Traveling with Type 1 Diabetes: Hanoi, Vietnam

Dr. Jody Stanislaw has had type 1 diabetes (T1D) for 40 years this June and is on an inspiring mission to inspire T1Ds everywhere that living a healthy and adventurous life with T1D is 100% possible.

She’s been traveling the world for the past 5 months and this month she is living in Hanoi, Vietnam. Watch this video to hear about the challenges she is facing.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Coronavirus and Diabetes: What You Need to Know

Unless you’ve been living under a rock the past few weeks, a new and deadly virus has quickly been spreading around the world: Coronavirus, or COVID-19, is a highly infectious, acute respiratory disease that is closely related to the SARS virus. This disease only affects mammals and birds, and seems to have originated from a seafood market in the Wuhan Province of China.

The numbers are changing daily, but the most recent numbers show that over 76,000 people have been infected with the virus, with 99% of them occurring within mainland China. There are now over 2,000 reported deaths, none of which have occurred within the United States. So how dangerous is the Coronavirus, and what do you need to know as a person living with diabetes? Read more to find out:

Do Not Panic

On January 30th, the World Health Organization declared the virus a global health emergency. There are currently protocols in place to restrict passengers entering the United States from mainland China (where the outbreak is the most devastating), and passengers suspected of being contaminated with the virus are being funneled through speciality airports with temperature screenings, to make sure they’re not bringing the virus into the United States. If someone is detected at an airport with the virus, they are being quarantined until they are no longer contagious, to stop the spread of the disease.

The Virus is Mostly Mild

Many people who are infected with the virus never seek treatment, and while COVID-19 is more contagious than SARS or MERS, the Chinese CDC estimates that the fatality rate is hovering around 2.3%. According to the World Health Organization, signs of the infection include fever, cough, shortness of breath, and difficulty breathing. If you suspect you may be infected, see your doctor right away.

Protect Yourself

To protect yourself from getting any type of seasonal virus, it’s best to avoid contact with other sick people, wash your hands frequently (especially and always after using the restroom and before preparing food!), wear a protective mask when traveling through airports or busy bus/train stations, get your flu vaccination, maintain a healthy sleep schedule, and eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. According to the CDC, Coronavirus is spread by respiratory droplets in the air, when an infected person sneezes or coughs. The virus can also be spread when an uninfected person touches a surface where the virus is (bathroom countertops or door handles), and then touches their face or mouth. Carrying antibacterial hand sanitizer with you can help to eliminate this threat!

Numbers Don’t Lie

Sometimes our diabetes gives us clues when we’re starting to get sick, and one of those clues is higher-than-normal blood sugars. If you’re starting to see your numbers creep up for no reason, it could be a sign that you’re coming down with something. Check out our sick day tips to stay on top of your diabetes when you get ill.

Seek Help

If you think you’ve become infected with the Coronavirus, call your doctor immediately. Even though most cases are mild, having a chronic illness and a virus at the same time can cause major trouble. If it’s severe enough, the Coronavirus can progress, eventually causing pneumonia and even death in some cases. Let your loved ones know you’re worried, and contact emergency medical help right away if you suspect something is wrong.

Have you or a loved one been affected by the international Coronavirus outbreak? Share your experience in the comments, below.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How Type 1 Diabetes Brought My Father and I Closer Together

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Samuel Frank

Lifelong Reality

I have no memories of my father without diabetes. My father was diagnosed with type 1 in 1989 when I was 3 years old. Diabetes and Papa Frank were always hand in hand, one and the same. As a chemistry professor and academic, he seemed to get a thrill from stable numbers and consistent control and he would never shy away from talking about it.

My father is incredibly loving, especially to his family. He loves to share a story or an exciting idea. I’m blessed to have grown up with such a loving, kind-hearted father — at no point were aggressive assertions of masculinity expected from me nor my brother. He is also very particular, specific, and regimented — presumably from having type 1 for so many years, or maybe, that’s just how he is.

