How to Get More Protein in Your Diet 

Protein is an essential macronutrient made up of amino acids that helps to build bones, muscles, cartilage and skin but it is also responsible for so much more. Protein plays a role in almost every process of a cell, from metabolic reactions, fighting infection, providing us with energy, repairing cells, etc.

There are 20 total amino acids with 9 of them considered essential since our body does not create them on their own; therefore we need to consume them daily. The amount of protein an individual needs is based on many factors and it is best to consult with your healthcare team before making any changes to your diet. Also, if you have kidney disease or other kidney issues,  you should consider that as well.

There are online calculators you can use to give you an idea of how much protein you should take in. Also, if you are an athlete, do strenuous exercise such as lifting weights, or are looking to put on weight or build more muscle mass, you may want to add more protein than the recommended amount.

Many people find it hard to fit in the recommended amount of protein per day. With a few tips and tricks, you can easily be on your way to meeting your protein goals.

Here are 5 ways to get more protein in your diet:

1. Start Your Day Off Right

Many breakfast foods are packed with protein which will keep you satisfied way past lunchtime. Experiment with egg omelets and muffins, protein pancakes, Greek yogurt or even a protein shake and you’ll be well on your way to hitting your daily protein requirement. My favorite protein shake to make is easy: 1 scoop of protein powder, 1/3 almond milk, 1/2 tin Greek yogurt, one tablespoon of your favorite peanut butter (or PB2 for less calories, carbs and fat), a drizzle of sugar-free chocolate syrup and blend with ice.

2. Plan Your Plate

When preparing your meal focus on having half your plate consist of a protein, 1/4-1/2 containing vegetables, and the other quarter for whole grains or other carbs if you so desire. If you’re watching your weight, it’s a good idea to focus on leaner proteins, like chicken and fish, as a lot of fat and calories can come along with some richer protein choices. Keeping this mentality will help you hit your protein goals and also keep you from eating empty calories.

3. Find New Options Online

There are so many health blogs and websites that offer delicious recipes for free. Have you ever had a protein ball? Some can contain as many as 10 grams of protein. It’s a great snack to take on the go, freezes well, and will keep your blood sugars in check too. Also, shop for specialty items, like low-carb flours online. Look out for promotions and special deals to buy in bulk, or save some money if it’s your first time buying — many online shops will offer such discounts!

4. Buy in Bulk

If you’re focusing on increasing your protein, you’ll likely need to add more lean meat, fish or other plant-based protein sources so buying in bulk will help you save money and allow you to meal prep too. Consider prepping and freezing too, it makes deciding what for dinner much easier. Whether you’re going to your local Costco, or finding a great deal on the internet (see above), buying staples in bulk is sure to save you some cash.

5. Preparedness Is Key

If you are actively trying to increase your protein, you are likely tracking what you eat. Preparing meals ahead of time allows you to customize your meals to the exact macros you set. This will also help avoid last-minute food runs that offer little to no nutrition at all. Some great apps to help you track your macros are MyFitnessPal and MyPlate.

Eating more protein will make you feel fuller longer, build and strengthen muscles, along with many other health benefits. Make sure to discuss with your doctor how much protein is right for you and you will be well on your way to a healthier version of you!

Do you find it hard to get in your daily recommended dose of protein? What tips and tricks can you share?

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Home Chef: Meal Kit Delivery That Fits Your Needs

Meal kit delivery services have been gaining popularity in recent years, and it’s no wonder why. It sure is convenient to have all the premeasured ingredients, all ready to prepare the predetermined recipe delivered to you every week, cutting down on both time and food waste.

Recently, I reviewed several meal kits from Home Chef, in particular to assess the more “diabetes-friendly” options. I received two meals at no charge and did not receive any additional compensation for this review. All opinions are my own.

Who They Are

The mission at Home Chef is to “provide everything you need to bring more delicious meals and moments to the table, no matter how busy you are”. Their meal kit delivery service allows you to fully customize your preferences in terms of the types of food, quantities, and cost. You can also choose to skip any weeks when you do not need meal delivery.

Services Offered

When you sign up with the service, you can select from several dietary preferences to get suggestions. Select your preferences, as well as the number of people and meals per week, and you’re almost ready to go!

Photo credit: Home Chef

You will be given suggestions from the current menu, based on your choices. You can still choose to customize all your meal choices within the particular week’s menu options.

Photo credit: Home Chef

Some meals take about 30 minutes to prepare from start to finish, while others boast just a 15-minute prep time. You can also select from the oven-ready or grill-ready collections as well as the classic culinary collection. Finally, there are also entrée salads available for purchase.

The total cost per week will vary, depending on your specific delivery preferences and menu choices. Meals start as low as $6.99 per serving!

My Review

I chose to sample two meals: The Sirloin and Mushroom Demi-Glace for the culinary collection as well as the Pesto Parmesan Chicken with Tuscan Tomato Green Beans from the oven-ready section.

