We Asked an Immunologist Your Questions About COVID-19 Vaccine Safety

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Lala Jackson

August 2021 is starting to feel like March 2020 – the COVID-19 delta and other emerging variants are more dangerous than the original virus, but what does that mean? Cases are rising rapidly, are we safe? Do we need to wear masks or not? Vaccines work, but do they for everyone?

To get some clarity, we spoke with Bernard Khor, MD, PhD, of the Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason in Seattle, Washington. Dr. Khor’s laboratory is trying to find new ways to treat autoimmune diseases, specifically for people living with Down Syndrome as they are more likely to develop autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes. Because he spends so much time researching immune responses, we published his interview on whether type 1 diabetes means a person is immunocompromised and wanted to talk with him more about COVID-19 vaccine safety for people with type 1 diabetes.

Beyond Type 1: Are people with type 1 diabetes more likely to get COVID-19?

Dr. Khor: People who have autoimmune diseases aren’t necessarily immunocompromised; instead we can think of it as having a dysregulated immune system. That’s what causes the immune system to attack its own body. It does not necessarily mean that they don’t respond appropriately against infections.

What we do know is that, if they catch it, people with type 1 diabetes are more susceptible to worse outcomes from COVID. If it were my child or loved one living with type 1 diabetes, I would do everything I could to mitigate that risk.

What about the delta variant? How did we get here?

The delta variant and other variants we’re seeing start to develop are worse for everyone. These mutations happen because the virus has had time to persist and improve itself. If we were able to completely contain it, if everyone got the vaccines right now, we could stop this pattern by giving it nowhere to hide. But if the coronavirus is hiding in 30 to 40 percent of the population, it will come back and come back worse again and again. It’s just a matter of time.

That’s the thing about a virus – it’s not a one time threat. It’s an ongoing, adaptable threat. It’s a virus that mutates. It’s trying to survive. It can change and adapt to circumstances. There’s another variant coming out from Peru that’s getting more powerful – it’s affecting younger people, it’s leading to more rapid hospitalization, it’s a worse disease.

I cannot overstate how much COVID-19 needs to be respected. The writing on the wall was very clear from the beginning. We have seen outbreaks of diseases before and we have seen pandemics before. They are all agents that need to be respected immensely.

Other forms of coronavirus – SARS, MERS – were incredibly bad. In both cases we basically escaped worse outcomes because we got lucky; transmission rates of those viruses weren’t as high as COVID. Now we have COVID. We started off unlucky, and if we don’t respect it, it will get worse. It can cause death, it can cause disability, it can cause horrible outcomes. We’ve seen nursing homes decimated, it’s devastating.

We as scientists can make the best thing we possibly can, but it doesn’t matter if no one uses it. I see this as our generation’s World War event. We’re lucky that many of us are inside, that we have Netflix and ways to work from home. But the societal impact is every bit as serious.

Are people with type 1 diabetes more likely to have a particularly bad reaction to the vaccine?

All the data points to no. You’ll rarely hear a scientist say never—1 in millions is not never—but all the studies to date say no, and we can have confidence in that because there’s been a lot of post-marketing assessment of these vaccines. We have a lot of people who have taken the vaccines already worldwide to see how it’s working.

And that’s what we look at—the remarkably low rate of adverse reactions that are reported and tracked, versus the highly measurable rates of severe illness or death, or of long-term disability from long haul COVID.

What about the fear that vaccines in general can lead to new or more autoimmune issues? Can you explain the risk?

It’s a terrible thing to come down or have your child come down with a severe life-long illness. Type 1 diabetes is so diabolically difficult, and it’ll be different for different people. It’s a slog. So of course we want to know why it happens. Especially when you’re trying to find that important of an answer, our minds are programmed to look for patterns, but when you look from a single case, you’re only able to make the pattern from the single situation. Huge studies have uniformly debunked the idea that vaccinations commonly cause autoimmune issues.

That’s the benefit of our system – it’s very transparent. When there are adverse effects, we know about them. There are rare occurrences that have been seen; an example was a batch of flu vaccines in the 1970s, where several people came down with a rare autoimmune disorder called Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Even in that instance, the risk of getting GBS was ten times less than the risk of death from flu. The cost benefit ratio is not even close.

Editor’s Note: There have been 100 reports of GBS among people who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, from approximately 12.5 million doses administered. Each year in the United States, an estimated 3,000 to 6,000 people develop GBS. Most people fully recover from the disorder. Whenever health issues like these do arise from vaccines, the FDA requires revisions to the information provided to vaccine recipients and healthcare providers so that they know about potential risks. No similar pattern has been identified with the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines.

How can we trust vaccines that only have emergency use authorization (EUA) And are not fully approved?

Editor’s Note: Since this interview was published on August 10, 2021, the FDA has granted the Pfizer and BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine full approval for ages 16 and up, with the EUA still in effect for ages 12-15 and booster doses for immunocompromised individuals. 

I think it’s incredible that we have a vaccine ready as quickly as we did – that has been due to immense collaborative work from the entire global scientific community. That work happened because of the immense threat and impact of COVID-19.

In this case, scientists worked hard, building upon decades of existing research to make this thing work. In a sense, we also got lucky. We are so fortunate that these vaccines work as well as they do. We built this nice big shiny thing, now we have to walk on in. Because scientists can build the best possible solution and it means nothing if people don’t use it.

Lack of full approval—which we know is coming soon—is due to the fact that the FDA has a rigid and bureaucratic approval process. It’s not wrong. But it makes it very slow even once the medicine and science has been proven, as is the case with the COVID-19 vaccines we offer in the US.

But no corners have been cut—the data has been reviewed, the process has been transparent. Everyone understands the need for post-marketing surveillance, ongoing data from the vaccines as they are administered. No expense has been spared for that.

How do we know that people who take the COVID-19 vaccine won’t face health issues from it in twenty years?

I cannot think of a scientific mechanism to be worried about that. I do know that COVID is here and is a very real risk, right now. We fear the unknown; the fear of the known has become hard to remind people of. After more than a year, we’ve gotten used to the bear that’s in the house. We can get worried about how we’re dealing with the bear, or we can go ahead and get the bear out of the house.

We heard discussion a few weeks ago about the psychology of choosing to take the COVID-19 vaccine; that to humans, it’s scarier to face making a choice and something bad happening, like taking the vaccine and getting sick from it, and less scary if something bad happens to you passively, like getting COVID-19 when you are going about your daily life trying to be careful. It feels like less responsibility. What are your thoughts on this?

Choosing not to do something is as much a choice as doing something. It’s about the risk of not doing it, not taking the vaccine.

You can always be nervous about some infinitesimal risk of doing something, but there’s a true risk of not doing something in this particular case. And the risk is not just what might happen to you if you get COVID, it’s the risk of all the people you might pass COVID to, including grandparents and children.

Because it’s not a question of if you will be exposed to COVID-19, it’s a question of when.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Back to School with Diabetes Amidst the COVID-19 Variants

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Lala Jackson

This article was published on August 13, 2021. As of Monday, August 23, the FDA has granted the Pfizer and BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine full approval for ages 16 and up, with the Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) still in effect for ages 12-15 and for booster doses for immunocompromised individuals. Full approval for other COVID-19 vaccines currently under EUA is expected soon.

While hopes were high that we could head back to school for the 2021 school year as though we were closer to “normal,” the development of COVID-19 variants amidst low vaccination rates has thrown a wrench in plans. But when kids need to get back to in-person schooling for quality of life, quality of learning, and socialization, how can we best keep them safe?

To help answer this and other questions about going back to school safely, JDRF—in collaboration with American Diabetes Association and Sansum Diabetes Research Institute—hosted a conversation with doctors and experts from the CDC, ADA, and the Fairfax County Health Department (Virginia).

Moderator Dr. Kristin Castorino, senior research physician at Sansum Diabetes Research Institute, kicked off the event with the most pressing question—is it even safe for students and their teachers who have diabetes to return to in person schooling, particularly for those under 12 who cannot be vaccinated yet?

“I’d change the question from ‘is it safe?’ to ‘is it appropriate?’ and I think it is,” answered Dr. Fran Kaufman, pediatric endocrinologist and chief medical officer at Senseonics. “There aren’t known answers as things change… but we need to get our kids back to school, not only for learning but for socialization.”

