Five Reasons Why I Choose Multiple Daily Injections

Since the day I was diagnosed, I have had people telling me I should consider an insulin pump. Seven and a half years later, I still say no. My A1c has always been in a healthy range, and I am fine with only having one device, the Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitor (CGM), on my body. I know pumpers rave about their tight control and I am truly amazed by the pump’s capabilities, even more so now with the new features on the Medtronic 670G. However, I prefer a KwikPen, which is true to its word — it is quick and easy and just the way I like it!

Here are my five top reasons for being on team MDI (multiple daily injections):

1. No Kinks or Knots

I constantly hear stories of people waking up with a blood sugar in the 300s, and they had no idea. This is because there was a kink or knot in their tubing and the insulin wasn’t getting into their body all night long. Yes, if they are wearing a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), it should have alerted them, but that sounds like a pain you don’t get from the poke of a pen!

2. Fewer Bruises and Scar Tissue

Don’t get me wrong, the pokes of 6-8 injections a day does add up, and I do have bruises on my body. But have you seen the needle on those pump infusion sets? They are a lot longer and thicker than my Humalog pen. Also, the cannula stays in your body, therefore, leaving much larger holes. This means more bumps and bruises and also means more scar tissue.

3. No Crazy Calculations

As I mentioned above, I am amazed at what a pump can do. It can give you a precise amount of insulin right down to the decimal point. It can also tell you what your insulin on board (IOB) is. My pen can’t do either of these things! However, I do use Humalog Luxura, which is a half-unit pen so I can get more accurate dosing. Also, I mostly eat low-carb, so my dose is usually between 1-3 units. I prefer not having to count every carb I consume; math is not my strong suit!

4. Quick and Easy

KwikPens are quick and easy and take one second to use! I compare these seconds of my day to a lifetime of walking around with another device attached to me, tubing included, and that’s just not for me. Between CrossFit and being a mom, the tubing would not be kind to me.

5. I Don’t Have to Carry Around My Pancreas

When people first recommended the pump, I really only focused on not wanting to wear something else attached to my body. What I didn’t consider was the fact that I would have to actually carry around my new pancreas! When I went to my first type one weightlifting event, Bolus & Barbells, I was so surprised to see everyone with their phones in one hand and their stand-in organ in the other. I imagine that showering and going to the bathroom is a little more challenging than it is for the average Joe!

Photo by Allison Caggia

While I know there are many benefits to wearing a pump; it is just not something I am considering at this time. For me, the fewer reminders of this disease, the better. And with another device attached to me, especially with tubing, I would feel tethered. If I were to consider a pump, it would be the Omnipod since it is tubeless. For now, I will remain loyal to team MDI.

Are you someone who is on multiple daily injections and won’t have it any other way? Or are you someone who was MDI and made the switch to a pump and are glad you did? Share your story!

A previous version of this post has been updated.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Review of TempraMed VIVI Cap 1: Reusable Insulin Cooler Cap

The TempraMed VIVI Cap 1 is a reusable insulin cap cooler that promises to keep your insulin safe in extreme weather – protecting it from both hot and cold. Your insulin won’t overheat, and it won’t freeze. This is a great tool for the hot summer months or the dead of the winter. Wouldn’t you like to stop worrying about your insulin and just live in the moment?

What Does It Do?

This device offers supercharged insulation for your insulin pen.

The VIVI Cap 1 is scientifically proven to keep your insulin at room temperature, which allows you to spend time in extreme weather conditions without worrying about your insulin going bad. With a built-in temperature sensor and a temperature indicator, you can rest assured that your insulin will stay cool and safe.

VIVI Cap 1 is a simple solution that is easy to use and requires no maintenance. Just discard the cap that comes with your regular insulin pen, and slide the pen into the VIVI Cap 1. It will click into place, and you’re ready to take it along as you would normally. It doesn’t require any re-charging, no water, no ice – you’re good to go! When you’re done with your pen, just slide a new one into the cap.

How Can I Get VIVI Cap 1 and How Much Does it Cost?

You can purchase TempaMed’s VIVI Insulin Cap Cooler directly off their website. You can also make use of your FSA/HSA when purchasing this product.

VIVI Cap 1 costs $95 dollars and comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee if you are not pleased. It also comes with a 3-year warranty.

The company graciously offered our readers a 15% off each purchase discount code: DDAILY

The VIVI cap is compatible with many different insulin pens:

Pre-Filled Pens

  • FlexPen
  • NovoLog | NovoLog Mix | Levemir | Victoza |  NovoRapid | Insulin Aspart | Novolin R
  • FlexTouch
  • NovoLog |  NovoRapid | Tresiba (Degludec)  | Fiasp | Levemir U-100 & U-200 | Saxenda | Ryzodeg | Xultophy | Ozempic
  • KwikPen
  • Humalog | Humalog U-100 & U-200 | Humalog Jr | Humalog Mix |  Basaglar | Humulin Mix | Humulin | Humalog R U-500 | Lyumjev U-100 & U-200 | Insulin Lispro U-100
  • Solostar
  • Apidra | Lantus | Admelog | Soliqua

Refillable Pens

  • Eli Lilly
  • Luxura | Luxura HD | Ergo II | Savvio
  • Novo Nordisk
  • NovoPen 4 | NovoPen 5 | NovoPen Echo
  • Sanofi
  • ClickSTAR
  • Medtronic / Companion Medical
  • InPen

My Review

I think VIVI Cap 1 is a great product for anyone using pens for multiple daily injections. I’ve tried other insulin insulation products, but most require ice packs, water, batteries, or cords, all minor annoyances that I’d strongly prefer to do without. This product is extremely lightweight and can easily fit into a small purse or pocket, no problem. It was easy to set up and didn’t add any fuss.

Sometimes my blood sugar is erratic, and when I troubleshoot I realize that my insulin has lost effectiveness due to extreme temperature exposure. This product can help avoid that issue and save you money and a headache as well! I highly recommend giving this product a try!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Insulin at 100, Part 3: Insulin’s Uncertain Future

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

This is Part 3 of James S. Hirsch’s exploration of the riveting history of insulin, on the occasion of its 100th birthday.

Part 1: The Discovery

Part 2: Failed Promises, Bold Breakthroughs

Insulin’s Uncertain Future

Insulin

Image source: Emily Ye, Diabetes Daily

As further refinements in insulin occurred, the insulin narrative should have become even more powerful – that insulin not only saves people, but in reaching new pharmacological heights, it is allowing patients to live healthier, better, and more productive lives. These should be insulin’s glory days – as well as days of unprecedented commercial opportunity. According to the International Diabetes Federation, in 2019, the global population of people with diabetes had increased a staggering 63 percent in just nine years – to 463 million patients.

Insulin sales should be booming, with a new generation of Elizabeth Evans Hughes and Eva Saxls to tell the story. In fact, insulin sales are declining, and insulin has no spokespeople. Reasons vary for these developments, but one fact is undeniable: insulin has lost its halo.

