Want to Donate Your Unused Diabetes Supplies?

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Eliza Skoler

If you’ve got unused diabetes supplies that you no longer need, don’t throw them away! Here are several easy ways that you can donate your supplies to others.

If you’ve recently switched to a new diabetes medication or device, you may have leftover diabetes supplies that you won’t need. It might feel like such a waste to throw away things like insulin vials, needles, and test strips, especially when there are many people in the world who cannot afford the diabetes devices and medication that they need to live healthy lives. The good news is that there are several ways to donate your supplies so that people who do need these items can receive them.

It’s important to know that your supplies should be unused and unopened – most donations will not be accepted if the supplies are no longer sealed, or if they have already expired.

Option 1: Contact your healthcare office

There is a chance that your care team collects unused diabetes supplies to provide to other people with diabetes. You can call and ask them about whether they are interested in your donation

Option 2: Contact local diabetes advocacy organizations

Diabetes education centers or local branches of advocacy organizations (like ADA or JDRF) may collect diabetes supplies themselves or be able to refer you to other donation sites.

Option 3: Mail your supplies to a national organization

We know of four national organizations currently accepting diabetes supplies donations: Insulin for Life, SafeNetRx, Integrated Diabetes Services, and CR3 Diabetes. The most well-known and widest-reaching of the three is Insulin for Life. Learn more about each organization below.

Insulin for Life is a non-profit organization that collects diabetes supplies from people in the US for redistribution all over the world to people who otherwise cannot access the life-saving treatments that they need. You can read our 2015 profile on Insulin for Life here.

Insulin for Life accepts the following supplies donations (with specific details and requirements for each found on their site). The organization does not accept pump supplies.

  • Insulin Vials
  • Insulin Pens
  • Insulin Cartridges
  • A1C Test Kits
  • KetoStix
  • Glucagon
  • Glucose Meters
  • Glucose Strips
  • Lancing Devices
  • Syringes
  • Pen Needles
  • Lancets

To donate, click here. You’ll be able to download and print a shipping label to mail your supplies to Insulin for Life. You can find instructions on how to pack insulin (with refrigeration) here.

SafeNetRx collects medical supplies and redistributes them to people in need living in Iowa. To donate diabetes supplies, call 1-866-282-5817.

Integrated Diabetes Services collects many types of diabetes equipment and supplies (almost anything but lancets) to distribute by request to people with diabetes in the US and around the world. To donate or request supplies, call 1-877-735-3648.

CR3 Diabetes Association provides affordable diabetes devices and supplies (glucose meters, test strips, insulin pumps, and pump supplies) to people with diabetes across the world. CR3 Diabetes currently accepts:

  • Medtronic insulin pumps – 630G, 670G, and 530G (models 551 and 751)
  • Unexpired pump supplies
  • Guardian3 sensors
  • Glucose test strips

Read the specifics for donating and find mailing instructions here. If you or someone you know need help paying for diabetes supplies, you can apply for assistance through CR3 Diabetes.

Thank you for taking the time to donate your old diabetes supplies to those who need it. At diaTribe we are grateful each day for the strength and generosity of the diabetes community. Given the immense need, we’re hopeful that someday soon there may be easier and more effective ways to also donate unused diabetes medications.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How to Lose Weight and Be Active With Type 1 Diabetes

Editor’s Note: Cliff Scherb, Founder of the Glucose Advisors Consulting community and Tristar Athletes LLC, is a nutrition, health, and dosing expert. He consults virtually through the Glucose Advisors University, teaching the Scherb Method decision support system for insulin management, nutrition, weight loss, and activity. To inquire about program openings, courses, and general questions working with Cliff or Glucose Advisors, join the community or email him directly at cliff@glucoseadvisors.com.

Most of my career as a health expert, I have had the privilege of helping others. In the type 1 diabetes  (T1D) spotlight, I am one who walks the walk and talks the talk when it comes to general health and well being. Yes, most of my career has been spent as a more extreme endurance athlete – yet these days most of my endurance is spent behind a computer teaching others how to achieve their T1D goals, still active but more inclined to also be happily chasing my 1.5 year old daughter as she grows up.

Cliff Scherb

Photo credit: Cliff Scherb

Sitting more regularly and burning less energy overall each day has had some meaningful changes to my management methods. Let’s face it, if I continued to eat the same amounts of calories each day such as when I was racing and training, I would blow up like a balloon!

I have always maintained what I will call a “normal” lifestyle and stayed true to what most do in life who do not have T1D. Meaning I don’t bend my will to T1D and I’m not afraid of carbohydrates or feel compelled to eat only fats. I believe that you can do what’s best for you, and if it makes you happy to join one of these extremes, by all means do it.

The internet is full of advice for people with T1D and never before have we had the wealth of information at just a fingertip-length away. How you put that information together and use it to your benefit is what is not so easy to do. Knowing what is worth your time and what is not can mean the difference between brilliant blood sugar control and avoiding longer term complications. The following tips we use have helped our students stay on track.

Here are five things you can do as a person with T1D that can help to improve your blood sugar and to help maintain a lean body composition:

1. Consider an Insulin Pump

If you have the option and ability, the pump allows you to lower and raise your total daily insulin dose more easily. When there are periods of your day that do not include insulin, there is a greater opportunity to process fat stores. If you are using multiple daily injections you may want to speak with your doctor about moving away from long-acting insulins such as Lantus, which have close to a 24-hour duration. On an insulin pump, only short-acting insulin is used, which is out of the body more quickly and may help lower the total daily insulin dose.

2. Choose More Fiber

Consuming an adequate amount of fiber in your diet can help not only by giving you the feeling of fullness but also by not requiring any extra insulin. Considered a carbohydrate, it does not generally impact blood sugars and can be subtracted out of your total carbohydrate count at meals.

3. Choose Lean Proteins

Proteins are great at promoting blood sugar stability and also have fewer total calories per gram when compared to fats. Fat grams, while having the benefit of blood sugar stability, can promote insulin resistance (increased insulin demand) and have nearly twice as many calories.

4. Time Your Carbohydrates Earlier in the Day vs. Later at Night

This means having a larger carbohydrate-loaded breakfast to supercharge your energy during the day and setting it up so that your insulin levels overnight are lower. This is a great way to lower your total daily insulin dose. You should also try to limit insulin prior to activity and time it post-activity when you are more sensitive and need less insulin overall.