Dr. Kaufman stressed that the best way to make school safe is for everyone who can get vaccinated to do so. Dr. Christa-Marie Singleton, MD, MPH, senior medical advisor at the CDC later elaborated, “Vaccines protect folks against serious symptoms, hospitalization, and death. The best way to protect ourselves, our families, and our youngest people is for the adults and kids over the age of 12 around them to get vaccinated.”

“We also know about the importance of masking,” continued Dr. Kaufman. “It’s important to follow the CDC’s recommendation that all children and adults should be masked in the indoor school environment.”

What About the Legal Rights of Kids With Diabetes?

Particularly as some states ban school districts from being able to require masks in indoor learning environments, what legal protections do kids with diabetes have to stay safe in school? Crystal Woodward, MPS, director of the ADA’s Safe at School campaign, stressed “the rights of students with diabetes do not go away during a pandemic. They have legal protections under federal and state laws. Those accommodations may look a little different, but they do not go away.”

Similarly to how the Americans with Disabilities Act protects people with diabetes in the workplace, section 504 of The Rehabilitation Act protects the education of children with disabilities like diabetes. This law allows children with diabetes and their families to create what are known as 504 plans, which clearly outline agreed upon accommodations for students with disabilities at school.

While parents cannot dictate the actions of other students, they can include directives for their own children to stay safer from COVID-19 in 504 Plans, like instructions that their student must always wear a mask or will need extra physical distance in a classroom setting.

“It’s imperative that [children with diabetes] have a section 504 plan,” Crystal explained. “Everyone needs to be clear on what accommodations will be provided and by whom, like the student having the ability to take an exam at an alternate time if blood glucose levels are out of range during the scheduled test time.” Ensuring the student also knows what is in their own 504 plan can help them feel more empowered and comfortable asking for what they need.

For distance learning, 504 plans can dictate that children with diabetes can take snack or meal breaks at times best for the student, or have an agreed upon communication method with the teacher if the student needs to take a break to attend to a low or high blood sugar.

“Bottom line: the rights of students do not go away,” Crystal reiterated. “Students with diabetes and their families should work with schools and everyone needs to understand their role and responsibilities, and the plan should be updated as needed. It’s always better to get it in writing. Put the 504 plan in place while everything is going well—you never know if a principal or a nurse or a teacher is going to be there throughout the year.” Panel members stressed that families who don’t speak English, particularly in public schools, have a legal right to translators who can help establish 504 plans.

Jacqueline McManemin, RN, BSN, certified diabetes education and care specialist (CDECS) and assistant nurse manager for the health services division of Fairfax County Health Department in Virginia, spoke about what they’re continuing to do in their school district (one of the 15 largest in the nation) to keep students safe. “Parents should expect to see much of the same precautions this year that were in place last year. Particularly when students are inside, they should be masked.”

School administrators across the country can work to make schools more safe for all children, particularly those with chronic illnesses like asthma and diabetes, by putting in protective measures like establishing two different health clinics—one for people exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19 or other communicable illnesses and a separate clinic for routine care and injury treatment.  Meals can be eaten outside as weather permits and student interaction in hallways can be minimized by teachers rotating between classrooms rather than groups of students switching classrooms every period. Protocol also needs to be clearly communicated with all staff and parents about what to do if a student starts showing symptoms of COVID-19 while at school.

Getting Kids Mentally Ready for in-Person School

Back to school doesn’t just mean a change of location, it’s a change in schedules, types of interaction and stimulation, and levels of distraction that can also impact diabetes care. Psychologist Cynthia E. Muñoz, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of clinical pediatrics at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine and president of healthcare and education for the American Diabetes Association, reminded the community that the impact of the pandemic on each individual has been unique and therefore approaches to regain a sense of normalcy must be unique too.

“For parents and guardians, be aware of how you’ve been impacted. Seek support, through family, through primary care, through a therapist. Find ways to talk about your fears or concerns,” encouraged Dr. Muñoz. She went on to suggest ways to get kids mentally and physically ready for school again.

“Now that schools are starting to open, it’s time to start looking at sleep schedules, screen time, and start shifting routines and schedules to get children ready for the new routine,” she noted. “Many people watch a lot of content on social media or television—not just kids, everyone—but it’s a passive interaction with others. Shifting to a more active form of communication with others can be another way to help people ease into the change of a lot more interaction than people have had in the last year or so.”

Helping Kids Who Feel Singled Out

Kids with diabetes often deal with feelings of being the odd kid out, having to visit the school nurse, having to deal with special routines. When COVID-19 is added, kids with diabetes may feel like they’re the only ones taking special precautions, which can be additionally isolating. How can parents help children dealing with these feelings?

“I like to approach this question around the concept of support, building layers of support around the student,” Dr. Muñoz explained. “One level should be ensuring that someone at the school should know that the child has diabetes and knows what kind of support they need. Another category is who could know [the student has diabetes], but doesn’t necessarily have to, like friends. For the student with diabetes, getting support from a friend or classmate they trust could go a long way. If the student feels like they’re going to be the only one wearing a mask, they can ask a friend to wear it with them.”

“I think it’s important for adults to be sensitive to this,” Dr. Muñoz continued. “Saying “everyone has something different” might minimize how a student feels. Acknowledging their feelings and taking the time to ask them what will help goes a long way.”

To get advice from other parents and guardians or to help your student with diabetes find other kids who understand, be sure to join the Beyond Type 1 community.

Learn more about the JDRF – Beyond Type 1 Alliance here.

You Can Watch the Entire Conversation Here:

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Rush for COVID Vaccine Hinders Diabetes Tech Advancements

Modern science is amazing. The COVID-19 pandemic, which is still shaking the world as we know it, is quickly getting controlled due to fast scientific progress and the vaccine rollout (in the United States, at least).

Having an effective vaccine come to market within a year of the appearance of a novel disease is unheard of; most medicines take decades for adequate approval processes within the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be completed. This feat is incredible.

That being said, with all of the rush to get a vaccine to the masses, the FDA pushed the Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines literally to the front of the approval line, delaying other important medical and technological advancements, including those related to diabetes.

While the vaccine did (and should!) take precedent here, the delays have been tough for people with diabetes in many ways. 

The head of the FDA’s device center, Jeff Shuren, described a “tsunami” of product applications from companies hoping to join the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic.

Those applications include over 1,200 submissions for products like diagnostic tests, ventilators, and digital technology, all of which have slowed their work in other diseases, including diabetes.

Shuren went on to say that review times had begun to increase amid growing backlogs due to the high volume. 

The agency is trying to make as much space as possible to approve COVID-19 related vaccines, medicine, and technology quickly to end the pandemic, which has taken precedence over almost everything else. Experts suspect that the FDA may not be able to meet its own timelines going forward.

In addition, lockdowns and social distancing regulations halted clinical trials and product releases. It’s been a tough year for diabetes tech firms to get much done.

The following products, and their release dates, have been most affected by the pandemic:

Senseonics’ 180-Day Eversense Glucose Monitor

The Eversense continuous glucose monitor (CGM) is a device implanted under the skin that lasts for 90 days. The newest version of their CGM system aims to double its lifespan to 180 days without changing a sensor.

What was supposed to be released in early 2021 now faces delays of up to two months for its application to the FDA while the agency tasks its staff with emergency reviews of coronavirus tests and other medical devices. The new release date of the model is scheduled for mid-2021.

The Omnipod 5 (Originally “Horizon”)

Insulet’s Omnipod 5 system, which utilizes CGM data to make automated adjustments to basal insulin throughout the day, will be the company’s first hybrid-closed loop system.

Similar to the T-slim Control IQ system, this insulin pump will provide mobile app control and insulin dosing from a smartphone, eliminating the need to carry their hallmark Personal Diabetes Manager (PDM) around to control the release of insulin.

While significantly delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Insulet said during its Nov. 4, 2020 investor update call that it had recently finished its clinical trial and was finalizing its FDA submission.

They hope to launch their product by June of 2021.

Medtronic 780G

Also known as the Advanced Hybrid-Closed Loop (AHCL) system, this system will improve upon its first iterations of the hybrid-closed loop system, the 670g and 770g. Hoping to seek approval for adults and children as young as two, this system includes:

  • A CGM sensor that will require just one calibration on the first day of wear and no further calibrations after that
  • Automatic correction bolus delivery every 5 minutes, in conjunction with CGM readings, that can automatically bolus for missed meal doses.
  • A lower glucose target range, adjustable between 100-120 mg/dL
  • Different insulin duration times, to adjust for the “tail” of your insulin (eg, Fiasp vs. Humalog)
  • Built-in Bluetooth to share data and provide remote software updates

Due to the pandemic, the approval for this device has been delayed, but Medtronic confirmed that it had submitted its application for review to the FDA in February, 2021.