Insulin is still essential for any person with type 1 diabetes, though even with type 1 patients, insulin is sometimes under-prescribed as doctors fear getting sued over a severe hypoglycemic incident. The belief is that patients are responsible for high blood sugars, doctors for low blood sugars.

Where insulin has lost its appeal is with type 2 patients, which has driven the diabetes epidemic in the U.S and abroad. According to the CDC, from 2000 to 2018, America’s diabetes population surged 185 percent, from 12 million to 34.2 million, and an estimated 90 percent to 95 percent of that cohort has type 2. (The global percentage is similar.) These patients have long had options other than insulin – metformin, introduced in 1995, remains the ADA’s recommended first-line agent. But as a progressive disease, type 2 diabetes, in most cases, will eventually require a more intensive glucose-lowering therapy. Nothing achieves that objective better than insulin, but insulin is delayed or spurned entirely by many type 2 patients.

Some concerns are longstanding; namely, that insulin can lead to weight gain because patients now retain their nutrients. Some type 2 patients wrongly associate insulin with personal failure surrounding diet or exercise, so they want to avoid the perceived stigma of insulin. Some people just don’t like injections. Meanwhile, other patients associate insulin with the medication that an ailing patient takes shortly before they die: insulin as a precursor to death. Some clinicians who care for Hispanic patients refer to insulin pens as las plumas to avoid using a word that carries so much baggage.

What’s striking is how dramatically the cultural narrative has changed, from insulin the miracle drug to insulin the medical curse. And where are the commercials, the movies, the documentaries, and the splashy publicity campaigns about the wonders of insulin? They don’t exist.

The greatest impact on insulin use in type 2 diabetes has been the emergence of a dozen new classes of diabetic drugs. These include incretin-based therapies known as GLP-1 agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors (introduced in the 2000s) as well as SGLT-2 inhibitors (introduced in 2014). diaTribe has covered these therapies extensively, and their brands are all over TV: Trulicity, Jardiance, Invokana, and more. They all seem to have funky names, and like insulin, they can all lower blood sugars but – depending on which one is used – some have other potential advantages, such as weight loss. (Some have possible disadvantages as well, including nausea.)

The expectations for these drugs were always high, but what no one predicted was that GLP-1 agonists and SGLT-2 inhibitors have been shown to reduce the risk of both heart and kidney disease – findings that are a boon to type 2 patients, who are at higher risk of these diseases. These findings, however, were completely accidental to the original mission of these therapies.

Insulin, the miracle drug, has been eclipsed by drugs that are even more miraculous!

Consider Eli Lilly, whose Humalog is the market-leading insulin in the United States. In 2020, Humalog sales fell 7 percent, to $2.6 billion, while Trulicity, its GLP-1 agonist, saw its sales increase by 23 percent, to $5 billion.

That’s consistent with the global insulin market. Worldwide insulin sales in 2020 declined by 4 percent, to $19.4 billion, marking the first time since 2012 that global insulin sales fell below $20 billion.

It’s quite stunning. Amid a global diabetes epidemic, and with the purity, stability, and quality of insulin better than ever, insulin sales are falling. (Pricing pressures from insurers and government payers have also taken a revenue toll.) In 2019, Sanofi announced that it was going to discontinue its research into diabetes, even though its Lantus insulin had been a blockbuster for years. More lucrative opportunities now lay elsewhere.

Falling sales may not be the insulin companies’ biggest problem. Public scorn is. Though the insulins kept getting better, the prices kept rising, forcing many patients to ration their supplies, seek cheaper alternatives in Canada or Mexico, or settle for inferior insulins. Some patients have died for lack of insulin. According to a 2019 study from the nonprofit Health Care Cost Institute, the cost of insulin nearly doubled for type 1 patients in the United States between 2012 and 2016 – they paid, on average, $5,705 a year for insulin in 2016, compared to $2,864 in 2012.

Many patients are outraged and have used social media to rally support – one trending hashtag was #makeinsulinaffordable. Patient advocates have traveled to Eli Lilly’s headquarters to protest. In March of this year, nine Congressional Democrats demanded that the Federal Trade Commission investigate insulin price collusion among Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk, and Sanofi, asserting they “are using their stranglehold on the market to drive up costs.” The letter notes that as many as one in four Americans who need insulin cannot afford it, and at least 13 Americans have died in recent years because of insulin rationing.

The criticism has been unsparing. In April 2019, in a hearing for the U.S. House of Representatives on insulin affordability, Democrats and Republicans alike pilloried the insulin executives. At one point, Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Illinois) said to them, “I don’t know how you people sleep at night.”

Insulin is hardly the only drug whose price has soared, but as the Washington Post noted last year, insulin is “a natural poster child of pharmaceutical greed.”

In response, the insulin companies have adopted payment assistance programs to help financially strapped consumers. They also blame the middlemen in the system – the PBMs, or the Pharmaceutical Benefit Managers – for high insulin prices, who in turn blame the insulin companies, and everyone blames the insurers, who point the finger at the companies and the PBMs.

Drug pricing in America is so convoluted it’s impossible for any patient to accurately apportion blame, but the history of insulin explains in part why the companies have come under such attack. When Banting made his discovery, he sold the patent to the University of Toronto for $1. He said that insulin was a gift to humankind and should be made available to anyone who needs it. Insulin was always profitable for Eli Lilly and the few other companies who made it, and critics have complained that the companies found ways to protect their patents by making incremental improvements in the drug.

But for years, those complaints were easily dismissed. The companies were revered for their ability to mass produce – and improve – a lifesaving drug that symbolized the pinnacle of scientific discovery while doing so at prices that were affordable.

When prices became unaffordable – and regardless of blame – the companies were seen as betraying the very spirit in which insulin was discovered and produced, and their fall from grace has few equivalents in corporate history.

Is the criticism fair?

Hard to say, but even the companies would acknowledge that they’ve squandered much good will. Personally, I’m the last person to bash the insulin companies – they’ve kept me and members of family alive for quite some time. Collectively, my brother, my son, and I have been taking insulin for 117 years, so I feel more regret than anger: regret that at least one insulin executive didn’t stand up and say loudly and clearly:

“Insulin is a public good. No one who needs it will be without it. And we will make it easy for you.”

Insulin

Image source: Emily Ye, Diabetes Daily

Whatever that would cost in dollars would be made up for in good will – and such a public commitment would honor the many anonymous men, women, and children, before 1921 and after, who gave their lives to this disease.

The next chapter for insulin? It will almost certainly include continued improvements. Both Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk are trying to develop a once-a-week basal insulin to replace the current once-a-day options – that would be a major advance is reducing the hassle factor in care. Research also continues on a glucose-sensitive insulin, in which the insulin would only take effect when your blood sugar rises. That would be a breakthrough, but investigators have spent decades trying to make it work.

Since its discovery, the ultimate goal of insulin has been to make it disappear, as that would mean diabetes has been cured. It turns out that insulin therapy may indeed disappear someday, even if no cure is found. Since its discovery, the ultimate goal of insulin has been to make it disappear, as that would mean diabetes has been cured. It turns out that insulin therapy may indeed disappear someday, even if no cure is found.

