ultra-gourmet truffles, and can be used to make a creative and healthy snack at your next celebration. The recipe attached suggests turning this into a luxe snack mix by adding nuts and pretzels.

5. Butternut Squash Mac N’ Cheese Bites

These bites are made from butternut squash, macaroni, a blend of cheddar and gouda cheese, and some seasonal spices. They are fried and make for a delicious appetizer or side. Coming in at only 18 carbs, this is a unique treat you can definitely sink your teeth into.

6. Egg Frittata with Swiss Cheese and Cauliflower

This is one of my favorite recommendations, to which a store employee agreed, as she excitedly told me she eats them 2-3 times a day!  Coming in at only 10 grams of carbs and 25 grams of protein for 2, this is a great low-carb, high-protein way to start your day that will keep you satiated until your lunch break.

Chewy Chocolate & Peanut Butter Protein Bars

Photo credit: Trader Joe’s

7. Chewy Chocolate and Peanut Butter Protein Bars

With only 12 net carbs, this Trader Joe’s protein bar rivals its competitors in taste and in price too. It can be tough to find good (and affordable) lower-carb snacks to eat on the go. This great snack on the go packs 10 grams of protein, making it a worthwhile snack to keep on hand.

8. Organic Freeze-Dried Berry Medley

If you are looking for something sweet without a ton of sugar to add to your smoothies, shakes, yogurts, and such, look no further. One entire bag only contains 29 carbs (along with 9 grams of protein), so you can feel free to use this sparingly to add some sweet flavor and healthy goodness to any of your favorite protein-filled snacks.

9. Jicama Sticks

This raw root vegetable is ready-prepared for you into small sticks so you can throw over a salad, or get creative and turn it into jicama french fries. Simply sprinkle with olive oil and any seasoning of your choosing and roast or air fry for about 10 minutes at 425 degrees (just double the time if you are using a conventional oven) for a crispy, tasty alternative to french fries.

10. Cauliflower Pizza Crust

This low-carb, high-fiber alternative to the real thing will keep your blood sugars stable and is quite tasty. Top this base with any of your favorite pizza toppings to make a delicious meal for you or your family.

This list just scratches the surface of what healthy finds Trader Joe’s has to offer. Please keep in mind that their offerings do change seasonally and while some of these are not linked to their website, I spoke with a manager who confirmed they are all still offered. Please be sure to also check out their dips, cheese spreads, and fresh produce.

Have you found any healthy good finds at Trader Joe’s? Be sure to share and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Quiche the Crust Goodbye

This content originally appeared on TCOYD: Taking Control of Your Diabetes. Republished with permission.

This light veggie quiche is made without a traditional quiche crust in order to keep the carbs down. You can tailor it to your tastes with your favorite veggies and cheese, and pair it with these Cauliflower Hash Browns for breakfast, lunch, or dinner.

Quiche the Crust Goodbye

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Quiche the Crust Goodbye

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This easy, cheesy, fluffy egg casserole ditched the crust but kept the flavor so you’ll be eggcited to dish it up with your favorite fixins.
Course Breakfast
Cuisine French
Keyword quiche
Servings 4 servings
Calories 326kcal

Ingredients

  • 8 eggs
  • 1 cup milk or milk alternative. I used hemp milk, purchased from Trader Joe’s
  • 1-2 tablespoons seasoning I used Green Goddess Seasoning from Trader Joe’s
  • 1 cup cheese shredded. I used a Swiss/Gruyere blend
  • 1 cup sautéed veggies of choice I used chopped asparagus, mushrooms, and white onion
  • 3 tablespoons green onions finely chopped, plus 2 tablespoons for garnish
  • salt to taste
  • pepper to taste
  • ¼ cup goat cheese 1-2 oz, crumbled

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  • Chop and sauté veggies in a large skillet over medium heat.
  • Crack eggs into a large mixing bowl and whisk.
  • Add seasoning, milk, and cheese to eggs, and whisk again until combined.
  • Add sautéed veggies and freshly chopped green onion, and whisk together.
  • Spray a 9×9 glass baking dish (or 9″ glass pie dish) with nonstick cooking spray and pour egg mixture into dish.
  • Bake for 40-45 minutes, or until set in the middle.
  • Garnish with more fresh green onion, crumbled goat cheese, and salt and pepper, if desired.