They hope to have a commercial launch sometime in 2021.

Dexcom G7

The much-anticipated Dexcom G7 continuous glucose monitor (CGM) was also delayed due to the pandemic, but it should be worth the wait. You’ll no longer need to buy separate transmitters; each sensor is a complete and disposable transmitter/sensor integrated system. Some other great features include:

  • No calibrations, much like the G6
  • At the start, wear time will be 10 days, but eventual use will include a 14-15 day feature, also without any calibrations
  • Smaller and thinner: the newest CGM will be 60% smaller than the G6
  • One hour warm-up period

Dexcom CEO Kevin Sayer said that the company eventually plans to have different versions of the G7 for different people.

For example, people with type 2 diabetes who don’t use insulin (or even the general public) might opt for a much simpler interface than people with type 1 diabetes, who will want all of the alarms and settings.

Abbott Freestyle Libre 3

For years, the FreeStyle Libre from Abbott Diabetes was a considered Flash Glucose Monitor (FGM), because it only reported blood sugar levels whenever a user scanned their sensor with a receiver or smartphone.

That will change with the new edition: The Freestyle Libre 3 will function as a real-time CGM, because it won’t require sensor scanning to get a “flash” of blood glucose data. It will instead provide trends and graphs to track blood sugars throughout the day.

The Libre 3 generates real-time blood sugar readings every minute (as opposed to Dexcom’s every 5 minutes), displaying the result on a mobile app on your smartphone. This version also has optional high and low blood sugar alarms, a feature introduced with the Libre 2 in 2020.

Additionally, the sensor is much smaller and thinner (a 70% size reduction), and is kinder to the earth, using 41% less plastic overall.

The Libre 3 received global approval in September 2020. The timeline in the US has been pushed backwards, but with clinical trials now complete, we’ll likely see the Libre 3 applications submitted to the FDA mid-2021.

While the hustle for an effective COVID-19 vaccine has been nothing short of miraculous, people with diabetes don’t want to wait any longer!

Hopefully, with the hastened release of the vaccine, we can see more diabetes technology hit the market in 2021. 

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes + COVID Vaccines: What You Need to Know

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Lala Jackson

COVID-19 vaccines are here. If you have diabetes and/or other underlying health concerns, you may have questions about timing, safety, and what to expect.

It’s important to remember that having well-controlled diabetes alone does not seem to put anyone more at risk for contracting the novel coronavirus, but other factors like older age, high-exposure employment, consistently elevated blood glucose levels, or other non-diabetes related health factors like obesity and hypertension may increase your risk of infection.

We also know that diabetes care itself is made far more complicated after contracting COVID-19 and protecting anyone with diabetes from getting COVID-19 is our ultimate goal. That’s why we encourage everyone with diabetes to get vaccinated as soon as possible.

Immediate side effects from the vaccines are similar to many people’s experience with the flu shot – soreness at the injection site, general muscle aches, some nausea, and tiredness. Some – but not all – people with diabetes are experiencing slightly elevated blood glucose levels. These side effects are typical, indicate the immune system is learning how to fight the virus, and go away within 24 to 48 hours.

Once you are able to get your vaccine, keep practicing safety measures. A vaccine protects you from severe outcomes from COVID-19, but it may still be possible to spread the virus to others. Keep wearing a mask and keep social distancing to help keep us safe until we’re all safe.

Want a deeper dive? Here’s everything you may want to know:

What Vaccines Are These?

In November 2020, Pfizer and BioNTech announced positive results from the conclusion of their COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials, quickly followed by Moderna. In February 2021, Johnson & Johnson’s announced the same.

Each has now been approved for use in multiple countries across the globe, with a few other vaccines rolling out on a country by country basis. Worldwide, more than 60 other vaccines are in various stages of clinical trials.

Each vaccine went through the standard three phases of clinical trials – Phase 1, where it is administered to a small number of people to show initial safety, Phase 2 to hundreds of people split into groups by things like age, ethnicity, and background to show how different types of people react to the vaccine, then Phase 3, in which it is given to tens of thousands of people, tested against a placebo. Because of the speed needed for development, both vaccines were approved to go through animal clinical trials at the same time as human Phase 1 clinical trials.

To be approved, the FDA requires the vaccine work in at least half of those who receive it. Early analysis from the National Institutes of Health independent data review board (DSMB) saw that 94-95% of those who received the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines in the trials became immune to the coronavirus. Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine showed 66% effectiveness against the virusMost importantly, all three vaccines provide significant protection against severe outcomes from the virus.

The Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines are mRNA vaccines, a type of immunization that does not use the real virus in the vaccine, but instead employs a piece of genetic material to create antibodies against the novel coronavirus. Each of the mRNA vaccines requires two doses, given three to four weeks apart. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is slightly different, which makes it easier to store and only requires one dose.

Other vaccines – different types of immunizations made by multiple companies – are currently in clinical trials with results expected early (and throughout) 2021. More than 50 vaccines are currently going through human clinical trials; in any trial where participants exhibit worrisome symptoms, the trial is paused and cannot proceed until any issues are corrected.

  1. More than 60 vaccines are under development worldwide. In the US, the three currently being distributed are from Pfizer/BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson, with some others being rolled out in certain countries.
  2. All three vaccines approved for emergency use in the US provide protection against severe complications or death from COVID-19. Each vaccine has a slightly different rate of protection against getting the virus at all, but each guarantees protection against the worst outcomes of the disease.
  3. The Moderna vaccine trials had a slightly more diverse participant group but both leading vaccine trials included participants from across races and ethnicities, age ranges, health conditions including type 1 and type 2 diabetes, etc. No specific populations experienced any major issues with the vaccines.

Do COVID Vaccines and Diabetes Mix Well?

People with diabetes in each of the vaccine’s trials have not reported major side effects (read this T1Ds experience in the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine trial). Overall, some clinical trial participants have reported mild side effects of the vaccines, much like how some people experience injection-site soreness, mild lethargy, a low-grade fever after other vaccines. These mild reactions some people experience after vaccines are typical and not cause for alarm – they are a result of the immune system going into action as purposely triggered by the vaccine, creating the ability to fight against the actual virus were a person to be exposed to it.

In the UK, two healthcare workers who received the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine during initial general population rollout experienced severe allergic reactions for which they administered adrenaline autoinjectors. Both individuals had a history of severe anaphylactoid reactions for which they carry adrenaline autoinjectors anyway, so if you are a person who does tend to experience severe allergic reactions, it is recommended that you not receive the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine at this time. Other vaccines may be better indicated for your use. If you do not have a history of severe allergic reactions, there is no reason to expect you will experience one from a vaccine.

Because of the mild symptoms experienced by some, it is important to stay vigilant about blood sugar levels for the first 24 to 48 hours after receiving the vaccine. The symptoms may impact your BG, so check your levels frequently, stay hydrated, and be familiar with your sick day routine. The mild symptoms you may experience after the vaccine are significantly safer and more easily managed than potentially getting COVID-19 itself.

As we currently understand, you are not more at risk to catch the novel coronavirus if you have diabetes, but if you do catch the virus, you may be more at risk for more severe complications from COVID-19, particularly if you have been experiencing consistently elevated blood sugar levels.

If you have specific concerns or worries, make sure you speak to a healthcare provider you trust (or keep tuning into Beyond Type 1 coverage of COVID-19 to hear from the healthcare providers we trust, like Dr. Anne Peters).

Read this T1Ds experience in the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine trial

Great, When Can I Get Mine?

While the vaccines rollout in the US started as a bit of a logistical mess, the process is finally starting to get more clear! As of March 31, the CDC classified all people with diabetes as part of priority vaccination groups, updating their previous guidance that only included type 2 diabetes. And as of April 19, the Biden administration has announced that all people aged 16 and above in the US are eligible for the COVID-19 vaccines.

