Semglee, A Low-Cost Basal Insulin, Comes to the US

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Karena Yan and Joseph Bell

A more affordable alternative to Lantus (insulin glargine) will cost $148 for five pre-filled insulin pens

Mylan and Biocon Biologics announced last month the long-awaited US launch of Semglee, a new insulin aiming to be deemed “biosimilar” to insulin glargine (basal insulin) by the FDA. A biosimilar drug is a biological product that is highly similar in structure and function to a product already approved by the FDA, known as the reference product. Semglee is said to be similar to Sanofi’s basal insulin Lantus; it has the same protein sequence and has a similar glucose-lowering effect. The FDA has yet to classify Semglee as “biosimilar” or “interchangeable” to Lantus due to the need for additional review – so for now, Semglee should be considered a new basal insulin option for people with diabetes. Semglee was previously approved in 45 countries, including Australia, Europe, Japan, and South Korea. We aren’t positive how “interchangeable” will go – would someone using Tresiba or Toujeo “next-generation basal” insulin want to go with Semglee instead? This is unlikely in our view.

Semglee is currently available by prescription in either a pen or a vial and can be used by people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It costs $147.98 for five 3 mL pre-filled pens or $98.65 for one 10 mL vial. Semglee is reported to be the cheapest available insulin glargine-equivalent on the market, with a 65% discount from the list price of Lantus. That calculation is a bit misleading as does not take into account discounts and rebates available with a variety of insulin brands; actual out-of-pocket costs can differ dramatically for individuals.

Happily for people who don’t qualify for patient assistance programs, Semglee represents a far more affordable option for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who take basal insulin. While biosimilars are usually not as inexpensive as “generic” versions of drugs, because biosimilars are more expensive to manufacture, they do provide cheaper alternatives to brand name drugs, in this case, Lantus (and Levemir, Tresiba, and Toujeo). Further, because Semglee is thought to be essentially equivalent to Lantus, it should provide an important and practical option for basal insulin users who are concerned about insulin costs and do not have a route to pay less – this is far more people than often considered.

It’s also key to note that Semglee is not technically considered a “biosimilar” drug – it is currently under FDA review to gain approval of this designation. The biosimilar designation would mean that Semglee officially has bioactivity and clinical efficacy that are not different from Lantus, but are not necessarily exactly the same. If it earns an “interchangeability” designation, pharmacists would be able to substitute Semglee for Lantus without consulting the prescribing healthcare professional. Semglee might also be substituted for Tresiba or Toujeo, two “next generation” more stable basal insulins.

Two biosimilar insulins are currently approved in the US: Basaglar, a basal insulin glargine approved in 2016, and Admelog, a rapid-acting insulin lispro approved in 2018. If Semglee gains an FDA biosimilar designation, it will become the third biosimilar insulin available in the US.

Mylan is offering a co-pay discount card and a patient assistance program to help people afford Semglee. The co-pay card is available to people with commercial health insurance – you may be able to receive up to $75 off each 30-day prescription. Learn more here. For people without prescription insurance coverage, you may be able to get Semglee for free – access the patient assistance program by calling Mylan customer service at (800)796-9526.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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