Nutrition

Calories: 326kcal | Carbohydrates: 7g | Protein: 23g | Fat: 23g | Saturated Fat: 12g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 7g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 370mg | Sodium: 380mg | Potassium: 292mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 1111IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 404mg | Iron: 3mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Quiche the Crust Goodbye Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Why Allulose is My Favorite Zero-Carb Sweetener

I have always despised the flavor of alternative sugars. This article is about the first zero-carb sugar that I ever really liked.

“Despise” may sound exaggerated, but I use that word carefully: it’s a flavor that I really, really hate. I find it astonishing, for example, that anyone cannot tell the difference between diet soda and regular soda. The diet version seems to sear my tongue at the very first sip, and even the tiniest amount fills my mouth with a nasty flavor that lingers for minutes.

When I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, as an adult, I immediately knew that I would reduce my sugar intake. And with my aversion to fake sugars, I figured that I just wouldn’t get to enjoy sweet flavors very often.

As I dove into the diabetes online community – a totally incredible resource, by the way, worth far more to me than anything I ever learned from my doctor or endocrinologist – I noticed with trepidation how enthusiastic everyone else was about alternative sugars. It seemed like everyone’s favorite hobby was baking low-carbohydrate sweets at home, something that I had no interest in doing.

I wasn’t enthusiastic, but I figured that I might as well give alternative sugars a shot. I already knew that I hated Sweet’n Low, Equal, Splenda, and the like. And so I started ordering and tasting ones I’d never tried, newer and trendier alternatives. I gave stevia and erythritol and others a fair shake, but they all had nasty chemical flavors, or strange aftertastes, or both. No thank you. Around this time I figured that if homemade stevia cookies and cake was the best I could look forward to, you could count me out. I’d splurge on real sugar treats from time to time, and otherwise just pass on dessert.

The first alternative sweetener that I found more than halfway tolerable was monkfruit powder. Monkfruit has a powerful sweet flavor. It is subtly but identifiably distinct from sugar, and it still has a hint of a weird aftertaste. This was a partial success, the first sweetener I tried that I thought was actually good enough to use. But I didn’t love it.

Finally, I tried a winner.

Allulose is my favorite zero-carb sweetener. My reasons are incredibly simple: of every alternative sweetener I’ve tried, it tastes the best, which is to say that it tastes the most like true sugar. There is no aftertaste, no chemical flavor, no strange mouthfeel issues. I have dumped huge amounts of allulose into my tea, in the name of science, and have never noticed an off-flavor of any kind.

Allulose is not quite as sweet as sugar, and even if you add in extra to a recipe, it never will be as sweet. It’s also not quite as delicious as sugar. It tastes like actual sugar that has been somehow dulled or muted. It’s not perfect, but it’s good enough for me. Anyway, ever since reducing my carb intake, it definitely takes less sweetness than it used to in order to satisfy my sweet tooth.

When I’ve cooked with allulose I’ve been extremely pleased with the results. The texture is not different enough from granulated sugar to make much of a difference, as far as I can tell. You could easily fool an unsuspecting guest, especially in recipes like pudding that don’t require any starch or starch replacements. It’s also available as a liquid sweetener – an instant simple syrup replacement for cocktails.

The blood sugar effect is, from what I can tell, nonexistent. My CGM line doesn’t budge. Your mileage may vary, of course – there’s no telling how any one person might react to a new ingredient – but I couldn’t be more pleased about its blood glucose impact.

And guess what? Allulose might be kind of healthy, too. I admit that didn’t know or care about any secondary health impacts when I fell in love with allulose – it doesn’t spike my blood sugar, and that’s good enough for me. But it turns out that allulose may have a host of other metabolic health benefits. Dr. Peter Attia has written a long and exceedingly detailed essay on the subject. While most of the encouraging study of allulose has been in rodents, one meta-analysis of human trials found that allulose may actually reduce post-prandial glucose levels.

I’ve tried several brands of allulose, some with fancy brand names and packaging, some without. I haven’t discerned a difference from one brand to the other, so now I buy in bulk, usually whichever vendor happens to have lower prices at the time.

Maybe in the future we’ll have an even better option, an alternative zero-carb sweetener that is exactly as sweet and delicious as sugar. But in the meantime, allulose is a pretty great replacement, good enough to have turned me into an alternative sugars believer.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Matcha Latte Bombs: Low-Carb, Dairy-Free & Satisfying

This content originally appeared here. Republished with permission.