5. Create Insulin Sensitivity

Being active is a great way to introduce a higher level of insulin sensitivity. This sensitivity will lower your total daily dose overall, aiding in total reductions in body fat. When timed with an appropriate meal plan and diet it can be a recipe for success!

Keep in mind, anything worth doing takes work! What is one of the biggest obstacles to T1D management success? It certainly isn’t a lack of desire. No, it’s just one thing…

Follow-through.

All the tools in the world don’t matter if you aren’t implementing what you learn. Practicing your nutrition timing and activity can help you to create greater insulin sensitivity which lowers your total daily dose. Ultimately, when you track the total daily insulin dose, this can help lead to longer-term weight loss and happiness with enhanced blood sugars.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes Doesn’t Have Me

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Jasmine Wiese

Relief. That was the first thing I felt when I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

I was mildly sick for about a year and a half before my diagnosis. My skin healed slowly and I hardly slept. My mental health was pretty much nonexistent, but the most distinct memory I have is feeling like I had totally lost interest in the world around me. Then, a few days before my junior year of high school, I went to a physical exam and got a simple blood test. My resting blood glucose level after fasting was between 300-400 mg/dL, but everything else came back normal. I was told immediately that the most probable diagnosis was type 1 diabetes.

At that moment, I felt relieved. Suddenly, there was an answer for all the things I couldn’t explain – why I felt so sick (out of range glucose levels), why I constantly felt dehydrated, and why I felt like my life was spinning out of control. I decided right then and there that I would embrace my diagnosis and live with a positive attitude.

Image source: Beyond Type 1

My Education With Diabetes

Over the next few weeks, I went to lots of appointments and met different doctors, nurses, and certified diabetes educators. The best thing I did in the days after my diagnosis was reading the book, Think Like a Pancreas, by Gary Scheiner. If you haven’t read the book, I highly recommend it. I gained an understanding of diabetes that I would not have otherwise received.

From the beginning, I managed my diabetes myself. I counted carbs, calculated the insulin I needed, and kept myself healthy. I didn’t feel like I needed emotional support because for me, science has always been my way of coping. The more I learned about the immune system and diabetes, the more I felt in control, and I slowly began to regain confidence in myself.

I was extremely lucky when I was diagnosed because I received a continuous glucose monitor less than a month after my diagnosis, I met my first diabetes buddies a month after that, and I was training to use my insulin pump by Christmas. Thanks to the people I met at CarbDM and Tidepool, I learned about DYF’s Altitude 14,505 program. The program is a nine-day backpacking trip to climb Mt. Whitney, the highest peak in the contiguous United States, with a group of type 1 teens. I applied for the program in January, and I began training and buying lots of gear.

Last summer, before my first diaversary, I climbed Mt. Whitney. It’s one thing to know that you are physically and mentally capable of going on a long backpacking trip, but it’s another feat to actually do it. I carried thirty pounds on my back for over 75 miles. Some days we had thousands of feet of elevation gain, and other days hiked a (relatively) flat route for eleven miles. At one point, part of the trail and been blown off, so we had to climb along a cliff to keep going. There was a rest day at a natural hot spring, where we hopped back and forth from freezing river water to the steaming springs. On the day we reached the summit, we each enjoyed a Snickers bar – and it was delicious.

Image source: Beyond Type 1

Coming Full Circle

After climbing Mt. Whitney, I felt much more confident about my ability to travel alone and to deal with any diabetes surprises. I knew that if I could manage my health out in the wilderness, I could certainly do so in another part of the world. It was also my first diabetes camp and it was one of the most fun times I have ever had. I quickly felt empowered to keep managing my health and to keep going on adventures. I also made a lot of lovely diabuddies.

I realize I certainly had a whirlwind introduction to the diabetes community, but I learned that it’s all too important to know people your own age with diabetes, because the way you deal with diabetes is both similar and different from others. The things I worried about this time last year are so different from what I am worrying about today. I am fortunate enough to have diabuddies that I can rely on and commiserate with so I can share my experiences – both the good and the bad.

When all is said and done, I’m mentally and physically in a much better place now. I have diabetes, but diabetes doesn’t have me. I don’t hide my continuous glucose monitor or my insulin pump, and I don’t mind when people ask me questions about them. My devices are just accessories that I wear. If anything, I am more in tune with my health than I was before. I still have good and bad days, days when I am completely in range and days when I don’t feel like putting in a new infusion set. I know that diabetes will always be a challenge that I have to face, but I am optimistic about new treatments and research. From open source projects to clinical trials, I make a point to read about new developments every day.

I had my diaversary earlier this year, right around starting college, and I’m pretty excited for the future since I will be pursuing a degree in biology and hopefully doing diabetes research.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

From Coping to Healing (and Everything in Between): An Interview With Michelle Bauer

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Makaila Heifner

If you ask us, Michelle Bauer is about as badass as you can get. An Iron Man competitor, a newly published author, and one of the biggest hearts in the diabetes community, she’s the definition of a game-changer. Michelle recently sat down with Beyond Type 1 to talk more about her journey through grief after losing her son, Jesse, her work thereafter to create the support hub for T1D loss, Jesse Was Here, and what’s on the horizon now that she’s published her book.

Beyond Type 1: What were you doing before you got into diabetes professionally + how did you come to get so involved in the community?

Michelle Bauer: I started my own at-home business, doing medical billing for mental health clinics. I had no interest in diabetes, even though I grew up with five aunts and uncles that grew up with type 1 diabetes. It didn’t really resonate with me until Jesse, my son, was diagnosed when he was three years old on March 3rd, 2000.

I pretty much dropped everything to volunteer for JDRF. Doing the JDRF Ride to Cure became something I was really interested in, and I became an Executive Director for them. From there, I did Ironman Wisconsin and got interested in trying to find people with type 1 diabetes who wanted to do Ironman. I filmed and produced a documentary in 2008 about 12 people with diabetes doing Ironman, called “Triabetes.” Back then, nobody was doing that.

From there, I was doing the Riding On Insulin snowboard camp for kids with type 1 diabetes. And once Jesse passed away, I dropped everything even more, and then became a director for Riding On Insulin and helped develop camps all over the world for kids to snowboard and mountain bike.

Today, I work full-time at Diabetes Daily, as their Sales Director.

BT1: What was it like when Jesse was diagnosed? Did you have any prior knowledge about type 1?