The COVID vaccine rollout is being handled on a state by state basis, which has made finding vaccination appointments a bit tricky. Additionally, many states are falling short in equity – many vaccine appointments are only available online, and some states have limited and hard-to-get-to vaccine locations. If you’re trying to find a vaccine appointment, here are some recommendations:

  • VaccineFinder.org is a medical-professional vetted place to find a convenient vaccination appointment.
  • You can also look up your state health department’s guidelines. Each state generally has a special COVID-19 page where they then list out COVID-19 vaccine eligibility guidelines and locations. Many states have started working with local drug stores and pharmacies; if so, they are often linked to from the state health department website.
  • If it is unclear or you are unsatisfied with what you’ve found, go ahead and reach out to your healthcare provider. Particularly if you have a healthcare provider like an endocrinologist who helps you take care of your diabetes, they may have some insider information on how their hospital or practice is planning to distribute the vaccine. Remember to be kind and patient – healthcare providers are carrying an immense amount and they may not have an answer for you immediately.

What About Kids With Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)?

The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine is currently approved for ages 16+; they also just requested clearance from the FDA to expand eligibility to ages 12 – 15. Initial COVID-19 vaccine trials were focused on the adult population – both because adults seem more susceptible to severe outcomes from COVID-19, and because trials for those under the age of 18 require a stricter review and approval process.

Starting in 2021 and beyond, more trials are including children so that they may be safely vaccinated against COVID-19 as well. Important to note is that children do not seem to be likely to contract coronavirus or have severe outcomes from the disease. However, as we’ve seen throughout the pandemic, disparities are abundant. Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, American Indian, Alaskan Natives, and Hispanic children have experienced significantly higher rates of infection than their peers. Non-Hispanic Black children with T1D who contract COVID-19 are four times more likely to also experience DKA.

So while generally children are less likely to contract the coronavirus, it is important to remain vigilant and continue practicing measures to protect everyone – like wearing a mask and social distancing – to keep everyone safe until we’re all safe.

Still Have Concerns?

Individuals have expressed some hesitation to personal vaccination for COVID-19. This is an understandable feeling – vaccines do not typically make it through development and approval this quickly.

Here’s what we know:

  1. The speed with which the vaccines were developed was unprecedented. However, the clinical trials these vaccines had to go through were strict and the reporting of their safety and efficacy had to be unequivocally proven and replicated. Three phases of clinical trials, including a Phase 3 with tens of thousands of participants, had to prove safety and effectiveness of the vaccines. Phase 3 of the clinical trials were also double-blind, meaning neither the trial participants nor the company that created the vaccine knew if participants were receiving the vaccine or a placebo. Data was reviewed by the National Institutes of Health independent data review board, and final approval for the vaccines must be provided by the FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee, composed of scientists who have no ties to the companies by which the vaccines were produced.
  2. The Moderna COVID-19 vaccine trial focused on creating a diverse trial participant group, knowing that this is vital to ensuring the vaccine works as intended across populations. 37% of the trial’s participants were from communities of color, which is similar to the US population. The Pfizer and BioNTech trial had less representation, and many of the ongoing trials are not reporting diversity numbers at all. It is vital that each and every trial not only focus on recruiting diverse – across age, race, ethnicity, health background, and more – trial participants to prove safety and effectiveness, but also proactively communicate the effects of their vaccines across groups.
  3. Black, Native (including Pacific Islander), and Latinx communities have been hit hardest by COVID-19 because of systemic and medical racism, with Black Americans dying from COVID-19 at twice the rate of white Americans. Ensuring equitable distribution of the COVID-19 vaccines is vital to work against the deep impact of systemic and medical racism, but this must be coupled with understanding distrust due to violent medical racism throughout the US’s history.
  4. We don’t know for sure what percentage of the population needs to be vaccinated in order to achieve herd immunity, but we do know that the more people who are immune to carrying or spreading the virus, the better. Those who are willing and able to take the vaccine are helping to protect everyone in their community.
  5. If, after doing research from reputable, science-based sources (we recommend science communicators like Jessica Malaty Rivera for easy-to-digest and accurate information), you are still not comfortable taking the vaccine as it becomes available to you, continue to practice safe health measures to protect yourself and others from the novel coronavirus. Until the majority of the population is vaccinated, we cannot rely on herd immunity. We must keep those most vulnerable among us safe until we’re all safe, practicing simple actions like wearing a mask and social distancing to do so.

2020 has been hard; at many times, scary and filled with grief. Working toward getting our communities safe and healthy is important for a multitude of reasons, and will take a united effort. Ensuring you have a plan for when you will get vaccinated once you can is vital to keep yourself and those most vulnerable among us safe until we’re all safe.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

What You Should Know About COVID-19 Vaccines and Diabetes

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Eliza Skoler and Dr. Francine Kaufman

Last updated: March 22, 2021

COVID-19 vaccines have been authorized for use in the United States and in many parts of the world. We’re here to answer questions for people with diabetes. Are the vaccines safe? How do the vaccines work and does it matter which one I get? What are the side effects, and how will the vaccine affect my blood sugar? What can I do after I am vaccinated?

Now that three COVID-19 vaccines have been authorized for use in the United States, and ten more around the world, many questions are circulating about the vaccines, their safety, and when to get vaccinated. While timing may differ by state and even between sites, people with type 2 diabetes or obesity will be eligible for early vaccination in the US in the coming months, though this may not be the case for millions of others – including those with type 1 diabetes and loved ones who are not currently recommended by CDC to receive the vaccine early. As states begin to distribute the vaccines, we’re here to answer your questions about COVID vaccination in the US; we’ll update this article as more information becomes available.

Click to jump down to a group of questions:

Why get the vaccine?
Why should I get the COVID vaccine?
How does the COVID-19 vaccine work?
How do mRNA vaccines work?​
How do viral vector vaccines work?

Vaccine Safety
Is the vaccine safe for people with diabetes?
Does it matter which vaccine you get?
Which vaccine is best for people with diabetes?​
What are the side effects? Can the vaccine be dangerous?
How will the vaccine affect my blood sugar levels?
Do diabetes medications affect the vaccine?
Should I get vaccinated if I have diabetes and other health conditions?
What is the AstraZeneca vaccine?

Getting the Vaccine
When will people with diabetes get the vaccine?
How will I know when it’s my turn to get the vaccine?
How much does the vaccine cost?
What should I expect at my vaccine appointment?
I had COVID-19 – should I still get vaccinated?
If I have symptoms of COVID-19 now should I get the vaccine?

After Receiving the Vaccine
What happens after I get the vaccine – can I still infect people with COVID?
Can I see people now that I am vaccinated?
Is one dose of the COVID vaccine effective?
Does the vaccine protect against the new variant of COVID?
Can I get COVID from the vaccine?
Are other vaccines coming?
When can I stop wearing a mask?

Why get the vaccine?

Why should I get the COVID vaccine?

The vaccine has the ability to protect you, your loved ones, and your community. It will help your body’s immune system fight off a COVID-19 infection – this means that if you are exposed to COVID, your body can protect you and significantly reduce your chances of getting sick or experiencing severe complications from the virus. Two of the vaccines that are currently authorized in the US (from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna) are almost 95% effective at preventing symptoms of COVID in adults who have been exposed, and the third vaccine (Johnson & Johnson) is 85% effective at preventing severe COVID infection. In other words, if you are vaccinated with any of the three and then come into contact with someone who has COVID, you probably won’t get sick.

To stop the global spread of COVID-19, the majority of people around the world will have to become immune to the virus. The COVID vaccine – like the many vaccines that protect us from small pox, measles, the flu, and other illnesses – will play a major role in improving the health and wellbeing of people across the globe.

How does the COVID-19 vaccine work?

There are currently three vaccines that have received emergency use authorization in the US: the Pfizer-BioNTechModerna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines. The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines are similar – both use messenger RNA (mRNA) to target the “spike proteins” on COVID-19 virus molecules. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is a viral vector vaccine that also targets the spike proteins.

How do COVID mRNA vaccines work?

mRNA contains genetic instructions (like a blueprint) for making specific proteins in cells. The mRNA in COVID vaccines was developed by scientists to trigger human cells to make harmless COVID spike proteins, and after the proteins are built the vaccine mRNA is destroyed. The body’s immune system then recognizes these foreign proteins and builds antibodies against them. This means that if you are later infected with COVID-19, you’ll have antibodies that recognize the spikes on the viral molecule and can destroy it. To learn more about this process view this detailed, interactive piece from the New York Times.

mRNA vaccines are not “live” vaccines – the live virus is not injected into a person’s body. This means that you cannot get COVID from the vaccine. Similarly, the vaccine will not alter your own genes.

How do COVID viral vector vaccines work?