I was impressed with the appearance of the food upon delivery. Everything was appropriately packaged and at the correct temperature. The proteins and produce all looked fresh, and I also appreciated the recyclable packaging materials that were used.

The Sirloin dish was one of the 30-minute meals (*aside: no matter which meal kit I try, it always takes me a bit longer; clearly, this is likely a user issue). The recipe card made the cooking process easy and seamless, as the instructions were very clear, and provided illustrations as well. Most importantly, all the food tasted great! It really delivered a classic and gourmet meal in the comfort of your own kitchen.

The potatoes au gratin with spinach and gorgonzola cheese were particularly a hit with the family. Despite my lower-carb lifestyle, I sampled a small amount these as well, and they certainly delivered on flavor and richness, and were a great accompaniment to the star protein dish – the steak! I used leftover steak and mushrooms for my lunch over a salad the following day and wasn’t disappointed.

Although it was a simpler and plainer dinner, I was absolutely thrilled with the oven-ready chicken and green beans. As a mom of two young kids, working several jobs remotely, it was really a treat to just be able to stick the trays in the oven and have a delicious, nutritious, and carb-conscious option ready to go for everyone to enjoy.

This particular meal was a great option for blood sugar-friendly outcomes for those with diabetes. Can’t go wrong with plenty of lean protein and lots of green veggies covered in a tasty sauce – delicious and healthy for the whole family!

Summary

Overall, the entire family enjoyed both meals that we sampled. I appreciated the produce and protein quality and the clear instructions on how to prepare. Having all the ingredients ready to go, without extra planning or visiting or ordering from a grocery store certainly saves time and effort! Most of all, I really appreciated the multitude of customization options that Home Chef offers, whether by price, food type, dietary restriction, or frequency of delivery, to name a few.

If you’ve never tried a meal delivery kit service before, I would say, you can’t go wrong if you start here!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes-Friendly Starbucks Drinks

It’s that time of year again, the allure of pumpkin spice and everything nice suddenly takes over your summer vibes. I am not a coffee drinker, but each season I grow more envious of those who are. In the summertime, everyone has their refreshing cold coffee concoctions and each fall I entertain the idea of trying a pumpkin spice latte but never get the guts to follow through.

Most drinks you get at coffee chains like Starbucks come loaded with calories and sugar, making these delicious drinks not the healthiest of choices. There are, however, plenty of low-carb substitutions and creations for you to try. All are low-calorie and low-carb and won’t leave you worrying about your blood sugars or your favorite jeans fitting.

Here are some of the most intriguing diabetes-friendly drinks I found at Starbucks:

  • Sugar-Free Snickerdoodle – This is made by tweaking a Sugar-Free Vanilla Latte by adding one pump of Sugar-Free Cinnamon Dulce syrup. You can add 1-2 Splenda sugar-free sweetener if you need.
  • Skinny Mocha – The regular version contains about 20 g of carbs, but with a few small tweaks you can make it blood sugar friendly. Replace the milk with heavy whipping cream and opt for the sugar-free mocha syrup.
  • Caramel Macchiato – This is a favorite of many but is still loaded with calories and sugar since it contains milk and caramel sauce. Try it cold and swap out the milk for almond milk and hold the sauce. It is still rich with flavor and will get you energized!
  • Cinnamon Dolce Latte – These are delicious and the cinnamon is a great spice to add flavor without adding in any carbs. Ask for an Americano with ½ water and ½ steamed heavy cream and a few pumps of sugar-free cinnamon dolce syrup.
  • Frappuccino – These can be easily transformed into a low-carb drink by avoiding their classic syrup and replacing with sugar-free and 3 shots of heavy cream, blended Frappuccino style.
  • Ombre Pink Drink – The popular drink of the moment is the Ombre Pink Drink which contains their Strawberry Acai Drink, coconut milk and freeze dried strawberries, all of which contain sugar. To lighten up the carbs, opt for whipping cream, passion tango ice tea and four pumps of sugar-free vanilla syrup.

Also, here are some seasonal drinks to consider:

  • Pumpkin Spice Latte – I think people get over their summer blues with just the thought of ordering their first Pumpkin Spice Latte from Starbucks. Just opt for almond milk, hold the whipped cream and ask for one pump of their pre-sweetened pumpkin-flavored syrup.
  • Hot Peppermint Kiss – This is Starbuck’s Peppermint hot tea with 2 pumps of sugar-free vanilla syrup making it a sweet and minty treat.
  • Peppermint Mocha – This creation is a delicious seasonal treat but make sure to order it with almond milk, no whipped cream, and only one pump of their peppermint-flavored syrup to keep this gem blood sugar friendly. I will leave it up to you on whether you add the dark chocolate curls!