These keto-friendly green tea Matcha Latte Bombs are a fun take on the Tik Tok recipe trend, just like my Bulletproof Coffee Bombs! So if you’re looking for a little extra and want to have some fun, make these matcha latte bombs! There are a few simple steps to take to get them just right, so keep reading.

Sure, you could take these ingredients and make a regular matcha latte (and it would be fabulous!), but think it’s worth the extra effort to make the bombs because they have a super satisfying melt and pop.

Take it from a former barista, matcha lattes are even better than espresso!

Keto Matcha Latte Bombs

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Keto Matcha Latte Bombs

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Make the best ever bulletproof Keto Matcha Latte, and level it up with these fun melting bombs!
Course Drinks
Cuisine American
Keyword matcha
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 1 serving
Calories 117kcal

Equipment

  • milk frother

Ingredients

Keto Matcha Latte

  • 1 cup almond milk unsweetened
  • 1 teaspoon matcha powder
  • 1.5 – 2 teaspoons monk fruit sweetener or erythritol
  • 2 teaspoons coconut oil

Optional Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon whipped cream sugar-free
  • 1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

Make the Matcha Latte Bombs

  • Spoon about one teaspoon of softened room temperature coconut oil into each half sphere of your silicone mold, two half spheres for each bomb you plan to make. Pay extra attention to coat the sides, all the way up to the edges. Set the mold in the freezer for about 15 minutes, until hardened.
  • Use your hands to carefully remove the hardened half spheres, and set them on a chilled plate. Fill half of the pieces with matcha and sweetener.

    One at a time, rub the unfilled spheres face down in a warmed skillet, just for about 5 seconds. This will melt and flatten the edge, then use your fingers to close over one of the filled half spheres, smoothing and sealing the edges. If necessary, take a little more room temperature coconut oil and fill any gaps.

  • Set the filled bombs in the freezer for another 5 minutes, then sprinkle lightly with a little more matcha powder. Last, transfer the finished matcha bombs to an airtight container and store in the freezer until you’re ready to make your latte!

Make the Latte

  • Heat the almond milk in a small sauce pan until it starts to simmer, then transfer to a mug. Use a spoon to gently drop the the matcha bomb into the mug and wait for it to melt. Use a milk frother to fully combine and froth.

Notes

To store: Set in an airtight container and store in the freezer until you’re ready to use them!

Nutrition

Calories: 117kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 11g | Saturated Fat: 7g | Sodium: 325mg | Potassium: 1mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 200IU | Calcium: 300mg | Iron: 1mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Keto Matcha Latte Bombs Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

10 Fruits with 10 Net Carbs or Less

Fruits are high in vitamins and minerals and have several health benefits, including reducing the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. However, all fruit contains sugar, and this can be challenging for those of us living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The fruit mentioned below all have a carbohydrate count of 10 carbs and are low GI foods which means they won’t spike you as quickly. These fruits are also loaded with fiber, which can help keep you fuller longer, promote good digestion, and help your overall blood sugar management.

Be mindful of the carb count of the fruit you’re eating: it will help you enjoy this healthy and delicious food without spiking your blood sugar. And please note that fresh fruit and frozen fruit are always better choices than fruit that comes in a can or jar. Also, avoid processed fruits and dried fruits that contain extra sugar.

Here are 10 fruits that contain 10 carbs or less per serving:

Tomatoes

Surprise! The tomato is a fruit, and I find it to be one of the most versatile fruits to work with. You can eat tomatoes over a salad, serve them with fresh mozzarella and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar, roast them, or turn them into a sauce and add it to any of your favorite proteins. Tomatoes contain a slew of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants and only contain 4.8 grams of net carbs for an average-sized tomato (about 123 grams/4.3 punches).

avocado

Avocados

Containing only 1.7 grams of net carbs per 3.5 ounces/100 grams of avocados, this is a great choice that is full of healthy fats and antioxidants. It is also high in fiber, contains potassium, Vitamin K, Vitamin C, and folate. Adding some avocado to a salad is a flavorful way to get in some good nutrients without spiking your blood sugar. You can also turn this into guacamole and serve it with your favorite crudite.