Similar to an mRNA vaccine, a viral vector vaccine causes the body’s cells to make harmless COVID-19 spike proteins so that it can learn to recognize the foreign proteins and build antibodies against them. Later, if you are infected with COVID-19, your body will have antibodies ready to fight off the virus.

Instead of using mRNA, a viral vector vaccine contains the DNA for a different, harmless virus. In the case of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, it’s an adenovirus – the type of virus that normally causes a cold or a flu – that has been engineered so that it does not make you sick. Once you get the injection and the virus is inside your body, its DNA can be read by your cellular machinery to produce spike proteins. As your immune system works to fight these foreign proteins, it will learn to protect you from COVID-19. To learn more about this process view a detailed, interactive piece from the New York Times.

Vaccine Safety

Is the vaccine safe for people with diabetes?

All three currently authorized vaccines – Pfizer-BioNTechModerna, and Johnson & Johnson – appear to be safe and effective for adults with diabetes. Rigorous clinical trials tested the safety of these vaccines in adults of all ages, races, and ethnicities, as well as chronic health conditions.

  • The Pfizer-BioNtech trial included 3,150 people with diabetes (8.4% of trial participants).
  • The Moderna trial included 2,858 people with type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (9.4% of trial participants).
  • The Johnson & Johnson trial included 3,389 people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes (7.7% of trial participants).
  • In terms of racial and ethnic diversity, the trials each included more than 20% Hispanic or Latino participants, almost 10% African American participants, and almost 5% Asian participants.

These vaccines were advanced quickly thanks to the immense resources provided for COVID vaccine development – even with a speedy process, the vaccine manufacturers had to follow the typical safety steps and thorough checks. Read more from the CDC about how the vaccines work, potential side effects, and details from the human clinical trials.

Does it matter which vaccine you get?

No – all three of the vaccines will protect you and those around you. However, there are some differences between the vaccines that may be important to people with diabetes.

Clinical trials found both mRNA vaccines to be extremely effective in adults – with almost 95% efficacy overall, only one in 20 people that receives the vaccine would get sick from COVID. Among the trial participants with diabetes, the Pfizer-BioNtech was 95% effective and the Moderna vaccine was 100% effective, while the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was 53% effective. Participants were only followed for a few months, so we don’t yet know the long-term effectiveness of these vaccines. As more vaccines are administered there will be more data collected, and hopefully children will be enrolled in clinical trials soon.

What does it mean for these vaccines to be “effective?” If a vaccine is 50% effective it successfully protects half of the people who receive it from getting infected by COVID-19 if they are exposed. If a vaccine is 75% effective, it protects three out of four people from COVID-19 infection. More importantly, all three vaccines are highly effective at preventing severe COVID-19 infection. All three clinical trials found that in people who did get infected after vaccination, the infection was much milder – among people who had received one of the three authorized vaccines, there were almost no deaths or hospitalizations resulting from COVID-19. To learn more about how the three vaccines compare, watch this video.

During early vaccine distribution, you likely won’t have any choice in which vaccine is available to you because there will be a limited supply and the goal is to vaccinate people as quickly as possible. Both mRNA vaccines require two shots, meaning that they are not considered fully effective until you have received both doses, and your immune system has developed protection against the virus (after the second shot). You should receive two shots of the same vaccine (either Pfizer-BioNtech or Moderna). The Johnson & Johnson vaccine only requires one shot.

Which vaccine is best for people with diabetes?Which vaccine is best for people with diabetes?

Due to the distinct design of each clinical trial, it can be hard to directly compare the three vaccines that are currently authorized in the US. However, based on trial data and information from the vaccine manufacturers, here’s the best information we have on how the vaccines compare.

Vaccine data table

Image source: diaTribe

The data show that no matter which of the currently authorized vaccines you get, getting a COVID-19 vaccine is safe and important for people with diabetes. All three vaccines are highly protective against severe COVID illness and death. Click here to watch an in-depth video explaining how the vaccines compare.

What are the side effects? Can the vaccine be dangerous?

When you receive a vaccine for a particular virus, your immune system builds protection against it. Because your body is creating antibodies and learning how to fight the virus or bacteria targeted by the vaccine, you may experience normal side effects for a day or two – this is similar to getting a flu shot, and people with diabetes should monitor their blood sugar levels and have a sick day management plan ready.

According to the CDC, these are the common side effects of the COVID vaccines – they are similar for people with and without diabetes:

  • Pain, swelling, or redness in the vaccinated arm
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Muscle pain

These side effects are a result of your immune system preparing to combat a future viral infection – they do not mean that you have gotten sick from the vaccine itself. If your side effects don’t go away, contact your healthcare team.

Severe allergic reactions to the COVID vaccine are rare – you can learn more from the CDC here. If you have ever had an allergic reaction to any vaccine, ask your healthcare professional if you should get the COVID vaccine. If you experience a severe allergic reaction to the first dose of the COVID vaccine, do not get the second dose.

How will the vaccine affect my blood sugar levels?

Because the vaccine can cause symptoms of illness that can lead to high glucose levels, it’s important to carefully monitor your blood sugar levels for 48 hours after you receive your vaccination. Stay hydrated, and make sure to have your sick day plan ready in case you feel ill. So far, people with diabetes seem to be experiencing few side effects and minimal effect on blood sugar levels.

Do diabetes medications affect the vaccine?

At this time there is no information available on drug interactions between the authorized COVID vaccines and other medications – this has not yet been studied. However, it is not anticipated that the vaccine itself would interact with insulin or other standard diabetes medications. Note: it may be helpful to avoid injecting insulin or placing a glucose sensor or pump infusion set in your vaccine injection site for several days after vaccination.

Should I get vaccinated if I have diabetes and other health conditions?

People with complications of diabetes (including heart disease and kidney disease) are at much higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19. If you have other health conditions in addition to diabetes, getting the vaccine is especially important.

What is the AstraZeneca vaccine?

New results from the US clinical trial of the AstraZeneca viral vector vaccine show that the vaccine was 79% effective at preventing symptoms of COVID-19 infection, and fully prevented severe illness and hospitalization in more than 32,000 participants. The two-dose AstraZeneca vaccine is currently authorized in Europe and in other countries, but has not yet been authorized for use in the US. The latest clinical trial results show the vaccine to be both safe and effective.

In early March, several countries briefly paused giving people the AstraZeneca COVID vaccine due to concerns about possible rare side effects, including severe blood clots. However, since the data does not show that the vaccine increases the risk of blood clots, the World Health Organization determined that it is safe and that the benefits of the vaccine outweigh any risks. We look forward to updating this article if the AstraZeneca vaccine receives FDA authorized in the US.

Getting the Vaccine

When will people with diabetes get the vaccine?

In most places across the US, people with type 2 diabetes and obesity will be prioritized in the third group of early vaccination (Phase 1c) – this has already begun in some parts of the country. Type 1 diabetes is not currently considered a high-risk medical condition for this phase. Some diabetes experts believe that if you have type 1 diabetes and any evidence of kidney damageheart disease, or obesity with high insulin doses, it’s a good idea to seek vaccination as soon as possible because you may be at high risk for severe illness if you are infected with COVID-19. To learn about the CDC’s recommended stages of vaccination and where you fall in the vaccine line, read Dr. Francine Kaufman’s “When Can I Get the COVID Vaccine if I Have Diabetes?

How will I know when it’s my turn to get the vaccine?

The distribution of vaccines is the responsibility of each state, and states have different plans for vaccinating people. Most states will use networks within hospitals, healthcare offices, and pharmacies to distribute vaccines to residents. Depending on where you live, you may be asked to get on a vaccine waiting list. Click here to see the state by state report from the Kaiser Family Foundation, including who is currently eligible for vaccination in your state. To learn more about your place in the vaccination line, read Dr. Kaufman’s “When Can I Get the COVID Vaccine if I Have Diabetes?” If you have type 2 diabetes or obesity (a body mass index above 30 – check here), contact your healthcare office to ask when and how you can get vaccinated.

How much does the vaccine cost?

You will not have to pay for the COVID vaccine in the US; it will be given to all US residents for free. That said, some vaccination providers may charge an administration fee for delivering the injection. Ask your healthcare office if there will be any costs associated with your vaccination.

What should I expect at my vaccine appointment?

When you get your COVID vaccine, you’ll receive a paper card that says which vaccine you received, and when and where you received it. You’ll also get a fact sheet (paper or electronic) with more information about the vaccine, its benefits, and its side effects. After you get your injection, you’ll be asked to stay on-site for a short period of time so that healthcare professionals can monitor your body’s reaction.