Growing up, my father would work as a professor and come home around 5:00 p.m. And he had a list of maybe ten meals he would prepare, with occasional variations. He developed a “square meal” that was his baseline, average, expected, protein-and-vegetable rich meal. No snacks or sugary beverages, caution and restriction while eating out — all told, a marvelous diabetic. As a child, I don’t recall a moment when his health was in danger or his diabetes management was questioned. And it wasn’t a mystery; my father loved to disclose his diabetes management. A dinner out would often end with a round of, “Guess what my blood sugar is?!” And as a child, I knew enough about the symptoms of hyper- and hypoglycemia to make a prediction. When my father was on target after dinner, he was almost elated. The 115 mg/dL was a symbol of harmony for me. If my father was happy, I was too.

Kindred Spirits

I always saw myself in my father and he was always quick to relate to me. We both had one older brother, which created a powerful and unique dynamic of understanding. But it wasn’t just this. My father loved identifying our similarities and I loved being recognized, being seen, and losing that feeling of being alone. Today, I am 33, and this has remained ever so consistent. There have always been physical and emotional similarities between us. So, echoing my father, throughout my life, I imagined what it would be to have type 1. The poking and prodding of needles appeared horrific. And I often wrote it off, as he would be the first to remind us that he was 44 — later in life — when he was diagnosed. It happened the same way with his aunt and grandmother.

Samuel

Image source: Beyond Type 1

But it happened to me at 27, earlier than the other members in my family. I was in my second year of graduate school for social work and marvelously stressed. I went into DKA on December 27, 2013 while visiting my family in Fresno for the holidays. At one point in the weeks prior, I recognized some of the symptoms but attributed them to stress from graduate school and chose to ignore them. My family didn’t recognize the DKA since no one they knew had experienced it before, but they followed their instincts and my parents took me to the ER as I continued to get worse.

While traumatizing, it couldn’t have happened at a better time of year. After 3 days in the hospital, I took a week off from my internship in San Francisco and stayed home with my parents, acting as my father’s diabetes mentee. It was emotional and challenging and confusing, but I was so thankful not to have to do this alone.

So during that week, I dove into diabetes management, meals, and lifestyle adjustments. After meeting with a few endocrinologists and health educators, I learned about carb counting and daily totals. My father doesn’t carb count; since he has such a solid meal regimen, he knows how many units of insulin to take to maintain a functional rhythm. As I was learning how to bolus, he would lean over my shoulder, look at my plate, and create an approximation. My father owns his decision to use his square meal method instead of carb counting, stating, “I see it not as a calculation, but as an art.” I don’t think he’s wrong, but it felt divergent from the messaging I received from medical professionals. The nurse would tell me one thing but my Papa would tell me something else. I needed to make my own way.

The Same but Different

We were never apart, but diabetes brought my father and I closer together. To this day, it gives us something to talk about. I’m often captivated by his stories of obscure blood sugars at an inconvenient time, and I can share mine. When I’m fed up with abnormalities, my father is always there for support and advice. We learn together about modern technology to help our management and share information. Plus, most importantly, by growing up with a diabetic parent, he normalized the subject matter. I speak about my disease, my insulin pump, and management style with glee to my coworkers and friends. I think I notice a little bit of my father come through when I speak with good friends about a successful bolus for a carb-heavy meal.

Don’t get me wrong, we are also different people. I’m now 33 and don’t have children, so my lifestyle remains much more variable than my father’s ever appeared. My mealtimes are quite inconsistent, and my diet often fluctuates; I drink, I travel, I stay up late. But to this day, when he and I are eating the same meal and the same portion, it’s nearly the exact same size bolus that we give ourselves. I truly have my father’s disease. And that means I carry my family line ever so truly.

It always meant so much that I didn’t have to learn this alone. I wish for every parent of a child with diabetes to not just have compassion, but empathy and robust understanding, to normalize frustrations of the disease and its limitations for that child. I learned recently that type 1 isn’t always genetic, and often diagnosed earlier in life. The Frank family pancreas seems to just give out after a while, leaving us diagnosed later in life. But that makes our situation all the more unique, rare, and maybe even, special.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Food Shaming: Changing How We Talk About Food

This content originally appeared here. Republished with permission.

