Don’t Be Deceived: How Food Labels Mislead

People with diabetes have to be very conscientious about the foods they eat. This can sometimes be tricky in the world of 24/7 advertisements, fast-food billboards and commercials, and temptation around every corner.

Marketers and food conglomerates will try anything to appeal to an audience, even people with very specific nutritional needs, including people with diabetes.

The following food labels may be true, but they’re definitely deceiving. Next time you’re shopping or placing your takeaway order, be wary.

Gluten-Free

The explosion of gluten-free foods on the market has been a godsend for people living with Celiac disease. And because Celiac tends to affect people living with type 1 diabetes at higher rates, this is especially applicable to this population. There are, however, many misconceptions around gluten-free food.

Something being gluten-free doesn’t automatically make it “healthier” or even lower-carbohydrate. It simply means that the food was prepared without wheat proteins, a group of seed storage proteins found in certain cereal grains.

Prepackaged gluten-free foods can sometimes even have higher carbohydrate counts than foods containing gluten.

For example, Domino’s gluten-free pizza crust clocks in at 75 carbs (for a small pizza), whereas their crunchy thin crust pizza (for a small pizza) is only 67 carbs. If you’re Celiac, that’s great, but if you think going gluten-free will mean you’re automatically a low-carbohydrate eater, guess again.

Additionally, Domino’s gluten-free pizza dough contains the following ingredients: water, modified rice starch, rice flour, brown rice flour, potato starch, olive oil, potato flour, evaporated cane sugar, fresh yeast, honey, avicel (a “fat replacer”), salt, calcium propionate. These ingredients are not exactly the healthiest nor the cleanest.

No Sugar Added

A few years ago, the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) overhauled their food label protocol by adding more nuance to the “sugar” category. Now foods will be broken down into two categories:

  1. Total sugars
  2. Added sugars

There is no Daily (recommended) Value on food labels for total sugars because no official recommendation has been made for the total amount to eat in a day.

The Daily (recommended) Value for added sugars is 50 grams per day based on a 2,000 calorie daily diet.

This can be helpful for people with diabetes when they’re trying to decide what and how much to eat. It also distinguishes natural sugars, like those naturally found in fruit, milk, and vegetables, from added sugars, like the sugar, dextrose, or glucose added to popular children’s breakfast cereals, baked goods, and other sweets.

It’s healthier to choose a banana rather than two bowls of Cap’n Crunch, even if they have the same number of total sugar. But don’t be fooled! Just because something doesn’t have any added sugar doesn’t mean that it has no sugar (or no carbohydrates), and it definitely does not make it a low-carbohydrate food.

Fortified

If a food label says it’s been fortified or enriched, it simply means that nutrients have been artificially added to the product. For example, Vitamin D is often added to orange juice and milk, B Vitamins and Iron are often added to refined bread and granolas, and puddings, ice cream, and other children’s snacks are often fortified with Calcium.

But this doesn’t make any of these products inherently healthy. Be careful to read food labels and (especially) ingredient lists closely to make sure the “fortified” food you’re buying is worth it. You can always take a supplement of the Vitamin or Mineral you’re aiming to get, without the junk food accompanying it.

Organic

The organic food trend has hit the United States by storm, and as of February 2021, organic foods make up over 4% of overall food sales in the country. “Organic food” can be a few things:

According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), “produce can be called organic if it’s certified to have grown on soil that had no prohibited substances applied for three years prior to harvest. Prohibited substances include most synthetic fertilizers and pesticides.”

“As for organic meat, regulations require that animals are raised in living conditions accommodating their natural behaviors (like the ability to graze on pasture), fed 100% organic feed and forage, and not administered antibiotics or hormones.”

Organic may mean more natural, but it doesn’t necessarily mean a food is healthier. Some organic products may still be high in sugar, salt, fat or calories. For example, organic sugar is still sugar. An organic cookie might taste self-righteously good, but it’s still a cookie (and you’ll definitely still need to bolus for it).

Natural

One of the most misleading food claims is stating that something is “natural”. This is because there is no official guideline or definition from the FDA for what “natural” actually is, although the agency loosely has considered the term “natural” to mean that nothing artificial or synthetic has been included in, or has been added to, a food that would not normally be expected to be in that food (like artificial food coloring).

The FDA also did not consider whether the term “natural” should describe any nutritional or other health benefits.

“Natural” simply means that at one point, the manufacturer or food-processing plant worked with a natural source like soybeans, corn, or rice, all of which can be heavily processed and turned into unhealthy versions of themselves (most notably, types of digestible sugars!).