MB: I had a knowledge of it, but my knowledge was basically based in the 1970s and ’80s. I’m kind of wowed by it and I look back at my grandmother, who had multiple kids with diabetes so long ago when there wasn’t even blood glucose testing. They were peeing in vials that would change color and they had one kind of insulin.

I was very familiar with it, but they were all so independent. Everybody ran high because you didn’t know what your blood sugar was at any given point in the day, so there weren’t a lot of low blood sugars. It was a lot of high blood sugar and complications. When Jesse was diagnosed, I didn’t know as much as I should have, but it was different. The insulin pump was a new thing, and it was hard to get him on it when he was five. I had to fight to get him on a Medtronic pump. Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGM) just weren’t a thing yet; it was just a lot of finger pokes, and regular and NPH insulin back then.

Can you talk about what losing Jesse was like?

Take it back to 2010: I was very active in the diabetes community, and back then, nobody talked about people passing away from type 1 diabetes. Our diabetes educators never really talked about it being a possibility. All I ever heard was, “Oh, they’re fine. They’re going to live a healthy life. Don’t even worry about it.”

When he passed away, it was very sudden and unexpected. I was known enough in the diabetes community, from the documentary, that people knew who I was, so it put everyone in kind of a panic. That if this could happen to my family, it could happen to theirs. In the early days, the panic went the wrong way. People didn’t want me talking about it, they thought I was scaring the newly diagnosed families, and it wasn’t a very well-received conversation.

When I lost him, there was this feeling of dread – I thought I was going to lose my community. I’d spent so much time working in diabetes and all my friends either had type 1 diabetes or their kids had type 1 diabetes. I was thinking, “Well, who’s going to want to hang out with a mom who lost their kid to a disease their kids have?”

What happened was actually the exact opposite. My friends really rallied around me. They wanted me at events. They wanted me to talk about Jesse. I felt that the piece that was missing for me was wanting to know other people who were going through what I was going through. I started reaching out to other people and talked more and more about my loss, and slowly but surely, started the Jesse Was Here network. I just found it was really cathartic to talk to these other people who understood, who’d been in my shoes, and could relate to my pain.

Is it hard to be constantly reminded of Jesse through the work you do + how you cope when those feelings come up?

What I’ve learned over the ten years is that everybody grieves differently. My way of coping was to talk about him constantly. I found the more I talked about him and being involved with other people, I felt like he was living on in my life. People just want to feel like their loved one is still part of their lives and people don’t forget them.

It was very cathartic. When I look back, I went from coping to healing without even realizing it. Because I was coping every time a new mom called me that had lost their child and I would sob. I would stand in their shoes, I would feel the pain all over again. Now, it’s more of helping and healing. I don’t have to go back to that day every time I talk to somebody who’s lost, because now part of my healing is helping other people. But there are always days where I see a little boy who looks like Jesse or the smell of insulin sometimes gets me.

What are other ways you’ve commemorated Jesse’s memory?

Just weeks after he passed, I got an essay by him in the mail from a teacher. I was feeling really distraught, feeling sorry for myself, and trying to figure out what my path was going to be outside of diabetes because diabetes was no longer in my life. The essay could have been about anything he wanted, and it was just called, “My Mom is Courageous.” He had detailed everything that I had ever done for him in diabetes. He had detailed all of these things that he was proud of, like Ride to Cure Diabetes and Ironman. I knew, right then and there, I would continue on the Ironman route. I created the Riding On Insulin Endurance Team, where there were 63 of us who did Ironman Wisconsin. 36 of our teammates had type 1, which was probably one of my coolest moments.

Every year since he’s been gone, we have a rock concert called Jessepalooza, where we get local bands together and do auctions. It’s really an excuse to get together, to celebrate him. He played guitar and he played drums. We do that every summer, and we’ve had ten of those.

I was very involved in the JDRF Ride to Cure Diabetes when Jesse was alive. The year he passed away, I decided to go back to Death Valley, California and ride in his memory. The JDRF Ride Director, Allie, and the coaches at the time knew me very well, and they advised me that mile 23 was going to be a mile of silence from then on, in memory of Jesse; they came up with 23 because he died on February 3rd. And so Mile 23 has morphed into this amazing thing, where at the beginning of the weekend they talk about how there are 99 miles, to celebrate all that we’ve done towards a cure for type 1 diabetes, but there’s one mile to remember those we’ve lost. It’s meaningful to way more people than just my family; it’s in memory of everyone.

Talk to me about the book…

I have to pinch myself that it’s a real, tangible thing. About a month after Jesse passed away, I started writing. I felt like, “Well, maybe I’ll write down how I feel, for the first six months and maybe my writing will help somebody else not feel alone.” The book was supposed to just chronicle the first six months, but I kept writing. At the five year mark, it was ironic, because I was looking back, saying, “Wow. How I feel changed. I need to write about that.” At the ten-year mark, I thought, “Even more so.” I started to find joy in my life.

There’s a lot of satisfaction knowing that people have gotten their hands on my book and it’s helped them. There was a point where I was wondering if it would ever get published. But I was giving this draft copy to people as they were losing children and I knew it was helping them.

Then, a friend of mine who I kind of lost contact with saw me post on Facebook, and, when he realized who I was, told me he’d started a publishing company and that we should talk. That was in February, and by April 23rd, he had launched it. Since then, it’s been number one on Amazon in a couple of categories. We’ve sold a lot of copies, and what I love most about it is not only are people who have type 1 reading it, but a lot of first responders in the country are reading it. In Wisconsin, it kind of went out to all of the Wisconsin police as a resource for them. That’s one of the most rewarding parts, that it’s helping those beyond the diabetes community.

What are you hoping that people get out of your book + what have you learned about yourself through the grieving process?

I hope that it helps people who are grieving a recent loss to have hope that they can find joy again; that they’ll be allowed to push a little bit of the guilt aside, and that they feel their loss, but allow themselves to find happiness again, because that is what the people who are gone would want.

I’ve learned you’re not the only person going through something. You can’t just walk through Target and think that the grandma ahead of you is just living life with a grandchild on her hip. A lot of people have lost something big in their life. I’ve become a little bit more compassionate with other people, their losses, and their grief.

What’s next for you + Jesse was here?

We’re really hoping, through the Jesse Was Here program, to reach more siblings, and get them talking to one another. We do a really good job with parents, but we haven’t really done a great job with siblings. I’m also hopeful to re-engage public speaking in the T1D community and beyond.  I’ve been a keynote speaker on many occasions and hope to inspire others with a “Don’t Waste Your Pain” message of why it’s important to get involved.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

My Running Journey with Type 1 Diabetes

By Mariel Sotelo

I am 43 years old, was diagnosed just before I turned 20 years old.