Stem-cell therapy has long held promise in diabetes – specifically, making insulin-producing beta cells from stem cells, which the body would either tolerate on its own (perhaps by encapsulating the cells) or through immunosuppressant drugs. Progress has been halting but is now evident. Douglas Melton began his research in this area in 1991, and in 2014, he reported that his lab was able to turn human stem cells into functional pancreatic beta cells. The company that Melton created for the effort was acquired by Vertex Pharmaceuticals, and earlier this year, Vertex announced that it had received approval to begin a clinical trial on a “stem-cell derived, fully differentiated pancreatic islet cell therapy” to treat type 1 diabetes. Another company, ViaCyte, also announced this year that it will begin phase 2 of a clinical trial using encapsulated cells in hopes that they will mature into insulin-secreting beta cells.

It may take 10 to 15 years, but leaders in the field are cautiously optimistic that a cell-based therapy will someday provide a better option than insulin.

Diabetes would survive, but the therapy once touted as its cure would be dead.

Because I have a soft spot for happy endings – and because so much of own life has been intertwined with insulin – I have my own vision for insulin’s last hurrah.

A group of researchers in Europe are conducting a clinical trial to prevent type 1 diabetes. Called the Global Platform for the Prevention of Autoimmune Diabetes, the initiative began in 2015, and researchers are testing newborns who are at risk of developing type 1 to see if prevention is possible.

And what treatment are they using?

Oral insulin.

Like the discovery of insulin itself, this effort is a longshot, but if it works, insulin will have eradicated diabetes – a fitting coda for a medical miracle.

I want to acknowledge the following people who helped me with this article: Dr. Mark Atkinson, Dr. David Harlan, Dr. Irl Hirsch, Dr. David Nathan, Dr. Jay Skyler, and Dr. Bernard Zinman. Some material in this article came from my book, “Cheating Destiny: Living with Diabetes.”

About James

James S. Hirsch, a former reporter for The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, is a best-selling author who has written 10 nonfiction books. They include biographies of Willie Mays and Rubin “Hurricane” Carter; an investigation into the Tulsa race riot of 1921; and an examination of our diabetes epidemic. Hirsch has an undergraduate degree from the University of Missouri School of Journalism and a graduate degree from the LBJ School of Public Policy at the University of Texas. He lives in the Boston area with his wife, Sheryl, and they have two children, Amanda and Garrett. Jim has worked as a senior editor and columnist for diaTribe since 2006.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Insulin at 100, Part 2: Failed Promises, Bold Breakthroughs

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By James S. Hirsch

Insulin

Image source: diaTribe

The discovery of insulin in 1921 was heralded as the cure for diabetes. The reality was different.

Insulin, to be sure, could temporarily lower blood sugars to near-normal ranges, but it could also cause hypoglycemia – blood sugars that are too low – that could lead to shakiness and confusion or, in extreme cases, seizures, loss of consciousness, or death. Insulin was a daily, self-administered drug, but if used incorrectly, it could kill a patient just as well as it could save a patient. No self-administered therapy, before or since, has quite those same attributes.

What’s more, insulin’s therapeutic powers were overestimated. Yes, insulin lowered blood sugars, but maintaining near-normal levels was still very difficult – and elevated blood glucose over time was still dangerous. As a result, by the middle of the 1930s, patients who were taking insulin began developing serious complications caused by elevated glucose levels, including damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and heart. Insulin hadn’t cured anything but had turned diabetes from a deadly condition into a chronic condition, and a perilous one at that. At the dawn of the insulin age and for many decades thereafter, even those who understood the importance of maintaining near-normal blood sugars did not have the tools to do so. Blood sugar levels were measured by proxy through urine tests, in which samples had to be boiled for three minutes. Simpler methods were developed by the 1940s, but home glucose monitoring was not available until the late 1970s.

Until then, patients – unaware of their blood sugar levels – gave themselves insulin doses flying blind.

But few people outside the diabetes world knew about the daily rigors and risks of the disease – not only because it affected a relatively small percentage of people but also because the insulin narrative was too powerful.

Diabetes, after all, had been cured or at least resolved. That’s what all the pictures showed. That’s what the headlines blared. And that’s what the ads promoted.

Eli Lilly’s ads, for example, initially touted insulin as “An Epoch in the History of Medicine” and later featured a beautiful bride on her wedding day, kissing her beaming father, with the tagline, “Our favorite picture of insulin.”

Even that picture paled in comparison to the astonishing newspaper and magazine stories about insulin, and not just those about Elizabeth Evans Hughes. Insulin was a redemptive tale about science and survival.

Eva and Victor Saxl were Czech immigrants who fled to Shanghai during World War II. There, Eva was diagnosed with diabetes, and when her insulin supplies ran short, Victor, a textile engineer, found a book that described how to make insulin and, using the animal organs from a nearby slaughterhouse, brewed up enough insulin for his wife to survive. After the war, they immigrated to the United States, and when their story was discovered, they soon found themselves on numerous radio and television shows, including Edward R. Murrow’s, and a movie was also produced – about a husband’s devotion to his wife, expressed through the salvation of insulin.

Other life-saving medical breakthroughs occurred – antibiotics in the 1940s, the polio vaccine in the 1950s – and these would treat more people than insulin. But the unique circumstances of insulin’s discovery, with the young, untested scientists finding the potion that would bring children back from the brink of death, was too dramatic to ignore. In 1988, that story was the subject of a television movie on Masterpiece Theater called “Glory Enough for All,” based on Michael Bliss’s definitive book, “The Discovery of Insulin.”

I watched the movie on PBS when it was released, and it featured the brawling Toronto researchers – Banting and Collip literally came to blows over control of the experiments. But ultimately, the movie was about the triumph of medical science in saving dying children, and among the researchers, there was “glory enough for all.”

And then the movie ended.

There was nothing about living with diabetes – about the wildly fluctuating blood sugars, about the relentless demands, about the injections and the doctor visits and the complications, about the dietary restrictions, about the stigma and the isolation and the limitations of insulin.

“Glory Enough for All” was introduced by Alistair Cooke. An American-born Brit with a silver tongue, Cooke was enthralled not only by insulin’s inspirational story but also by the phrase “islets of Langerhans,” used to describe the island of pancreatic cells discovered by Paul Langerhans. “Islets of Langerhans” just rolled off Alistair Cooke’s tongue. To him, insulin was not just a miracle. It was poetry.

The lyrical beauty of insulin was lost on patients. Many of them, in fact, were frustrated that their own stories weren’t being heard. The parents of young patients were frustrated as well.

In 1970, a professional singer in Philadelphia, Lee Ducat, had a 10-year-old boy with type 1 diabetes, and she was miffed by the breezy disregard of his doctor, who told her that “insulin was the cure.” Ducat knew that wasn’t true, so with several other parents, she formed the first chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation (which is now the JDRF). Other parents soon opened chapters in New York, Washington, New Jersey, and Miami, and their mission was to educate the public about the stark challenges of diabetes in hopes of raising money and finding a cure.