If you prefer tea to coffee, there are still plenty of ways to get creative! Many sugar-free options are just waiting to be turned into a low-carb creation, whether it’s Black Tea, Green Tea, White Tea, or Passion Fruit Tea. Here are a few such options:

  • Passion Fruit Tea Drink – This one is very popular in the diabetes community. Be sure to try sugar-free vanilla syrup in Passion Fruit Iced Tea for a refreshing and tasty treat.
  • Low-Carb London Fog – A London fog is typically a combination of Earl Grey tea, steamed milk and vanilla syrup. Replace the milk with whipping cream and use sugar-free vanilla to create this low carb goodness.
  • Unsweetened Peach Citrus White Tea – A refreshing option is to modify it by adding a splash of heavy cream, a few pumps of sugar-free vanilla syrup, no water, and ice.

Living with diabetes makes us more aware of what we are eating and drinking. Thanks to these low-carb tweaks, we can enjoy while not worrying about our blood sugars. I can’t wait to join in on the seasonal fun!

Have you discovered any great low-carb drinks at Starbucks recently? Share and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Low-Carb Caramel Apple Cheesecake Bars

This content originally appeared on Sugar-Free Mom. Republished with permission.

It may seem like a bit of work, but it’s a pretty simple recipe with 3 easy layers of deliciousness!

The first layer is like a shortbread crust made without almond or other nuts for those who have tree nut allergies like my youngest son. The middle is all cheesecake filling and it’s topped with a crumble of apples and coconut flour mixture to make it have some fabulous texture once baked!

Of course it’s best if chilled, but you could certainly enjoy it straight from the oven. Just be sure to allow it some time to set or it will fall apart when you try cutting into it. Cheesecake and crusts without gluten are known for that, just part of the issue baking low-carb. Wait a bit and this will slice easily. Enjoy it with some of my Sugar-Free Caramel Sauce on top!

Low-Carb Apple Cheesecake Bar

Print

Keto Low-Carb Caramel Apple Cheesecake Bars

.wprm-recipe-rating .wprm-rating-star.wprm-rating-star-full svg * { fill: #343434; }

Your bite of fall: Shortbread crust filled with creamy cheesecake and topped with a crumble of apples.
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Keyword apple, cheesecake
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 16 bars
Calories 229kcal

Ingredients

Shortbread Crust

  • 1/2 cup butter softened
  • 1 cup coconut flour
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp Caramel Liquid Stevia or 1/2 cup sweetener of choice

Cheesecake filling

  • 16 ounces cream cheese room temp
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tsp apple extract
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp Caramel Liquid Stevia

Topping

  • 3/4 cup apples skinless, diced
  • 1 tbsp coconut flour
  • 1/2 tsp apple pie spice
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp butter softened
  • 1/2 tsp Caramel liquid stevia

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Combine crust ingredients together in a bowl and stir well until combined. Spread onto a parchment-lined, 8-by-8-inch baking dish.
  • Combine all cheesecake ingredients in a stand mixer, or use an electric mixer on medium speed, until smooth and well incorporated. Taste and adjust stevia if needed. Spread the cheesecake filling over the crust evenly.
  • Mix the topping ingredients together in a small bowl, then sprinkle mixture over the cheesecake. Bake for 30 minutes, then chill 3-4 hours to set or overnight. Top with sugar-free caramel sauce, if desired.

Notes

Recipe Notes

  • Net carbs: 4g

Brenda’s Notes: 

 

Nutrition

Calories: 229kcal | Carbohydrates: 7g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 21g | Saturated Fat: 13g | Cholesterol: 61mg | Sodium: 324mg | Potassium: 59mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 723IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 41mg | Iron: 1mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Low-Carb Caramel Apple Cheesecake Bars Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

The Keto Diet Isn’t for Everyone: A Type 1 Diabetes Perspective

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Christel Oerum

I’m a firm believer that there is no such thing as a “Diabetic Diet,” but that we each need to find the best diet for our bodies and mental happiness.

In the search for the diet that’s right for me, I tried the keto diet, and this is what happened.

Why I Decided to Try the Keto Diet

I’ve been living with type 1 diabetes since 1997 and didn’t pay much attention to my diet or followed any specific nutrition regime for the first 17 years. I just ate and adjusted my insulin to my food. And you know what, that worked pretty well for me.

Then in 2014, I started preparing for my first bodybuilding competition and I really had to focus on my diet in a way I never had before. Back then, my coach had me on a high protein, medium/low-carb, and very low-fat diet.

After that experience, I became fascinated with different nutrition approaches and I’ve tried out quite a few diets in the name of research and just plain curiosity.

What is so fascinating about nutrition is that every approach has its die-hard followers and I’m always curious to see if I’ll love it as much as they do.

So, in the name of research, I set out to try the keto diet on my own body.

