The Latest on COVID: Staying Safe as The Pandemic Surges

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Eliza Skoler

As COVID restrictions and recommendations shift, what do we know about staying safe with diabetes? How can we protect others and make careful decisions about risk?

As the pandemic continues to unfold, states and countries are leading their own initiatives to reduce infection rates and keep people safe. This means that people around the world are experiencing different stages of caution, risk, and safety. As we navigate the uncertainty of conflicting messages and daily updates to guidelines and recommendations, everyone – with or without diabetes – can do some things to keep themselves and others as safe as possible. In this article, we’ll look at the latest scientific recommendations to discuss what we know about preventing serious COVID-19 infections.

View our new COVID and diabetes infographic here. Click to read our first COVID reopening article, “COVID Phase 2: Diabetes Care During Reopening,” or check out more of our articles on COVID-19. You can also find the official reopening plan for your US state here.

On July 17, the CDC updated its recommendations for people who are at higher risk for severe coronavirus infection. People with type 2 diabetes have increased risk for severe illness, while people with type 1 diabetes may have increased risk. If you have diabetes, the best thing you can do to prevent severe COVID infection is avoid contact with other people as much as possible.

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diabetes and COVID

Image source: diaTribe

Stay at home as much as possible to avoid contact with other people

Coronavirus is spread through contact with infected people. This means that by avoiding public spaces and people who do not live with you, you can dramatically reduce your chances of infection. We know that not everyone is able to stay home – if you are an essential worker, thank you for the work you are doing. Please be as careful as possible and see below for information on protecting yourself outside the home.

COVID-19 is primarily spread through the droplets that come out of an infected person’s mouth or nose when they talk, breath, cough, sneeze, laugh, or holler. The virus is carried through these small droplets. Anyone close by can be infected by the virus if the droplets enter their mouth, nose, or eyes.

  • Droplets can also land on surfaces (like door handles or food at the grocery store) and infect someone who touches a contaminated surface and then touches their face.
  • The World Health Organization acknowledged in July that COVID-19 may be spread invisibly through the air. Many scientists agree that tiny droplets can stay in the air for an extended period of time after they are released, which means COVID-19 could be considered an airborne virus, increasing its danger. This provides even more reason to stay home.

Protect yourself if you are outside your home

  • Social distance by staying at least six feet away from other people.
  • Wear a cloth face covering when around other people in public. Your mask should full cover your mouth and nose and fit snugly against your face. See below for more tips on wearing and cleaning your face mask.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds; use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol when you don’t have access to soap and water.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick, even in your home.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes. Do not remove your mask to cough, sneeze, or talk to others.
Mask

Image source: CDC

Many people with coronavirus may not show symptoms or know that they are carrying the virus; however, even those without symptoms can still spread it to other people. Cloth face masks are meant to protect people around you if you are already infected (as shown in the image on the right; source: CDC). Studies show that masks are extremely effective: the more people wear masks in public, the less the virus is passed.

Here are some resources on cloth face masks:

As things reopen, make careful decisions

For many people, the hardest part about removing or lessening restrictions is that it can feel “safe” to go back to our pre-pandemic activities. To make the problem even more challenging, even though it’s not completely safe yet, many people are tired of social distancing and staying at home, and the social isolation has taken its toll on many.

According to the CDC, “the more people you interact with, the more closely you interact with them, and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread.” While the pandemic is still raging, here are some ways to be careful if you will be seeing people.

  1. See people outside, rather than inside

Because COVID-19 is spread through the air, it is much easier to spread the virus indoors than outdoors given that wind circulation and open space outside are far greater. This means that closed, small, indoor spaces are the most dangerous places to interact with other people. If you or someone you live with has diabetes, avoid seeing others indoors. Instead, consider seeing people outside, where you have more space to remain distant and the breeze complicates the transmission of droplets.

  • If you must see family or friends indoors, open windows or doors to create air flow. Find an indoor space that is large, so that you can stay far apart.
  • Wear cloth face coverings, even at socially distant gatherings.
  • Wash your hands often (or use hand sanitizer) and don’t touch shared surfaces.
  • Read more about the safety of outdoor gatherings from the New York Times.
  1. Avoid travel

The CDC continues to recommend that people avoid travel, if possible, because traveling exposes you to many other people who may be infected. This is especially important for people with increased risk; if you have diabetes, or you are considering visiting someone with diabetes, travel can pose a high risk for serious coronavirus infection.

