Has President Biden Just Canceled Affordable Insulin?

President Biden, a long-time champion of both expanded access to healthcare and affordable prescription drugs, just froze a move made by the Trump administration late in his term aimed at reducing the cost of insulin. This has some advocates fearing that Biden essentially “canceled” affordable insulin in his first week in office. So, what’s going on?

In fact, President Biden did indeed freeze a plan that was promoted by the Trump administration to lower the cost of insulin. But it’s not what you think.

Last week, the Biden administration announced a regulatory freeze pending review on all new regulations and Executive Orders (EOs) signed by President Trump during the final days of his term, including new regulations that had not yet gone into effect. The freeze will last 60 days until the Biden team can review them more thoroughly.

President Trump had signed an EO last year claiming to make insulin more affordable, that would force community health centers, including Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) to pass along 340B Program federal discounts on insulin to patients who qualify under the program. The rule was finalized in December 2020.

This would have essentially made insulin-free for low-income patients who qualify, instead of between $1-5 dollars per vial that they have traditionally paid at these health centers for their insulin. The rule was supposed to go into effect on January 22 but has now been delayed until March 22nd.

President Trump claimed that the rule change would make insulin more affordable for the 28 million Americans who frequent FQHCs for their health care, but a Health and Human Services statement admitted that “the economic impact is expected to be minimal” because the majority of patients who get insulin from these 340B participating health centers already get discounted insulin. In some cases, patients receive a 30-day supply of insulin for just $7, according to the report published in the Federal Register.

There is some speculation that enacting President Trump’s Executive Order would cause some Federally Qualified Health Centers to go out of business, which would be truly detrimental to the populations they serve during a pandemic, and the Biden administration just wants time to review all EOs and assess their potential consequences before taking further action.

In short, the 60-day regulatory freeze is not causing the price of insulin to increase, and it is not preventing action in the future to make sure that insulin is available and affordable for all Americans who need it. Additionally, there is no evidence that the Executive Order would have actually lowered insulin costs in a substantial way for the majority of people who require the hormone to live.

While President Trump’s Executive Order may have caused a media firestorm last year, it in no way paved the way for more affordable insulin for the 7.4 million Americans who rely on daily insulin injections to live, and President Biden freezing Trump’s EO in no way raises the cost of insulin, either.

Only time will tell what steps will be taken at the federal level to assure more affordable insulin for all Americans who need it to survive. Time is of the essence, and we’re running out of it.

What steps do you think the new Biden administration needs to take to address the rising cost of insulin in the United States? Share your ideas below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Prior Authorization: Getting Diabetes Supplies and Medications Covered by Insurance

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Divya Gopisetty

What is a prior authorization? Read on to learn more about why diabetes supplies or medications might require a prior authorization and how to go through the process

It can be frustrating to learn that you need a prior authorization when you already have a prescription. Insurance plans sometimes require a prior authorization to cover a diabetes supply, device, or medication, even if your doctor prescribed it to you.

Read on to learn about what a prior authorization is, and how you can make the submission process as smooth as possible.

In this article:

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What is a prior authorization?

My pharmacist told me I need a prior authorization. What happens next?

How can I check if I need a prior authorization?

How long do prior authorizations last?

What happens if the prior authorization is denied?

What is a prior authorization?

A prior authorization, also known as a pre-authorization or pre-certification, means that your healthcare provider or device company has to get specific approval from your health insurance company (so that it will pay for it).  The requirements for prior authorization differ between and within insurance plans.

If you need a prior authorization, the pharmacist cannot process your prescription until your healthcare professional has contacted the insurance company. Similarly, a device company may not ship your diabetes device to you until it has prior authorization from the insurance company.

A prior authorization is designed to make sure certain prescription drugs or devices are used correctly and only when medically necessary. Before your insurance plan will cover a certain device or drug, you must show that you meet a set of criteria.

Prior authorizations are most often handled by your healthcare professional’s office, but sometimes are handled by the device company itself (e.g., for CGM).

If you want to see what a prior authorization request form looks like, check out this one for OptumRx.

My pharmacist told me I need a prior authorization. What happens next? 

  1. If your insurance company requires (and has not received prior authorization), your pharmacy will contact your healthcare professional.
  2. The healthcare professional will contact your insurance company and submit a formal authorization request.
  3. Your insurance plan may have you fill out and sign some forms.
  4. Your insurance plan will contact the pharmacy once it has approved or denied the request.

During this process, be sure to communicate with both your healthcare provider and your insurance company to see if they need any additional information. Prior authorizations usually take about a week to process – after that, check with your pharmacy to see if the request was approved. If the request was approved, you should be able to pick up your prescription from the pharmacy.

If it wasn’t approved, your pharmacy should be able to tell you why, and then you can decide to request an appeal.

As someone living with diabetes, you are your best advocate. Be prepared to track down the paperwork to make sure you receive the requested device or medication.

How can I check if I need a prior authorization?

Check your health plan’s policy and formulary (you can normally access these on the insurance company’s website) to see if any of your treatments require a prior authorization. Or, you can call the member services number found on the back of your insurance ID card to speak with someone directly.

How long do prior authorizations last?

Most approved prior authorizations last for a set period of time (usually one year). Once it expires, you’ll have to go through the prior authorization process again.

What happens if the prior authorization is denied?

  • You can request an appeal (which is often successful!)
  • You can pay the full cost for the medication or healthcare supply, without insurance coverage.

Want to learn more?

Check out this easy-to-read resource created by DiabetesSisters on prior authorizations, step therapy, and appeals.

What’s Worked for Other People with Diabetes? Hear from Them!

  • I was denied my first CGM in 2008 by a Blue plan and fought and won by knowing how to Google my payer’s medical policy and prove that I met coverage criteria. It helped that I was given the HCP line phone number by a nurse sympathetic to my cause, but I ended the call with an authorization code. – Melissa
  • My strategy has always been persistence pays (eventually the insurance company will give in, although they may have peculiarities to navigate. The doctor’s office is really key and many have specialists who only deal with insurance company issues [mine does]). I’ve been covered by 4 insurance companies over the past decade while at the same employer if that tells you anything about the evolving insurance market. My experience with Anthem was a hassle but predictable, United Healthcare was easiest to navigate, Aetna was straightforward but a pain and had some weird rules (Why does a precertification inexplicably expire at the end of a calendar year? My chronic illness did not expire at the end of the year.). – Scott
  • Do you have experiences with prior authorizations? Let us know!
diaTribe Series

Image source: diaTribe

This article is part of a series on access that was made possible by support from AstraZeneca. The diaTribe Foundation retains strict editorial independence for all content. 

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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