By Brenda Manzanarez, MS, RD, and Cynthia Muñoz, Ph.D., MPH

You know you shouldn’t be eating that kind of stuff, right?

If you’d just eat better, you wouldn’t have to take so many medications.

I know someone who cut out all carbs and cured their diabetes; have you tried that?

Do any of these comments sound familiar? Maybe someone else has said them to you, maybe you’ve said them to someone, or maybe you’ve thought them about yourself. Either way, comments like this, even if they have good intentions, often come off as judgmental and shaming. This type of “advice” can cause confusion, anxiety, frustration, and an unhealthy relationship with food.

Our Relationship with Food

Food is important when it comes to keeping blood sugar in range, but managing diabetes is not just about glycemic control—we also need to juggle lifestyles, health goals, and mental health.

There are so many factors that influence our food choices, and you cannot see those factors by just glancing at a plate. Food is an important part of our lives, and it can have so many meanings to different people. It can mean health, love, sense of community, or pleasure, but for others, especially people with diabetes, it might cause feelings of anxiety and fear.

Changing the way you eat is a major lifestyle change, and major lifestyle changes always take time.

While you are on this journey, unsolicited advice from strangers and even loved ones can feel more like judgment and might cause you to question yourself or feel guilty about your own choices.

Changing the way you eat is a major lifestyle change, and major lifestyle changes always take time. There are a lot of things to juggle when managing diabetes, so be patient with yourself and with others.

Unintended Consequences

Food shaming often happens when someone’s own preferences and opinions don’t line up with others’. Judgmental comments like “you shouldn’t eat that” may be a projection of their own frustrations or a reflection of their misconceptions about diabetes.

As clinicians who work with children, teens, and young adults with diabetes and obesity, we know that talking about food can be very difficult. We also know that negative comments, pictures, and memes on social media can have a harmful impact on someone’s emotional well-being, especially people with diabetes.

No one should be shamed about their food choices.

No one should be shamed about their food choices. Shame leads to negative feelings about food, which can lead to anxiety, depression, and even disordered eating. And these conditions can cause more damage to physical health than poor diet.

Rethink the Role of Food and Your Health

Instead of thinking of food as “good” or “bad,” or judging people (or yourself) by the way you eat, picture food and eating as being neutral and adopt a non-judgmental way of thinking. The food you put on your plate, is just food that will provide energy and nutrients to fuel your body.

Unlearning what we have been exposed to takes time but being aware of those negative thoughts is a start.

Instead of thinking of food as “good” or “bad,” picture food and eating as being neutral.

Remind yourself that there is no one right way to eat with diabetes— it has to be tailored to your own unique needs— like your budget, taste preferences/favorite foods, cultural norms, cooking skill, time, etc. And you don’t have to feel guilty about enjoying a treat every now and then.

Break the cycle and be nice to yourself and to others. Instead of criticizing people, ask them how they feel about the changes they’ve made and have them decide how they feel about it. If appropriate, provide encouragement.

If you are concerned about a loved one, privately ask how they are doing, and don’t offer advice unless they ask for it. Ask if there is anything you can do to support them, and/or seek information about healthy food choices and incorporate this in your own life as a form of support for your loved one.

If you feel this is a big issue in your own life, don’t be afraid to seek out help—talk to your primary doctor or with a therapist. If you don’t have a therapist ask for a referral from your doctor. To find a mental health provider with knowledge about diabetes, check this directory.

Bottom Line

Food is meant to be nourishment for our bodies and to be enjoyed; find a balance that works for your health, be confident in your choices, and be accepting of other people’s choices.

If you find yourself wanting to criticize someone else’s food choices or appearance, don’t! This is generally not helpful and can have a negative emotional impact.

A neutral and non-judgmental way of thinking is best when talking about food and diabetes; there are no “good” and “bad” foods. The key is to balance what you eat to get the nutrients you need.