  • While traveling in personal vehicles carries the least risk of COVID-19 infection, activities such as road trips can still expose you to the virus at rest stops, gas stations, and other places where you may stop.
  • Learn more about travel considerations from diaTribe and from the CDC.
  • Given the uncertainty of travel restrictions, if you travel you may run the risk of not being allowed to return home.
  1. If you haven’t already, ask your healthcare team if you can try telehealth appointments

Going to a clinic, medical office, or hospital can expose you to people who have COVID-19. Many healthcare teams offer telemedicine appointments so that you can discuss your diabetes management without coming into contact with other people. Ask your healthcare team whether it is safe and important for you to visit the clinic for regular diabetes management.

  1. Stay as healthy as possible

For people with diabetes, it is more important than ever to carefully manage your blood glucose levels. Keeping your blood glucose levels stable will keep your body healthy and ready to fight off an infection.

If you show symptoms or begin to feel unwell, get tested for COVID-19

Symptoms of COVID-19 can appear up to 14 days after you have been infected with the virus. According to the CDC, these are the symptoms to watch out for:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Tiredness
  • Muscle ache, headache, or body aches
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

If you have any of these symptoms or are not feeling well, stay away from others, contact your healthcare professional, and get tested for COVID-19. Find free testing sites in your state here. It is important to note that you may experience other symptoms of COVID-19 that are not listed above, or even no symptoms at all.

We know that people with diabetes face more serious outcomes of COVID-19 infection. If you, or someone close to you, has diabetes, it’s even more important to be careful in this pandemic. The best thing you can do to protect yourself and those around you is stay home as much as possible and wear a face mask (appropriately!) when you’re out in public.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Incorporating a Latinx Lens for Mental Health

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Mariana Gomez

As I prepared to write this piece, I had to do my own personal research. My family and I moved from México to the United States in July 2019. We have spent a lot of time trying to learn as much as we can to better understand systemic racism in this new home of ours and learn how to work towards a difference. It is our duty not only to learn as parents, but to teach a thirteen-year-old who is watching, learning and is ready to join in any possible way to help his peers.

What I’ve learned? There is major work to be done in health policies, programs and campaigns that address social determinants of health, health disparities, risk factors, and to build health services for the Hispanic/ Latinx population alongside other ethnicities and races.

Because of a lack of easily accessible or fair health services, the Hispanic and Latinx population in the US will pay a high mental health and emotional well-being price during the COVID-19 pandemic. According to Minority Health, poverty levels among these groups will also have an important impact on emotional health.

“Poor access to care due to low rates of insurance, immigration status, language and cultural barriers in healthcare which can include differences between provider-patient in explanatory models of illness and families as the gatekeepers can limit entry into treatment.” (Cortes et al, 2008) as read in the Handbook of Multicultural Mental Health Assessment and Treatment of Diverse Populations.

Talking about Latinx population includes different sub-groups. Us Latinx are a diverse community. Most of us come from different countries and speak different languages. Yes, Spanish is the official language but some will speak native tongues as well.

I am a Mexican Diabetes Educator who believes that talking about Latinx culture in the diabetes space requires us to work on more topics besides food and language barriers in our practice. Diabetes Education must include programs that recognize our many cultural differences as well.

We need more Latinx researchers, professors and conference speakers guiding these efforts in order to build better, stronger but also culturally appropriate strategies and programs. The work we’ve been able to see so far is indeed amazing, but how about incorporating a “Latinx lens” when talking about us Latinx populations and our health needs? Addressing our emotional health is even more complex as these cultural differences should be included in the different programs designed to help.

I found Salud Latina some years ago in a twitter conversation and felt immediately drawn to their mission “to lead the creation of culturally relevant multimedia research, tools, and stories to fuel people to start and support policy, system, and environmental changes in schools and communities to improve Latino child health, reduce disparities, and promote health equity and a culture of health.”