I had COVID-19 – should I still get vaccinated?

Yes – though you can wait up to 90 days after initial onset of your COVID-19 infection. Researchers don’t know how long immunity against the virus can last after natural infection, though evidence suggests that you’re not likely to get sick with COVID again for the first 90 days. You should still get vaccinated for longer-term protection, and the CDC says that you can wait 90 days after the infection before getting your vaccine.

If I have symptoms of COVID-19 now, should I get the vaccine?

If you recently tested positive for COVID-19, are currently experiencing symptoms, or were exposed to someone with COVID, please stay away from other people.

  • If you test positive for COVID, wait until you’ve recovered (as early as 14 days from infection) and up to 90 days before getting the vaccine.
  • If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID, self-isolate and get tested.
  • If you were exposed to someone with COVID, quarantine for 14 days and monitor yourself for symptoms. Get a COVID test. If you do not get sick and your test is negative, get vaccinated once your quarantine period is over.

After Receiving the Vaccine

What happens after I get the vaccine – can I still infect people with COVID?

Once you have received both doses of the vaccine, it should protect you from getting sick with COVID. However, researchers don’t know whether you may be able to carry the virus (without symptoms) and pass it on to others. That’s why it’s still important to maintain safety measures even after receiving the vaccine: wear a face mask that fits you well if you’re in public, avoid contact with people not in your household, social distance from others, wash your hands, and monitor your health. Continuing to follow these measures will help you protect others and your community.

Can I see people now that I am vaccinated?

Two weeks after your final vaccine dose (one dose for Johnson & Johnson, two doses for Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) you are considered to be fully vaccinated and protected against severe COVID-19 infection. According to new CDC guidelines, people who are fully vaccinated:

  • Can gather indoors with others who are fully vaccinated, with no need to wear a mask.
  • Do not need to quarantine, stay away from others, or get tested if exposed to someone with COVID – unless you begin to show symptoms of illness.

The CDC also says that people who are fully vaccinated can “visit with unvaccinated people from a single household who are at low risk for severe COVID-19 disease indoors without wearing masks or physical distancing.” However, people with diabetes have a higher risk of getting severely ill from COVID-19 (though there’s no greater chance of being infected). For this reason, even if you are vaccinated, please continue to be cautious.

Is one dose of the COVID vaccine effective?

For the Johnson and Johnson vaccine, yes.

For the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, not entirely. Results from the clinical trials (Pfizer-BioNTechModerna) show that one dose of the vaccine can offer some protection, but two doses of both authorized vaccines are required for full efficacy.

Does the vaccine protect against the new variant of COVID?

Probably, but not certainly. Researchers are still studying the newest variants of COVID-19 to determine how effective current vaccines are at protecting against them. So far, much of the virus structure is unchanged in the variants and the currently-authorized vaccines seem to produce antibodies that recognize variants of COVID-19. Other strains of COVID will likely develop with time (similarly to the flu), and the vaccines can then be tweaked to match the changed threat. Click here to learn more about COVID variants, how they work, and what you can do to protect yourself.

Can I get COVID from the vaccine?

No. The vaccines do not contain the live virus, so they cannot infect you with COVID-19. Side effects that appear after you receive the vaccine occur because your immune system is activating and building antibodies – they are not signs of infection.

After vaccination it takes time for your body to develop full immunity to the virus, so it is still possible to get infected with COVID in the days before or after your vaccination. This does not mean the vaccine did not work; rather, it means that your immune system did not have enough time to build full immunity from the vaccine before coming into contact with the virus.

Are other vaccines coming?

To date, 13 vaccines have been approved for full or limited use around the world. Seventy-eight vaccines are currently in different stages of human clinical trials: 55 are in the early stages and 23 are in the final stages of testing. Hopefully, some of these vaccines will be found to effectively protect against COVID, opening up more vaccination options for people around the world. To track global vaccine development, view the New York Times Coronavirus Vaccine Tracker.

When can I stop wearing a mask?

Even after you get the vaccine you should still wear a face mask whenever you are in public places. Masks will continue helping to shield you from the virus and new variants of COVID (since no vaccine is perfect), and will reduce your chances of spreading COVID-19 to people around you (if you are carrying the virus and don’t have symptoms). As more people get vaccinated, the number of people carrying the virus in your community will decrease, bringing the risk of infection down. Public health authorities will make announcements about this, which may vary from place to place and even with the season.

If you are fully vaccinated, you can begin spending time with others who are fully vaccinated without wearing face masks.

While we await further information and research on COVID vaccines, protect yourself and those around you. For more information, read “Staying Safe – And Staying Well – During a Pandemic Winter” and “COVID Variants, Double Masks, Diabetes, Oh My!

Editor’s note: This article was first published on January 8, 2021, and last updated on March 22.

Dr. Francine Kaufman is Chief Medical Officer at Senseonics, a diabetes device company and Distinguished Professor Emerita of Pediatrics and Communications at the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Is COVID-19 Causing a Diabetes Epidemic?

As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on into its second year, researchers have discovered a new, disturbing trend: there has been a statistically significant rise in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes diagnoses observed in patients after an experience of severe COVID-19. Even more disturbing is that nearly 14.4% of people who are hospitalized with COVID-19 go on to have either a type 1 or type 2 diabetes diagnosis, according to a November 2020 study that followed nearly 4,000 patients with severe COVID-19 infections.

It’s too early to tell if these forms of diabetes are permanent or temporary, but the correlation between severe COVID-19 cases and the development of diabetes is strong.

It’s well known that viruses can sometimes trigger diabetes. When someone contracts a virus, the immune system starts mounting a defense to fight it, mostly with T-cells. Sometimes the body will overreact, and start destroying its own pancreatic beta cells, the result being type 1 diabetes.

Scientists believe the same thing may be happening in the case of COVID-19 patients. Traditionally, COVID-19 has been an attack on the lungs, but a host of other issues and complications have come to light from sufferers of “long-haul COVID”: neurological disorders, blood clots, kidney failure, heart damage, and now many believe an epidemic of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes diagnoses may soon be added to the list.

The association between other coronaviruses and the development of diabetes has been made in the past during the SARS outbreak as well.

After the 2003 SARS pandemic, Chinese researchers tracked 39 patients who had developed high blood sugar levels characteristic of a diabetes diagnosis, within days of hospitalization with the disease. For all but six, blood sugar levels had returned to normal by their hospital discharge, and only two still had diabetes after two years.

This isn’t entirely new, either. Doctors in Wuhan, China reported a link between COVID-19 and elevated blood sugar levels back in April 2020. Italian scientists also looked into whether higher blood sugar levels could lead to a diagnosis of diabetes. That study, from May 2020, admitted more research needed to be conducted before a conclusion was reached.

Because COVID-19 is a global pandemic and the link to new diabetes cases has been observed in multiple countries, researchers globally are collecting data points about those patients in a registry called CoviDIAB.

Scientists do not know whether COVID-19 might exacerbate already developing issues or actually cause them; some believe it’s both. Many people who have had COVID-19 and have gone on to develop type 2 diabetes already have existing risk factors, such as obesity and a family history of the disease. Perhaps the increased medical attention sought out by people suffering from COVID-19 has detected the disease early, when a diagnosis was inevitable later on down the line anyway. Some medical experts believe that more people are getting medical attention than ever before, being closely monitored by experts in the field, and are unveiling underlying issues that may have been there all along.

Another theory is that elevated blood sugar levels also are common among those taking dexamethasone, a steroid that is a common treatment for COVID-19. Steroid-induced diabetes is rare, but not unheard of, and may trigger diabetes in people who have no known health risks for the disease.

“Researchers are working like crazy to see if COVID attacks the beta cells of the pancreas, which makes insulin,” pediatrician Dr. Dyan Hes said. “Some studies feel that they do, but other studies have been repeatedly saying it is not attracted to the beta-cell.”

How exactly the two conditions are connected isn’t quite clear yet, but a prominent theory is that the COVID-19 virus destroys or alters insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas possibly by binding to ACE2 receptors, according to a short letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Whatever the association is, researchers from the journal of Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism say a direct effect of COVID-19 on the development of diabetes, “should be considered.”

Francesco Rubino, a diabetes surgery professor at King’s College London, is convinced there is a connection between the two conditions and has been tracking and studying the phenomenon since early last year. “We really need to dig deeper, but it sounds like we do have a real problem with COVID and diabetes.”