How I Implemented the Keto Diet

The keto diet restricts the amount of carbohydrates and protein consumed, which means that you primarily rely on fats for your daily energy. The goal is to consume very few carbohydrates (~5% of your daily calorie consumption, or 20-50 grams max), thereby forcing your body to burn fat for fuel.

Fans of the keto diet usually like the approach because it supposedly helps with blood sugar management as well as weight management. And let’s face it, if you’re into bacon and cheese, it sounds very alluring.

Many say that they’ve seen weight loss even though they don’t pay attention to calories, simply because a diet high in fat is very satiating, making them feel full quickly so they eat less.

Based on all of this, I decided to eat less than 50 grams of carbs a day (including veggie carbs/fibers), about 80 grams of protein, and as much fat I needed to feel full without keeping a track of my calorie intake.

My Experience Following the Keto Diet

Christel

Image source: Beyond Type 1

At first, my experience was great. I enjoyed the cheese, nuts, seeds, and avocado that my diet predominantly consisted of.

When it came to my diabetes management, I saw a flatter blood sugar profile with fewer spikes on my Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) that I often see when I eat a more carb-heavy diet (which is not surprising since carb are what gets converted into glucose the fastest in the bloodstream).

But my experiment quickly went south. I started to become increasingly insulin resistant after only about a week, which meant that I needed more and more insulin to manage my blood sugars, even though I was eating very few carbs.

I still wasn’t seeing any major spikes in my blood sugars, but since fat slows down the release of glucose into the bloodstream, my blood sugar would continue to slowly creep up. To keep my blood sugars in-range, I had to increase my long-acting insulin significantly while micro-dosing my rapid-acting insulin more often.

The reason for the micro-doses rather than doing larger doses was to adjust my blood sugar without ending up with low blood sugar.

Not only did I become more insulin resistant and had a harder time managing my blood sugars, I also started to have a lot of digestive issues and was gaining weight at an alarming rate.

None of the last two issues are really a surprise.

  1. My digestive issue was most likely related to my diet being low in fibers and volume
  2. And when it comes to my weight gain, fats are very calorie-dense compared to protein and carbs and since I wasn’t monitoring my calorie intake, I was eating too many calories for my needs. I have a healthy appetite and fats alone were just not satiating enough to make me feel full quickly.

After about a month of sticking to the keto diet, I switched back to my moderate/low-carb way of eating. At that point I didn’t feel good, I was constantly bloated, couldn’t fit in my clothes, and my endo was not impressed with how negatively it was impacting my diabetes management.

If you only take one thing away from this post, I hope that it will be this: that you can (and should) try things out, and if they don’t work for you, then “cut your losses.”

It’s Not a Failure, It’s Just an Approach That Doesn’t Work for You

So maybe the keto diet intrigues you, or the Paleo or Vegan diet sounds more appealing. My recommendation would be to research the diet, talk to others who have tried it, assess if it might trigger any unwanted eating patterns, and then try it out if you like.

There are thousands of people with diabetes who follow any of the three diets I mention above with great results so they clearly work for a lot of people – they just don’t work for all people. It may take some experimentation to find the diet that works for you.

If you’re interested in trying the keto diet, you can find a keto meal plan with recipes on Diabetes Strong.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

On-the-Go Snacking: Strategies for Work Days, Road Trips, and Keeping Carbs at Bay

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Catherine Newman

Catherine shares her favorite low-carb, high-protein snacks that you can buy at a convenience store, make at home, or keep in your pantry

If you’re reducing the carbs you eat, then you already understand why snacks are so uniquely challenging. Because, for so many of us, snacking has always been about the chips and the muffins, the cookies and crackers and donuts. Or at least, it used to be. But we’re changing our ways so that a sudden pang of hunger doesn’t mean we end up crashing just when we need our energy and stable blood sugar the most. High-protein, low-carb snacks. It’s got a holy grail kind of feeling to it, I know. But we’re on it.

Our advice here is divided into three components, all of them focused on savory snacks that have less than 10 grams of carbohydrates per serving. Click to jump to a section:

  • How to snack on the road and/or from a convenience store, because stopping to refill your tank doesn’t mean you can’t get a reasonable bite to eat.
  • Our recommendations for snacks to stock up on – plan-ahead stuff you can buy at the store or order online and tuck into your desk drawer, briefcase, or glove compartment for daily, occasional, or emergency snacking situations.
  • Our own Zucchini Chip recipe for at-home cravings. You didn’t know you needed a zucchini chip recipe? Ah! You were wrong.
  • More recipes for make-at-home snacks.
  • For airport/airplane snacking after the pandemic, please see Adam Brown’s article.

We typically recommend whole foods versus processed foods, but we’re not doing that here. Or not exclusively, because many packaged snacks have been processed. But don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good. Just do your best to get some nutrients into your body, and to minimize your carb load. You’ll feel so much better – we’re almost sure of it.