The doctor misdiagnosed me with type 2. After the diagnosis of my middle daughter, I understood why I was misdiagnosed. She was diagnosed as a MODY 3 and she is now being treated with oral medication. I started with oral medication and three years later, I got married and was planning to grow our family. I started to research insulin pumps. My endocrinologist had no idea about any of the pumps, but he signed off on the paperwork within a few months of me getting pregnant with my first daughter. As she turned one, I found out I was pregnant with my second daughter. After I had my second daughter the weight just piled on from there. After my oldest started school is when I decided to do something about the weight and my sugar. I met the gym owner who is the one responsible for me starting my love/hate relationship with running.

In 2013 we started to train for our first half marathon. It was not an easy thing for me to do. I could not just say I am going out for a run like the rest of them. Why? Because I have type 1 diabetes (T1D) and at first it was trial and error just to figure out how to handle the pump, the blood glucose, and the effort put into it. I always love the idea of having to use less insulin after a run.

marathon medals

Photo credit: Mariel Sotelo

After running a few more half marathons, everyone decided it was time to go to the next level. I was a little scared, but not because of my diabetes. I was scared because everyone was getting faster and it seemed like I wasn’t making any progress. I have continued to run no matter how fast or how slow I am. I know I have T1D and that alone is a hassle sometimes, but I know that a lot of the women that now run in the group say that they started and continue to run because of me! They feel inspired when they see that no matter what, I do not back out from running.

Even COVID-19 did not stop me from completing a challenge I had signed up for back in November of 2019. My first run was completing a half marathon in May which I had to do a week after a 14-day quarantine after contracting COVID-19 from work and having mild symptoms. I have to say, I did have some concerns with my lungs, but I did okay and was able to finish. On October 25th, I completed my 8th marathon which was part of the challenge. On the weekend of November 14th and 15th, I finished my 9th marathon. I ran 14 miles on the 14th for World Diabetes Day and 12.2 miles on the 15th to complete my run.

Diabetes has not stopped me from running! I am not the fastest runner of the group but I always reach the finish line!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Dexcom’s Chief Technology Officer Reveals Updates on the G7

We are almost through to the end of this year and we are all looking forward to new diabetes technologies coming out in 2021! Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology is an incredibly useful tool that can improve diabetes management, and the release of Dexcom’s new CGM, the G7 is certainly one to look out for. For me, the sheer difference in size alone (the G7 will be about the size of a quarter, certainly an improvement over the G6!) is something to get excited about. Moreover, the company has completely redesigned the product, which will now be completely disposable, as opposed to previous iterations that included a reusable transmitter.

I recently talked to Dexcom’s Chief Technology Officer, Jake Leach to get the most recent scoop on what’s to come with the release of the highly anticipated new product.

When Will the G7 be Released?

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the start of clinical trials was delayed. Leach explained that the company used that time to integrate in even more technology with the G7. Clinical studies needed to get FDA approval for the G7 are currently in the process of getting started. Although they could not disclose specific details on timing, Dexcom confirmed that will see the product come to market in 2021. A broader launch is expected to come in 2022.

What About the Accuracy?

Dexcom has taken a lot of technologies of the G6 and made improvements on them. It will need to meet stringent accuracy requirements to be approved by the FDA. It is expected that the product will perform well and offer improvements over existing technologies.

What About the Wear Time?

Currently, the Dexcom G6 is approved for 10-day wear. However, many users try to circumnavigate this. Dexcom’s CTO had this to say about advancements for the G7:

“The platform is designed to extend the wear beyond 10 days, so the electronics, etc. are compatible with that. We are striving for a very high level of reliability for both the sensor and the adhesive patch. [So far, early studies have shown that] the right time frame for our customers is 10 days with this product, but we do intend to continue working to expand both the sensor and adhesive performance to go beyond 10 days. We feel that our customers deserve a sensor that is highly reliable for the full wear duration, and so 10 days is where we’re at with G7.

What About the Cost?

“We know that for CGM to be accessed by many many people, we need to continue to remove cost from the general system. So, G7 is designed to be highly manufacturable in very large volumes. We have our first G7 line up and running. We are using a fully automated assembly line. The product is not only highly reliable but also lower cost to manufacture. Providing users with the product that is disposable, there were hurdles that we had to overcome in engineering, to be able to provide a product where you are throwing away more components, but we are able to do that at a cost-point equal to or lower than G6.”

What About the Sensor Insertion?

The sensor insertion will be fully automated. Dexcom stated that the product will be even easier to apply than the G6, and that the applicator will be much smaller than the G6, reducing the environmental footprint.

“We specifically designed it to be as small as possible [but still large enough to ensure a comfortable insertion process]. Definitely smaller than G6…”

What About the Adhesive?

In the diabetes online community, I have recently been hearing more reports of adhesive-related allergic skin reactions, and speculations that perhaps there was a change in the adhesive formula being used. Here is what Dexcom had to say about that:

“Some very small number of users do have issues with irritation, and there is a number of different ways that can be addressed. It’s a balance between the adhesive properties of making the sensor stay on for the full duration and there are so trade-offs with irritation. We are very focused on minimizing irritation. We have made improvements to the patch where many users are seeing their sensors last longer, but we have seen a small number of irritation complaints and we are focused on [for both the G6 and the G7] always making improvements. We are focused on investigating what possibly could be causing these irritant properties. The G7 does have a different adhesive than G6 and we are looking to ensure that [causes] very little, if any, irritation.

What About New Integration with Other Systems?

“The way that we’ve designed our system is so that it can integrate with many different types of systems.”

In addition to integration with the Tandem’s Control IQ and Insulet’s OmniPod system, integration has also been developed for Companion Medical’s InPen as well as over 25 commercially-available apps. Leach also highlighted that as of now, the Dexcom CGM is the only product that has been approved for use with hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery systems.

What About New Predictive Modeling Algorithms?

Recently, Dexcom has partnered with the University of Virginia to conduct research on a variety of automated insulin delivery models and algorithms. Dexcom has also partnered with the European company Ypsomed to further develop CGM integration for automated insulin delivery systems. In addition, Dexcom is working to investigate the use of CGM data, in general, to provide users with key insights on blood glucose trends and potential therapy optimizations.