They had no use for the American Diabetes Association, which was founded in 1940 and for many years was little more than a social club and referral service for physicians. As far as the parents were concerned, the ADA was complicit in perpetuating the jaunty insulin narrative that had hurt the cause for decades. Unless the truth about diabetes was known, how could lawmakers, regulators, philanthropists, and journalists – not to mention clinicians – do what had to be done to improve the lives of people with diabetes?

That question was driven home when the JDF chapter in Miami bought a full-page newspaper ad in 1972 to publicize its cause. The ad featured a little boy in a crib holding a glass syringe, and it described the many complications that could arise from diabetes, including blindness and amputations. The headline read, “The Quiet Killer.”

On the day the ad appeared, Marge Kleiman, whose son has type 1, was working in the JDF office, and the phone rang.

“I’m Charles Best,” the caller said, “and I discovered insulin.”

Now retired, Best had become an icon who, after Fred Banting died in 1941, carried the mantle for the Nobel-winning team that had discovered insulin. Best had been praised by the pope, the queen of England, and other heads of state, and he had given the keynote address at the ADA’s first meeting and later served as its president. He happened to be in Miami on the day the JDF ad appeared, and he was outraged.

“What kind of propaganda are you using?” he screamed. “You’re frightening people! This is not the way it is!”

Kleiman knew better. “Dr. Best, what you did was wonderful,” she said. “It allowed people to live longer. But we’re not trying to frighten people. If you tell the truth, maybe they can avoid these complications. Please don’t tell us to keep quiet.”

The JDRF, now a massive international organization focused primarily on type 1,  has continued to tell the truth about diabetes – and fund research – ever since, but changing the insulin narrative was not going to be easy.

Patients could at least take solace that the insulins kept getting better. The first extended-action insulins were introduced in 1936 and continued with widely used NPH insulin (1946) and the Lente insulins (1951). But the real improvement came in the 1970s, spurred by concerns about actual insulin supply. Meat consumption was declining, and slaughterhouses were cutting production, while the number of people with diabetes had been rising steadily (in 1976, there were about 5 million Americans with the disease). At some point, insulin demand could outstrip the animal-based supply.

As described in the book Invisible Frontiers: The Race to Synthesize a Human Gene, by Stephen S. Hall and James D. Watson, the specter of an insulin shortage triggered a race to develop genetically engineered insulin using recombinant DNA technology. Investigators succeeded by inserting the insulin gene into bacteria, which produced insulin that was chemically identical to its naturally produced counterpart.

The first human insulins, Humulin (made by Eli Lilly) and Novolin (made by Novo Nordisk), were introduced in the 1980s. Whether they were superior to animal-based insulins is a matter of debate, but they alleviated fears about an impending global insulin shortage.

Moreover, researchers soon discovered that changing the order of two amino acids in the human insulin molecule created a faster-acting formulation, and that led to the introduction of Humalog (1996) and Novolog (1999). Known as “insulin analogs” because they are more analogous to the body’s natural release of insulin, they were considered clear advancements. Another huge leap came with long-lasting basal insulin analogs, specifically Lantus (by Sanofi in 2000) and Levemir (by Novo Nordisk in 2005). These insulins keep blood sugar levels consistent during periods of fasting and, typically taken once a day, replicate the insulin release of a healthy pancreas. They were immensely popular and also used by many type 2 patients – Lantus was a $5 billion a year drug by 2011.

The improved insulins changed how patients cared for themselves, as the new formulations led to “basal-bolus” therapy – a 24-hour insulin complemented by a mealtime insulin – and that became the standard of care for type 1 diabetes. (Insulin pumps use the same basal-bolus framework.)

A new era of diabetes care, thanks to these insulin breakthroughs, appeared to beckon.

Stay tuned for part three of this riveting story next week!

I want to acknowledge the following people who helped me with this article: Dr. Mark Atkinson, Dr. David Harlan, Dr. Irl Hirsch, Dr. David Nathan, Dr. Jay Skyler, and Dr. Bernard Zinman. Some material in this article came from my book, “Cheating Destiny: Living with Diabetes.”

About James

James S. Hirsch, a former reporter for The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, is a best-selling author who has written 10 nonfiction books. They include biographies of Willie Mays and Rubin “Hurricane” Carter; an investigation into the Tulsa race riot of 1921; and an examination of our diabetes epidemic. Hirsch has an undergraduate degree from the University of Missouri School of Journalism and a graduate degree from the LBJ School of Public Policy at the University of Texas. He lives in the Boston area with his wife, Sheryl, and they have two children, Amanda and Garrett. Jim has worked as a senior editor and columnist for diaTribe since 2006.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Rush for COVID Vaccine Hinders Diabetes Tech Advancements

Modern science is amazing. The COVID-19 pandemic, which is still shaking the world as we know it, is quickly getting controlled due to fast scientific progress and the vaccine rollout (in the United States, at least).

Having an effective vaccine come to market within a year of the appearance of a novel disease is unheard of; most medicines take decades for adequate approval processes within the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be completed. This feat is incredible.

That being said, with all of the rush to get a vaccine to the masses, the FDA pushed the Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines literally to the front of the approval line, delaying other important medical and technological advancements, including those related to diabetes.

While the vaccine did (and should!) take precedent here, the delays have been tough for people with diabetes in many ways. 

The head of the FDA’s device center, Jeff Shuren, described a “tsunami” of product applications from companies hoping to join the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic.

Those applications include over 1,200 submissions for products like diagnostic tests, ventilators, and digital technology, all of which have slowed their work in other diseases, including diabetes.

Shuren went on to say that review times had begun to increase amid growing backlogs due to the high volume. 

The agency is trying to make as much space as possible to approve COVID-19 related vaccines, medicine, and technology quickly to end the pandemic, which has taken precedence over almost everything else. Experts suspect that the FDA may not be able to meet its own timelines going forward.

In addition, lockdowns and social distancing regulations halted clinical trials and product releases. It’s been a tough year for diabetes tech firms to get much done.

The following products, and their release dates, have been most affected by the pandemic:

Senseonics’ 180-Day Eversense Glucose Monitor

The Eversense continuous glucose monitor (CGM) is a device implanted under the skin that lasts for 90 days. The newest version of their CGM system aims to double its lifespan to 180 days without changing a sensor.

What was supposed to be released in early 2021 now faces delays of up to two months for its application to the FDA while the agency tasks its staff with emergency reviews of coronavirus tests and other medical devices. The new release date of the model is scheduled for mid-2021.

The Omnipod 5 (Originally “Horizon”)

Insulet’s Omnipod 5 system, which utilizes CGM data to make automated adjustments to basal insulin throughout the day, will be the company’s first hybrid-closed loop system.

Similar to the T-slim Control IQ system, this insulin pump will provide mobile app control and insulin dosing from a smartphone, eliminating the need to carry their hallmark Personal Diabetes Manager (PDM) around to control the release of insulin.

While significantly delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Insulet said during its Nov. 4, 2020 investor update call that it had recently finished its clinical trial and was finalizing its FDA submission.

They hope to launch their product by June of 2021.