Some “natural” yet not the healthiest foods include:

  • Natural fruit juices
  • All-natural ice-cream
  • Natural dried fruits
  • Natural potato chips

Be careful not to correlate the word “natural” with “healthy,” especially if you have diabetes.

The Bottom Line

The easiest way to avoid being misled by food labels is to avoid processed foods altogether, and to enjoy whole foods (that have no ingredient lists!) instead. If you choose to eat packaged foods, have a keen eye for the ingredient list, know how to properly read the nutritional label, and be wary of deceiving food labels and trendy terms. Bon appétit!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Crustless Butternut Squash Tart

This content originally appeared on ForGoodMeasure. Republished with permission.

While technically a winter fruit, antioxidant-rich butternut squash is available year around either fresh from the farm or frozen. Embracing spring’s yellow blossoms, summer’s golden sun, autumn’s amber hues & winter’s hearty recipes – this flavorful, crustless tart is perfect any season as a savory breakfast or light dinner alongside fresh greens tossed in a snappy vinaigrette.

Crustless Butternut Squash Tart

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Crustless Butternut Squash Tart

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This flavorful, crustless tart is perfect any season as a savory breakfast or light dinner alongside fresh greens tossed in a snappy vinaigrette.
Course Breads and Baked Goods
Cuisine American
Keyword Butternut Squash
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours 10 minutes
Servings 8 slices
Calories 140kcal

Equipment

  • Immersion blender or processor

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups butternut squash peeled, seeded & cubed
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 egg yolks
  • ¼ cup heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons creme fraiche
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon white pepper
  • ¾ cup goat cheese*

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  • Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment.
  • Toss squash in olive oil and arrange on prepared baking sheet.
  • Roast for 40 minutes, until tender.
  • In a small bowl combine roasted squash, eggs, egg yolks, heavy cream, creme fraiche, salt and pepper.
  • Purée squash mixture, using an immersion blender or processor.
  • Grease a 9-inch pie dish with cooking spray.
  • Crumble goat cheese in prepared dish, distributing evenly.
  • Pour egg mixture over cheese.
  • Bake for 30 minutes.
  • Serve warm.

Notes

Naturally low-carb & gluten-free

*I prefer creamy Capricho de Cabra for this recipe

Nutrition

Calories: 140kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 11g | Cholesterol: 110mg | Sodium: 245mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

 

Crustless Butternut Squash Tart Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Review: RxSugar’s Zero-Carb Sugar and Syrups

It isn’t easy to find a natural sugar substitute that tastes good, keeps your blood sugars in check and doesn’t upset your stomach. I was pleasantly surprised to find RxSugar tasted great and was kind to both my blood sugars and my digestive system. I received RxSugar products free of charge, and all opinions are my own.

What Is RxSugar?

RxSugar is the first natural plant-based sugar that contains allulose and has been clinically proven to help support weight management and body fat reduction. It has 90% fewer calories than traditional table sugar, contains zero net carbs, and scores a zero on the glycemic index.

How Is RxSugar Different From Other Sugar Substitutes?

RxSugar, per the FDA, does not have to be listed on the Nutrition Facts label as a sugar or added sugar since it is not metabolized by the body like traditional sugar. Therefore, it does not significantly impact blood glucose levels.

Allulose is the only natural crystal alternative sugar that is patented non-GMO Certified and Tested, Keto Approved, FODMAP Friendly, Kosher, and Halal. It’s also naturally Vegan, Gluten-free, Grain-free, Soy-free, and Cholesterol-free.

How Does It Taste?

I was pleasantly surprised by the taste of RxSugar. It is about 70% as sweet as regular sugar, and I didn’t find it overpowering at all.

First, I tried their easy individual stick sugar packs in my coffee and found no weird aftertaste and no effects on my blood sugar or stomach. Next, I tried their sugar, which comes in an easy-to-use 1-pound canister, for some of my low-carb baking. I found it tasted great, with none of the cooling effect that some other sugar substitutes are known to have. And last but certainly not least, the syrups were the best sugar substitute that I have tried to date. For one breakfast, I sneakily replaced my daughter’s regular maple syrup with RxSugar’s pancake syrup, and she had no idea. She even asked for seconds! It is great knowing that my kids, who don’t eat as low-carb as me, can still enjoy their waffles and pancakes without so much added sugar. And for me, I enjoy making my own protein waffles and love that I can use this syrup liberally!