On-the-Road Snacking

Ideally, if we’ve got to be in the car for a while, we would all plan ahead and pack up deviled eggs and cut-up veggies. But so often we don’t, and we’re pulling into the snackmart hungry and scanning the aisles for our best bets. Plus, with many of us trying to minimize time in grocery stores during COVID-19, here are three parts of the store to focus on:

  1. Snacks

    Image source: Catherine Newman

    The refrigerated case. Specifically, the cheese sticks and discs, and the shrink-wrapped hardboiled eggs—all high-protein, no-carb options. You might think you don’t want a shrink-wrapped hardboiled egg, but I’m here to tell you that if you keep salt and a bottle of hot sauce in your car, it’s really a pretty good snack.

  2. Snacks

    Image source: Catherine Newman

    The jerky/sausage aisle or endcap. Is jerky an ideal food? Well, not exactly – I mean, it’s processed and salty, and the meat might strike you as sketchy. But also? It tends to be very high in protein and very low in carbs, making it a very good choice in a pinch. Read the ingredients to make sure there’s no (or barely any) added sugar. This photo is from a run-of-the-mill middle-of-nowhere gas station, and it shows three of my favorite processed meat items: Duke’s Shorty Sausages (these come in a bunch of flavors, and offer 7 grams of protein and less than 1 gram of carbs per serving), Tillamook Zero Sugar Beef Jerky (14 grams of protein and 0 grams of carbs per serving), and Vermont Smoke & Cure meat sticks (these also come in many flavors, and have 8 grams of protein and 2 grams of carbs per 1-ounce stick).

  3. The place where the nuts and seeds are, which might be kind of spread out around the candy. Look for products with no added sugar: sunflower seeds in and out of the shell, peanuts, smokehouse almonds, and pumpkin seeds are all good options. These tend to be high in protein and relatively low in carbs, plus they give you the crunchy-salty-filling trifecta you might be looking for in a snack.

If you’re thirsty, grab a bottle of water, unsweetened iced tea, or unsweetened flavored seltzer from the fridge!

Plan-Ahead Snacking

Once you’re planning ahead, snacking gets a lot easier, and you might already have plenty of good, snackable, packable food at home: nuts and seeds; cheese sticks; cut-up veggies and dip; cottage cheese; hard-boiled eggs; avocados; pickles, olives, and the like. Invest in some reusable small containers, and consider prepackaging what you’ll need for the week.

But I also like to have more grab-and-go style snacks on hand, with a few especially delicious items in the mix so that I don’t succumb to the temptation of the vending machine Cheez-Its. These are all low-carb, some are high-protein, and most of them are fairly expensive. I try to think about these a little differently to offset my concern about the cost: unlike most junk food, these are actually made from whole, high-quality ingredients. In other words, they’re more like food than like snacks, which makes them worth investing in (at least for me). All of these snacks have the added advantage of being gluten free.

Trader Joe’s Norwegian Crispbread

Snacks

Image source: Catherine Newman

These have answered my cracker-lover’s prayer. They seem a little. . . seedy at first. A little excessively wholesome. But the more I eat these, the more I love them: they’re nutty-tasting and crunchy, and one cracker slathered with mustard and piled with cheese makes a pretty perfect mid-afternoon meal (my daughter spreads hers with peanut butter).

Per serving: 4 grams protein; 3 grams fiber; 6 grams carbs

$4.29 per (7.55-ounce) package at Trader Joe’s

Whisps

Snacks

Image source: Catherine Newman

We’re pretty much crazy about all the single-ingredient cheese crisps out there (can you guess the single ingredient?) but these are our current favorite. They are SO CHEESY! They’re like the part that leaks out of a grilled cheese sandwich and crisps on the grill. And we can’t keep them in the house, whatever flavor we get, because everybody loves them so much. Other brands we like include Moon Cheese and Just the Cheese.

Per serving: 6 grams protein; 0 grams fiber; 1 gram carbs

$15 for 12 (.63-ounce) packages on Amazon

Epic Pork Rinds

Snacks

Image source: Catherine Newman

I grew up seeing pork rinds in the bodegas of my childhood, but I’d never tried them until recently. And they’re really good—or at least these are. They’re like popcorn, but if popcorn were meat flavored and crunchier than anything you had ever bitten into in your life. Not crumbly-crunchy, but hard-crunchy, which is strange and nice. They’re also very filling. We like the Pink Himalayan + Sea Salt flavor, which have a happy two ingredients: antibiotic-free pork and salt. (Or three ingredients, if you count the two types of salt.)

Per serving: 11 grams protein; 0 grams fiber; 0 grams carbs

$4-4.50 per (2.5-ounce) bag at Whole Foods or epicprovisions.com

Flock Chicken Chips

Snacks

Image source: Catherine Newman

These are basically the pork rinds of the chicken world. If you’re a person who volunteers to carve a roast chicken so that you can pull off its crispy skin and stuff it into your mouth before anyone else even knows it existed, then this is the snack for you. The chicken flavor is shockingly fresh and good. Be warned, though, that these are almost eerily filling. They come in different flavors, but we’ve only tried the original ones.