“Our general approach is to provide many options to our users. We know diabetes is a personal disease and everyone has different opportunities to connect with different devices, and what they feel fits into their lifestyle. We try to support as many options as possible so we do that through the pump integration, as well as the digital ecosystem of the app partners.”

What About the Data Display and Device Compatibility?

“It will be compatible with both Android and iOS. One thing we are doing with the G7 app is we are integrating more insights into the app. So, G6 does a great job of showing glucose information, trends, as well as the ‘urgent low soon’ alert. G7 is taking that even farther and starting to integrate in a lot more of the some of the functionality from Clarity, some of those insights you get will be built into the G7.”

Dexcom is also working to enhance some features of their apps for data sharing with support people and clinicians. In addition, a receiver will still be a part of the new system, for those users who want an alternative to using their smartphone for data display.

Staying Ahead of the Competition

The CGM market is growing rapidly, with more and more companies coming out with competitive products. We asked Dexcom where they view themselves and what their advantages are over other systems.

“We feel that G7 is going to be a whole new level of comfort and convenience in the CGM ecosystem and the integration that we can build on with both insulin pump partners and the digital ecosystem of  apps… is a significant differentiator between [us] and some of the other competitors. We’ve been providing real-time CGM data since day 1, and we want to continue to expand and improve and provide users with new tools that enable them to take control of diabetes.

Moreover, the use of CGM technology is also expanding in the clinical setting, and Dexcom is a big player there.

“With COVID, we got approval for emergency authorization use for Dexcom CGM in the hospital. During the pandemic, since the beginning, hospitals have been acquiring the G6 from us and using the device in the hospital setting. It has performed very well. It also limited the need for interaction between healthcare providers and the patients [with COVID].”

We thank Jake Leach for taking the time to provide us with the most updated information. Sounds pretty great to us, and we look forward to learning even more and updating our readers as more details come to light!

Do you use a Dexcom CGM? What are your thoughts on the advances in CGM tech? Please share your thoughts in the comments.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How to Get Through to Your Teen With Diabetes

If you’re raising a pre-teen or adolescent living with diabetes, you know that sometimes conveying the seriousness of the disease can be a difficult challenge. What oftentimes is easier and convenient now, such as grabbing fast food on the go, or neglecting to adequately count carbohydrates, take insulin or even test for days on end can contribute to serious complications later on in life. It can be extremely difficult to get through to your teen but making sure they know the seriousness of a life with diabetes is paramount. So, how do you communicate with a teenager when diabetes is the last thing they want to deal with? Does “tough love” work on teens?

Feeling Invincible

One’s adolescent years are an incredible time of drastic and fast change. Not only are teenagers growing rapidly physically and emotionally, but they’re also dealing with the drama of school and friends, and the challenges that managing a chronic condition brings. Teenagers and young adults often tend to feel quite invincible, even earning the nickname “young invincibles” for their seeming unwillingness to buy affordable health care plans or take reasonable preventive actions to take care of themselves and their bodies. More often than not, when teenagers neglect their diabetes management, it’s a sign of feeling quite burnt out.

Do Scare Tactics Work?

Can scare tactics help your teenager take their diabetes more seriously? When communication is difficult, it can seem almost impossible to prioritize diabetes management. Sometimes a teenager just doesn’t want to hear it, and in the worst of cases, giving your teenager scare tactics in the form of storytelling worst-case scenarios, playing the game of “what if” with complications, and threatening them can backfire, resulting in dangerous management patterns, disordered eating, or can even cause them to completely shut down all communication.

Lynn, from Pennsylvania, says,

“Scare tactics don’t work with me, and no one I know has used them. The best support I’ve gotten is when my loved ones decided to eat keto. We plan low-carb meals and look for new recipes together. If [my family] was eating tons of carbs, it would make it harder for me to stay low-carb. Otherwise, we don’t really talk much about my diabetes…my family does sometimes ask about my blood sugar after trying a new dish to see if it ‘worked’ for me.”

Cora adds,

“As young people, people with type 1 diabetes take criticism and scare tactics to heart. It’s basically verbal abuse because we don’t hear the practicalities behind what the parent is saying. Young people hear strongly worded comments about efforts to control our diabetes, and we take it personally. Except it comes through as ‘you’re bad’, ‘you’re lazy’, or ‘you’re incompetent’.”

Alienating your teenager with scare tactics is harmful, and you most likely will not get your desired result (more attention paid to their diabetes). There are healthier ways to help a person with diabetes in your life.

Photo credit: Adobe Stock

Honesty Doesn’t Have to Be Scary

It’s important to not scare your teenager with threats of complications, or a dark and scary future that may not come to fruition. Instead, model good behavior and have the whole family adopt practices that encourage a healthy lifestyle.

Meryl says,

“The best thing I have found to do is offer foods that he likes and can eat and not to nag.”

The good news that is well-adjusted teenagers eventually will take over the management of their diabetes, and thanks to technology, will begin to thrive. The power struggle and shirking of responsibility that comes with adolescence will end. In the meantime, here are some strategies to help you and your teenager thrive through this period of transition.

  1. Be there to listen. The power struggle between a teenager with diabetes and their parents comes down to them wanting to feel more independent, and the parents ultimately having to give up some (or all!) control of diabetes management and rigorous expectations. Make sure you’re there to talk with your teen, but more importantly, to listen to their wants and needs. If they want autonomy and space, be there to give it, but also hold them accountable (by showing you their glucometer memory, pump data, or meals and carbohydrate counts), to eventually earn more freedom. This way, you can problem-solve and strategize around emerging issues together. Additionally, here are some things not to say to someone with diabetes. 
  2. Find a great endocrinologist. Find a doctor that your teenager will work well with, and remember that communication is key. Finding the right dietitian, social worker, nurse, and primary care physician is also critical during this vulnerable time in a teenager’s life. Make sure your teenager feels comfortable talking with their doctors, sharing their concerns, and standing up for themselves during visits. This will be crucial for good diabetes management as they take on more of the responsibility of their care moving forward.
  3. Expose them to other teens with diabetes. Sign your teenager up for a diabetes camp, or a local support group for teenagers dealing with diabetes. Make sure they know that they are not alone, and find ample opportunities for them to meet other kids their age who are struggling with the same issues that they are. Usually, once a kid or teenager makes a “dia-bestie” their diabetes management improves, because now the thing that used to single them out suddenly makes them part of the cool crowd, like having the newest Patch Peelz or insulin pump.
  4. Try a tech break. If your teenager is struggling with constant insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor (CGM) changes all the time and is feeling like a cyborg, let them take a technology break. Sometimes a change in routine helps everyone suffering from diabetes burnout, and it can help bring a fresh perspective of and appreciation for the technology when you bring it back.
  5. Seek individual or family counseling. Sometimes a child loses interest in their diabetes management due to depression, which is more common among people with diabetes. Teenagers who have depression may not always exhibit the classic symptoms of depression such as crying, sudden anger, and changes in sleep and eating patterns. Regardless, a teen who stops taking an interest in their diabetes management is sending a clear message and call for help. This is an excellent time to find a great therapist who can help your teenager work through their issues.