If you receive a negative comment from a stranger on social media or in person, remember that person doesn’t know you and how you take care of yourself. Don’t beat yourself up and continue to focus on ways to be the healthiest version of yourself.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes Love Letter: An Ode to Mandi’s Late Parents

By Mandi Franklin

To my late parents:

It was the winter of 1990 and I was spending the week at my aunt and uncle’s house while my parents were chasing sunsets in the Caribbean. I loved sleepovers at their house – we would play “grocery store,” paint my fingernails, and stay up late.

This time was different…

“She’s drinking so much water. She can’t seem to quench her thirst,” my aunt said to my mother when she called to check on me.

I was so thirsty that I would climb on top of the bathroom sink and gulp water from the faucet like a parched cat. My aunt and uncle knew something was wrong.

Photo credit: Mandi Franklin

My parents caught the next flight home and I was rushed to Sinai Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland.

This is when the perfect world we once knew changed for me and my family.

“She has juvenile diabetes and we need to give her insulin,” explained the ER physician to my parents. Imagine hearing that your little, previously healthy 3-year-old now has a permanent disease that will need to be managed with multiple fingersticks and numerous injections daily.

Confused. Angry. Sad. Guilty. Numb. These are things that I am sure my parents felt at this moment.

Over the next few days, we learned how to cope with my new life with the help of the medical team, nurses, dietitians, child life specialists, and of course family support.

From that day on, my parents vowed to never treat me differently and promised that I would live a “normal” childhood.

Photo credit: Mandi Franklin

Looking back, I admire them for how they tackled this diagnosis and disease. I never felt like I couldn’t do something due to my illness. I was able to dance, play sports, go on vacations, and have sleepovers.

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for 29 years. There are days when I want to throw in the towel and say “OK diabetes, you win.” The other days are just like yours, except with a few extra pokes and a special ability to count carbohydrates.

My parents taught me to live my life and never let my disease get in the way. Because of this, I do what I love and continue to chase my dreams.

In conclusion, don’t ever give up.

Thank you, mom and dad, for raising me to be a strong, independent, resilient, goal-crusher who just happens to also have type 1 diabetes.

Love you always,

Mandi

More about the author on her website and Facebook Page.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Ways to Save Money on Diabetes Expenses

Diabetes is an expensive disease. According to the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), diabetes is the costliest disease in the United States. In 2017 alone, over $327 billion dollars was spent on people with diabetes and their needs, and that number has only increased since, as prevalence and incidence of the disease have risen as well.

Diabetes is also expensive, personally. Between medications, doctors’ appointments, time off work and school, buying healthy foods, and committing to an exercise routine, it can be troublesome to keep on top of all the bills and expenses. A landmark Yale study recently showed that as many as 1 in 4 people with diabetes have rationed their insulin, simply because it’s too expensive.

So, how do you prepare for the cost of a new type 2 diabetes diagnosis? In part 2 of our 4-part series, we dive into how to protect yourself from the high costs of diabetes.

Prescription Assistance Programs

Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about prescription assistance programs. They can help you get free or lower-cost drugs, especially if your income is low or you don’t have health insurance. Online resources, such as RxAssist, can also point you in the right direction towards prescription drug cost relief.  You can also get lower-cost care at a Federally Qualified Health Center, if you meet certain eligibility requirements.

Take Advantage of Your Employer’s Section 125 Plan (If They Have One)

These flexible spending arrangements let you contribute up to $2,650 per year (pre-tax!) to spend on out-of-pocket expenses for things like prescription drugs and copays for doctor visits. These plans usually adhere to a “use it or lose it” policy, so make sure you’re spending down anything left over in these accounts towards the end of your enrollment year (usually in December every year).

Enroll in Medicare

Many people 65 and older are not enrolled in Medicare, but if you’re diagnosed with diabetes, it’s highly recommended that you take advantage of this program. Medicare Part B covers a portion of bi-annual diabetes screenings, diabetes self-management education classes, insulin pumps and glucometers, and regular foot and eye exams. Medicare Part D covers insulin expenses. Learn more about the Medicare application process here.