Strawberries

This personal favorite of mine contains only 8 net grams of carbs per cup. This fruit is high in vitamins, fiber, and antioxidants, along with many other nutritional benefits. You can do so much with strawberries and don’t have to worry too much about your blood sugars. Make a smoothie, toss on your favorite summer salad, or dice them up and add to greek yogurt. Add a drizzle of sugar-free chocolate syrup for a decadent and healthy snack.

Lemon and Lime

While most people don’t actually eat whole lemons and limes, either is a great addition to water to make it more palatable. It is also great to mix with your favorite alcohol for a low-sugar tasty drink. Lemon and lime both only contain 7 net carbs per serving, so feel free to use them generously in your drinks and to season meals as well.

Blackberries

Out of all the really fruity fruits, berries contain the lowest amount of carbs, only 8 net carbs per cup. (Blueberries, by contrast, contain 17 net carbs per 1 cup serving). They are packed with vitamins and high in fiber, making them a great choice.

kiwi

Photo credit: Pranjall Kumar (Unsplash)

Kiwi

Unbeknownst to many, kiwis are berries, and like most other berries they have minimal sugar, coming in at 8 net carbs per kiwi. The health benefits of kiwis are plentiful, they are packed with vitamins, antioxidants and are high in fiber, which will help aid digestion. When it comes to using kiwi, the options are endless- smoothies, puddings, desserts, even bread. Check out these recipes for more ideas on how to use this super fruit.

Plums

This fruit only contains 7.5 net carbs per average-sized plum and is packed with nutrition. Plums have also been found to reduce blood sugar thanks to a hormone, adiponectin, which helps regular blood sugars.  The fiber will also help avoid a quick spike in your blood glucose levels.

Rhubarb

Coming it at only 1 net carb per cup, this fruit is worth the effort. You can eat it on its own (only the stalk; the leaves are poisonous), but most people use it to bake with. This superfruit is packed with vitamins and antioxidants and has numerous health benefits, such as aiding collagen production and fighting inflammation, to name a few.

Watermelon

With only 8 grams of carbs per 100 grams/3.5 ounces of watermelon, this is a delicious refreshing fruit you can enjoy any time of year. Not just high in vitamins and antioxidants, watermelon also contains lycopene, which has has been found to lower blood pressure and cholesterol, reduce inflammation, and benefit brain health.

Cantaloupe

Like watermelon, cantaloupe only contains 8 grams of carbs per 100 grams/3.5 ounces. It is full of vitamin A, C, and potassium. You can get pretty creative with this succulent fruit by turning it into sorbet, cantaloupe chia pudding, or even this refreshing drink

Do you try to stick to low-carb fruits? What are some of your favorites and how do they impact your blood sugar levels? Share and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Lemon-Herb Halibut with Caprese Topping

This content originally appeared on ForGoodMeasure. Republished with permission.

While Insalata Caprese was created post WW1 as a patriotic Italian tribute, Caprese salad also plays homage to summer’s colorful bounty. Juicy tomatoes, aromatic basil, refreshing mozzarella & fruity olive oil, paired with a lemon-herb halibut and a drizzle of pesto. Squisito! Simple, yet layered, this recipe is the perfect ending to a sun-kissed day.

Lemon-Herb Halibut with Caprese Topping

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Lemon-Herb Halibut with Caprese Topping

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Simple, yet layered, this recipe is the perfect ending to a sun-kissed day.
Course Dinner
Cuisine Italian
Keyword fish
Servings 4 servings
Calories 248kcal

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil divided
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon parsley minced
  • 1 teaspoon basil
  • 1 teaspoon garlic minced
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt divided
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper divided
  • 4 four-ounce halibut fillets
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes halved
  • ½ cup mozzarella pearls halved
  • ¼ cup basil leaves

Instructions

  • In a small bowl, combine 2 tablespoons olive oil, lemon juice, parsley, basil, garlic, ½ teaspoon sea salt & ⅛ teaspoon pepper.
  • Set aside.
  • In a shallow dish, place halibut fillets in a single layer.
  • Pour olive oil mixture over halibut, refrigerating for one hour.
  • Meanwhile, in a small bowl, toss cherry tomatoes in remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil.
  • Add mozzarella pearls, seasoning with remaining ½ teaspoon sea salt.
  • Set aside for 30 minutes.
  • Line a shallow baking dish with parchment.
  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  • Place marinated halibut in prepared baking dish.
  • Bake until internal temperature reaches 145 degrees, or desired doneness.
  • While baking, add basil and remaining ⅛ teaspoon black pepper to tomato mixture.
  • Top baked fillets with Caprese mixture.
  • Serve alongside basil pesto, if desired.