Peter from New Jersey adds,

“From my experience, the key is to bring them to these realizations gradually, at a pace they can handle. That pace is very individual, and parents, and sometimes even doctors need to work on understanding that pace. In the meantime, just support them and make sure they don’t make any huge mistakes.”

These strategies can help you and your teenager thrive during this turbulent time in their lives, by prioritizing compassion, openness, and love. Also, be sure to check out recent research from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) about what works when it comes to transitioning to self-management.

What have you found to be the most helpful strategies in helping your teens thrive with diabetes? Please share your thoughts and experiences in the comments below.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

What You Need to Know If You’re Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Dr. Francine Kaufman

If you or your child was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you probably have many questions about how to manage this new condition. Dr. Fran Kaufman explains glucose levels and glucose targets, types of insulin and insulin doses, the honeymoon phase, and more

Were you recently told that you have, or your child has, type 1 diabetes? If so, you were likely filled with emotions, concerns, doubts, and questions. You were probably informed that there are many concepts you have to learn and many tasks you need to master. Hopefully, you were signed up for diabetes education sessions taught by certified diabetes care and education specialists (CDCES). You may have felt like you were on shaky ground; and despite all this, you knew that the sooner you learned how to manage diabetes, the better you would feel. Attitude matters, and the best attitude to have is a positive one – so hopefully you’re learning the tasks to successfully manage your diabetes.

Diabetes is a life-long condition. It is a marathon, not a sprint; no one day, one glucose level, or one meal makes a difference in the long run. One of the main goals of diabetes management is to balance insulin doses, food, and activity to keep your blood sugar or glucose levels in the desired or target range, as much of the time as possible. To do that, first you must know what the glucose targets are and how glucose levels are measured.  You must also understand what types of insulin are available and how they are combined for your insulin regimen. Finally, don’t forget to focus on your feelings, find support, and look to the future.

Click to jump down to a section:

  1. What are the glucose targets at diagnosis and how do they change over time?

Often when someone is first diagnosed, they are advised to keep their glucose levels between 100-200 mg/dL, to avoid hypoglycemia (low glucose) while they learn how to manage their diabetes. But after a few weeks or so, it may be time to bring glucose into the target range of 70-180 mg/dL, with pre-meal glucose between 70-130 mg/dL and post-meal glucose below 180 mg/dl. Before bed, healthcare professionals often recommend a glucose level above 100 mg/dL to help prevent hypoglycemia.

  1. How are glucose levels measured?

It is crucial that everyone diagnosed with type 1 diabetes learns how to perform fingerstick blood glucose measurements (referred to as BGs, fingersticks, self-monitoring of blood glucose, or SMBGs) and how to use a blood glucose meter (BGM).  When you are first diagnosed, blood glucose tests should preferably be done before each meal, 2-3 hours after each meal, before bed, in the middle of the night, before and after exercise, and before driving.  Here are a few tips for testing your blood glucose:

  • Before testing: Remember to follow the directions on your BGM. Be sure to set the date and time on your meter, have working and backup batteries, and keep all testing supplies away from extreme temperatures.
  • During testing: Make sure your hands are clean and dry. Put a new lancet in the lancing device and put the test strip in the meter. Poke the side (not the middle) of your finger with the lancing device so you maintain more feeling in your finger. Touch the blood droplet to the test strip allowing the BGM to read the glucose value.
  • After testing: Always throw away the lancet into a labeled “sharps container.” Write down the reading to keep a record of your blood sugar trends or review the stored data in the machine or on your computer; this will help you and your healthcare team recognize glucose patterns to more effectively manage your diabetes.

Continuous glucose monitoring devices (CGMs) are a more recent and convenient way to track glucose levels. A sensor that measures glucose (either through the same enzymatic reaction used by the BGM or through a fluorescent technique) is placed in the fatty tissue under the skin in the same place you give insulin shots, or where the insulin pump catheter is placed. Depending on which CGM is used, the sensor lasts either 7 days, 10 days, 14 days, or 90 days. These sensors measure glucose every five minutes and transmit the real-time glucose readings, a trend graph, and alerts to a smartphone or monitoring device. The data is stored in the monitoring device or in the data cloud so that you and your healthcare team can analyze it (if you give your healthcare professional permission to access it). CGM data can also be sent in real time to one or more care partners’ smartphones so they can help with your diabetes management. CGM is a powerful tool that many believe everyone with diabetes should be able to use, including those who are newly diagnosed; however, this technology is still not widely accessible or affordable.

The goal for using any of these devices is to assess the glucose value, and if it is not in your target range, to consider taking some action. If the glucose value is high, it might mean you should take a correction dose of insulin. If the glucose value is low, take oral glucose to bring it back up to the desired range (above 70 mg/dL). Ultimately, you’ll aim to have as many of the glucose measurements in the range of 70-180 mg/dL as possible.  With a CGM – which gets up to 288 glucose measurements a day – the goal is to have 70% of glucose levels in the target range of 70-180 mg/dL (referred to as Time in Range, or TIR). Seventy percent of glucose values is equal to about 16 or 17 hours per day spent in range.

  1. What are the types of insulins and insulin regimens?

It is essential that people with type 1 diabetes take insulin. The insulin can be taken by injection with a pen or syringe, through an insulin pump, or through inhalation. For people with type 1 diabetes, insulin is usually taken multiple times a day. There are many different types of insulin and many different ways to take insulin. Similar to how insulin would work in the body if diabetes wasn’t present, a common way to take insulin is called “basal-bolus insulin.” Basal (long-acting) insulin is considered a “background insulin,” as it is designed for 1-2 daily injections, and it helps the body balance glucose between meals and overnight. Bolus (rapid-acting) insulin acts over a much shorter time period, around 3-4 hours, and should be taken before meals and to correct high glucose levels.