Per serving: 14 grams protein; 0 grams fiber; 0 grams carbs

$24 for 8 (1-ounce) bags from flockfoods.com

Roasted Seaweed Snacks

Snacks

Image source: Catherine Newman

These are those papery little sheets of seaweed that are a little fishy, a little salty, and strangely satisfying, if you like seaweed. Seaweed has lots of micronutrients (it’s especially rich in minerals) but it doesn’t have a lot of protein, so these won’t satisfy actual hunger. But if you’re just feeling a little snacky, seaweed snacks can really hit the spot. Our favorite flavors include the Seasnax lime flavor and the gimMe Organic sesame or teriyaki.

Per serving: 1 gram protein, 0 grams fiber; 1 gram carbs

Around $1 to $2 per (.35 ounce) package at many stores and online

And! The recipe.

Zucchini Chips

Image source: Catherine Newman

Nobody ever says this about zucchini, but bigger is actually better here, since these are like Shrinky Dinks in the oven. You can season them however you like once they’re baked: a sprinkle of curry powder, a shake of cheese powder, a dash of smoked paprika. But we love them plain, too. There’s something about the shrinking process that concentrates all of their sweetness. Maybe you didn’t even know that zucchini had any sweetness to begin with! Now you will.

View the recipe.

More make-at-home snack recipes:

About Catherine

Catherine loves to write about food and feeding people. In addition to her recipe and parenting blog Ben & Birdy (which has about 15,000 weekly readers), she edits the ChopChop series of mission-driven cooking magazines. This kids’ cooking magazine won the James Beard Publication of the Year award in 2013 – the first non-profit ever to win it – and a Parents’ Choice Gold Award. Her book “How to Be A Person” was published in 2020. She also helped develop Sprout, a WIC version of the magazine for families enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), as well as Seasoned, their senior version. They distribute over a million magazines annually, through paid subscriptions, doctor’s offices, schools, and hospitals. Their mission started with obesity as its explicit focus – and has shifted, over the years, to a more holistic one, with health, happiness, and real food at its core. That’s the same vibe Catherine brings to the diaTribe column.

[Photo Credit: Catherine Newman]

Source: diabetesdaily.com

5 High-Protein and Flavorful Shrimp Recipes

It is easy to understand why shrimps are a favorite option among people with diabetes. They are high in protein, the macronutrient that makes you feel fuller and consequently reduces your craving for unnecessary and sugar spiking carbs. Apart from this effect on appetite, protein is also good for your bones, muscles, and blood pressure, among others.

But let’s not stop at discussing their health benefits. Let’s also explore how we can prepare them for easy, quick, and tasty meals with your loved ones.

Zucchini Shrimp Fra Diavolo

Photo credit: Cooking at Home Mom

Zucchini Shrimp Fra Diavolo

What do you get if you mix spiraled zucchini, sauteed shrimps and Arrabbiata sauce? A spicy Italian treat! Zucchini is a great low-calorie replacement for noodles but be sure not to overcook it as it gets mushy and watery. If you have kids, you can serve a different sauce for them. Suggested options include mild marinara, pesto, or with garlic, lemon, and a little salt.

Sesame Shrimp Stir Fry

Sesame Shrimp Stir Fry

With shrimps paired with broccoli, this is one of the healthy recipes you’d like to keep at hand. The toasted sesame seeds add more texture, and with the other condiments into the mix, it’s a “party in your mouth.” It has a hint of sweetness, which appeals to kids and picky eaters.

shrimp spaghetti squash Alfredo with broccoli

Video screenshot from Low-Carb Yum

Shrimp Spaghetti Squash Alfredo with Broccoli

This is another Italian recipe that replaces high-carb fettucini noodles with the blood sugar-friendly option, spaghetti squash. The pan-fried shrimps, steamed broccoli, and “noodles” blend well with the creamy and cheesy Alfredo sauce. No broccoli in the fridge? Don’t worry, you can replace it with any spinach, kale, or other low-carb vegetables.

shrimp gumbo

Photo credit: For Good Measure

Shrimp Gumbo

This shrimp-based, vegetable-loaded recipe takes a longer time to prepare than the other recipes on this list, but the flavor and nutrition you get from it make the effort worth it. Many people often consume it with rice, but low-carb bread and fresh salad are friendlier to your pancreas.

Spicy Shrimp Taco Lettuce Wraps

The regular tacos are high in carbs but if you use lettuce wraps and stuffed them with spicy shrimps and avocado tomato salsa, you’re in for a low-carb Mexican celebration. Top it with some creamy jalapeno and cilantro lime sauce for an added kick. You will want to have more after a serving but each taco has only 4g of net carbs, which is a pretty good deal.