To explore and learn more about these disparities and the way our mental health is being addressed nowadays, I spoke with Rosalie Aguilar, project coordinator for the Salud America! program at University of Texas Health San Antonio.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, is there a need for culturally and linguistically-oriented mental health care for the Hispanic/Latinx population?

Rosalie: Yes! For Latinos and other people of color, COVID-19 has caused disproportionately higher rates of cases and death, job loss, and other inequitable impacts.

Many are also experiencing more mental health issues than in previous eras, according to Dr. Madeline Aviles-Hernandez, the Outpatient Services Director at the Gándara Center.

“This crisis is making life much more difficult for those [Latinos, African-Americans and other culturally diverse populations] we serve, including those in recovery and people who have yet to be treated for such problems as anxiety and depression,” Áviles-Hernández said in a statement. “Minorities have been—and continue to be—less likely to receive mental health treatment.”

The COVID-19 outbreak has resulted in forced isolation, school and business closure, massive job loss, food insecurity, and a litany of other impacts outside of the illness itself.

These ramifications impact more than just physical health, but mental wellness, too, according to Cathi Tillman, the executive director and founder of La Puerta Abierta — a Philadelphia nonprofit providing mental health support to immigrant and refugee communities.

“People who were supporting themselves on some level now can’t,” Tillman told the Philadelphia Inquirer. “They’ve lost their jobs. They can’t congregate socially, or go to church, which is a big part of the community for many people. They can’t come into the office for therapy. For recent immigrants and refugees, the things that were already difficult are 100% more difficult now.”

How are these needs being addressed so far? What kind of help are these groups receiving and how is your organization and team working to provide support? 

Rosalie: Various nonprofits are stepping in to help fill the gap, but there’s still a huge need for mental health care services and additional social support services. There’s also a need to help address the stigma involved with accessing these services.

Our organization is not involved with providing direct mental health care services. But at the Institute for Health Promotion (IHPR) at UT Health San Antonio, the headquarters of Salud America!, we do have a team of community health workers, promotoras, who provide patient navigation and reach out to patients in the Bexar County area to check up on them, provide social support and to help them connect with their health care providers. These services have been associated with less anxiety and depression among patients and fewer hospital readmissions.

There are other groups out there at the national level like NAMI that can also help connect people to services. We really also appreciate that Informed Immigrant, Immigrants Rising, and FWD.us produced a 10-step guide to help mental health care providers respond to the distress of immigrants whose status is in flux due to ongoing changes to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, amid coronavirus. We wrote about it here.

Folks can also use findhelp.org or call 211 find support services in their areas. We actually got a chance to speak with the creator of findhelp.org, and tell the story of how he and his team were able to take on the herculean task of digitizing all the social services available in the United States, thus making it easy for people to find and apply for those resources.

How can us Latinx people in the non-profit and health space work and help you? 

I think the important thing right now is to continue to do all we can to prevent the spread of COVID-19 with culturally appropriate messaging and also to continue to push for health equity in Latino communities. If you offer a support service that can be helpful to Latinos let us know, because the word needs to get out.

Also, share our materials on the Impacts of COVID-19 on Latinos and solutions. We have a bilingual infographic, a landing page on “Coronavirus and Latino Health Equity” and a list of actions that could help Latino communities.

What is the biggest campaign you are working on and how can people and our readers join and help?

We are working on several things right now, including culturally aligned messaging to help stop the spread of COVID and also a campaign to help communities get their cities to declare racism a public health issue and commit to action. We know that racism coupled with the impacts of COVID-19 are detrimental to our population. Therefore, we need to do all we can to promote a culture of equity and to reduce bias.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Patient Advocate Speaks Out on Eli Lilly’s Lowered Prices

By Madelyn Corwin

On April 7, 2020, Eli Lilly announced it would be selling its insulin to select patients for $35/month. This covers the uninsured and people with high deductibles. While myself and the entire diabetes community are happy lives will be saved through this news, we are not going to commend Eli Lilly for doing what they could have and should have done a decade ago.