Mail Order Your Supplies

If you’re able, use mail order to get recurring medications and supplies (you can sign up through your existing pharmacy). Oftentimes, you can buy a 90-day supply of your medicine for a single copay, instead of three separate copayments for three separate months. Mail-order supplies are bulk packaged and shipped to your home. This can be an excellent alternative if it’s hard to leave your home, and if you know you’ll need the same medication consistently, for months at a time. It’s also helpful in saving you money. Additionally, a lot of (over the counter) supplies can be bought in bulk from online retailers like Amazon for a fraction of the price you’d pay at a traditional pharmacy.

Ask Your Doctor About Generic Drugs

Although there is no generic form of insulin, many pills taken for type 2 diabetes are available in generic form. A bottle of Glucophage (60 tablets) costs around $80, but the generic form (metformin) will cost you about $10. Talk to your healthcare provider about generic options that are available to you.

Taking these small steps can add up to big savings over time, and can help you to live a long, healthy life, without the threat of complications. Plus, saving money on your diabetes supplies can help you invest in other (more fun) areas of life!

Have you found ways to better budget for your diabetes? How have you saved money for this costly condition? Share this post and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes Love Letter: From Briana to Husband

By Briana Payne

Dear Aaron,

You are my husband, best friend, father to our children, and partner in crime. You were there in the instacare clinic on a Sunday morning April 24, 2016, when I got the dreaded diagnosis of diabetes. We later confirmed the following week that it was type 1 diabetes because I had the antibodies present that come with type 1. I walked into an instacare clinic confused why I was urinating so much, and found out it was sugar in my urine that was dumping out of my system, since I was dealing with undiagnosed diabetes. We thought it was a simple UTI that I could fix, and quickly found out it was a lifetime autoimmune disease.

Photo credit: Briana Payne

When I first got diagnosed, you were the one giving me my Levemir injections. Nine months into the diagnosis, I gave a continuous glucose monitor a chance. You helped me to put it on my body, especially in harder to reach places, like the back of my arm, or near my backside. You’ve always been patient with me and figuring out my diabetes with the technology, injections, cost of insulin, glucometers, diabetes appointments, etc.

Aaron, thank you for your sacrifices finding a job that will provide good insurance for me to switch to when I turn 26 in April 2020. You went out of your way to get a better insurance plan that will make your paychecks a little bit smaller, because you want to be able to afford our healthcare costs the best way.

Photo credit: Briana Payne

This disease is not pretty, nor is it cheap. I’ve dealt with some high and low blood sugars that have affected me, and you have been patient with me through it all. There are times to this day that I still feel guilty that I got this autoimmune disease six weeks after we got married. You could have left me after discovering that your new wife had a new chronic illness, but you didn’t. You have always been a very loyal and dedicated man — I cannot thank you enough. Amidst all of the struggles with costs and the daily to-dos is with this disease, I know we can continue to navigate this life together.

Happy Valentine’s, Aaron. Thanks for being my valentine.

Love,

Briana

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Life With Type 1 Diabetes: A Gamer’s Take

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By DJ Lipscomb

I never thought I would be the type of person who watched someone play video games on the internet. But here I am, a 32-year-old dad who loves video games and not only watches other people stream, but recently started a streaming page + podcast dedicated to video games. Oh yeah, and did I mention I also have type 1 diabetes?

The Name of the Game

I was diagnosed with type 1 at the age of ten and it completely changed my life. It required me to grow up a lot faster than I would have liked and has shaped so many decisions I have made over the last 22 years. I remember being so terrified to do basic things on my own as a kid, even thinking that I might die. As a parent to three minions of my own now, I would never wish that feeling on any of them. That type of mentality is not easily shaken, but I eventually was able to push through the fear and not allow this illness to keep me from being everything I wanted to be.

Lipscomb

Image source: Beyond Type 1

The funny thing about growing up fast is that you leave a lot of “kid” stuff behind. I played video games a lot as a young kid. My brother and I would spend hours playing Gameboy or Super Nintendo. Looking back, I can see now how my diagnosis shifted my mentality on what I thought was age-appropriate. I just didn’t feel like a kid anymore. I had new responsibilities that had life-threatening consequences if ignored. Sure, I still played games, but I lost that pure innocence and fun that comes along with jumping into a brand new world for the first time because I was obsessed with keeping my blood sugar in check.