Medtronic 780G

Also known as the Advanced Hybrid-Closed Loop (AHCL) system, this system will improve upon its first iterations of the hybrid-closed loop system, the 670g and 770g. Hoping to seek approval for adults and children as young as two, this system includes:

  • A CGM sensor that will require just one calibration on the first day of wear and no further calibrations after that
  • Automatic correction bolus delivery every 5 minutes, in conjunction with CGM readings, that can automatically bolus for missed meal doses.
  • A lower glucose target range, adjustable between 100-120 mg/dL
  • Different insulin duration times, to adjust for the “tail” of your insulin (eg, Fiasp vs. Humalog)
  • Built-in Bluetooth to share data and provide remote software updates

Due to the pandemic, the approval for this device has been delayed, but Medtronic confirmed that it had submitted its application for review to the FDA in February, 2021.

They hope to have a commercial launch sometime in 2021.

Dexcom G7

The much-anticipated Dexcom G7 continuous glucose monitor (CGM) was also delayed due to the pandemic, but it should be worth the wait. You’ll no longer need to buy separate transmitters; each sensor is a complete and disposable transmitter/sensor integrated system. Some other great features include:

  • No calibrations, much like the G6
  • At the start, wear time will be 10 days, but eventual use will include a 14-15 day feature, also without any calibrations
  • Smaller and thinner: the newest CGM will be 60% smaller than the G6
  • One hour warm-up period

Dexcom CEO Kevin Sayer said that the company eventually plans to have different versions of the G7 for different people.

For example, people with type 2 diabetes who don’t use insulin (or even the general public) might opt for a much simpler interface than people with type 1 diabetes, who will want all of the alarms and settings.

Abbott Freestyle Libre 3

For years, the FreeStyle Libre from Abbott Diabetes was a considered Flash Glucose Monitor (FGM), because it only reported blood sugar levels whenever a user scanned their sensor with a receiver or smartphone.

That will change with the new edition: The Freestyle Libre 3 will function as a real-time CGM, because it won’t require sensor scanning to get a “flash” of blood glucose data. It will instead provide trends and graphs to track blood sugars throughout the day.

The Libre 3 generates real-time blood sugar readings every minute (as opposed to Dexcom’s every 5 minutes), displaying the result on a mobile app on your smartphone. This version also has optional high and low blood sugar alarms, a feature introduced with the Libre 2 in 2020.

Additionally, the sensor is much smaller and thinner (a 70% size reduction), and is kinder to the earth, using 41% less plastic overall.

The Libre 3 received global approval in September 2020. The timeline in the US has been pushed backwards, but with clinical trials now complete, we’ll likely see the Libre 3 applications submitted to the FDA mid-2021.

While the hustle for an effective COVID-19 vaccine has been nothing short of miraculous, people with diabetes don’t want to wait any longer!

Hopefully, with the hastened release of the vaccine, we can see more diabetes technology hit the market in 2021. 

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Type 2 Diabetes and Insulin: What to Expect

Whether you’ve been newly diagnosed or have been living with type 2 diabetes for a long time, you may know that it is often a progressive disease. The longer someone lives with type 2, the more likely they are to need insulin therapy to manage their blood sugars. Often, but not always, people with type 2 diabetes start the management of their condition with exercise and diet alone, and then may progress to oral medications like Metformin, before finally (over the course of months or even years) requiring insulin to manage their blood sugar levels.

If this happens, you and your doctor will need to come up with a new treatment plan. But what can you expect? This article will describe what will and what won’t happen, and how to prepare when adding insulin therapy to your diabetes management.

There Is No Need to Panic

It’s important to remember that you haven’t done anything wrong if you get to a point where you need insulin therapy. Physicians used to prescribe insulin to people with type 2 diabetes as a last resort, but in recent years are prescribing it much sooner, due to the benefits of more stringent blood sugar management to prevent complications.

Since type 2 diabetes is often a progressive disease, many with the condition will require insulin at some point. You didn’t fail at diabetes management, and insulin is no punishment. Adding insulin therapy to your management toolkit is just another way to better meet HbA1c goals, enjoy better blood sugars, improve your quality of life, and even extend your life. Embrace it!

Insulin Does Not Inherently Make You Gain Weight

There is a common myth that insulin makes you gain weight. And this line of thinking is simply false. Here’s the connection between insulin and weight gain: When you take insulin, glucose from food is better able to enter your cells, making your blood sugar level drop. But if you take in more calories (eat more) than you need, your cells will also get more glucose than they need, and anything extra is stored as fat.

But this is obvious: the same process happens to people who do not have diabetes. People also believe that insulin causes weight gain because at diagnosis, people might be underweight (as a symptom of the disease), and finally getting the insulin they need into their bodies makes them gain the much-needed weight back. There are many side effects of insulin, but if you eat right, exercise, and take it as prescribed, extra weight gain is not one of them.

You Will Experience More Low Blood Sugars

One well-known and common side effect of insulin, however, is hypoglycemia. If you’ve traditionally managed your diabetes with exercise and diet alone, you may have rarely, if ever, experienced low blood sugar. Even oral diabetes medications, such as Metformin, rarely cause low blood sugars when taken on their own, but insulin is a whole different story.

You will need to work with your doctor to fine-tune your management, so you are able to take enough insulin to manage high blood sugars, while not taking too much where you will drop too low. It is a learning process, and it will take time.

Be better prepared by always carrying a snack on you, and making sure to check your blood sugar more often to prevent lows. Symptoms of low blood sugar include:

  • Dizziness
  • Slurred speech
  • Confusion
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Sweating
  • Rapid heartbeat

Symptoms of severe low blood sugar include:

  • Seizure
  • Loss of consciousness

Severe low blood sugar always requires immediate emergency medical attention and 911 should be contacted right away. Ask you doctor about a prescription for Glucagon,  an emergency injection that can be used to bring blood glucose levels up in case of an emergency.

Your Medical Bills Will Go Up

Diabetes is a costly disease, as of 2017, was the most expensive chronic disease in the United States, costing over $327 billion dollars per year. While diet, exercise, and even oral diabetes medications are cheaper ways to manage type 2 diabetes, insulin is one of the most expensive chronic disease medications on the market in the United States, averaging around $285 per vial.

Be prepared for higher costs at the pharmacy counter, especially if your physician prescribes you fast-acting, analog insulins like Humalog, Novolog, or Fiasp. Cheaper, human-insulins are available over the counter at places like Walmart, although they are much slower-acting, are much older, and their efficacy may not be as good as modern insulins.

Make sure to sign up for health insurance, and make sure your insurance plan will cover prescription insulin at a decent out-of-pocket cost. See if you are eligible for Medicaid or Medicare for more affordable coverage.

If available, make sure to take advantage of your employer’s Health Savings Account (HSA) and work with your doctor to make sure you have been prescribed insulin that you can comfortably afford for the long-haul. More resources for affording insulin can be found here.

