8 Spooky but Diabetes-Friendly Halloween Recipes

Everyone talks about treats during Halloween, which can be frustrating for those who regularly carb count. Fortunately, you can still celebrate the occasion without the sugar overload. You just need to get your creative juices flowing while preparing any of the low-carb recipes below.

Photo credit: Corina Nielsen

Spooky Mini Cheesecake Ghost Bites

If you’re looking for an alternative to candies and sweets during Halloween, these no-bake, fluffy, and flavorful ghost bites won’t disappoint. It takes 15 minutes to prepare them and an hour or two to set in the refrigerator. If you have kids, let them add the chocolate chips for the eyes.

Bloody Pumpkin Peppers

Carve a face into your bell pepper before filling it with the ground meat mixture. When cooked, it will look like an aging Jack-o-Lantern. Top it with mozzarella and marinara sauce, and you seemingly have brains and blood oozing out of Jack’s head.

sugar-free mummy recipe

Photo credit: Cat Martin

Halloween Cookie Dough Mummy Treats

Turn your edible cooking dough into something creepy but fun. Shape the dough into small ovals and cover them with layers of melted sugar-free white chocolate. You can make them ahead of time and store them in the fridge for your trick-or-treaters!

Graveyard Chicken Enchilada Dip

If you opt for something Mexican to celebrate Halloween, try this chicken enchilada dip. It’s easy to make, flexible, and addictively delicious. Decorate it with keto or low-carb crackers as tombstones for the eerie feel.

witches finger breadstick

Photo credit: Denise Wright

Witch Finger Breadsticks

Make these witch finger breadsticks with fathead dough, basil, and garlic for snacks. The breadsticks are tasty as they are, but if you’re craving for tomato flavor, you can dip them in marinara sauce.

Halloween Cucumber Spiders

This may seem fiddly to prepare, but your kids will love decorating your sliced cucumbers with olive spiders. If you want to divert their attention from sweets to something equally fun and delicious, a kitchen session with this recipe can be a terrific way to go.

spooky deviled eggs

Photo credit: Lindsay Cotter

Deviled Egg Eyeballs

If you’re thinking of having deviled eggs as a healthy appetizer for Halloween, you might as well get creative and make its spooky version. You only need to add green or black olives for the eyes, and then sprinkle paprika or add chili sauce to make it look bloodshot.

Eggplant Jack-O-Lantern Pizzas

This is another recipe your kids will love. Bake eggplant slices, add sauce and cheese for flavor, and then decorate them with Jack-o-Lantern faces using sliced pepperoni, ham, or bacon. The best thing about this nutritious pizza? No kneading and rolling needed!

What other interesting Halloween recipes do you recommend for those following a low-carb diet? Share with us how you celebrate this occasion at the dining table.

Diabetes-Friendly Halloween Recipes

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How to Handle Halloween for Children with Diabetes

It’s that time of year again: the leaves are falling, the temperatures are dropping, and all things scary and spooky are on store shelves. While pumpkin picking and catching a hay ride are (for all intents and purposes) “low carbohydrate” activities, trick-or-treating can be anything but. So, how do you handle Halloween with a young child with diabetes? Do you allow them to “be a kid” for an evening, and go all out on the chocolate and sugar spike? Or do you limit them to a few, portion-controlled treats, with a food scale nearby? While there’s no one right answer to this question, here are some helpful tips to make your Halloween a little less spooky this year.

Take the Focus Away from Food

This is helpful for all children, for all holidays. No holiday needs to be 100% about the food, especially for a child with diabetes. For Halloween specifically, focus on carving pumpkins, watching scary movies, dressing up in really elaborate Halloween costumes, and yes, if you and your child wish, some candy, too.

Noelle from California says, “Our kiddo is three so our main focus is on creating traditions that will be helpful for her later on with type 1. For parties, I create treats that aren’t food-related.”

Lila from New York City says, “We completely avoid the candy thing. Trick or treating isn’t a huge deal in our neighborhood, so this hasn’t been an issue yet.”

Kate, from Pennsylvania, says, “We go out a little, but limit the number of stops. After we get home, we go through our candy, keeping only what we really, really like. The rest, we give to the Switch Witch, and she brings the girls a little present in the morning as an exchange for giving her their candy.” There’s even a book you can buy that helps explain the magic of the Switch Witch.

Create Unique Traditions

Perhaps you have a spooky, scary dance party or movie night on Halloween, or the whole family dresses up in matching costumes to go walking around the neighborhood. Maybe you bob for apples or roast pumpkin seeds after carving, or let your child have a few friends sleepover. Creating unique family traditions that are inclusive will be beneficial not only for your child now, but will be helpful as they grow up with type 1 diabetes.

Be Wary About Restrictions

Be cognizant about putting too many restrictions on candy for your child. Children with diabetes are much more likely to develop an unhealthy relationship with food. If your child really wants to indulge, just make sure they’re carbohydrate counting appropriately, and let them enjoy themselves (within moderation, of course). Most of the time children intuitively eat anyway, and don’t actually end up eating that much candy.

Melissa, from Iowa, says, “We bring any candy home and carb count it ahead of time, and then put a post-it note on each piece, so our daughter can dose appropriately whenever she’s hungry or wants a treat.”

Plan Ahead

Like all things diabetes-related, it helps to plan ahead. Make sure your child eats dinner with some protein and fat before going trick-or-treating, so they’re not just eating sugar on an empty stomach, which can cause the roller coaster effect. Make sure you know where and how far they’ll be walking, or better yet, walk along with them. Have your child carry low snacks (they shouldn’t solely rely on candy that won’t have any nutrition facts or carbohydrate information on it), and make sure they’re drinking plenty of water. It’s helpful if your child also has fresh continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and insulin pump sites on, but not absolutely necessary.

Hannah says, “Planning ahead a learning to navigate holidays with type 1 diabetes is critical and so empowering once you find what works for you and your family.”

Don’t Stress the Small Stuff!

It’s important to remember that Halloween is only one night, and you shouldn’t stress the small stuff. Some parents of children with diabetes shy away from candy, while others let them indulge, and there is no one right answer. Do what works for you and your family, but don’t let the stress of one holiday ruin the evening for you and your child. Relax and let them have fun! They’ll be doing so much running around anyway that you’ll be glad they had the extra “low snacks” on them anyway.

Lija, from Minnesota, says, “We don’t do anything different for my type 1 and non-type 1, and it works out fine. We find that she tends to go low while out trick or treating, so she just eats and boluses a little while out; it isn’t actually a difficult holiday for us!”

The key is finding what works for you. There are no right or wrong answers. Here’s to a happy, spooky Halloween! Hopefully the candy (and subsequent blood sugars) are the least scary part.

How do you and your family handle Halloween in a household affected by diabetes? What tactics and strategies have helped you manage appropriately? Share your experience in the comment section below; we love hearing from our readers!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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