After going through some major life changes in 2016, I suddenly found myself faced with an opportunity to take stock of who I was and who I wanted to be. My diabetes had suffered immensely as a result of the stress from a divorce, I was out of shape, and I was a little lost. I remember one of the first things that I did for myself during that transition was buy a Nintendo Switch. I will never forget the moment I hooked the Switch up and played The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild for the first time. That joy I had forgotten suddenly rushed back through my veins. I knew at that moment, gaming would forever be a part of my story.

Fast forward to today. I am the healthiest I have ever been thanks to a major shift in my diet and to a recently introduced workout regimen. I own a successful consulting and media company called Exhale Creative that helps brands determine what type of content they need to create in order to help them grow and better reach their audience. We also produce 99% of the content for those clients. I have been a hired guitar player, touring all over the world and playing in front of tens of thousands of people (that’s a whole other glucose management article on its own). And now, I am chasing down a new dream called Patch Notes.

How to Stream

Patch Notes was created to celebrate the intersection of life and video games. We want to show how video gaming can bring out the best in people while simultaneously breaking down stereotypes about who or what a gamer is. We stream on Facebook Gaming, and you can find our podcast on iTunes and Spotify.

When Facebook announced that on Giving Tuesday they would match dollar for dollar the money raised through charity streams, I was thrilled to raise some funds for Beyond Type 1. I have had the privilege of interacting with several members of the Beyond Type 1 team and truly love the light they shine on all things diabetes. And even though I did not raise an abundant amount of money during our stream, my growing community did step up and donate while we hung out and played Pokemon Shield.

My platform is growing and I can’t think of a better way to use it than to help people, who like me, face this illness every day. It is also worth noting that there are several type 1 diabetes people (T1Ds) who watch the stream, which has made it feel even more meaningful to me. I am excited to host more streams that bring awareness to a disease that is often misunderstood or misrepresented, and look forward to bringing in more donations to help others with diabetes pursue their passions.

You can go back and watch the stream (and still donate) here. And come hang with us anytime at Patch Notes.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Accepting a New Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis

One of the toughest transitions in life can be a new diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Either for yourself or a family member, the initial shock of diagnosis is sometimes hard to take and can require some getting used to.

In this first installment of a four-part series on type 2 diabetes, here are five ways to adapt to a new diagnosis in your family and the best ways not only to cope, but to thrive with type 2 diabetes:

There’s No Shame in a Diagnosis

There is nothing to be ashamed of with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Type 2 diabetes is simply the body’s response to becoming insulin resistant or the body’s inability to produce enough insulin naturally (more symptoms listed here). There are many risk factors that contribute to a type 2 diabetes diagnosis, but genetics and environmental factors do play a role. You may be discouraged upon diagnosis, but there’s no shame in having diabetes, and there’s no shame in taking charge of your health and taking care of yourself.

Today Is the Perfect Day to Be Healthy – Start Now

Not next week or next month, or even next year. Today is the perfect day to begin. Once you have a diagnosis, make sure you’re prepared with a glucometer, test strips, and a lancet device to start monitoring your blood sugar. You may also have a prescription for metformin or insulin that should be filled. Your doctor probably referred you to a nutritionist to come up with a meal plan, and maybe they’ve recommended regular exercise. Start small. Include more vegetables at your next meal, and aim for a short walk before bed. Taking small steps to improve your health today will lead to lasting health benefits down the road.

Assemble Your Care Team

This includes both professional and community support. Diabetes affects the whole family, and it’s important to have their physical and emotional support. You will need to enlist the expertise of not only your physician, but also an endocrinologist, and perhaps a nutritionist or maybe even a therapist. Caring family members can offer emotional support during this time of transition, and researching local support groups or diabetes advocacy organizations where you can find community will be a tremendous help in the weeks and months to come.