You Will Need Additional Support

Adding insulin therapy to your diabetes management is a big decision. You will need extra emotional, mental, and even physical support during this time. Insulin therapy is expensive, and the toll of managing low blood sugars for the first time can be tough. Insulin injections can sometimes hurt, finding new injection sites can be hard without a second set of eyes, counting carbohydrates more closely is time-consuming, and fighting off stigma and shame is real and can be hard on everyone. It is a big adjustment.

Getting support from family and friends, joining a diabetes support group, or simply becoming more engaged in the diabetes community can really help during this time. Make sure to enlist friends and family to help you, and be open and honest with them about your worries and struggles. Adding insulin therapy to your management is meant to help, not hurt, but it’s easier when you’re not doing it alone.

Insulin Can Improve the Quality of Your Life

When taking insulin, it is crucial that you work with your doctor and follow your treatment plan to better meet your health goals. The transition from managing with diet and exercise alone or solely taking oral medications to insulin therapy can be challenging, but with a growth mindset and preparation for what lies ahead, you can thrive on insulin therapy and vastly improve the quality of your life.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Moving Abroad for Better Diabetes Care

Anyone who lives with diabetes in the United States knows that affording care, and specifically insulin, is becoming more and more difficult as prices on insulin and essential medications continue to rise. A recent Yale study even showed that 1 in 4 people with diabetes have rationed their insulin due to cost, which can quickly lead to serious complications and even premature death. In our recent study , an overwhelming 44% of respondents reported struggling to afford insulin.

Our lack of a strong social safety net is leaving some patients feeling as though they have no other options for affordable care, and some patients have even resorted to crossing the border into Canada and Mexico to buy cheaper insulin, where federal price caps prevent runaway pricing on essential medications and prescription drugs. In light of all this, some people with diabetes have even daydreamed of completely relocating to another country for better care, where health coverage is centralized, universal for all people, and where medications are more affordable. The United States is the only rich country in the world that doesn’t guarantee healthcare for all its citizens.

Meet Liz Donehue, a comedian, writer, and American expat who has lived with type 1 diabetes for the past ten years. She moved abroad a few years ago to find better diabetes coverage, and I chatted with her about her experience moving to the Czech Republic.

What made you want to leave the United States? 

I left the United States for many reasons, but one of them was that the motion to repeal Obamacare passed in the House in 2017. Most of my employers didn’t provide health insurance, so the enactment of Obamacare in 2013 was a life-saving situation. Healthcare and insulin had never been unaffordable to me, but then again I was fortunate enough to have my parents support me in times of need, especially after I aged out of their insurance at age 26. I have never rationed insulin due to cost, only at times when the pharmacy or my endocrinologist made an error during insulin refills.

Why did you choose the Czech Republic? 

Part of the reason I chose the Czech Republic was that their visa process was relatively easy compared to other countries. I also chose the city I’m in, Brno, because of the cost of living. Having moved from Seattle, my cost of living went down by 66%. Other candidates included Poland, Vietnam, and Cambodia, but I had previously been to CZ and they had the most advanced healthcare system out of the four.

What was the deciding factor that made you move?

I had recently been laid off from my job, and I had just gotten out of a relationship. Essentially there was no true reason that kept me in Seattle, so I started to look at other options, especially where there was available socialized healthcare. I did research for about four months before moving, and I was able to secure an apartment online for myself and my cat who I brought with me. I’m living here permanently and my visa is through my current employer.

Will you become a citizen? 

I’m not a Czech citizen and as a “third country national” (non-EU), I will need to have lived in the country for ten years before I can apply. When I first arrived and waited for my freelance visa to process, I had to get private insurance through an international company for my application.

Typically, how expensive is diabetes care and insulin in your new country? 

During this wait, about five months, I was paying out of pocket for appointments and medications. But because it’s CZ, the costs pale in comparison to what they are in the US. A pack of five Humalog pens costs $18 here as opposed to $556 back home without coverage. When I got hired by my current employer, they took over paying for my healthcare costs, about $98 a month. I paid this for myself while I was self-employed, but everything was covered. There are no prior authorizations and the notion of pre-existing conditions doesn’t exist here.

Additionally, monthly insulin supply costs me nothing. I take Humalog and Tresiba daily and my test strips are also free of charge and included with my health insurance costs paid for by my employer. I get new prescriptions every 90 days whether I ask for them or not, so I now have a surplus of insulin and I don’t need to worry about refills.

Do you miss anything about the US healthcare system? 

I think the major thing I miss about the US healthcare system is the access to current technology. The system in CZ, while affordable and readily accessible, doesn’t have the technology to download glucometer readings, for instance. I also need to provide my own samples of urine for quarterly testing instead of having it done in the office. The medical equipment and tools are often metal and sterilized as opposed to plastic and designed for one-time use, which I’ve heard is a practice left over from the communist era.

Are you ever planning on moving back to the US? 

My move to CZ was an act of self-preservation. In the US, for some reason, health insurance is tied to a person’s employment. As long as that system is in place or there is no enactment of a system like Medicare for All, I can’t move back to the US. The pandemic has increased my concerns, and right now, I could go back to the US to visit, but I would not be let back into the Czech Republic just on the basis that I was IN the United States as the situation is worsening by the day. I feel healthier [living here] but I’ve also been taking extreme precautions due to the pandemic since I’m immunocompromised.

Thank you for your time, Liz. We really appreciate you sharing your story with us!

Have you ever considered moving abroad for better health coverage and diabetes care? Why or why would you not move abroad? Share your thoughts below; we would love to hear from you!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Tackling Carbs with Tech

Many people who live with diabetes avidly avoid eating carbohydrates, as historically speaking, it has been notoriously difficult to cover carbohydrates appropriately with exogenous insulins. But with access to better, faster insulins and the uptick in the use of patient-friendly technology, things are changing, and people’s diets (and their feelings of freedom) have expanded more than ever. Here are the best tech-friendly hacks to tackle the carbohydrate conundrum.

MyNetDiary

This popular app has a searchable database with nearly a million food entries for people to access and look up carbohydrate counts on the go. The company also has a separate Diabetes app that allows users to track blood glucose levels, HbA1c results, and insulin doses, to track their progress over time. If you’re looking to lose weight, MyNetDiary can create a diet plan to meet your needs. You never have to feel restricted when eating meals with family or friends, having all your carbohydrate counting needs right at your fingertips.

Photo credit: GreaterGoods

GreaterGoods Nourish Digital Scale

This food scale is a game changer for those who cook with lots of fresh produce, where carbohydrate counts can vary quite a bit. This scale lets the user view nutrition facts for over 2,000 foods in the scale’s built-in database, and create up to 99 more custom entries. Measure individual ingredients, track full meals, and calculate daily carbohydrate intake much easier with this digital scale.

InPen

This revolutionary device is the only FDA-approved smart pen insulin system that helps prevent users from “stacking” their insulin doses and take the right amount of insulin at the right time. This device works in tandem with a phone app, where users can track insulin on board/active insulin, personalize your doses, sync with continuous glucose monitor (CGM) or glucometer data, and share reports with others. The pen itself is compatible with Humalog, Novolog, and Fiasp, and will even dose in half units. Eating carbohydrates has traditionally been much harder on multiple daily injections, but advancements such as the InPen are making strides to make life much easier for people with diabetes.