We have already lost lives from rationing insulin, people have lost their vision, their limbs, their college savings accounts, their cars, their homes and so much more. People have literally chosen not to marry the love of their life just because they want to remain on Medicaid for their insulin. People have turned to the black market to buy insulin for years because of Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk, and Sanofi’s price gouging. We can never get those lives back, those homes back, or people’s eyesight back. No amount of money or affordable insulin can fix the irreparable damage that has been done by the big 3 insulin manufacturers.

Madelyn Corwin, advocate for affordable insulin

This is not to say I’m mad about the $35 announcement. You have to understand where thousands of insulin4all advocates are coming from right now. Many advocates have made unthinkable sacrifices just to be able to pay that bill at the pharmacy counter so they can live to see tomorrow. People have skipped meals for days and worked out to the point of injuring themselves to bring their blood sugar down because they didn’t have enough money for more insulin. Many have rationed and been put in the hospital for DKA, only then to receive an even larger medical bill that they cannot pay, all at the hand of companies like Eli Lilly.

While the end goal is obviously and will always be affordable and accessible insulin for every person on this planet, we will not praise any manufacturer for doing the right thing after they’ve done the worst thing possible for years. It’s like when a country starts a senseless war and then ends it ten years later. Like, alright. Thanks, I guess. You profited, I guess. But the money paid to that senseless war by citizens is now gone and lives on both sides are also gone. So, I guess you did the right thing by ending the war, but why were we even there to begin with? And now, there is no way to repair the damage. So now, we will hold X country accountable forever for the lives and money lost, and this will be in the history books. This analogy works well with this $35 insulin issue.

There will always be an ulterior motive to these types of things, especially when Eli Lilly and other insulin manufacturers have pushed against patient advocates when trying to get emergency insulin access bills passed in their states (Alec Smith Emergency Insulin Act). These manufacturers send money to every politician they can possibly get to take their checks – yes, that includes the state level as well – so do your research. Here is a list of groups Eli Lilly has given money to. A big reason bills cannot get passed quickly or get passed at all is because there are many insulin price gouging lobbyists standing in the way. Why would Lilly suddenly lower the price when they spend millions lobbying our politicians? Why would they do this when they jump through patent loopholes (evergreening). Why would they be continuously paying off anyone trying to make a cheaper generic? Something does not add up.

cost of type 1 diabetes infographic

Infographic: T1DInternational.com

I may be pessimistic, but personally I do not and will never trust any insulin manufacturer after what they have done. I know a lot of people do not understand the capacity of the insulin4all movement, but it’s more than the t-shirts and social media posts. A great deal of patient advocates are working extremely hard every single day to get the insulin price-gouging story heard. There are hundreds of advocates interviewed by large news networks annually. These advocates have built personal relationships with their representatives and advocates that spend hours a day on social media trying to make a difference.

Insulin manufacturers have seen this; they’ve seen the uproar. They know we exist, and they know we are angry. They’ve known this for the last six or so years, yet they have done nothing. In fact, they mock us, and they pay off politicians to push their big pharma narrative. Common example: “Insulin has to be priced at $300 for research and development.” We’ve all heard it from some politician who happily accepts thousands of dollars from an insulin manufacturer.

Eli Lilly CEO David Ricks has even laughed at the question of affordable insulin and pushed the blame onto insurance companies and PBMs. While advocates are 100% aware that insurance companies and PBMs also play a large role in what the price of insulin is in the USA (you know, since they all profit off of our struggle at the pharmacy counter), he has twisted the narrative to make Lilly look like the good guy.

Lilly does this frequently; it’s probably in their training manuals by now. They gaslight patients and try to make it look like we’re the ones who don’t know what’s going on. Don’t fall for it. This is classic insulin manufacturer PR, they’ve been doing it for years. They love to push the blame elsewhere when in reality, those are the people they happily work with and write up their contracts with, all so they can make billion-dollar profits. In reality, they can just lower the price. They just proved that to us on April 7, 2020. Again, this should show you this company cannot be trusted and you should rely on your own personal, unbiased research.

