Managing the Emotional Toll of Diabetes and COVID-19

The world as we know it has changed due to COVID-19, the illness caused by the novel coronavirus. The number of businesses closing, people being quarantined (mandatorily or voluntarily), laws changing to contain the spread of the disease in the United States, cities invoking curfews and travel bans, and people dying is changing by the hour. If it suddenly feels as though you traveled through time and landed in the zombie apocalypse, you’re not alone.

Add to that the layered anxiety and worry that comes with having diabetes in the time of an unmitigated infectious disease (of global pandemic proportions) disaster, and it can become too much to manage. It can be a complicated mix of concern for the world, the risk to yourself, and how you feel about the risk to loved ones in an environment of uncertainties and unknown unknowns. Here are our top ways to manage the stress:

Know the Facts

Having diabetes doesn’t necessarily put you at any higher risk for getting COVID-19, but you can be susceptible to more severe complications if you acquire the disease. Do not panic. Do not get sucked down into the rabbit hole of myths and conspiracy theories. Learn the facts from reputable sources only. Following advice from The World Health Organization and the CDC are two good places to start. You may have increased anxiety around diabetes and coronavirus (that’s expected and warranted), but unnecessary stress doesn’t help, either.

Disconnect

Most of us are working from home these days, and while that’s an excellent way to help contain the spread of disease and protect people with preexisting conditions like diabetes, it’s also keeping many people glued to their screens for most of the day, and that means, glued to the news. Get away from your computer screen, the news, Twitter, and the chaos of Facebook for some time each day (walks outside are excellent, now that the spring weather is upon us!). Set limits on how much you watch the news (it’s crucial to stay informed, it’s not so crucial to watch CNN for 7 hours straight). Or better yet, limit screen time to evenings only.

Infographic by The World Health Organization

Be Prepared, Not Panicked

There’s only so much you can do, but make sure you do it! Practice proper social distancing, hand washing techniques, stay home if you’re sick, and avoid crowded places, sick people, and high traffic areas (airports, etc.).

If you can, stock up on two weeks’ worth of food, toiletries, and medication, and make arrangements to work from home, if able. It’s understandable that most people cannot afford to stock up on fresh food and medication. More affordable, shelf-stable food items that can go a long way include canned goods and frozen vegetables, and dried beans and rice. That being said, there’s no need to necessarily hoard grocery items, as grocery stores do not have any supply-chain issues and hoarding for yourself may cause deprivation for others (although, of course, make sure you have more than enough supplies to treat low blood sugar at home). Additionally, check out our advice for obtaining additional diabetes supplies without breaking your budget during this crisis.

If your job requires in-person time (if you work in the service industry, are a healthcare worker, provide city services such as garbage collection or sanitation, or your boss simply won’t budge on a work from home arrangement), try and maintain 6 feet distance between you and others, ask for latex gloves if you work in a grocery store or are a mail carrier and touch lots of objects (be sure you know the proper way to use them!), and avoid standing near sick people. Also, wash your hands thoroughly and often. If you can find it, hand sanitizer also is extremely helpful when on the job if running water and soap aren’t readily available. COVID-19 is caused by a novel Coronavirus, meaning it’s never been seen before, and the epidemiological characteristics of the spread of the disease are still being uncovered. It’s best to use extreme caution. It’s recently been revealed that it *may* be airborne, although studies are conflicting.

After you’ve adequately prepared, don’t continue to panic. Falling to hysteria won’t help anyone, but being prepared can give you peace of mind if you’re forced to be at home for a while.

How to Protect Others from Getting Sick - Coronavirus 2

Infographic by The World Health Organization

Move Your Body

Exercise is one of the main ways to decrease stress, and just because many cities are closing down their gyms, doesn’t mean you can’t move your body. Aim for a moderate activity for at least 30 minutes every single day. Warming weather can mean outdoor runs or walks, bike rides or hikes, and YouTube is an excellent resource for yoga and meditation classes and various cardio routines. Check out this article for even more ideas! You may not be able to control a lot right now, but moving your body is one concrete thing you can do to feel better.

Create Structure

With school closings and changing work routines, nothing feels normal right now and that can cause a lot of anxiety. Try to create some sort of structured routine (small changes can make a big difference!). Wake up at your normal time, even if you don’t have a commute right now. Make your bed every morning. Shower. Put on pants (yes, some people need a reminder to change out of their PJs when working from home!). If you usually have Tuesday night pasta night, have your Tuesday night pasta night. Sticking to a routine is especially important if you have children at home and they’re not in school currently, but a routine is healthy for everyone.