Where Can I Purchase It and How Much Does It Cost?

RxSugar products are now available nationwide in over 3,000 retailers, including Vitamin Shoppe; you can also order through their website. They offer granulated RxSugar in 1 pound canister or as a 30-pack of individual sticks (coming soon in a variety pack). The business also offers RxSugar in a liquid form, in addition to the pancake syrups, in both maple and chocolate flavors.

All of their products are $12.99, and the website offers free shipping on all orders over $40.

My Review

I thoroughly enjoyed all of the RxSugar products and will definitely be making them a staple in my house. The substitute sugar is great to have on hand for my coffee and baking, allowing me to enjoy delicious sweetness without worrying about my blood sugars. Additionally, the syrup has quickly become a family favorite, and I will be purchasing it for a long time to come. I can give RxSugar products my highest recommendation.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Lemon Broccoli Soup with Parmesan

This content originally appeared on ForGoodMeasure. Republished with permission.

Sometimes only soup will do. This recipe is perfect alongside a salad, as a wintry-inspired side to a meaty main, or best yet, solo on a cozy night. Filling, hearty … but not heavy. It comes together with little prep in about an hour, less if you opt out of adding the rind. Although, I highly recommend investing in this flavor-enhancing step — think of it as culinary upcycling.

Lemon Broccoli Soup with Parmesan

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Lemon Broccoli Soup with Parmesan

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This filling and hearty recipe is perfect alongside a salad, as a wintry-inspired side to a meaty main, or best yet, solo on a cozy night.
Course Soup
Cuisine American
Keyword Broccoli, lemon
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 12 cups
Calories 77kcal

Equipment

  • Immersion blender or processor

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 5 cups broccoli stems chopped
  • 2 cups celery chopped
  • 3 cups onion chopped
  • 8 teaspoons garlic minced
  • 6 cups vegetable stock low sodium
  • 1 Parmigiano-Reggiano rind
  • 4 cups broccoli florets
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice preferably Meyer
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • ¼ cup Parmigiano-Reggiano grated

Instructions

  • On medium heat, melt butter in a Dutch oven.
  • Add broccoli stems, celery, and onions, until softened.
  • Add garlic and stir until fragrant, about one minute.
  • Add vegetable stock and Parmigiano-Reggiano rind, stir to combine.
  • Cover and simmer for 50 minutes.
  • Add broccoli florets, simmer until just tender.
  • Add lemon juice, pepper, and salt, stir to combine.
  • Remove from heat and discard rind.
  • Puree soup, preserving some texture, using an immersion blender or processor.
  • Top with grated Parmigiano-Reggiano & serve.

Notes

  • Naturally low-carb & gluten-free
  • Net carbs: 8g

Nutrition

Serving: 1cup | Calories: 77kcal | Carbohydrates: 11g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 7mg | Sodium: 944mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 4g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Lemon Broccoli Soup with Parmesan Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

ChipMonk Keto Bites: A Decadent and Wholesome Dessert

It has been just over a year since I first reviewed the fabulous assortment of cookies offered by ChipMonk Baking, a new company dedicated to “bringing back keto dessert for so many people who are struggling with challenges like diabetes, the keto lifestyle, and celiac disease.”

The company has since expanded, now offering a variety of other goods, including keto bites, dry mixers, sweeteners, and more on their website. I recently had the opportunity to try out the Keto Bites, and overall, I was very impressed. I received the products at no charge and all opinions are my own.

What Are “Keto Bites”?

Keto bites, much like they sound, are very low-carb, high fat, bite sized desserts. Somewhere between a muffin and a brownie in texture, they are available in a variety of flavors, including:

They are made with almond flour, butter, and eggs, and include allulose and monk fruit as the sweeteners. Some other natural ingredients used include psyllium husk powder, konjac powder, and fibers from plant sources, such as lemon and Norwegian kelp. All products are gluten-free and come in at only 1-2 g net carbohydrate per bite!

My Review

I really liked these! They were filling and delicious and did not affect my blood glucose levels, requiring a minimal and predictable insulin bolus. My personal favorites were the Toasted Coconut and White Chocolate Macadamia flavors, whereas my four-year-old really liked the Chocolate Chip Pecan variety. Even my 1-year-old approved of these, which is saying a lot. He preferred the Peanut Butter ones.

Overall, I enjoyed the chewy texture and thoughts all the flavors were tasty. Most importantly, these were filling and very easy to manage blood sugar-wise. I also appreciate the wide assortment of flavors – something for everyone!