Use Alternative Pump Boluses

If you are an insulin pump user, dosing for a high carbohydrate meal can also be difficult, especially if the meal also has a moderate amount of protein and fat (which can delay the absorption of the glucose in the meal). To handle that, try opting for a combination bolus (a.k.a. Combo Bolus or Dual Wave Bolus,  for Animas or Medtronic users, respectively; Omnipod, Tandem t:slim users will use “Extended Bolus”). This is a hybrid delivery mode: a specified portion of the total insulin bolus is delivered upfront, as a normal bolus, while the rest is delivered over a specified period of time as an extended/square wave bolus.

For example, given a 12U dose delivered as a 60/40 combination/square wave bolus over 3 hours: 60% of the total dose (7.2U) will be delivered within seconds of pressing the “deliver” button; the remaining 40% (4.8U) will be delivered equally every few minutes over the next three hours. The result is an initial dose to cover faster-digesting foods, plus an extended amount of insulin action to deal with the slower-digesting foods (which tend to be fattier or have more protein), and to prevent postprandial spikes in blood glucose. Utilizing these settings can be extremely helpful when you’re eating foods like pizza, pasta, Chinese food, Mexican food, or ice cream. Always consult with your diabetes healthcare provider before making any changes to your dosing routine.

Dexcom CLARITY Diabetes Management Software

Photo credit: Dexcom

Dexcom Clarity App

This software can be helpful for patients already using the Dexcom continuous glucose monitoring system, but are wanting to track and change problematic patterns in their blood glucose. This app lets you set target goals for your blood sugars, will track time-in-range, detects patterns of highs and lows and will alert you to them, and will even give the user a predicted HbA1c result. You can also choose to share your data with your health clinic to make changes to your insulin routine or insulin to carbohydrate ratio in real time, and to really find what will work best for you for optimal management.

Living with diabetes is never easy, but thankfully technology has made counting carbohydrates and eating easier than ever before. What apps or tech has helped you to navigate food, eating, and counting carbohydrates? What’s worked best and what hasn’t? Share this post and comment below; we love hearing from our readers!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes and Reality TV, with Marcus Lacour from Say I Do

By Alexi Melvin

Netflix’s “Say I Do” is a reality show about surprise dream weddings, but its first episode showcased something we don’t often see in reality TV – type 1 diabetes (T1D). In the episode, Marcus LaCour was given the chance to surprise his wife Tiffany with a magnificent wedding do-over.

Alongside planning and logistics, Marcus also spoke candidly about his life with type 1 diabetes, spurred by a conversation around how wedding catering decisions needed to take into account the food choices he makes to help manage his blood sugar levels. We caught up with Marcus to chat about his experience on the show, how he handled presenting his type 1 diabetes to the world, and where he and his family are now.

Did you ever imagine that you’d be on a TV show on Netflix?

I definitely didn’t expect it. It’s one of those things where you’re like, you know what? If it happens great, if it doesn’t, it’s great too. I don’t think it dawned on me really until we started shooting. Once we started filming, I was like, “Oh, this is it. This is legit.”

When you were talking about your T1D on the show, it came across so well. Is that something you discussed beforehand with the producers? Did you preface anything or was it organic?

It was organic. We literally were just sitting and talking about it. The subject of food came up and early on I told them, “Hey, I’m a type 1 diabetic.” We were just having a conversation of, “Hey, how’s this, how’s that? How did that happen? How were you diagnosed?” Literally, just conversation flowed from there. In my honest opinion, it was one of the most genuine conversations I’ve had with anyone about my condition, just because it was in a room and in the area where there was an open space where I could tell them everything I needed to tell them about the condition.

You touched on how much your wife did for you when you had a situation where you lost your healthcare – the rationing of food and things like that. Did that also include rationing of insulin? Were you having issues with getting supplies?

I was. I was getting samples from my doctor’s office at one point. You know when you’re trying to ration insulin or trying to pick the insulin you can afford, it’s not as effective as what you’re used to. I was getting the regular 70/30 mix insulin pens. I kept bottoming out throughout random times of the day. I was used to taking NovoLog but [at one point, my doctor] didn’t have any NovoLog samples. So I was literally just getting whatever he had.

When [my doctor] did get the NovoLog pens, I was using those thinking, okay, he should have some more samples. Well, there was a time where he didn’t, and that time for about a month maybe, we’ll say three weeks, I was rationing my insulin, because I’m trying to make sure that if I do go high, I have enough to cover the high. If I go low, just [having food] to eat, but more importantly, what you need on a daily basis [to keep your levels stable].

One day, the doc called and said they didn’t have any samples. I was down in my last 10 units. So for about an extra two and a half, almost three weeks, I was rationing 10 units of insulin.

When did that situation start getting better for you?

I ended up getting a loan from my boss because at the time I started a new position and he was like, “I don’t want to see you suffer.” At the time, NovoLog Flex Pens were $250 for the pack. So he gave me a check for $250 and said, “Hey, go get your meds.” So that was how I got through that. Then somehow, by some sort of miracle, after that pack ended, my doctor, all of a sudden, got samples again.

What is your management routine like now?

It’s the Omnipod right now. I’ve got better insurance that covers the pods altogether. It’s still an adjustment for me though, because I’m used to not having a PDM. Before, [when] I was on the injections, it was, wake up, take your long term, and then just carry the Humalog pen on me at all times. Then with the pump, [if] we’re going to work out, I forget to suspend my insulin flow. Or if the site doesn’t take, having to double check and make sure blood sugars aren’t really high. So it’s a couple of different things, but it’s not bad. It’s still an adjustment though.

Do you feel you prefer the MDI or do you feel the pump ultimately is going to be better?

I’m already seeing changes in my numbers, just from average standpoint. On the shots, the lowest my A1C was, or I could get it, with 6.9, 6.8, but now I’m seeing, that even though there are days where I may be high because the pod didn’t take, or I may run low, those days are few and far between, so I’m running normal on a lot more of a regular basis.

Do you use a Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM)?

I don’t. It looks we have to go four months without a CGM and track those numbers before insurance will approve it.

In terms of your diet, on the show, you talked about how you’re conscious of what foods are going to spike your blood sugar. Is there a specific diet you to stick to? Are there certain foods you prefer or are you getting more flexible with it because of the pump?

I am still a very conscious eater. I prefer to eat clean. Everything has to have a balance. Now I know with the pump, you have that freedom to literally eat whatever you want. But for me, when I was diagnosed, I didn’t have that option. So, it was literally sticking to that diet, sticking to that regimen. Everything has to have a fresh fruit or fresh vegetable, [there] has to be a starch. There has to be a grain and there has to be a protein. That’s the only way that I know.

I came across a comment online that said, “Well, diabetics can eat whatever they want.” It’s very true. But for me, I don’t want to run that risk. I think I’ve always done something whenever I got a new insulin, when I got my Humalog, I wanted to make sure it worked. So I got a peanut butter Twix, took it to cover it, just to see what it would do. When I got my pump, I had a chocolate chip cookie just to make sure it was working. It would work, but overall, my diet is consistent. I prefer to eat clean. It’s just because I know these things aren’t going to have a whole lot of impact on my blood sugar.