Nutrition

Serving: 4ounce | Calories: 248kcal | Carbohydrates: 3g | Protein: 25g | Fat: 15g | Cholesterol: 67mg | Sodium: 751mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Lemon-Herb Halibut with Caprese Topping Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Reasons to Try Low-Carb… and Reasons Not To

If you are looking to lose weight and/or lower your blood sugars, you may have considered eating low-carb. There are many health benefits to reducing your carbohydrate intake. For those of us with diabetes, our bodies cannot properly break down sugar, so lowering carbs should naturally lower our blood sugar. Also, if you use insulin, cutting back on the carbs can also help you to reduce your insulin requirements.

With that said, people can be successful at weight and blood sugar management on both low-carb and high-carb diets. When I was eating very low-carb, I found the diet too restrictive and it messed with my mental health. In a previous article, I talked about how I increased my carb intake and still achieved the same A1c of 5.8.

The main goal is to find a way of eating that works for you, one that you can sustain and be successful at. I thought it would be nice to hear our community’s thoughts and experiences on eating low-carb…or not. While the definition of low-carb changes from person to person, the voices below define it as 100 grams of carbs a day or less.

People Living With Type 1 Who Prefer to Stay Lower Carb

“I feel better on low-carb for most things. Nothing strict, but I like to choose high protein and high fat over carbs. I think it’s definitely a personal preference. And I do splurge sometimes, though I’ll sometimes regret it because I can *feel* the unpleasant spike.” – Jessica R.

“I love low-carb. It helps me manage with way better accuracy and I do a lot of sports. The biggest issue is when I reintroduce a night out and I make a calculation error and it takes a couple of days of fumbling back to get on track.” – Nick G.

“I am not keto but do eat lower-carb. I have for many years and find it to be very helpful. I eat a higher protein diet. I am also an endurance athlete.” – Cathy J.

“Super easy and it regulates my blood sugar. I use a modified Paleo-type diet as a guideline. I typically have between 30-45 grams of carbs a day.” – Annie A.

“I try my best to be low-carb. It definitely helps me to lower my blood sugar. I try not to buy high-carb things when I shop, like bread and crackers, and when I eat out I do the best I can. If I am at a sandwich shop, I’ll eat what is on the menu and adjust my bolus for it.” – Mason R.

“I accidentally started low-carb one day and it has been great. Every 2-4 hours I eat 4 oz of protein and 2 oz of any vegetable. I never have to give myself insulin for it and my blood sugars stay stable all day with no unexpected highs or lows.” – Kelley B.

“I have been keto for about 10 years and have had type 1 for 32 years. I cycle and run and have found it much easier to manage under a keto diet. With so much less insulin on board, any highs or lows come on much more slowly. I have ridden century rides and run marathons with only needing water and with solid flat readings on my CGM the entire time. I miss a good carby beer, but overall well worth it.” – Owen F.

“I stick to low-carb most of the time but I don’t deprive myself if I want something carby. I use my insulin and most of the time my blood sugar remains stable.” – Allison C.

People Living With Type 1 Who Prefer Moderate to High Carb

“I don’t really worry about low-carb, I just try to eat good carbs. I know white rice, white flour and other types of carbs shoot my blood sugar through the roof so I try to limit those. I eat a lot of fruit though and whole wheat bread (love Dave’s Killer Bread). I can’t imagine doing keto or very low-carb though.” – Amanda S.

“I was low-carb, high-fat for about a year. Most days I was eating under 20 grams and always under 40 grams of carbs. Low-carb, high-fat worked great for snowshoeing at 9,000+ feet. It worked poorly for life in general (brain function, dependant on glycogen, glucogenesis from fat is slow). Cardio like running or cycle was a real struggle. Heart lungs and legs need glycogen when your heart rate elevates.” – Rob C.

“I work out 5 days a week and do strength training. For me personally, I like to use carbs before my workout for energy and I don’t limit them in general. Mastering the right dose of insulin at the right time is what it is all about” – Matt F.