The price point wasn’t the lowest, at a bit over $1 per each bite. However, you get what you pay for, and the ingredients used, texture, and taste all delivered! I would recommend trying these out for anyone who has a sweet tooth but needs to be mindful of sugar and carbohydrate content for health reasons.

You can purchase these directly from the company website. Be sure to check out the FAQ section and read the multitude of positive reviews, as well.

Finally, for a longer shelf-life storage, consider storing them in the refrigerator.

Have you tried Chipmonk Baking products yet? Let us know your thoughts in the comments. Know of any other pre-packaged desserts that are easy on blood sugar levels? Please share!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Air Fryer Garlic Mushrooms

This content originally appeared here. Republished with permission.

It’s official. Cooking mushrooms in the air fryer is my new preferred way to make them. Why? Well, air frying mushrooms is faster than oven roasting, there’s less cleanup, and they taste absolutely perfect!

It’s for these same reasons I absolutely love cooking zucchini, sweet potato fries, and heck, even pork tenderloin in my air fryer!

And did I mention these air fryer garlic mushrooms are vegan, Whole 30, paleo, gluten-free, keto, low-carb, and WW friendly?

I know that’s a long list, but basically, all I’m saying is that this recipe works for lots and lots of different ways of healthy eating. So whatever diet your family is following, this is a side dish that would work for pretty much everyone!

Maybe the best thing about this recipe though is that it’ll turn even mushroom skeptics into mushroom lovers! Yup, it’s really that good!

air fryer mushrooms

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Air Fryer Garlic Mushrooms

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This mushroom recipe is a delicious side dish, made with just a few simple staple ingredients.
Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Keyword garlic, mushrooms
Servings 4 servings
Calories 76kcal

Equipment

  • Air Fryer

Ingredients

Garlic Mushrooms

  • 16 oz. baby bella mushrooms
  • 1.5 tablespoons oil of choice see variations below
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Asian-Inspired Variation, All Optional

  • 1.5 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 2  green onions  sliced

Italian-Inspired Variation, All Optional

  • 1.5 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon fresh parsley minced
  • 1 tablespoon coconut aminos

Instructions

  • Preheat the air fryer to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. If your air fryer doesn’t have a preheat setting, turn to 400 degrees and wait about 5 minutes for it to come to temperature.
  • Meanwhile, cut the mushrooms in half and mince the garlic.
  • Add the mushrooms, oil of choice, salt, and garlic to a large bowl. If using the optional balsamic vinegar or coconut aminos, add that in as well. Mix well to coat the mushrooms with the oil and seasonings.
  • Once the air fryer is hot, pour the seasoned mushrooms into the air fryer basket in a single layer. Although the mushrooms may touch (they’ll shrink a lot during cooking), be careful not to overcrowd the basket too much.
  • Close the air fryer and cook for 5 minutes, then stop to gently shake the basket or use a spatula to turn them.

    Air fry again for another 5-7 minutes, checking near the end of the cook time to make sure they aren’t overcooking.

  • Transfer the cooked mushrooms to a serving bowl or dish, garnish with green onions or parsley (if using), and serve!

Notes

To store leftovers: Transfer any leftovers to an airtight container, or transfer to a bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Store in the refrigerator for 3-4 days.

To reheat leftovers in the air fryer: Preheat the air fryer to 400 degrees Fahrenheit, then add leftovers to the air fryer basket. Cook for 3-4 minutes or until heated through and beginning to crisp up again.

*Nutrition information does not include optional ingredients.

Nutrition

Calories: 76kcal | Carbohydrates: 6g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 5g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Trans Fat: 1g | Sodium: 153mg | Potassium: 531mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 60IU | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 28mg | Iron: 1mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Air Fryer Garlic Mushrooms Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Hazelnut & Orange Dark Chocolate Bark

This content originally appeared on ForGoodMeasure. Republished with permission.

The pairing of chocolate and hazelnuts conjures up creamy, sweet Nutella for most palates. This recipe is about to rearrange your tastebuds. Found in prehistoric China, the hazelnut has shared a long, sacred history in Scandinavia, Scotland and Ireland. It entered the confectionary scene in Italy in the 1800s and has been a staple ever since. For our modern twist, we matched it against rich, dark chocolate and tangy orange zest with a sprinkling of sea salt for a delightful endnote.

