How Do We Afford Our Insulin During an Economic Crisis?

COVID-19 has caused widespread panic across the globe, and that has quickly become apparent given the recent bear stock market, which hasn’t been seen since the Great Recession over a decade ago. You may have seen your IRAs and 401ks plummet in recent weeks because investors are scared.

Some economists are predicting that the United States could even see up to a 30% unemployment rate, as layoffs sore from the mandatory closings of restaurants, bars, gyms, coffee shops, and retail stores across the nation, trying to prevent the spread of COVID-19, the disease that is caused by the novel coronavirus. You may have experienced a recent layoff or reduced hours as a direct result of COVID-19, and if you have, your health insurance may have taken a hit as well (or gone away altogether). So, how can we afford our insulin during an economic crisis? Here is our (hopefully!) helpful advice:

If You’ve Lost Your Job

File for unemployment insurance immediately. Most states require that you’ve lived/worked in the state in which you’re applying for benefits for at least six months to qualify, and you don’t qualify if you quit or were fired from your most recent job. These bi-weekly payments have a cap (depending on your income and the state in which you live), but can definitely help you in the short term until you’re able to find new employment. Congress recently passed the COVID Stimulus Package, which includes expanded unemployment benefits (extending by 13 weeks), and enhances said benefits for four months. The program has also been broadened to include freelancers, furloughed employees and gig workers, such as Uber and Lyft drivers.

Special Enrollment Period

It’s well-known that one must sign-up for health insurance during “open enrollment”, which is a time period, usually once a year, when individuals and employees of companies and organizations may make changes to or buy different health insurance plans. Under the Affordable Care Act, a change in your personal situation, such as getting married, having a child, or losing your health coverage (by way of losing your job) makes you eligible for a Special Enrollment Period, which allows you to enroll in health insurance outside of the typical open enrollment period.

In response to COVID, many Governors are creating SEPs (Special Enrollment Periods) to specifically address people’s concerns over having health insurance and affording their medication during the global pandemic. If you currently do not have health insurance (by choice), but are worried about affording your insulin, or are particularly concerned about contracting COVID19, you may be able to take advantage of a SEP in your state.

See If You Qualify for Medicaid

As of now, 36 states have expanded eligibility for their state Medicaid programs (to 138% FPL), which offer extremely affordable insulin and diabetes care. If you’re a low-wage worker whose employer doesn’t offer health insurance, and you can’t comfortably afford to buy a plan, see if you qualify for Medicaid. Many Governors are looking into expanding Medicaid even further during the national public health emergency.

Cash Relief is Coming

Congress recently passed a $2 trillion Coronavirus Stimulus Package that includes direct cash payments to all American taxpayers. Lawmakers agreed to provide $1200 in a direct (single time) payment to taxpayers making up to $75,000 per year, with $5 less for every $100 per year a person makes all the way up to $99,000. Families will receive an additional $500 per child, in an attempt to create a safety net for people whose jobs and businesses have been negatively affected during this public health turned economic crisis. This bump of cash will help millions of Americans, including people with diabetes, afford their medications easier in the short term while longer-term policy solutions are worked out to help everyone during this crisis.

If All Else Fails, Reach Out for Help

If you’re still struggling to afford your medication, you can reach out to your insulin manufacturer for help: Lilly Cares, NovoCare, and Sanofi Patient Connection can help get you free or discounted insulin when you’re in a desperate spot. Currently, insulin manufacturers are not anticipating any supply-chain issues as a result of COVID-19.

Additionally, the diabetes online community (on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter) is an amazing resource of dedicated activists and helpful hands who are always more than willing to help fellow people with diabetes in need. Reach out to your friends and family and let them know you’re struggling. Ask your doctor if they have any samples of insulin you can take from the clinic for free. Let your struggle be known, so people can help you. Do not suffer in silence.

Have you had issues affording your medications and/or insulin during this global pandemic turned economic crisis? What strategies have helped you? Share this post and comment below, we love to hear your stories and suggestions!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Benefits of Time in Range: New Study Shows Cost Savings

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Eliza Skoler and Albert Cai

A new paper suggests that as people with diabetes increase their time in range, healthcare costs decrease

IQVIA, a healthcare consulting firm, published a 22-page paper describing the limitations of A1C and the potential financial benefits of improving time in range, the time a person spends with blood glucose levels between 70-180 mg/dl. The paper was sponsored by Lilly Diabetes.

The paper predicts that if the average time in range for people with diabetes in the US increases to 70% or 80%, healthcare costs will be reduced. The savings could be up to $9.7 billion for the US healthcare system over ten years if the average time in range for people with diabetes is increased to 80%.

The graphic below shows how much money is saved over ten years just by reducing hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) events in people with type 1 diabetes. Other costs saving would likely come from a reduction in diabetes-related complications. Studies (Diabetes Care 2019, Diabetes Care 2018) have suggested that greater time in range is associated with a lower risk of health complications.

Stat

Image source: diaTribe

Unsurprisingly, the biggest reductions in healthcare costs were seen in people with high baseline A1C. While a 5% increase in time in range for a person with an A1C under 7% would save only $20 over ten years, the same 5% increase in time in range for a person with an A1C over 8% would lead to $1,470 in savings over ten years – mostly due to a greater reduction in the risk of diabetes-related complications. This means that to get the greatest health and cost benefits, it is essential to bring time in range practices to people who are most struggling to manage their blood glucose.

To calculate the effects of improving time in range, the study assumed an average time in range for people in the US of 58% (type 1 and type 2 diabetes). This 58% came from a 2019 review of four major CGM studies. However, these four studies were done at top diabetes centers and the participants had relatively low A1Cs (~7.5%). Additionally, the majority of people with type 1 diabetes and almost everyone with type 2 diabetes still don’t have access to CGMs. In other words, the actual population average is likely much lower than 58% time in range and the $9.7 billion calculated in cost savings would actually be much higher if the population’s time in range reached 80%.

IQVIA provides several reasons why CGM should be used to support blood glucose management in people with diabetes:

  • A person with diabetes can understand how variables like food, exercise, and sleep habits affect blood glucose and can use that information to improve decisions and outcomes.
  • Healthcare professionals can provide more individualized care to support people with diabetes.
  • The healthcare system will save money on diabetes care.

The illustration below outlines how CGM can be used to monitor blood glucose and guide shared decision making for a healthcare professional (HCP) and person with diabetes (PwD).

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Image source: diaTribe

The last eight pages of the paper discuss how time in range can become more commonly used, asking policymakers, healthcare professionals, and people with diabetes to drive the time in range movement forward. IQVIA’s ideas include:

  • promoting CGM to help people measure and understand time in range;
  • educating healthcare professionals and people with diabetes about the health benefits of time in range; and,
  • tackling affordability and access issues to make sure all people with diabetes (or even prediabetes) can use CGM.

This paper not only emphasizes the importance of time in range for well-being but also highlights time in range as a public policy matter. While there is clearly much work to be done, this study is an important step in underscoring the need to bring CGM and time in range to more people.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Traveling With Diabetes: 10 Ways to Prepare for Your Flight

This content about flying with diabetes originally appeared on SkyParkSecure.com. Republished with permission. Air travel can be stressful for anyone, but if you have diabetes, it requires more planning and preparation. Whether it’s your first time on a plane or you’re an experienced veteran, it’s always worth checking this guide before you next go away. […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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