How do you want your shrimps prepared? Share your recipes ideas in the comments!

5 High-Protein and Flavorful Shrimp Recipes

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Baked Cucumber Chips With Salt & Vinegar Flavor

This content originally appeared on Low Carb Yum. Republished with permission.

Although most of our cucumber plants got destroyed by a wild animal, we managed to get a few more cucumbers from the garden. A friend with a productive garden also gave us a couple more.

With all the cucumbers laying around, I figured I better find a good use for them. So, I pulled my Excaliber dehydrator out of storage so I could preserve some. The dehydrator is basically just a low temperature convection oven used to slowly remove moisture from foods. It’s perfect for preserving fruits and vegetables.

I decided make a batch of salt and vinegar baked cucumber chips. If you don’t have a dehydrator, you can bake them at a low temperature in a regular oven as well. I prefer using a dehydrator to make vegetable chips because they come out better. And, you don’t have to worry about cooking them too long and burning. However, it is a lot faster to make these baked cucumber chips in the oven. It takes only 3-4 hours compared to the 8-10 hours when using the dehydrator.

It’s best to use a mandoline to get consistently thin slices. I used an old Pampered chef mandoline slicer that isn’t available anymore.

If you don’t like vinegar, you can leave it out for plain salted chips. However, salt and vinegar was always my favorite potato chip so I wanted to have a low-carb version.

Baked Cucumber Chips

Print

Baked Cucumber Chips

.wprm-recipe-rating .wprm-rating-star.wprm-rating-star-full svg * { fill: #343434; }

Baked salt and vinegar baked cucumber chips are a healthier low-carb snack. They are easy to make and low in calories, too.
Course Snack
Cuisine American
Keyword Cucumbers
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 hours
Total Time 10 hours 10 minutes
Servings 6 people
Calories 25kcal

Equipment

  • Excaliber dehydrator or oven, mandoline slicer

Ingredients

  • 2 medium cucumbers or 3 small ones
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil or avocado oil
  • 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar or vinegar of choice (omit for regular chips)
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt or more if needed

Instructions

  • Slice cucumber very thin. Use a mandoline slicer for best results.
  • Remove excess moisture from slices using a paper towel.
  • Put cucumber slices in a large bowl and toss with oil, vinegar, and salt.
  • For dehydrator: Place slices on trays and dry at 125-135°F for 10-12 hours or until crispy.
  • For oven: Place slices on parchment lined baking tray. Dry at 175°F for 3-4 hours or until crispy.
  • Allow slices to cool before serving.

Notes

If using foil lined pans, don’t cut the cucumbers too thin and be sure to flip half-way so they can be removed easier.

Nutrition

Serving: 0.5cup | Calories: 25kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Sodium: 396mg | Potassium: 51mg | Vitamin A: 50IU | Vitamin C: 0.8mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

 

Baked Cucumber Chips Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Mammoth Creameries: The Keto Ice Cream That Tastes Like the Real Deal

If you eat low-carb, you probably know that there is no shortage of alternative products when it comes to our favorite treats, like ice cream. However, far from all are able to deliver a wholesome list of ingredients in a product that is blood sugar-friendly and tastes great!

I received samples of several flavors of ice cream from Mammoth Creameries at no charge. I was not additionally compensated for this review and all opinions are my own.

Who They Are

Mammoth Creameries is a family-owned, low-carb, low-sugar ice cream business based in Austin, TX. It was founded by Tim Krauss and his wife, Sue, shortly after Tim’s diagnosis with type 1 diabetes. Tim explains how the diagnosis changed the course of his and his family’s life, and how the ice cream company was born:

“I committed myself to living a more health-conscious life centered around exercise and eating well, adhering to the paleo diet before making the shift to a low-sugar, low-carb, and high-fat ketogenic diet. Sue, in her typical fashion, went above and beyond in helping guide me through this difficult life transition before eventually going ketogenic herself. She quickly became our household’s go-to keto chef, exploring recipes and dishes of all kinds. However, there was one thing she couldn’t find for our new lifestyle: ice cream.

Born in our kitchen and warmly welcomed by our innovative city, the positive reception and growth we’ve seen since starting this company has reinforced our belief that Mammoth Creameries is the gateway to a dietary independence that diabetic and ketogenic individuals are hard-pressed to find in today’s world. Together, we’re creating dessert that works for your body, not against it!”

The company is committed to using well-sourced, high-quality, real ingredients, including butter from grass-fed cows and egg yolks from cage-free chickens. All products don’t have any added sugar and are sweetened instead with xylitol, a sugar alcohol that does not impact blood glucose levels (Note: Xylitol is very toxic to dogs, so do take extra care if you have a pet!).