Check in on Your People

Gathering in crowds is not recommended right now, per CDC guidelines, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t check in on your friends and family. Skype, FaceTime, or even good old-fashioned texts and phone calls are excellent ways to stay in touch with everyone. We’re all in this together, and reminding people that they aren’t alone is crucial right now for mental health and sanity.

Supporting loved ones amid covid-19 pandemic

Infographic by The World Health Organization

Do Something Tangible

When you take away social gathering, date nights out, going to the movies, playing mini-golf, going bowling, and your kids’ weekly ballet class, everything suddenly feels…digital. Do something tangible: clean out the garage you’ve been meaning to clean out for the past 2 years, go through your clothes for Goodwill donations, repaint and rearrange a room, learn how to knit, dig around in your garden, pull out the dusty Scrabble and Scattergories games from the basement and have a game night, master your grandma’s cornbread recipe–anything that is physical will benefit you tremendously, and help peel you away from the constant stream of anxiety-provoking news.

Eat Healthy

The whole world being on pause right now might have given you license to stress-eat ice cream every night last week, or pour one too many glasses of wine over the weekend, but keeping a healthy eating routine will fuel your body and make you feel better over the long run. What feels good in the moment isn’t always the best thing for us over the long haul, and making sure we’re drinking enough water, eating plenty of vegetables, and getting good sources of protein will sustain us much better than ice cream ever could (sorry to say!).

Allow Yourself Some Grace

The world isn’t operating at 100% right now, and so it’s okay that you aren’t, either. You haven’t been able to concentrate on your work emails at all? Haven’t had the motivation to cook an elaborate meal? Not feeling optimistic about the future? Give yourself some grace, and allow yourself to slow down and feel this moment. This is a global pandemic, and (hopefully only) a once-in-a-lifetime event. Things are not normal, and it’s unreasonable to expect yourself to pretend like everything’s okay. It’s okay to not be okay right now.

Know This Is Only Temporary

Everything is in extremes right now, and it’s foreign to many of us. Maybe you’ve had to cancel travel plans, maybe you’ve had to return home from a study abroad program early, or you’re missing out on a Broadway play. Maybe you’ve even postponed your wedding. These are not normal times, and things won’t always be like this. Eventually, you will be able to go to the movies again, go to concerts with large crowds and not worry, get dinners, go bowling and grab happy hour without a care, and when you do, you can toast to happiness and good health, and getting through this horrific time, together.

How are you coping emotionally during this difficult and complicated time in the world? Share this article to help a friend, and comment your thoughts below; we would love to hear them!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Life With Type 1 Diabetes: A Gamer’s Take

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By DJ Lipscomb

I never thought I would be the type of person who watched someone play video games on the internet. But here I am, a 32-year-old dad who loves video games and not only watches other people stream, but recently started a streaming page + podcast dedicated to video games. Oh yeah, and did I mention I also have type 1 diabetes?

The Name of the Game

I was diagnosed with type 1 at the age of ten and it completely changed my life. It required me to grow up a lot faster than I would have liked and has shaped so many decisions I have made over the last 22 years. I remember being so terrified to do basic things on my own as a kid, even thinking that I might die. As a parent to three minions of my own now, I would never wish that feeling on any of them. That type of mentality is not easily shaken, but I eventually was able to push through the fear and not allow this illness to keep me from being everything I wanted to be.

Lipscomb

Image source: Beyond Type 1

The funny thing about growing up fast is that you leave a lot of “kid” stuff behind. I played video games a lot as a young kid. My brother and I would spend hours playing Gameboy or Super Nintendo. Looking back, I can see now how my diagnosis shifted my mentality on what I thought was age-appropriate. I just didn’t feel like a kid anymore. I had new responsibilities that had life-threatening consequences if ignored. Sure, I still played games, but I lost that pure innocence and fun that comes along with jumping into a brand new world for the first time because I was obsessed with keeping my blood sugar in check.

After going through some major life changes in 2016, I suddenly found myself faced with an opportunity to take stock of who I was and who I wanted to be. My diabetes had suffered immensely as a result of the stress from a divorce, I was out of shape, and I was a little lost. I remember one of the first things that I did for myself during that transition was buy a Nintendo Switch. I will never forget the moment I hooked the Switch up and played The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild for the first time. That joy I had forgotten suddenly rushed back through my veins. I knew at that moment, gaming would forever be a part of my story.