Basal-bolus insulin means you take one or two injections of a basal insulin per day, and you take bolus insulin every time you eat carbohydrates or need a correction dose of insulin for a high glucose level. Some healthcare professionals have people newly diagnosed with diabetes start on a “fixed” insulin regimen – the basal insulin is taken the same way, but you eat a set amount of carbohydrate at each meal with a set dosage of insulin. The advantage of the basal-bolus regimen is flexibility in what you eat and when. The advantage of the fixed regimen is you are usually given a specific meal plan with information on how to substitute one carbohydrate choice for another – you don’t have to be an expert in carbohydrate (“carb”) counting right away, but hopefully you will master it over time. Talk to your healthcare team about which insulin regimen might be best for you and your lifestyle.

  1. How do I take insulin?

To inject insulin, you will use either a pen or a syringe. Make sure to store your insulin in the refrigerator before opening, and at room temperature after opening. Here are some best practices for administering insulin injections:

  • Wash your hands and inspect the pen or syringe. Check that you have the right type of insulin, that it is not expired, and that there are no cracks or unusual qualities to the vial or in the liquid.
  • Label the date that you open your insulin.
  • Rotate the location of injection between the arms, abdomen, legs, hips, and butt, and try not to use the exact same spot in each location. Varying the site of injection will help keep scar tissue and excess fatty tissue from developing.

Insulin pumps are small machines (the size of a deck of cards or smaller) that deliver only rapid-acting insulin; no long-acting insulin is given. The pump delivers insulin directly under your skin without the need for multiple injections each day. There are many types of insulin pumps with various features. Some can be paired with a CGM for automated insulin delivery (AID, also called closed loop or artificial pancreas). Many people are started on insulin pumps weeks or months after diagnosis, but others choose to wait much longer, or to never use an insulin pump at all. If you are interested in an insulin pump, talk with your support network and your healthcare team to determine what type of insulin pump system might be best for you.

  1. How are my basal and bolus doses determined?

In the beginning, you should have frequent contact with your healthcare team to adjust your insulin doses. At first you might need to change your doses almost on a daily basis, but later on, dose adjustment is usually not done unless a pattern lasts at least three days.

  • Basal insulin dose adjustments: Basal doses are in large part determined by your morning glucose levels before breakfast (fasting glucose). The goal of basal insulin is to allow you to wake up with a glucose level between of 80-130 mg/dL, without hypoglycemia (low glucose) or hyperglycemia (high glucose) during the night. Basal insulin also helps maintain glucose levels between meals and if you skip a meal.
  • Bolus insulin dose adjustments:
    • Insulin to Carbohydrate Ratio (ICR): Your ICR is the specific amount of insulin you take for every gram of carbohydrate you eat. In other words, how many grams of glucose are covered by one unit of insulin. You may be told to take your meal insulin at least 15 minutes before you start eating. The American Diabetes Association recommends that your glucose level be less than 180 mg/dL for 1-2 hours after your meal. You should then be back to your premeal value after four hours, without hypoglycemia.
    • Correction bolus insulin: This is taken when the glucose level is higher than the target glucose level of 180 mg/dL. Correction insulin is used to manage high glucose levels before and 3-4 hours after meals, or when hyperglycemia develops during the day or night. For most people, a correction dose of insulin should not be taken for three hours after the last insulin injection. You also need to be careful about correction insulin before exercise or bedtime unless otherwise instructed by your healthcare team.  A correction dose should bring your glucose level back to the target range within three hours, without dipping below 70 mg/dL.

Know that your insulin needs will likely change over time after you are first diagnosed with diabetes. Your basal amount, your insulin to carbohydrate ratio, and the amount you take for correction boluses will all change first with the “honeymoon” or remission phase of diabetes. After that they will change with growth, illness, weight change, aging, or a variety of other factors that can affect how sensitive your body is to insulin.

  1. What is the remission or honeymoon phase of diabetes?

Often after diagnosis and the initiation of insulin therapy, people with type 1 diabetes enter a honeymoon period. This occurs because some insulin-producing cells in the pancreas begin to function again – and make insulin. This means that you’ll be able to decrease the basal and bolus doses of insulin you are taking. Occasionally, someone can get down to a very low dose of insulin each day. It is best not to stop taking insulin altogether, even if it means you only take a very small amount of basal insulin. Unfortunately, the honeymoon period does not last forever, and glucose levels begin to rise again, at which time insulin doses may need to be increased.

There has been a national effort to identify newly diagnosed individuals with type 1 diabetes and tell them about studies designed for people with new onset, including the National Institutes of Health TrialNet study. diaTribe writes about clinical trials here. Please look into research being done and discuss this with your healthcare team if you are interested in being part of the effort to better understand type 1 diabetes and ways to try to preserve insulin-producing cells.

  1. How can I take charge and best support my health? 
  • Focus on how you are feeling – mentally and physically. Identify your challenges, find helpful resources, and get answers to your questions.
  • Put together your team of supporters – your healthcare team, your family and friends, and your co-workers.
  • Think of the overall mission – to successfully manage your diabetes and realize all your life dreams and goals. Master the day-to-day tasks, like how to check your glucose levels, take insulin, balance glucose levels, food, and activity, return to school or work, and stay healthy today and into the future. This is a marathon – give yourself time to adjust, learn, and thrive.

Reach out when you need help, and encourage your support team to do the same – there is a world of resources: doctors, nurses, nutritionists, mental health professionals, coaches, articles, books, videos, websites, associations, and organizations all waiting to help you. diaTribe is one of them.

About Fran

Dr. Fran Kaufman is the Chief Medical Officer of Senseonics, Inc. She is a Distinguished Professor Emerita of Pediatrics and Communications at the Keck School of Medicine and the Annenberg School of Communications at the University of Southern California.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

The Future of Insulin Therapy: New Tech For Better Outcomes

Advances in insulin types and delivery systems over the last few decades have aimed to improve blood glucose management and quality of life for people with diabetes. From improvements to insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems, to new insulin formulations, and automation of insulin delivery, the technological developments in the diabetes world have been numerous and fast-paced.

What other new products and technologies can we expect in the future? The medical company Thermalin has many exciting ideas and ongoing developments on the horizon.