Additionally, Rubino thinks the type of diabetes being developed as a result of COVID-19 may be a hybrid form, something of a cross between type 1 and type 2. His findings show that the symptoms in these patients have some characteristics of each form of diabetes, which he finds concerning.

Researchers are also now seeing a rise in type 2 diabetes diagnoses in children who have had asymptomatic COVID-19, which is even more troubling, as many schools are back in session, many public places do not require masks on children, and the tipping point of a diabetes epidemic may rest solely on the shoulders of our youngest, most vulnerable citizens.

This can also complicate a few things for people: firstly, that neither the Pfizer-BioNtech nor the Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are approved for children, and secondly, that type 1 diabetes is not being prioritized on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s list for vaccine dissemination. States are able to follow their guidance or dismiss it out of hand, but federally, there is no coordination to prioritize the population.

With nearly 10% (34 million people) of the United States already affected by diabetes, and another 100 million living with prediabetes, the tidal wave of COVID-19 cases could very well send our country into catastrophe fighting two disasters at once: both uncontrolled community spread of COVID-19 along with a (COVID-triggered) explosion of new diabetes diagnoses, especially in children. This would not only send our country into panic mode but could also completely overwhelm our already fragile health care system that everyone is so heavily relying on.

Scientists are rushing to find the exact connection between severe COVID-19 cases and new diagnoses of diabetes, but between diabetes being a major risk factor for death in COVID-19 cases (nearly 40% of COVID-19 deaths have been in patients with diabetes), along with the increased risk of developing diabetes from a severe bout of COVID-19, one thing is for sure: we need to find the connection and fast and get the diabetes community and those at risk for diabetes vaccinated as quickly as possible. We don’t have time to waste.

 

Source: diabetesdaily.com

COVID-19 Vaccine: Experience and Thoughts from the Diabetes Community

We are almost one year into the COVID-19 pandemic and while it is still causing devastation, there is light at the end of the tunnel thanks to two companies, Pfizer and Moderna, now offering a vaccine.

It varies by state but healthcare workers and people over 75 years (over 65 in some states) are the first in line. After that, people with high-risk, pre-existing conditions will be next. See here to find out your exact eligibility per state.

Many people have mixed feelings about the vaccine. Some are certain they will get it, not only because they don’t believe the vaccine is at all harmful but because they want life to go back to normal as soon as possible, while also protecting their health. Others are reluctant, possibly questioning the novelty and quick turnaround of the vaccine and wondering if there may be unforeseen side effects.

We thought it would be nice to hear from people like ourselves, who also live with diabetes, and see how they feel about getting vaccinated. We also spoke to some people who have already received the vaccine and heard about their experiences with side effects.

We asked our own Diabetes Daily forum members and the diabetes online community and here is what they had to say:

My wife with type 2 diabetes also suffers from COPD, bronchitis, and asthma. Accordingly, she would have a problem surviving COVID, so we have both registered with the NJ Covid Registry and will take the vaccine as soon as it becomes available. ~ Don1942

As I see it, two of these vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna) use a completely new and untested approach called mRNA. They were tested for only a short term on young, healthy adults. Animal, medium, and long-term testing were bypassed entirely. No testing on those with various health issues, and no testing for drug interactions. They only claim to reduce the number of symptoms. Zero claims are made about keeping you from getting or transmitting the virus. Last statement verified by Fauci saying anti-social distancing, lockdowns, and masking will still apply once you have had the vaccine. Then there are the 3+% of those who are vaccinated who suffer worse side effects than the symptoms the drug is supposed to reduce, keeping in mind that in the age groups tested only 1% would ever show any symptoms at all.

Finally the manufacturers take zero fiscal responsibility for bad outcomes. If they don’t believe their drugs are safe, why should I? ~ BobCan2

I have a nephew that has a doctorate in biochemistry (currently working on gene therapy). Said “I would take any of the vaccines in a second.” His wife also an MD has had the Moderna vaccine. I have a niece that is working on her doctorate in microbiology who has had the vaccine. So yes, I will take it. ~ 1986

I’m a no. Given my recent extended exposure, I’m not concerned. I’ll gladly wait for herd immunity. ~ HaoleBoy

I am a surgeon. I got the first dose of the Moderna vaccine. Just a sore arm. I have reviewed all of the science presented to the FDA and have no concerns. Glad to have access! ~ Dr. Carrie D.

So I voted yes… I’ve stated before that I used to be in the vaccine industry and I trust the science and the process. It’s not new technology being used. ~ Jughed

I’m getting the Moderna vaccine on Monday. I am a special education teacher in WI and we are the first group identified in the school district. Blessing! ~ Melissa R.

I think most people of my age remember friends getting polio, and I also remember giving my father chickenpox, which made him very, very ill; so having seen the miracles these vaccines did for quality of life, and preventing unnecessary deaths, I know I am very much pro-vaccination. My name will go down for a vaccine when it finally arrives here, hopefully, next month. I’m eligible for priority vaccination because of my age and a couple of chronic conditions.

I am 81 years old and a type 1 diabetic for 75 years. I am very high risk if I have the COVID virus. I am scheduled for the vaccine on Wed, Jan 21. My only hesitance is that the vaccine is being given in the gym complex at the local high school. I will probably encounter several individuals in the parking lot, while entering the building, inside the building, etc. In some states, people are receiving the vaccine without getting out of their cars. I wish it was done that way here where I live. ~ Richard `57

I am getting mine next weekend. I am 100% behind the science and haven’t given it a negative thought. Bring it on! ~ Susan K.

I’ll have it as soon as it’s offered. I am just recovering from COVID and it is awful. Sugars were terrible. I never want it again if I can help it. ~ Michelle R.

I will not be getting one. Mostly because I can’t help but think childhood vaccines play a major role in type 1 diabetes in the first place as vaccines are designed to trigger the immune system. ~ Fabian B.

I plan on getting the J&J one once it’s approved. I’m uncomfortable with the speed of the first two on the market, despite all I know everyone is saying. I feel better about the slow poke even if it’s irrational. ~ Caroline L.

Nope, nope and nope again. ~Kristin R.

I won’t be giving it to my son or myself. ~ Julie P.

I plan on getting one. In Nebraska, people living with diabetes are now eligible. ~ Wendy G.

My daughter is type 1 but it is not approved for children yet but she will not receive one and will remain not vaccinated as she always has been. ~ Stefanie R.

Here is what the people who have already received the vaccine had to say:

I had both doses. I’m 10 days out and still feel very run down. I was COVID-tested yesterday because it felt like a mild case but was negative. I received the vaccine 2 weeks ago and no side effects. Type 1 for 55 years. ~ Cindi H.

Tolerated both injections. Side effects were mild, with some deep muscle soreness, at least for me. I did note some insulin resistance post injections. ~ Chris A.

I got my first dose a couple of weeks ago and will get my next one in two weeks. I just had a sore arm and a little fatigued the next day. By the third day, I felt pretty normal. I didn’t notice any changes to my insulin sensitivity or blood sugar levels. ~ Karissa G.

I received both doses. My only issues were headache, fatigue, and chills.

COVID vaccine update #2: 24 hours later, I don’t feel horrible, but definitely off. Some body aches, headache and overall sluggishness. I went to bed at about 8:30 and “slept” till 10:30. (with my saul dog interruptions and the baby kicking my bladder, etc.)” ~ Nicole M.

I had mine because I work for the National Health Service and I had no side effects at all. ~ Kate B.

I was nauseous after my first dose for about 12 hours. I took a Zofran and was fine. ~ Jamie B.

I did have side effects (pain, mild fever) but I won’t hesitate to go for the second shot.

I have completed the series and just had a sore arm for a couple of days each time.

No side effects beyond a sore arm. I like the peace of mind and I did extensive research before getting it to fully understand what I was getting into. ~ Sarah R.

My 82-year old identical twin sisters each received the first dose. One got the Pfizer and the other the Moderna. No adverse reactions thus far. The one that got the Pfizer has allergies so was a bit concerned but had no reaction. ~ Auburn75

It should be mandatory that vaccines like this are taken. It’s not a conspiracy theory. There aren’t robots in the vaccine. This whole virus story isn’t a hoax, and this hasn’t been started because some people are simply trying to make some money. The sheer lunacy I’ve seen out there is beyond description. Some people think the world is flat. I’ve gotten both doses and have had zero side effects. ~ Sheralyn B.