I saw on Instagram that your daughter’s been learning more about your T1D management. How’s that going?

It’s going well honestly. Before, when I was taking my shot, it was just, “Hey, Daddy’s got to take his insulin,” or, “Daddy’s got to check his blood sugar.” So she’d always been curious about it. Then one day I had to change my pod. “Are you changing your pod, Daddy?” “Yeah, Daddy’s changing his pod. you want to watch?” “Yeah, I want to watch.” So she came in and got hands on. I always want to make her aware just in case something happens. If my blood sugar goes low and I’m unresponsive, or if I’m too low and I can’t get up to get anything, I want to make sure she’s aware to say, “Oh, Daddy’s not feeling well. Daddy he needs something to eat.” Or, “Something’s going on. Let me tell Mommy.” I always want to make sure she’s aware of what my condition is, not to scare her, but to the point where she can be reactive.

Who did you have as a support system when you were first diagnosed?

My mom was my biggest supporter. I didn’t keep it from my friends, but I felt they wouldn’t be able to understand. They were used to me just being able to get up and do whatever. If we wanted to play football, it was get up and do it without having to worry about anything. They knew I had type 1 diabetes, but they didn’t know the entire scope of what it meant to take care of that condition. So it was my mom. Then over time, my friends started to get a little bit more of an understanding of it. So my friends would ask, “Hey, what’s your blood sugar like? Are you OK?” Or if I was going to the gym to work out with some of my buddies, “Hey, don’t forget your meter.” Or I’d always bring my meter with me and I’d have to check in the middle of work out, see either I’m high or low, or just to figure out where I was at. They would always ask, so they held me accountable in that regard.

Have you been getting a lot of people in the type 1 community reaching out on Instagram or social media?

I’ve gotten that. It’s always refreshing because [they’re] like, “Thank you for representing and letting the world know about your condition.” Well, it’s a part of me. I’d be foolish to hide it, like, “I don’t have a condition.”

Had you been involved in the type 1 community at all before appearing on Say I Do?

Not necessarily. I’ve always wanted to though. I’ve been at this for almost 20 years, it’ll be 20 years in November. When I first got diagnosed, there weren’t a lot of support groups. There weren’t very many places for me to go where I could vent or even if I had high blood sugars or even lows, how to combat that and deal with those. But now times have changed. I would love to be able to get out and talk to people about what our condition is and how to manage it effectively.

What’s next for you and your family?

Honestly, I am not sure. I work for a Children’s Hospital down here, so I recruit for them and it’s just more or less just going with everything at this point, just laying back and enjoying the ride while we have it.

Do you think you’re going to seek out more TV opportunities?

To be honest, I don’t know. This is all new. It’s all new to both of us. If more opportunities come, then yeah. Absolutely. But it really just depends on what comes down the pipes. I think the ultimate goal would be just for us to just enjoy this and see where it takes us.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

REVIEW: Companion Medical’s InPen, A Smart Delivery System

Companion Medical’s smart insulin delivery, the InPen, is a reusable injector pen plus user-friendly mobile device which allows individuals to improve their diabetes management. I choose multiple daily injections (MDI) over a pump for various reasons, but I cannot deny that a pump allows for more precise calculations. With InPen, people on multiple daily injections can achieve the same accuracy plus so much more!

What Is It?

The InPen is a reusable injector pen that not only helps you calculate your doses but also keeps a log of insulin data for up to a year. The InPen connects, via Bluetooth, to the smartphone app, and keeps track of all your insulin deliveries.

InPen is now approved for all ages (7 and over, or under the supervision of an adult), who are insulin-dependent. The pen can deliver between .5 units to 30 units of insulin, dialed in half-unit increments. The pen is compatible with the Lily Humalog, Novo Nordisk Novolog and Fiasp U-100 3.0 ml insulin cartridges.

InPen is compatible with all Apple iOS devices that support iOS 10 or greater. It is also compatible with Android (more info about compatibility here).

What Does It Do?

I made sure to use this pen for about a month before writing my review. I am in awe of how easy this pen makes my management. Up to now, to be quite frank, I am guilty of a lot of “WAGS” (wild a** guesses) and then winding up too high or too low. I also really never kept tabs on when my last insulin dose was, so would find myself stacking quite often. Thanks to InPen, a lot of this carelessness has been eliminated. Here are all the amazing things it can do:

1. Insulin delivery information

The InPen connects to the app via Bluetooth which allows the app to store your insulin delivery information and shows you how much insulin you have taken and how much you have on board. There have been so many times when I would correct a high, not realizing I still had insulin on board, which led to episodes of hypoglycemia. As you can see here, your information appears in real time from your lock screen.

InPen Screenshot 1

Screenshot from Companion Medical

2. Built-in calculator

The InPen has a built-in calculator to help you get the most accurate dose possible. Your physician enters your settings, and it will give a recommendation on how much to dose. It takes into account your previous insulin delivery, your current blood sugar and the number of carbs you are eating. Since I have been using this feature, my blood sugars have improved greatly.

InPen Screenshot 2

Screenshot from Companion Medical

3. Reminders

It also has a reminder to take your long-lasting insulin. There have been so many times when I can’t remember if I took my Tresiba. I know this is a common problem for people on daily injections. This takes the burden off of the individual and has proven to be one of my favorite features.

InPen Screenshot 3

Photo credit: Companion Medical

4. Reports

The InPen generates reports that you can share with your healthcare team. These comprehensive reports will allow for easier decisions regarding changes to your diabetes management.

Screenshot from Companion Medical

5. Temperature alerts

The InPen comes complete with temperature alerts! It will notify you anytime your pen is in temperatures too hot or too cold which could make your insulin ineffective. This will come in handy during my next vacation or even if I leave my bag in the car for too long.

6. Syncing to Dexcom

InPen can sync up to the Dexcom continuous glucose monitor, via the Health app. This allows you to see your continuous glucose monitor graph on your logbook and reporting feature of the app.

Screenshot from Companion Medical

How Can I Get the InPen?

Many commercial insurance companies cover InPen, you can fill out this form and a representative will contact you about your copay. They also have a copay assistance program.  Commercially insured InPen customers will not have to pay more than $35 dollars a year which is a small price for better control.

Conclusion

I think InPen is a game-changer for anyone on multiple daily injections. With all of the capabilities the InPen offers, I can achieve better blood sugar numbers. I feel more in control of my diabetes because now I am confident that I am administering the right doses. I am also avoiding stacking insulin, which means fewer blood sugar roller coasters, and now I also have reminders to take my long-lasting insulin.

InPen can also help empower children to make better choices and manage their own diabetes. You can even sync two different pens if a child wanted to leave one pen at school and one at home.

Using InPen has helped me take back some control of my diabetes. It allows me to feel more in control and allows me to spend less time thinking about my condition. I can’t imagine going back to MDI without InPen in my toolbox and highly recommend this to anyone else who prefers injections over the pump.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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