Thermalin was started approximately ten years ago by Michael Weiss, MD, PhD, Distinguished Professor and Chair of The Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology at the Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. Weiss has decades of experience, and an extensive publication record, with a particular focus in insulin physiology. One of the primary goals of his company is to develop “new forms of insulin that will lower the burden of insulin use, increase patient adoption of and adherence to insulin therapy, improve patient lives and outcomes, and lower the cost.”

Products in Development

At this time, researchers are investigating several approaches that aim to lessen the burden of insulin therapy and improve outcomes. Some of the potential products and technologies they are working on include:

  • Small insulin pumps that will be about one-fourth the size of what is currently available. They are expected to have broad compatibility with a variety of smart devices and integrate with CGMs. Moreover, the pumps will come pre-filled and is expected to last for up to one week. Excitingly, a prototype has already been developed.
  • A variety of stable insulin preparations (no need for refrigeration). In particular, efforts on ultra-rapid and concentrated insulins are ongoing, with several products poised to begin clinical trials soon.
  • “Smart” basal insulin that will respond to changes in blood glucose levels. This product is still early in the stages of development.

Thermalin has recently announced that they received a grant from the NIH that should enable them to move forward with one of their ultra-rapid insulin candidates. Importantly, the development and approval of temperature-stable insulin will also allow for improvements to insulin pump technologies. Devices could then come pre-filled, and users could enjoy longer wear time without worrying about insulin integrity.

Altogether, temperature-stable insulin analog, along with smaller pumps that are technologically advanced but also less burdensome to wear, may help patients view pump therapy more favorably. The company points out a particular population that may benefit on their website:

“Many patients prefer to inject themselves privately before meals rather than wear a visible stigma of their disease. Good treatment habits are frequently developed in childhood but too often are lost in the teenage years; for body-conscious teenagers, a pump that is too visible just won’t be used. This means many patients will not adopt the new, automated pumps that can significantly improve blood sugar control.”

They also note the importance of shelf-stable insulin, and particularly in the developing world:

“In many parts of the developing world, patients do not have refrigerators and live long distances from clinics. Further, many of these clinics are not well served by “cold chain” distribution.  This means these patients do not have a reliable supply of needed insulin.”

We will continue to follow the development of these new products and update you as they begin to progress through clinical trials.

What do you think about these advances? What would you like to see come about in diabetes technology in the next decade? Please share your thoughts in the comments; we love hearing from our readers!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How to Handle Halloween for Children with Diabetes

It’s that time of year again: the leaves are falling, the temperatures are dropping, and all things scary and spooky are on store shelves. While pumpkin picking and catching a hay ride are (for all intents and purposes) “low carbohydrate” activities, trick-or-treating can be anything but. So, how do you handle Halloween with a young child with diabetes? Do you allow them to “be a kid” for an evening, and go all out on the chocolate and sugar spike? Or do you limit them to a few, portion-controlled treats, with a food scale nearby? While there’s no one right answer to this question, here are some helpful tips to make your Halloween a little less spooky this year.

Take the Focus Away from Food

This is helpful for all children, for all holidays. No holiday needs to be 100% about the food, especially for a child with diabetes. For Halloween specifically, focus on carving pumpkins, watching scary movies, dressing up in really elaborate Halloween costumes, and yes, if you and your child wish, some candy, too.

Noelle from California says, “Our kiddo is three so our main focus is on creating traditions that will be helpful for her later on with type 1. For parties, I create treats that aren’t food-related.”

Lila from New York City says, “We completely avoid the candy thing. Trick or treating isn’t a huge deal in our neighborhood, so this hasn’t been an issue yet.”

Kate, from Pennsylvania, says, “We go out a little, but limit the number of stops. After we get home, we go through our candy, keeping only what we really, really like. The rest, we give to the Switch Witch, and she brings the girls a little present in the morning as an exchange for giving her their candy.” There’s even a book you can buy that helps explain the magic of the Switch Witch.

Create Unique Traditions

Perhaps you have a spooky, scary dance party or movie night on Halloween, or the whole family dresses up in matching costumes to go walking around the neighborhood. Maybe you bob for apples or roast pumpkin seeds after carving, or let your child have a few friends sleepover. Creating unique family traditions that are inclusive will be beneficial not only for your child now, but will be helpful as they grow up with type 1 diabetes.

Be Wary About Restrictions

Be cognizant about putting too many restrictions on candy for your child. Children with diabetes are much more likely to develop an unhealthy relationship with food. If your child really wants to indulge, just make sure they’re carbohydrate counting appropriately, and let them enjoy themselves (within moderation, of course). Most of the time children intuitively eat anyway, and don’t actually end up eating that much candy.

Melissa, from Iowa, says, “We bring any candy home and carb count it ahead of time, and then put a post-it note on each piece, so our daughter can dose appropriately whenever she’s hungry or wants a treat.”

Plan Ahead

Like all things diabetes-related, it helps to plan ahead. Make sure your child eats dinner with some protein and fat before going trick-or-treating, so they’re not just eating sugar on an empty stomach, which can cause the roller coaster effect. Make sure you know where and how far they’ll be walking, or better yet, walk along with them. Have your child carry low snacks (they shouldn’t solely rely on candy that won’t have any nutrition facts or carbohydrate information on it), and make sure they’re drinking plenty of water. It’s helpful if your child also has fresh continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and insulin pump sites on, but not absolutely necessary.

Hannah says, “Planning ahead a learning to navigate holidays with type 1 diabetes is critical and so empowering once you find what works for you and your family.”

Don’t Stress the Small Stuff!

It’s important to remember that Halloween is only one night, and you shouldn’t stress the small stuff. Some parents of children with diabetes shy away from candy, while others let them indulge, and there is no one right answer. Do what works for you and your family, but don’t let the stress of one holiday ruin the evening for you and your child. Relax and let them have fun! They’ll be doing so much running around anyway that you’ll be glad they had the extra “low snacks” on them anyway.

Lija, from Minnesota, says, “We don’t do anything different for my type 1 and non-type 1, and it works out fine. We find that she tends to go low while out trick or treating, so she just eats and boluses a little while out; it isn’t actually a difficult holiday for us!”

The key is finding what works for you. There are no right or wrong answers. Here’s to a happy, spooky Halloween! Hopefully the candy (and subsequent blood sugars) are the least scary part.

How do you and your family handle Halloween in a household affected by diabetes? What tactics and strategies have helped you manage appropriately? Share your experience in the comment section below; we love hearing from our readers!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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