Fast forward to today. I am the healthiest I have ever been thanks to a major shift in my diet and to a recently introduced workout regimen. I own a successful consulting and media company called Exhale Creative that helps brands determine what type of content they need to create in order to help them grow and better reach their audience. We also produce 99% of the content for those clients. I have been a hired guitar player, touring all over the world and playing in front of tens of thousands of people (that’s a whole other glucose management article on its own). And now, I am chasing down a new dream called Patch Notes.

How to Stream

Patch Notes was created to celebrate the intersection of life and video games. We want to show how video gaming can bring out the best in people while simultaneously breaking down stereotypes about who or what a gamer is. We stream on Facebook Gaming, and you can find our podcast on iTunes and Spotify.

When Facebook announced that on Giving Tuesday they would match dollar for dollar the money raised through charity streams, I was thrilled to raise some funds for Beyond Type 1. I have had the privilege of interacting with several members of the Beyond Type 1 team and truly love the light they shine on all things diabetes. And even though I did not raise an abundant amount of money during our stream, my growing community did step up and donate while we hung out and played Pokemon Shield.

My platform is growing and I can’t think of a better way to use it than to help people, who like me, face this illness every day. It is also worth noting that there are several type 1 diabetes people (T1Ds) who watch the stream, which has made it feel even more meaningful to me. I am excited to host more streams that bring awareness to a disease that is often misunderstood or misrepresented, and look forward to bringing in more donations to help others with diabetes pursue their passions.

You can go back and watch the stream (and still donate) here. And come hang with us anytime at Patch Notes.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Shadow’s Edge: Video Game Designed to Help Kids Cope With Chronic Disease

Being a kid is hard enough as it is. Add in having a chronic disease and it can make those very special years potentially very isolating ones. Shadow’s Edge is a virtual reality game that allows children to process and express their feelings about their disease — or whatever else they may be going through. This mobile game can help change the experience of a serious diagnosis, or challenging times, by combining art therapy and cognitive behavior therapy and giving children a safe place to not feel so alone.

Action video games can help reduce depression in teens and Shadow’s Edge hopes to help bring positivity and community to those who need it most. Founder and philanthropist, Sherri Sabrato Brisson, is a brain cancer survivor who initially co-wrote a book, “Digging Deep: A Journal for Young People Facing Health Challenges ” with Rose Ofner, to help kids process their chronic disease or serious illness and it had great success. She then met Rosemary Lokhorst, who is now the game producer because of how much she loved the concept and that is how Shadow’s Edge was born.

Shadow’s Edge is a free and completely donation funded, virtual city that has just been overtaken by a storm, much like our lives after being hit with a diagnosis of some kind. The storm removes all the color from the city, much like our disease has the potential to take away some of our happiness…if we let it. The object of the game is to bring back the color to the city through writing and art, which helps empower the player to take on whatever it is they are going through.

Shadow's Edge

Photo credit: Shadow’s Edge

So far, Shadow’s Edge has worked with many organizations and university clinics in the US, Brazil and in Europe, focusing on kids and teens with cancer, and has received very good feedback, especially from doctors. Currently, they are running a complex research study nearby the Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago, with more than 100 kids testing Shadow’s Edge. So far, the results have been fantastic, and the game is helping these children build up the resilience to tackle the challenges they are facing.

I was able to chat with Sherri to find out more about Shadow’s Edge and their plans for the future.

Sheri, the journey you went through with brain cancer must have been so traumatic. Did writing your first book, Digging Deep: A Journal for Young People Facing Health Challenges, prove to be therapeutic? What about creating this game?

As a survivor, I can tell you, I know how difficult it was for me to even know how I was feeling at the time, let alone be able to express these feelings.

On my 25th anniversary of survivorship from brain cancer, I envisioned a world where every young patient has real-time access to the tools he or she needs to build emotional resilience through their experience.

I started by co-authoring Digging Deep: A Journal for Young People Facing Health Challenges, with Rose Offner, MA. I donated 35,000 journals to hospitals across the country, but it still wasn’t enough. So, we decided to meet young people right where they are—on their phones, playing games.