The Products

Currently, four flavors of the ice cream are available: Vanilla Bean, Chocolate, Lemon Buttercream, and Chocolate Peanut Butter. A 4-pack of one flavor (pint-size) or a combination 4-pack can be purchased on the company website for $55.00.

Although the ingredients list for each flavor varies slightly, the main ones for each are: cream, butter, sweetener, and egg yolks. They are all very low in carbohydrate (~1 g net per serving), and high in fat (~26 g per serving).

My Review

I have previously tried many low-carb ice creams from different companies and have often made my own, using simple ingredients, like cream, almond milk, sweetener, and vanilla extract. I have to say that out of all the commercially-available products I’ve tried, this one tasted the most like my home-made ice cream!

All the flavors tasted very rich and creamy. Not surprising, as this company uses real cream and butter, delivering a full-fat and satisfying product. The texture perfectly resembled ice cream and wasn’t crumbly, like some other ones I have tried. Caveat: let this product sit out of the freezer for about five minutes to get the perfect ice cream consistency!

Most importantly, the impact on my blood sugar (BG) levels was almost negligible, without even taking any insulin! This is truly a “keto-friendly” and “BG-friendly” ice cream that delivers on its promises and tastes like real ice cream.

As far as the flavors, I enjoyed all of them. My favorites were the classic Vanilla Bean and the subtly citrusy Lemon Buttercream. Meanwhile, my 3-year-old thoroughly enjoyed both of the chocolate flavors! That is perhaps the true test: is it kid-friendly? The answer this time is a resounding “yes!” (which is often not the case for many other low-carb products that I have put to the “toddler test”)!

Also, a little goes a long way! I don’t think I would be tempted to eat a whole pint—due to the caloric load, a ½ cup serving size really does leave you feeling satisfied.

Summary

Overall, Mammoth Creameries delivers a high-quality, blood sugar-friendly line of products that are made with simple and real ingredients. While the price point is on the higher side, if you consider that you can actually eat just one serving and feel satisfied, along with being able to eat delicious ice cream that has no impact on your blood sugar without making it yourself, it is well worth the investment!

***

What’s your favorite low-carb ice cream? Have you tried this product? Please comment below – we love hearing from our readers!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Sugar-Free Keto Whipped Cream

This content originally appeared here. Republished with permission.

If you’re following a keto or low-carb way of eating, you don’t have to miss out on your favorite sweet treats and desserts. And that includes whipped cream!

With a very simple swap, every generous serving of 1/4 cup of keto whipped cream has only 1 net carb! You can’t beat that. You might be wondering how to make whipped cream keto and sugar-free. It’s easy! Simply omit sugar and swap a keto-friendly sweetener.

If you don’t have an electric mixer, you can also make the recipe by hand or in a mason jar! Find out the details in the original post.

Print

Sugar-Free Keto Whipped Cream

.wprm-recipe-rating .wprm-rating-star.wprm-rating-star-full svg * { fill: #343434; }

This recipe makes ultra creamy and fluffy whipped cream with 1 net carb per serving, great for desserts, drinks, and more!
Course Condiment, Dessert
Cuisine American
Keyword whipped cream
Servings 16 servings
Calories 103kcal

Equipment

  • Mixer

Ingredients

  • 2 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 4 tsp monk fruit sweetener or keto-friendly sweetener of choice
  • 2 tsp cocoa powder optional, for chocolate flavor

Instructions

  • Chill the cream, mixing bowl, and attachments. Simply place your glass or metal mixing bowl and whisk attachment in the refrigerator for 20-30 minutes, and keep the whipping cream in the back of the refrigerator until just before you use them.
  • Add the chilled heavy whipping cream, sweetener, and vanilla extract to your bowl. The cream will almost double in size while it’s whipped, so be sure there’s plenty of room in your mixing bowl.
  • Mix on medium speed for 5-6 minutes. Use a hand mixer or stand mixer with whisk attachment set to medium speed to whisk the cream until it almost doubles in size and has soft peaks. Be careful not to over-mix your whipped cream.
  • Serve immediately or store covered in the refrigerator until you’re ready to serve.

Notes

  • Keto friendly sweeteners: Use 2 teaspoons of monk fruit sweetener, Swerve sweetener, or erythritol for every cup of heavy whipping cream; Alternately, use 1/4 teaspoon stevia for every cup of heavy whipping cream.
  • To store whipped cream: The best way to store homemade whipped cream is to carefully spoon the mixture into an airtight container, preserving its fluffiness. You could also skip transferring the whipped cream and cover the mixing bowl with plastic wrap. Store covered in the refrigerator 3 to 4 days, unless the best-by date on the heavy whipping cream container comes first.

Nutrition

Calories: 103kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 11g | Saturated Fat: 7g | Cholesterol: 41mg | Sodium: 11mg | Potassium: 22mg | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 437IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 19mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Sugar-Free Keto Whipped Cream Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

1 2 3 13

Search

+