Hazelnut & Orange Dark Chocolate Bark

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Hazelnut & Orange Dark Chocolate Bark

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Hazelnut matched against rich, dark chocolate and tangy orange zest with a sprinkling of sea salt for a delightful endnote.  
Course Dessert, Snack
Cuisine Italian
Keyword Chocolate, hazelnut, orange
Prep Time 15 minutes
Waiting Time 30 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 16 servings
Calories 166kcal

Ingredients

  • 9 ounces dark chocolate 85%
  • 1 cup hazelnuts skins removed & chopped **
  • ¼ cup orange zest finely sliced
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt

Instructions

  • Line a small rimmed baking sheet with parchment, refrigerate.
  • Break apart chocolate into small pieces.
  • Set a double boiler over medium heat. *
  • Add chocolate pieces and stir occasionally until melted.
  • Remove from heat and add ½ cup hazelnuts & ⅛ cup orange zest, stirring until combined.
  • Pour chocolate mixture onto prepared sheet.
  • Sprinkle remaining hazelnuts, orange zest & sea salt over surface.
  • Refrigerate for 30 minutes, until set.
  • Break into quarter-sized pieces.
  • Store refrigerated in an airtight container.

Notes

Naturally low-carb & gluten-free

Net carbs: 3g

* If you do not have a double boiler, simmer a few inches of water in a medium saucepan, fit a glass bowl inside, ensuring water does not enter the container.

** To remove bitter skins, heat oven to 400 degrees. Lay hazelnuts in a single-layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast for 10-15 minutes, until skins have darkened, mindful not to burn nuts. Place roasted nuts in a clean kitchen towel & rub until skins flake off. Repeat roast and rub process until all skins are removed.

Nutrition

Serving: 2tbsp | Calories: 166kcal | Carbohydrates: 6g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 14g | Sodium: 41mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 4g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Hazelnut & Orange Dark Chocolate Bark Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Keto Nutella Fat Bombs

This content originally appeared here. Republished with permission.

Fat bombs are bite-sized snacks that are sugar-free, very low in carbohydrates, and high in fat, and they can be sweet or savory. They’re usually designed to help keep you in ketosis, but you don’t have to be in ketosis to enjoy fat bombs. Our bodies need fat to thrive, so there’s an easy Paleo-friendly adaptation included below.

And what better way to enjoy a fat bomb than with the famous flavors of Nutella! Nutty, earthy, and distinct hazelnut flavor paired with rich chocolate are what give Nutella its nutella-ness, and those foods are both keto and Paleo-friendly. Just add some creamy coconut oil and whatever sweetener you prefer, depending on if you’d prefer to keep it keto or Paleo, and you’re in business!

This dessert is gluten-free, grain-free, and refined sugar-free. So no matter who you’re cooking for, there’s something for everyone to love!

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Keto Nutella Fat Bombs

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Made in the blender with just four ingredients, these are the perfect no-bake treat or dessert!
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Keyword fat bombs, nutella
Prep Time 10 minutes
Resting Time 30 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 12 servings
Calories 182kcal

Equipment

  • High speed blender or food processor

Ingredients

  • 1 cup hazelnut butter
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup cocoa powder or substitute cacao powder + 1/4 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 3 – 3.5 tbsp monk fruit sweetener swerve (erythritol), or xylotol, or substitute any Paleo or Keto friendly sweetener of choice – see notes below for more options.
  • 1/2 tsp flakey sea salt optional
  • 1 tbsp chopped hazelnuts optional

Instructions

  • Add all ingredients to a high speed blender or food processor. Blend until completely smooth.
  • Pour the mixture into 12 lined muffin cups and transfer to the refrigerator. If you aren’t using muffin cups, transfer the mixture to a bowl and set in the refrigerator.
  • Allow the fat bombs to chill for at least 30 minutes. Remove the fat bombs from the muffin cups or scoop from the bowl into small 1-2 inch balls. Sprinkle with flakey sea salt and hazelnuts, if using. Keep chilled in the refrigerator or freezer until you're ready to serve, and enjoy!

Notes

Keto-friendly sweetener substitutions: 1/4 tsp liquid stevia.

Paleo sweetener options: 4 dates, 4 tablespoons maple syrup, or 4 tablespoons agave.

To store: Transfer to an airtight container and store in the refrigerator for 2-4 weeks or freezer for 1-2 months. Keep chilled until serving.