Seeing the success of your book shows that there is a need for resources and tools for people who have serious illnesses or a chronic condition. How do you think Shadow’s Edge can help fill that gap for our children?

Just like the physical journal, Shadow’s Edge helps teens build their emotional endurance to tackle the challenges they face through the power of their personal narrative. There are very few resources directed at teens today. Our aim is to meet them where they are – on their phones, playing games. So this time, teens are engaged through their medium—their phones or tablets—to express themselves through writing and now, covering a city in graffiti! Through gameplay, teen players realize they needn’t stay in their confined world—they have the power to reshape their world into whatever they choose. Through their expression, they can create beauty where there was once dilapidation: There can be light; There can be color; There can be hope. And, there can be a community.

“When starting to play Shadow’s Edge, a teen may not even know how they feel or what is troubling them. As they continue through their journey, they often discover they are at a different place emotionally in the end—there may be a sense of resolution, a greater understanding, a place of peace”.

I know for me personally, when I was diagnosed with type one diabetes, finding community changed everything for me. I was so much better off mentally and emotionally and had a much better outlook on my future. How does playing this video game help children connect with others? 

Yes – connection is key to build resilience and to feel better! Teens asked us for a space that is theirs only, where they can express things for themselves, as they are not always clear or ready to connect. Interestingly, this working with oneself helps to reach out. Additionally, the game has an in-game sharing space (once you reach the new level, Disillusionment). There you receive a means to see other players’ art and provide messages of support and where you can publish your graffitis. The community aspect is one that we are focusing on to expand – it is the key ask of players to build on.

I could see how the concept can be applicable to many different obstacles a child could be facing, what other areas are you focusing on and what do you hope to accomplish?

We are expanding the content so that teens facing a variety of difficult situations can benefit from it – these can be changes in the family like a divorce or death of a family member, bullying, anxiety, stress, depression, identity questions.

Shadow’s Edge has the potential to help so many children going through hardships. Where do you see Shadow’s Edge going from here?

We are working on expanding the community aspect of the game. We want to create a community around self-expression where teens facing all kinds of challenging situations can share, collaborate to create art, find psychoeducational content and just connect with each other.

As a brain cancer survivor, what message would you like to share with people facing a health battle of some kind? 

Your challenge does not define who you are, you define this. When you are ready, take an active role in opening up–every time you tell your story you tell it a little differently, this make you integrate it and see new perspectives. Practicing this also supports you to understand you are stronger than you think, getting comfortable with your story and owning it as a part of you, but not all of you.

Shadow’s Edge is available on both IOS and Android, and available in 6 languages.

They also have a special website dedicated to helping parents and healthcare professionals who are helping a young person with illnesses, see more information at www.diggingdeep.org.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Este Haim on Burnout + Bolusing for Pizza

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Todd Boudreaux

Este Haim is the bassist of the pop group Haim, which she formed with her sisters Alana and Danielle in 2007. Este has also been living with type 1 diabetes for nearly 20 years. Last week, Haim announced the release of their new track “Hallelujah,” stating the song is for “anyone struggling with chronic illness.” Beyond Type 1 caught up with Este to ask about the genesis of the track, her life on the road with T1D, and how she faces diabetes burnout with the help of her support system.

A Rough Transition

Freshman year of high school is perhaps the biggest transition in any teenager’s life. For Este Haim, that transition was made all the more difficult by her diagnosis with type 1 diabetes at age 14. Este recalls how difficult it was to fit in given all that she was going through.

“Yeah, it wasn’t a great way to start my first week of high school… I was basically a social pariah for a very long time. You know, I was just the diabetic kid in school that passes out and no one knows why and the diabetic girl that smelled like orange juice all the time.”

Although some of her classmates made life difficult in high school, there are two people Este has always been able to depend on — her sisters Alana and Danielle.

“Not only are they my sisters, I’m also in business with them, so we spend so much time together. We’re on the road together 24 hours a day for weeks on end. So they’ve seen every version of me. They’ve seen me in a good place with diabetes, and in a sh*tty place with diabetes,” Este says.

“I’m lucky that I have Danielle and Alana to be my support and when I am having a bad day, a bad week, a bad month, they’re always the first people to be like, ‘Dude we got you. Whatever you need. We’re going to get through this. Let’s get you a healthy meal. Let’s not have pizza after the show tonight. Let’s go get you something good so that you don’t wake up and your blood sugar is 350.”