“People with type 1 can still eat whatever they want. I enjoy my pizza and cake and still maintain optimal blood sugars.” – Kelly V.

Photo credit: iStock

People Living With Type 2 Who Choose Low-Carb

“I eat low-carb because it simplifies my life and reduces stress. I am a very carb-intolerant type 2. I ‘eat to my meter’ i.e. limit carbs enough to keep my meter readings in an acceptable range. For me, that’s about 30 grams of carbs a day. My choices are to eat what my body can handle or eat more carbs and take medication. I prefer to take the least amount of medicine, so low-carb it is. I don’t find it a big sacrifice, and after 11 years of low-carb, I feel better and less bloated, less hungry with no carb cravings.” – Lynn W.

“I needed to find a way of eating that helped all of the health issues I was facing (basically metabolic syndrome). A low-carb, healthy fat, moderate protein “diet” fit that bill quite nicely.” – Forum member

“[Low-carb] brought my blood sugar down, off all drugs. Sometimes I go off a bit (birthday parties?) but I see the impact on my daily blood test and it keeps me on course. Now I just avoid sugar and common carbs (rice, potatoes, bread, pasta) and that is enough. Oh, I have a house full of sugar substitute non-wheat flour baked bread, muffins, cookies & cake so I don’t miss anything. Just have to watch when out eating socially although there is usually enough to choose from.” – Forum member

“I joined a diabetes forum the day I was diagnosed with type 2 in 2011 and read many stories of doing well on an LCHF diet by members. The foods they reported eating to bring their diabetes under control are many of my favourites, so I decided to give it a go. The result was that I discovered I was very grain intolerant and my digestion improved dramatically when I stopped eating them. My weight started to drop fast as well, even though I was eating very high calories. Six months later I decided to take the extra step to go to a ketogenic diet, and everything improved even more as [I lowered] my carb intake to 12-20g a day and tested my ketones daily to make sure I was constantly in nutritional ketosis. I still test my ketones daily with my fasting glucose, and report both numbers here to keep myself honest. Nearly 10 years after starting low-carb, the weight loss has been maintained and I have never taken even a single metformin tablet. My quarterly HbA1c has been constantly between 5.0 and 5.2 (except for two 5.4 results) since six months after starting my low-carb diet. And I love the food I eat, so see no reason ever to go back to eating carbs for energy.” – Forum member

“I have type 2 and had my A1c in the 12 range. I was carb intolerant. My goal is to be medicine-free, have normal numbers, and to limit disease progression – and to keep the weight off.

“’Keto’ along with exercise helps my numbers remain ‘normal,’ weight is coming down slowly, BP numbers are in check, cholesterol is in normal limits, no longer have sleep issues/apnea. No T2 meds required, hope to be off my BP meds soon. A1C now in the low 5’s with normal fasting numbers.” – Forum member

People Living With Type 2 Who Prefer Moderate to High-Carb

“I’m type 2 and I don’t go low-carb since it’s a very restrictive diet. I have done low-carb in the past, and lost weight doing it. I just found it too hard to stick with when the people I dine with aren’t doing low-carb.” – Forum member

“I’m doing CICO (calories in and calories out) since you are allowed to eat anything as long you don’t go over calorie budget.” – Forum member

“I have been a type 1 since 2019. Before discovering low-carb I ate the advised 45-60g per meal which I got from Google/USDA guidelines. Truth is I’ve never been low-carb, more like moderate carb 100-200g per day. That was enough to promote rapid weight loss & return insulin sensitivity which improved over a year. My CGM trial had my A1c estimated at 4.6% & I only spent 1% of time above 140mg/dl.”- Forum member

“I do a lot of weight training and rely heavily on carbs for energy.” – Peter M.

“I’ve done research ad nauseum on what diet works best for diabetes, and long term, it appears that low-carb can actually increase insulin resistance. At first, it will definitely help your numbers, but other diets like the Mediterranean diet (which I am currently following) and Paleo have fared better in the long-term. It’s ultimately very individualized and depends on what works for you.” – Forum member

As you can see from our community members’ experiences, you can achieve both optimal blood sugars and weight on any diet. The trick is to find something you enjoy so that you can stick with it long-term.

Have you tried eating lower-carb? What was your experience like?

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Low-Carb Taco Tortilla Chips for Snacks

This content originally appeared on Sugar-Free Mom. Republished with permission.