On a recent conference call (March 16, 2020), Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms got on with Andy Vickery at Eli Lilly. Andy is on the Lilly Diabetes Insulin Team (skip to 3:00 to hear the question and answer). Stacey asks Vickery, “In a time of really what is very much uncertainty, understanding that people with diabetes cannot live without insulin, why not be a hero in this space? And say right now that Lilly will cut the price of insulin to $25 or $35? Why not let people fill prescriptions for what they are written? For a price that would obviously help people around this country feel better about the one thing that they are… devastatingly worried about?”

Vickery responds, “I appreciate the frustration… If we cut that price, could that disrupt the supply to our other supply channel partners… We have contracts in place with them for a certain price. It would go beyond our ability to cut that price. We would have to renegotiate with them… We are constantly looking at the things we can be doing at this time…” He continues on to talk about their authorized generics.

Let’s take a look at how he also, like David Ricks, pushes blame onto PBMs and insurance companies while taking no responsibility at all for their role in all of this. He says he would have to renegotiate with PBMs and wholesalers. This is quite funny because that means if they lowered the price of insulin to $35, then they got everyone in their supply chain to agree on that. Why didn’t they get everyone to agree and play nice in 2012 when this became a devastating price for Americans to have to pay? Why didn’t they do this after we lost our first life to insulin rationing? Because they enjoyed the profit they were making and felt no guilt. There will always be an ulterior motive with these people.

There is also always a “fine print” to these copay cards. If you’ve ever used a patient assistance program, there’s a good chance you know what I’m talking about. Diabetes advocates are still doing research and looking for answers from Lilly reps regarding the terms and conditions. When does this end? How much can it be used? Is there a maximum amount, like with all of their other copay cards? As far as it looks right now, this program could be maxed out at a $7,500-annual limit (so, it’s good for less than a year of insulin for the average patient). Laura Marston, an incredible diabetes insulin4all advocate and lawyer has been compiling this information for us and will provide us with more info as she receives it. Again, I am looking for further confirmation for this and we have people searching high and low for the extra terms and conditions.

[UPDATE: Laura has done some more investigating on the situation, “It’s a limit on the difference between retail price ($325 times number of insulin vials) and $35 if you’re uninsured. If you’re insured, it’s the difference between your copay and $35.” We have still not seen official terms and conditions released by Eli Lilly.]

To close off this article, I decided to reach out to a few of my friends with diabetes who have struggled to get their insulin since their diagnosis and people who lost family members with diabetes to insulin rationing. If you are still struggling to understand why people will never commend insulin manufacturers for making bare minimum decisions, read through these:

“I believe this is once again another PR stunt. We have seen them do this type of thing several times over the past few years when pressure gets put upon them. If it was so easy for them to lower the price during this time of a pandemic, why did they not lower it years ago when people were crying out for help, people online begging for assistance, people like my son Alec who died because he could not afford his insulin. I want to know why now? Why after meeting with Mike Mason and sharing my story of how Alec died and many others stepping forward and sharing their stories. How long is this price going to be in effect for? How are they going to transition people from paying $35 now to $350 when this crisis improves?”

– Nicole Smith-Holt, who lost her son to insulin rationing in 2017.

 

“So I had to purchase out of pocket on multiple occasions. Usually, at fault of my insurance company (which would also be the fault of Lilly considering the contracts they write up and agree on with them), but again, we know it shouldn’t come to that. First time, I broke my last bottle. I was still 10 days from refill through insurance. I had to pay out of pocket, $280 for a vial. Second time, my insurance changed and told me I could only get Novolog covered, but I only had a prescription for Humalog. My doctor’s office wasn’t open and able to get me a prescription, so I had to pay the list price out of pocket again with the Humalog script I had on file (I would’ve died if I didn’t get it). Third, was because they forced an RX required on the box, I didn’t have a prescription, and I was running low on Humalog. I was out on tour for a whole month and running on my last pump fill up on my flight home. My flight was delayed overnight, and I was about to run out of insulin within the next 4-5 hours. With no prescription and no one up at 2 AM to get me one, I had to go to the ER and have them fill my pump, which took 3 hours of waiting and a bill of $550 for 100 units of insulin. Thanks, Lilly.”