Real Talk

“Pizza is such a blessing but it’s also such a curse” — Este’s description of pizza is all too real for anyone who has lived with diabetes.

“After a show, I get so hungry and the only thing that’s available to me is pizza. And we all know that pizza does weird sh*t to blood sugar. It’s this unexplained thing — bread I can bolus for, tomato sauce I can bolus for, cheese I can bolus for, but for some reason when they’re all together it’s this magical thing that I can never get right. It’s insane, what is that? It’s like my favorite food. And of course, it’s the one thing that I really can never get right. It’s hard being on the road and craving food and realizing the only things that are open late are either diners that don’t really have a lot of like salad-y options, or pizza.”

Este’s sisters fully grasp the exhaustion that comes with living with diabetes and have become an amazing support system for her. Their holistic view serves to remind Este that she is more than her diagnosis.

“My sisters have this incredible attitude of, ‘If you’re going to have a bad day, have a bad day, and just live your goddamn life. Tomorrow’s a new day, you get back on the wagon, get back on taking better care of yourself, let’s make some healthier choices. Let’s take a walk around the venue for a little bit, let’s get some exercise.’ And that also takes energy on their part. So I’m thankful that I have them on the road and it’s definitely an integral part of diabetes, is having that support. I’m really lucky.”

Life on the Road

Haim

Image source: Beyond Type 1

Keeping track of blood sugars on a consistent schedule is extremely difficult, and the ups and downs of life on the road can wreak havoc on the ability to maintain glycemic control, of which Este is all too aware.

“It’s being in a different time zone and not being able to sleep and then the stress of that and the cortisol in my blood making my blood sugar rise for no reason. Often, I won’t even know that I’m stressed out, and then I’ll see on my Dexcom that the arrow just goes straight up.”

Having a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) has been a game-changer for Este, not just because it allows her sisters to follow her glucose levels remotely, but also because of what it means to others living with T1D.

“I think awareness is so important and that’s why I wear my Dexcom on my arm now because I have a way of showing people that I am a type 1 diabetic… before I didn’t really have that.”

Diabetes Burnout

Este doesn’t mince words when it comes to the importance of mental health awareness for people living with type 1 diabetes. She is candid about the very real struggles that anyone living with a chronic illness endures over the course of their life.

“I think something that I struggled with, something a lot of people with diabetes struggle with, is perfection. We were taught to look at high blood sugars as a failure. I think that leads to diabetes burnout because you’re constantly trying to be perfect. Mentally, there’s only so much of that you can take without feeling like a failure… And I think that’s been the majority of the reason that I burn out. I’m just like ‘F*ck it, fine, whatever.’”

Haim recently released a new song titled ‘Hallelujah’ and Este posted that her verse in the song was inspired by her struggles living with T1D, specifically calling out the phenomenon of diabetes burnout in her post.

“It’s a lot easier sometimes to just ignore it and not deal with it, but we all know it always catches up with you… I feel like I’ve gone through diabetes burnout — for long periods of time — at least 10 different times in the past 20 years of being a diabetic, and like it’s tough, man. It’s tough to maintain that as a type 1 with chronic illness because there isn’t necessarily a promise that there’s a light at the end of the tunnel, and I said it in my post, it’s like a 24-hour job you can’t clock out of, that you don’t get paid for. Maintaining that mental toughness I think is exhausting for a lot of people.”

Haim

Image source: Beyond Type 1

Looking to the Future

At the end of the day, it all comes back to the support we receive from the people around us. As our discussion wrapped, Este told Beyond Type 1 how important it is to remind those that support us just how appreciated they are.

“The thing that I want to impart to people is to tell our loved ones that support us — that we do appreciate them — and to thank them for being supportive because I don’t know what I would do without my sisters, my parents, my best friends and my boyfriend for that matter… I think it’s really important to find the people that truly love and support you. I know it sounds trite and cliché, but all we can do is look to the future and try and live our best lives and have fun doing it. Enjoy every day as much as you possibly can, and don’t let diabetes get in the way of you doing and achieving everything that you want to do. Truly, that’s all we really can do.”

Source: diabetesdaily.com

100 Things You Can Do This Year for a Better Life with Diabetes

The New Year is here and many of us are hoping to make those resolutions stick. Keep in mind that there are many ways you can influence change, and some steps you can take may seem small but are very effective nonetheless. Please note that anytime you make changes to your diet or exercise routine, it’s also a good idea to check in with your doctor and plan ahead for any necessary medication adjustments.