Nutrition

Calories: 182kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 18g | Saturated Fat: 6g | Sodium: 1mg | Potassium: 163mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 25mg | Iron: 1mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Keto Nutella Fat Bombs Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Feta and Roasted Red Pepper Dip

This content originally appeared on ForGoodMeasure. Republished with permission.

In my humble opinion, picnics are ubiquitous with summer & no al fresco dining experience is complete without crisp, crunchy vegetables & an accompanying dip. Here’s one of our favorites. A simplified version of Greek Ktipiti, this recipe combines the briny tang of fresh feta with the sweet, slightly smokey undernote of roasted red bell peppers. Cutting the traditional heat allows the flavor of an accompanying crudités to shine through, although you could always jazz things up with a dash of hot sauce or pinch of red chili flakes.

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Feta & Roasted Red Pepper Dip

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This recipe combines the briny tang of fresh feta with the sweet, slightly smokey undernote of roasted red bell peppers.
Course Dip
Cuisine Greek
Calories 84kcal

Equipment

  • Food processor

Ingredients

  • 2 red bell peppers halved & seeded
  • 1 cup feta cheese crumbled
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon garlic minced
  • teaspoon black pepper
  • teaspoon salt

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  • Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment.
  • Arrange halved peppers cut-side down on baking sheet.
  • Locate a glass or ceramic bowl large enough when inverted to cover the peppers, set aside.
  • Roast peppers for 40 minutes, until skins are soft & blackened.
  • Invert bowl over charred peppers, creating a steam bath.
  • After 15 minutes, remove the charred skins from the peppers.
  • Using the processor, combine the skinned peppers, feta cheese, olive oil, garlic, black pepper and salt, until thick and creamy.
  • Chill before serving.

Notes

Naturally low-carb & gluten-free.

Nutrition

Serving: 2tbsp | Calories: 84kcal | Carbohydrates: 2g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 8g | Cholesterol: 17mg | Sodium: 485mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Feta and Roasted Red Pepper Dip Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Gobble Review: Make Tasty Meals Without the Hassle

As many of us continue to stay at home more than usual, finding new ways to make creative, easy and healthy dinners is a priority for many. Recently, I tried out a meal kit delivery service from Gobble and thought I would share my thoughts as a mom of two living with type 1 diabetes.

I received the products at no charge and all opinions are my own.

Who They Are

Gobble is a meal kit delivery service that aims to make delicious, home-cooked meals fast and easy to prepare. Everything you need is sent out perfectly portioned, and each meal takes about 15 minutes to make. They offer a great variety of dinner menus and incorporate a lot of classic dishes that can please all kinds of palates, including kids’!

Services Offered

You can select from the traditional Gobble box dinner plan that features classic dishes, or opt for the Lean and Clean version, which features “lean proteins, healthy fats, and under 600 calories per serving” while still delivering the “and convenience and flavors of Gobble’s 15-minute dinner kits.”

For each option, you can select to have dinner delivered for either two or four people, either three or four days per week. You can customize your choices, and request accommodations for dairy-, nut-, and gluten-free items. Meals start as low as $11.99 per serving, and you can skip deliveries or cancel your subscription hassle-free.

My Review

I tried out three different meals from Gobble and was impressed with all of them:

Pan-Roasted Chicken with Green Bean Casserole & Mashed Potatoes: This one was a classic and rustic choice. We all enjoyed it, and I just skipped the mashed potatoes, to make life easier for blood sugar management. The green bean casserole was delicious and the skin on the chicken came out super crispy! My husband and four-year-old daughter loved it, too!

Miso-Glazed Salmon with (Soba) Noodles & Snow Peas: I am the fish-eater in the family, so I was thrilled to receive a well-portioned a fresh-looking piece of skin-on Salmon. Again, preparation was easy-to-follow, and quick, and the meal came out great! One caveat: I substituted my own edamame noodles in place of the Soba noodles to keep the carb count down. Delicious!

Citrus Chicken & Broccoli Stir Fry: This meal was an option from the “Lean and Clean” plan, and it was super quick to make! Most of the dinners I eat are basically some protein and non-starchy vegetables, so this was right up my alley. The sauce was a bit sweet, but I used it sparingly and was able to enjoy this filling and delicious meal without a blood sugar spike, which is always a win!

Summary

The two big factors that make the Gobble meal kit delivery service a winner in my book are:

  • They do not skimp on the protein!
  • The meals are really quick and easy to make (and most importantly, taste great, of course!)

Do you use a meal kit delivery service? Have you tried Gobble? How has your experience been? Please share your thoughts in the comments; we love hearing from our readers!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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