– Ryan Ank

 

“I think it’s great that they’re doing this because people really need all the help they can get right now. Eli Lilly has been the leader of everything insulin-related. This means they gouged prices, and the other pharma companies followed. They lowered prices, albeit temporarily, so the others might follow. My anger stems from this, proving they could have lowered the prices at any time. So many people died from insulin rationing. Their deaths could have been prevented. So many lives cut short. Lilly’s responses are always R&D, but this $35 cap is proof of their lies and greed.”

– Nicole Hood, who lost her son to insulin rationing in 2018.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

STUDY: How COVID-19 Is Affecting People with Diabetes

The COVID-19 pandemic is greatly affecting all of us, on an unprecedented and global scale. We recently utilized our Thrivable Insights Panel, comprised of almost 20,000 people living with or caring for someone with diabetes, to evaluate how the diabetes community is affected.

The infographic below provides a brief overview of data collected in the initial survey to gauge people’s perceptions, concerns, measures they are taking to prepare and protect themselves, and more. Stay tuned for a detailed data report, and more to come from our continued research efforts on COVID-19.

Want to make a difference? Join the Thrivable Insights research panel.

Also, please join our COVID-19-specific research efforts here.

Made with Visme Infographic Maker

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Managing the Emotional Toll of Diabetes and COVID-19

The world as we know it has changed due to COVID-19, the illness caused by the novel coronavirus. The number of businesses closing, people being quarantined (mandatorily or voluntarily), laws changing to contain the spread of the disease in the United States, cities invoking curfews and travel bans, and people dying is changing by the hour. If it suddenly feels as though you traveled through time and landed in the zombie apocalypse, you’re not alone.

Add to that the layered anxiety and worry that comes with having diabetes in the time of an unmitigated infectious disease (of global pandemic proportions) disaster, and it can become too much to manage. It can be a complicated mix of concern for the world, the risk to yourself, and how you feel about the risk to loved ones in an environment of uncertainties and unknown unknowns. Here are our top ways to manage the stress:

Know the Facts

Having diabetes doesn’t necessarily put you at any higher risk for getting COVID-19, but you can be susceptible to more severe complications if you acquire the disease. Do not panic. Do not get sucked down into the rabbit hole of myths and conspiracy theories. Learn the facts from reputable sources only. Following advice from The World Health Organization and the CDC are two good places to start. You may have increased anxiety around diabetes and coronavirus (that’s expected and warranted), but unnecessary stress doesn’t help, either.

Disconnect

Most of us are working from home these days, and while that’s an excellent way to help contain the spread of disease and protect people with preexisting conditions like diabetes, it’s also keeping many people glued to their screens for most of the day, and that means, glued to the news. Get away from your computer screen, the news, Twitter, and the chaos of Facebook for some time each day (walks outside are excellent, now that the spring weather is upon us!). Set limits on how much you watch the news (it’s crucial to stay informed, it’s not so crucial to watch CNN for 7 hours straight). Or better yet, limit screen time to evenings only.

Infographic by The World Health Organization

Be Prepared, Not Panicked

There’s only so much you can do, but make sure you do it! Practice proper social distancing, hand washing techniques, stay home if you’re sick, and avoid crowded places, sick people, and high traffic areas (airports, etc.).

If you can, stock up on two weeks’ worth of food, toiletries, and medication, and make arrangements to work from home, if able. It’s understandable that most people cannot afford to stock up on fresh food and medication. More affordable, shelf-stable food items that can go a long way include canned goods and frozen vegetables, and dried beans and rice. That being said, there’s no need to necessarily hoard grocery items, as grocery stores do not have any supply-chain issues and hoarding for yourself may cause deprivation for others (although, of course, make sure you have more than enough supplies to treat low blood sugar at home). Additionally, check out our advice for obtaining additional diabetes supplies without breaking your budget during this crisis.

If your job requires in-person time (if you work in the service industry, are a healthcare worker, provide city services such as garbage collection or sanitation, or your boss simply won’t budge on a work from home arrangement), try and maintain 6 feet distance between you and others, ask for latex gloves if you work in a grocery store or are a mail carrier and touch lots of objects (be sure you know the proper way to use them!), and avoid standing near sick people. Also, wash your hands thoroughly and often. If you can find it, hand sanitizer also is extremely helpful when on the job if running water and soap aren’t readily available. COVID-19 is caused by a novel Coronavirus, meaning it’s never been seen before, and the epidemiological characteristics of the spread of the disease are still being uncovered. It’s best to use extreme caution. It’s recently been revealed that it *may* be airborne, although studies are conflicting.