I received my first vaccine on Jan 8 with minimal side effects being a sore arm and mild low blood sugars. On Jan 27 I received my second vaccine. Initially only had a sore arm and headache but after 36 hours, developed mild fever of 99.7, body aches, headache, continued low blood sugars, and a grape side swollen lymph node in my armpit, the arm I received my vaccine in. Fever and swollen lymph node improved with Tylenol and Ibuprofen! ~ Carlie W.

Will you be getting the vaccine once it is available to you? Have you had one or both doses and experienced side effects? Share and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

COVID-19 Vaccine for People with Diabetes: What’s Going On?

The COVID-19 vaccine is here, and like most things dealing with the pandemic, the rollout of both the Pfizer-BioNtech and the Moderna vaccines has been a nightmare. The Trump administration’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP) released loose guidelines for states to follow in determining how to disseminate the vaccine but has largely left most of the decisions up to the states. Most people don’t yet know when they’ll receive the vaccine, and on the whole, most states are still in phase 1a, disseminating shots to frontline healthcare workers and those living in long-term care facilities.

In their initial recommendations, people with type 1 diabetes would receive the vaccine further down on the priority list, along with healthy individuals under 65 years old. People with type 2 diabetes are classified as, “at increased risk for severe COVID-19–associated illness”, and are thus to be given priority access in phase 1c, along with people who suffer from other conditions, such as cancer, heart failure, sickle cell disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and smoking. Type 1 diabetes is classified as, “might be at increased risk for severe COVID-19-associated illness”, to be given access in phase 2, with other conditions such as being overweight (BMI >25), and suffering from neurologic conditions.

This would put people with type 1 diabetes in the general population rollout, months after not only people with type 2 diabetes have gotten their shots, but behind many other chronic conditions, too. This is a harsh slap in the face for a community that could face so many negative consequences should they contract the virus (not to mention people with diabetes make up 40% of all COVID-19 deaths).

But recent data has come out that people with type 1 diabetes suffer from mortality from COVID-19 at similar rates as people with type 2 diabetes, and a study conducted by Vanderbilt University said people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes who have COVID-19 have three to four times higher risk of severe complications and hospitalization as compared to people without diabetes.

Several more studies show that having type 1 diabetes is potentially even more dangerous if you contract COVID-19  than having type 2: A Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology study published last year looked at medical records from the National Health Service in England to conclude that the risk of dying from Covid-19 was almost three times higher for people with type 1 diabetes and almost twice as high for type 2 than for those without diabetes.

In Scotland, another Lancet study said being admitted to an ICU or dying was more than twice as likely for type 1 diabetes patients and nearly 1.5 times more likely for type 2 diabetes patients than for people without diabetes.

People with type 1 diabetes have been told that they live with a disability the entire time they’ve lived with this incurable illness. We’ve sat on the sidelines while going low, been discriminated against in the school and workplace, shut out from certain industries and employers, and know the unique and awful feeling of our skin tightening from a hyperglycemic event after our pump failed for the umpteenth time in our sleep. We require special accommodations, a militant watch on our medication, exercise, insulin, and food intake, and are never offered a break, a day off, or even a hint of affordable insulin.

We live in the unique situation of a dual-reality: having a chronic condition, yet feeling its invisibility every day. We’re never quite “sick enough”; we never “look” diabetic; sometimes, we feel like we don’t even “deserve” the meager accommodations that we get (always pre-board flights, because you’re allowed to!). We live every day with the knowledge that our life expectancy is likely shorter, our days are harder, and especially during this pandemic, many of us have lived in fear of a serious complication should we contract COVID-19 and the bleak consequences we could face. Many of us have stayed home, shut-in, and waited this out, while watching some of our able-bodied peers continue to ignore public health protocols and guidelines.

The end result of the CDC’s recommendations burns and is tangible: states, including Iowa, Illinois, and Virginia, are prioritizing dissemination of the vaccination to people living with type 2 diabetes before people living with type 1 diabetes. Simply put: we’ve been told to stay in, shut up, and wait it out for the vaccine, due to our fragile health condition, and now that the vaccine is here, our disability is yet again being ignored.

Yes, type 2 diabetes is being prioritized and that is right, good, and important, but type 1 diabetes needs to be prioritized, too. They’re not mutually exclusive. Currently, the United Kingdom is not differentiating between type 1 and type 2 diabetes; they are prioritizing people who have either type. Other countries are following suit.

On Tuesday, the Trump administration reversed course, adopting part of president-elect Joe Biden’s distribution plan, advising states to prioritize everyone over the age of 65 and any person with a chronic condition to get the vaccine as soon as possible; states have yet to officially adopt these plans on a wide scale.

Recently, several letters were sent from various diabetes advocacy organizations to the CDC urging them to reconsider their guidelines. Organizations such as T1International, Mutual Aid Diabetes, The American Diabetes Association, JDRF, Beyond Type 1, Children with Diabetes, The diaTribe Foundation, DiabetesSisters, and T1D Exchange have lent their voices to make the needs of the 1.6 million people living with type 1 diabetes in America known.

The bottom line is that we need to curb the tide of this pandemic. Almost 400,000 Americans are dead, with a holiday-related surge in cases, hospitalizations, and death on the way. We need to get shots into as many arms as quickly as possible and stop telling some of our most vulnerable populations that, yet again, they aren’t sick enough to qualify, and that they can wait. We can’t.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Type 1 Nuclear Pharmacist on Getting a COVID Vaccine

Ann is a nuclear pharmacist who also lives with type 1 diabetes. We chatted with her about her recent experience with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

Hi Ann! Thank you so much for taking the time to speak to me. I know many people living with diabetes have had a challenging year whether trying to avoid COVID-19 or dealing with the virus itself. Now that a vaccine is available, I know many are wondering if it is right for them.

How long have you been living with type one diabetes?

I was diagnosed in March 1992, a few days before my 7th birthday.

Did having type 1 diabetes impact your decision on what you wanted to do career-wise?

Kind of. I would have loved to try to go to medical school, but I was worried about the difficulty of managing my diabetes throughout such a demanding program.

I understand you are a pharmacist, congrats! I know that takes many years of education and hard work and dedication! At what point did you know that was what you wanted to do?

I started working as a pharmacy cashier when I was in high school. That got me interested in the field of pharmacy.

Where do you work?

I’m a nuclear pharmacist for the University of Oklahoma.

I understand you have a very important role now that the vaccines have arrived at your University. What is your role? And why is it so important that you are all vaccinated?

My pharmacy is preparing all of the vaccine doses for the health sciences campus that we’re a part of. We prepared about 3,700 doses for this initial round. Besides preparing the vaccine, my pharmacy also delivers nuclear medicine doses to hospitals and clinics all around central Oklahoma. Our staff is potentially exposed to COVID during every delivery we make. It would be a devastating loss if multiple staff became infected and we were unable to operate at full capacity.

When you found out you were going to receive the vaccine, what were your initial thoughts?

I was thrilled! I had already made the decision that I would get vaccinated as soon as I had the opportunity.

Ann Kirkpatrick

Photo credit: Ann Kirkpatrick

Did you find most of your colleagues were willing to take it without hesitation? If they were reluctant, what was their reason?

So far, nearly all of our staff has received the vaccine. There are a couple who have had COVID recently, so they will not be getting vaccinated yet.

I understand the vaccine comes in two doses. When will you receive the next one?

I got the Pfizer vaccine. My next dose will be 21 days after my first dose. The Moderna vaccine doses are given 28 days apart.

Have you ever had COVID before?

I’ve never had COVID. People who have had it can still receive the vaccine. One of the current thoughts is that if you still have antibodies, you should wait to get the vaccine, so that others without antibodies may be vaccinated first.

What happens if you are exposed to COVID-19 in the interim before you receive your second dose?

The CDC recommends deferring vaccination until after the quarantine period following a known exposure. It’s best to receive the second dose as close as possible to the 21-day mark (or 28 days for the Moderna vaccine). However, there is no maximum time period between doses.

Did you notice any side effects after receiving the shot? Many are concerned that the shot will elevate their blood sugars. Did you notice any impact on your numbers?

The only effect I noticed was some soreness around the injection site. For me, it was mild and only lasted a couple of days. I did not notice any effect on my blood sugar!

Thank you so much Ann, for answering my questions. I will be sure to check back in with you but thank you so much for doing your part to rid this world of this devastating virus!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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