If you love all things taco flavored, these super easy Low Carb Keto Taco Tortilla Chips are one for your must-make list. They use almond flour tortilla as a base, then spiced with a homemade taco seasoning with no added preservatives or sweeteners!

You can make these tortilla chips in the air fryer or your oven. For the ultimate in crispness, the air fryer method wins. Baking these tortilla chips in the oven is just as delicious, just a touch softer, more like a crisp cracker.

You can make these almond flour keto taco tortilla chips nut-free if you or your family have tree nut allergies. Simply swap the almond flour for sunflower seed flour in the same amount and you will have perfectly crispy keto nut-free taco tortilla chips!

Low-carb keto taco tortilla (1)

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Low-Carb Keto Taco Tortilla Chips

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These crispy keto taco tortilla chips are easy to make at home, can be made nut free, and can be prepared in your oven or air fryer! They are the perfect party snack with any dip or salsa!
Course Appetizer, Snack
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword Tortilla Chips
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 8 minutes
Total Time 23 minutes
Servings 12 servings
Calories 76kcal
Author Jo Harding

Ingredients

Taco Seasoning

  • teaspoon chili powder
  • teaspoon onion powder
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¼ teaspoon oregano
  • ¾ teaspoon cumin
  • ¾ teaspoon smoked paprika

Tortilla Base

  • 1 cup almond flour or 100g
  • 2 tablespoons psyllium husk powder or 15g
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon xanthan gum
  • teaspoon salt
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 egg white
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil or olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons water

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 355F / 180C / 160 fan.
  • Prepare the taco seasoning by whisking all the ingredients together in a small bowl.
  • Place the dry ingredients (almond flour, psyllium husk powder, baking powder, xanthan gum, salt, and taco seasoning) into a mixing bowl and stir to combine.
  • Add in the wet ingredients (eggs, oil, and water) and mix well.
  • Place in the fridge to rest for 15 minutes then shape into a ball with your hands.
  • Cut the ball into 2 pieces. Place 1 ball between 2 sheets of parchment paper and flatten with your hands. Then, roll thinly using a rolling pin to about the thickness of a coin.
  • Remove the top sheet of parchment Cut into triangles. Gather up any dough ends from ball one and include them in ball two. Cut remaining dough into triangles. You should have 60 triangles in all.

Oven Method

  • Place triangles on a baking sheet with space around each one, so they don’t overlap.
  • Bake for 7- 10 minutes or until golden. Keep an eye on them, as cooking times will vary depending on how thin you roll them. Remove from the oven and allow to cool to firm up.

Air Fryer Method

  • Spray chips with a fine spray of olive oil on both sides. Preheat your air fryer if your model requires it. Lay the tortilla chips in a single layer, so they don’t touch each other. Cook at 335F or 168C for 4 minutes. Allow chips to cool to crisp up. Note: you will need to do this in batches to cook all the tortillas.

Storage

  • Tupperware for 4 days or freezer for 2 .months

Notes

Net carbs: 2g

Nutrition

Serving: 5chips | Calories: 76kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 6g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 16mg | Sodium: 140mg | Potassium: 31mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 103IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 32mg | Iron: 1mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Low-Carb Taco Tortilla Chips for Snacks Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

6 Healthy Snack Recipes Your Kids Will Enjoy

“What’s for snacks?” With your kids spending more time at home during this pandemic, you’ve probably heard them ask this question 239 times in a month. While there are nutritious options in the market, below are recipes you can try at home (with them if you need another activity to keep them entertained).

Sugar-Free Fruitless Fruit Snacks

Your kids would have no idea that these tasty jellos are not made with fruits. What’s the secret ingredient? Caffeine-free, flavored herbal tea! These snacks are so easy to make, and you’ll have fun creating those cute shapes with molds or cookie cutters. Yes, this can be an enjoyable kiddie kitchen activity, too.

pecan crackers

Photo credit: Jennifer Shun

Pecan Crackers

Pecans, nuts that are excellent sources of fiber, protein, and copper, make these savory and nutritious crackers a better alternative to store-bought ones. These snacks go well with sharp cheddar, apple butter, or a slather of warm brie. And if you need an interesting trivia to share with your kids while they enjoy their bite, here’s one: Pecans are the only tree nut native to North America.

oreo chaffles (1)

Photo credit: Lisa MarcAurele

Oreo Chaffles Recipe

Do you know a kid who doesn’t love Oreos? Probably not. Those classic cookies are a real treat for children, but if you’re looking for a low-carb alternative, this recipe is what you need. “They are deliciously chocolatey inside, and the creamy topping is very much like the cream filling in an Oreo cookie – without all the unneeded carbs,” says the author.