After you’ve adequately prepared, don’t continue to panic. Falling to hysteria won’t help anyone, but being prepared can give you peace of mind if you’re forced to be at home for a while.

How to Protect Others from Getting Sick - Coronavirus 2

Infographic by The World Health Organization

Move Your Body

Exercise is one of the main ways to decrease stress, and just because many cities are closing down their gyms, doesn’t mean you can’t move your body. Aim for a moderate activity for at least 30 minutes every single day. Warming weather can mean outdoor runs or walks, bike rides or hikes, and YouTube is an excellent resource for yoga and meditation classes and various cardio routines. Check out this article for even more ideas! You may not be able to control a lot right now, but moving your body is one concrete thing you can do to feel better.

Create Structure

With school closings and changing work routines, nothing feels normal right now and that can cause a lot of anxiety. Try to create some sort of structured routine (small changes can make a big difference!). Wake up at your normal time, even if you don’t have a commute right now. Make your bed every morning. Shower. Put on pants (yes, some people need a reminder to change out of their PJs when working from home!). If you usually have Tuesday night pasta night, have your Tuesday night pasta night. Sticking to a routine is especially important if you have children at home and they’re not in school currently, but a routine is healthy for everyone.

Check in on Your People

Gathering in crowds is not recommended right now, per CDC guidelines, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t check in on your friends and family. Skype, FaceTime, or even good old-fashioned texts and phone calls are excellent ways to stay in touch with everyone. We’re all in this together, and reminding people that they aren’t alone is crucial right now for mental health and sanity.

Supporting loved ones amid covid-19 pandemic

Infographic by The World Health Organization

Do Something Tangible

When you take away social gathering, date nights out, going to the movies, playing mini-golf, going bowling, and your kids’ weekly ballet class, everything suddenly feels…digital. Do something tangible: clean out the garage you’ve been meaning to clean out for the past 2 years, go through your clothes for Goodwill donations, repaint and rearrange a room, learn how to knit, dig around in your garden, pull out the dusty Scrabble and Scattergories games from the basement and have a game night, master your grandma’s cornbread recipe–anything that is physical will benefit you tremendously, and help peel you away from the constant stream of anxiety-provoking news.

Eat Healthy

The whole world being on pause right now might have given you license to stress-eat ice cream every night last week, or pour one too many glasses of wine over the weekend, but keeping a healthy eating routine will fuel your body and make you feel better over the long run. What feels good in the moment isn’t always the best thing for us over the long haul, and making sure we’re drinking enough water, eating plenty of vegetables, and getting good sources of protein will sustain us much better than ice cream ever could (sorry to say!).

Allow Yourself Some Grace

The world isn’t operating at 100% right now, and so it’s okay that you aren’t, either. You haven’t been able to concentrate on your work emails at all? Haven’t had the motivation to cook an elaborate meal? Not feeling optimistic about the future? Give yourself some grace, and allow yourself to slow down and feel this moment. This is a global pandemic, and (hopefully only) a once-in-a-lifetime event. Things are not normal, and it’s unreasonable to expect yourself to pretend like everything’s okay. It’s okay to not be okay right now.

Know This Is Only Temporary

Everything is in extremes right now, and it’s foreign to many of us. Maybe you’ve had to cancel travel plans, maybe you’ve had to return home from a study abroad program early, or you’re missing out on a Broadway play. Maybe you’ve even postponed your wedding. These are not normal times, and things won’t always be like this. Eventually, you will be able to go to the movies again, go to concerts with large crowds and not worry, get dinners, go bowling and grab happy hour without a care, and when you do, you can toast to happiness and good health, and getting through this horrific time, together.

How are you coping emotionally during this difficult and complicated time in the world? Share this article to help a friend, and comment your thoughts below; we would love to hear them!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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