Without further ado, check out this list of 100 simple things you can try to do this year for a better life with diabetes:

  1. Change your lancet.
  2. Eat lower carb.
  3. Take the stairs.
  4. Join a gym.
  5. See your eye doctor.
  6. Try a new vegetable recipe.
  7. Pack your lunch.
  8. Cut back on alcohol.
  9. Quit smoking.
  10. Invest in comfortable shoes.
  11. Buy a scale to keep accountable.
  12. Check your blood pressure.
  13. Stand while working.
  14. Go for a walk after lunch.
  15. Give gardening a try.
  16. Grocery shop the perimeter.
  17. Stretch.
  18. Keep a blood sugar log.
  19. Try a new diabetes app.
  20. Consider a continuous glucose monitor (CGM).
  21. Check your blood sugar more often.
  22. Don’t reuse your needle/syringe.
  23. Use alcohol swabs for injections and site changes.
  24. Read a book about diabetes.
  25. Join a diabetes support group.
  26. Choose green veggies over starches.
  27. Visit your endocrinologist.
  28. Do basal testing.
  29. Track your cycle.
  30. Count carbohydrates accurately.
  31. Try a half-unit syringe or pen.
  32. Consider trying an insulin pump.
  33. Ride a bike.
  34. Consider getting a pet.
  35. Eat more real food.
  36. Cut back on dessert.
  37. Try a flour substitute.
  38. Try a sugar substitute.
  39. Track your macronutrients.
  40. Track your steps.
  41. Educate about diabetes.
  42. Start a fundraiser.
  43. Attend a diabetes event.
  44. Sign up for our newsletter.
  45. Participate in diabetes surveys.
  46. Treat lows only with glucose.
  47. Eat consistent meals.
  48. Consider intermittent fasting.
  49. Ditch the foods that don’t work well.
  50. Invest in quality proteins.
  51. Eat more plants.
  52. Eat less processed foods.
  53. Ice skate.
  54. Try canoeing.
  55. Go hiking.
  56. Spend more time in nature.
  57. Shovel snow.
  58. Go swimming.
  59. Try ziplining or tree-to-tree.
  60. Get your A1c checked.
  61. Lower the high alert on your CGM.
  62. Eat more probiotics.
  63. Get more fiber.
  64. Swap juice and soda for more water.
  65. Sign up for a “couch to 5k” program.
  66. Jog.
  67. Go rock-climbing.
  68. Rotate your injection sites.
  69. Change your pump-site regularly.
  70. Change your CGM sensor regularly.
  71. Wear your CGM more.
  72. Review your CGM report regularly.
  73. Get a primary care physician.
  74. Get your flu shot.
  75. Figure out if you’re a moderator or abstainer.
  76. Jump rope.
  77. Meditate.
  78. Start a journal.
  79. Keep a food log.
  80. Create a 504 plan for your child.
  81. Speak with your child’s school about non-food related celebrations.
  82. Advocate for yourself or your child better.
  83. Ditch the scale if you’re obsessing.
  84. Take before photos (you will want them!).
  85. Figure out what self-care means to you and practice it daily.
  86. Seek out a friend or therapist if you feel you need help.
  87. Give back to the community by volunteering your time.
  88. Try a sport or activity you never tried before.
  89. Have more grace with yourself.
  90. Surround yourself with positive influences.
  91. Try to see the big picture more often.
  92. Create a healthy work/life balance.
  93. Appreciate the little things.
  94. Don’t be so hard on yourself.
  95. Check in with friends who may need it.
  96. Spend more time with family.
  97. Take the time to thank others and let them know they are appreciated.
  98. Take more deep breaths.
  99. Target things you feel you can change and start with those.
  100. Remember to be grateful for another year around the sun.

Do you want to add anything that has worked well for you? Please share your tips in the comments below.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Joslin Diabetes Center: A Global Leader in Research and Care

Learn about the mission and diabetes advocacy efforts of the Joslin Diabetes Center. Check out this summary to learn more about who they are, what they do, and more.
Source: diabetesdaily.com

World Diabetes Day 2019: The Most Important Issues We Face

Today is World Diabetes Day. What are the most important issues that you face as a person with diabetes? See what the online diabetes community had to say.
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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