Don’t Operate from a Position of Fear

Make no mistake, type 2 diabetes is a serious disease that can cause devastating complications if left untreated, but it does not necessarily need to incite fear. You can live a long, happy, and healthy life with type 2 diabetes. This is an opportunity to tune into your body and make healthy, positive changes for the road ahead. Healthy lifestyle choices you make now can prevent complications later on in life.

Think of What This Adds to Your Life

A type 2 diabetes diagnosis is not the end of your life. Instead of thinking in terms of deprivation, think of what this adds (and can add!) to your life. More exercise. More opportunities to go outside. More excuses to walk your dog, or play with your children or grandchildren. More vegetables on your plate. More reasons to see your doctor and keep a closer eye on your health. More reasons to be thankful that you have the opportunity to get a firm grasp on your health in the here and now. Think in abundance and be grateful.

A type 2 diabetes diagnosis does not need to bring misery and sadness to your life. It can be an opportunity to connect with yourself, get in tune with your body, and lead you to start or continue to make healthy choices to prevent complications later on in life. And that’s something to cheers to.

Have you recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes? How has the diagnosis affected your life so far? Share this post and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes Love Letter: From Eoin to Girlfriend

Editor’s note: I had the pleasure of meeting Eoin at a diabetes meetup in New York City last month. He had just won the Myabetic award for “Diabetic Male Fitness Influencer” and rightfully so since he motivates people every day to be the best version of themselves. He tackles affordability issues, stigmas and teaches his followers proper diet and exercise techniques. He is also a diabetic fitness trainer. You can follow him at @insuleoin on Instagram. 

By Eoin Costelloe

To my girlfriend,

Where can I start? It’s almost like we were both diagnosed. Just on different dates;

Myself with type 1 diabetes on 01.04.2012.

Without knowing, you were diagnosed with ‘second-hand type 1 diabetes’ on 08.10.18.

I feel it’s fitting for me, first of all, to thank you. Thank you for the time we’ve spent together, and thank you for everything you’ve done. I don’t think you truly understand how special you are.

When we started dating it was something you were interested in learning about, something you didn’t know much about, but something you didn’t know would almost become your full-time job, just as much as mine.

I remember explaining it to you, breaking things down; how we carb count, units of insulin required, the reasons, the complications, what it entails. At the time you knew a minimal amount. From then until now, you have become a diabetes expert.

Photo credit: Eoin Costelloe

Maybe looking back now, you wouldn’t have been so keen to take on such an admirable role as a girlfriend – as I’ve always said, ‘it’s an invisible disease.’

I often think of diabetes as a part of me that no one sees. It’s a disease that can let you live a normal life if you treat it with respect, but it’s always on your shoulder, it never takes any breaks and never leaves your side.

We often see in cartoons or movies how there is a devil on one shoulder and an angel on the other. For the past 8 years of my life, since being diagnosed, that devil has made a home on my shoulder. For 8 years he’s been there, day and night, sitting on my shoulder with no contender, no dispute or objection, no angel on the other side.

Since the day we met, you’ve been that angel. You’ve been the challenger.

Photo credit: Eoin Costelloe

You have always prioritized my health, even during the times when I didn’t. You’ve told me to ‘check your blood sugar’ when I was lazy about it, or prodded me to ‘take your insulin’ if it slipped my mind or yelled at me to ‘not eat another roll of sushi!’ You’ve cared more than I ever expected you to.

Sometimes I felt like it was a burden, almost like a third wheel in our relationship. Maybe there were times I didn’t want to stop and check my blood or pause to inject my insulin because we were in a perfect moment and didn’t want anything to ruin it. But you were the one to pause, you were the one to always reassure me that we were in it together no matter what.

Every injection, every high, every finger prick, every 3 am low blood sugar and every ‘regretful pizza’ eaten, you’ve been there. You’ve shown passion and intrigue to learn about this condition for the sole reason to help look after me. You’ve lived through it by my side and never once complained.

There are no words or phrases that can articulate my appreciation for you. You’re a star, chaim sheli!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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