Chocolate Zucchini Muffins

The title tells us what to expect: veggie-infused snacks that can satisfy anyone’s sweet tooth. Top the muffins with chocolate chips for more chocolatey goodness. Since this is a guaranteed favorite, you can make this recipe in a big batch and store them properly in the freezer.

strawberry fat bombs

Photo credit: Laura Miner

Strawberry Cheesecake Fat Bombs

These fat bombs taste like mini strawberry cheesecakes. They are low-carb and so easy to make with just four ingredients. Using freeze-dried strawberries is key to making these rich and creamy scoops extra flavorful. You can use fresh or frozen strawberries, but they can be watery.

Snack Bars

Anyone can enjoy these healthy snack bars. You can make this with pecans, macadamia nuts, or any keto-friendly nuts. With its sweet and salty taste, nutty flavor, and crunchy texture, you might want to prepare extra servings and keep them in an airtight container for up to 1-2 months at room temperature. No-hassle storage, easy to grab when you’re on the go.

Which of these snacks are you adding to your meal plan? We would love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

6 Healthy Snack Recipes Your Kids Will Enjoy

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Blueberry Cream Cheese Muffins for Breakfast, Brunch or Snacks

This content originally appeared on Low Carb Yum. Republished with permission.

When it comes to eating a low-carb diet, we often feel like we give up some of our favorite carb-filled recipes. But, it’s super easy to transition them to work with your new lifestyle.

Take for instance muffins. By subbing out all-purpose flour for cream cheese you are left with a keto version! Cream cheese is one of those staples that I always have on hand in my kitchen.

Cream cheese is a super versatile ingredient and a staple in many keto and low-carb homes. However, be sure to read the nutritional labels when you are shopping for cream cheese at your local grocery store. The amount of carbs varies from manufacture to manufacture.

Because of the high-fat content, cream cheese is sustainable on the keto diet, in moderation. Cream cheese is also high in Vitamin A.

These healthy blueberry cream cheese muffins are perfect to serve for breakfast or brunch.

blueberry cream cheese

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Blueberry Cheese Muffins

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These low-carb blueberry cheese muffins are more like cheesecake than muffins. They are gluten-free and can be eaten plain or with fruit and nuts on top.
Course Breakfast, brunch
Cuisine American
Keyword cheesecake, muffins
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 18 minutes
Total Time 28 minutes
Servings 12 people
Calories 155kcal

Ingredients

  • 16 ounces cream cheese
  • ½ cup low-carb sugar substitute or equivalent
  • 2 eggs adding 4 will lighten the texture (see note)
  • ¼ teaspoon xanthan gum optional
  • ½ teaspoon sugar-free vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup blueberries
  • ¼ cup sliced almonds

Instructions

  • Beat softened cream cheese with electric mixer until smooth and creamy.
  • Add sweetener, xanthan gum, eggs and vanilla.
  • Beat with mixer until well blended.
  • Fold in blueberries and almonds.
  • Spoon into 12 muffin molds lined with the papers.
  • Bake at 350°F for about 20 minutes or until set and tops just starting to brown. Cool and store in the refrigerator. Best served chilled.

Notes

Using room temperature cream cheese allows for a smooth cream cheese mixture.

Per reader comment, adding 4 eggs instead of two provides a much lighter cheesecake-like texture.

The following can be added in place of the blueberries:

  • sugar-free chocolate chips
  • raspberries
  • strawberries
  • blackberries
  • nuts
  • broken low carb cookie pieces

Instant Pot Directions:

Put the batter into half-pint jars with rings and lids, not tightened, just loose, and steam for 15 minutes, then NPR (natural pressure release) for 20 minutes.

Nutrition

Serving: 1muffin | Calories: 155kcal | Carbohydrates: 3g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 15g | Saturated Fat: 8g | Cholesterol: 69mg | Sodium: 134mg | Potassium: 78mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 547IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 47mg | Iron: 1mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Blueberry Cream Cheese Muffins Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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