Fun and Easy Meatless Main Dishes for Hot Days

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Catherine Newman

Four delicious, low-carb recipes that emphasize summer vegetables (and just so happen to be vegetarian!)

If you’re cooking meatless main dishes this summer — because you’re a vegetarian, because you’re feeding a vegetarian, or because you’re simply trying to eat less meat — then you may feel like you’re in a bit of a rut. In my house, this rut is filled with a lot of veggie burgers on the grill, a lot of herby scrambled eggs, and a lot of . . . veggie burgers on the grill. What else is there? I’m always racking my brain, and I find that it can be especially tricky if you’re keeping carb counts low – especially given how many of our summer staples can be a little carb-heavy (pasta salad, potato salad, and burger buns, we’re looking at you!). That’s where these recipes come in.

Here are three salads and a summery egg dish to mix it up a little. They hit all of the sweet spots of summer cooking and eating, and they’re perfect for those days when it is “too hot to eat” (I, myself, never have days like that, but I hear about them from other people). Plus, in the future, when we get to gather together at potlucks and barbecues again, these recipes will be perfect for sharing. We can hardly wait!

Until then, stay well, stay safe, and enjoy everything you can enjoy. It is, after all, as the poet Mary Oliver calls it, “your one wild and precious life.”

Here are a few other meatless mains on diaTribe:

Cauliflower “Mac and Cheese”

Crustless Quiche with Broccoli, Cheddar, and Mustard

Caprese Salad

Flavor-Saturated Tofu

Crustless Cauliflower Quiche with Blue Cheese

Baked Huevos Rancheros

Mason Jar Salads

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Image source: Catherine Newman

1. Zucchini Ribbon Salad

This beautiful tangle of wide zucchini ruffles shines in a simple lemony dressing. The cheese and pine nuts add enough heft and richness to transport this to main-course territory, but you could also serve it as a gorgeous side to something off the grill. Full disclosure: I invented this salad because my children have always found cooked zucchini “a little bit squashy” – a sin you could forgive since it is, after all, squash. But when it’s fresh and bright and raw like this, they eat it happily.

View the recipe.

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Image source: Catherine Newman

2. Cobbless Cobb Salad

Okay, while this recipe is missing the chicken and bacon that would make it a traditional Cobb salad, it has retained the other crucial elements that create a perfectly balanced meal: juicy summer tomatoes, pungent blue cheese, creamy avocado, and tender-yolked eggs. By all means add the meats back in, if you like. Or do what we sometimes do, and sprinkle on a handful of chopped smokehouse almonds; you’ll get bacon’s smokiness and crunch in a delightful vegetarian format.

View the recipe.

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Image source: Catherine Newman

3. Grilled Tofu Salad with Spicy Peanut Dressing

This salad hits all of our favorite notes: it’s creamy and rich, spicy and herby, tender and crunchy, and it’s filled with smoky flavors from the grilled tofu. Plan to serve it right away, though, since the cabbage and cucumbers will give up a lot of liquid fairly soon after they’re dressed. If you’ll want to wait a bit before serving, toss the vegetables with a teaspoon of salt and leave them to drain in a colander for 5 or 10 minutes; then dry them in a salad spinner or dish towel before assembling the salad.

View the recipe.

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Image source: Catherine Newman

4. Chile-Cheese Custard with Corn

This deliciously cheesy and corn-studded egg bake is a little self-conscious about not being a salad, so let me sing its summery praises: it will be ready to bake by the time the oven is preheated; you will dirty only one bowl and a baking dish; it is lovely eaten at room temperature or even cold; and it makes the most of a couple of ears of summer corn – enough for a cup of kernels, but not enough to serve on the cob. (Frozen corn is a perfectly acceptable substitute, however.) If you’ve never bought canned green chiles before, do try them here. You’ll find them in the Mexican food aisle of your supermarket in a tiny little can, and unless they say otherwise, they’re quite mild.

View the recipe.

About Catherine

Catherine loves to write about food and feeding people. In addition to her recipe and parenting blog Ben & Birdy (which has about 15,000 weekly readers), she edits the ChopChop series of mission-driven cooking magazines. This kids’ cooking magazine won the James Beard Publication of the Year award in 2013 – the first non-profit ever to win it – and a Parents’ Choice Gold Award. Her book “How to Be A Person” was published in 2020. She also helped develop Sprout, a WIC version of the magazine for families enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), as well as Seasoned, their senior version. They distribute over a million magazines annually, through paid subscriptions, doctor’s offices, schools, and hospitals. Their mission started with obesity as its explicit focus – and has shifted, over the years, to a more holistic one, with health, happiness, and real food at its core. That’s the same vibe Catherine brings to the diaTribe column.

[Photo Credit: Catherine Newman]

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Summer Is Here: Are You Still Safer at Home?

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Julia Flaherty

States and regions across America are slowly reopening, which means social distancing guidelines have become a bit fuzzy. However, the same principles apply to ensure you are best protecting yourself and others. COVID-19 is still a threat and will remain so until we have a widespread vaccine.

It’s important to remember that whether or not you’d like to slowly emerge back into society is your choice. You can absolutely still stay at home if that makes you feel safest and you are able to. But as more businesses and workplaces reopen, you may not have that choice.

It is also completely understandable that, after months inside, you’re ready to begin weighing the risks of certain activities to maintain other physical, mental, and emotional health needs. Both mentalities are okay. But if you plan to re-emerge or have to, there are important guidelines to keep in mind.

Know Your Risks

Public Gatherings

To remain cautious, keep your social circles small. Continue to limit your interactions to the people you live with, and be mindful of any emerging illnesses among your household members. If someone in your household does get sick, the CDC advises quarantining any ill family members in a specific room of your house (if they do not have to be monitored in a medical facility) to keep everyone safe from the spread.

Experts have outlined the risk factors of certain summer activities. While hosting an outdoor barbecue in your backyard with one other household is low to medium risk, going to a beach or pool among strangers is medium to high. Experts also say eating indoors at a restaurant is medium to high risk.

There are still many safety benefits of engaging with friends and family via virtual chats, ordering takeout instead of sitting down at venues (meanwhile supporting your local economy), and enjoying the great outdoors. Experts rate exercising outdoors and camping as low-risk summer activities.

Hygiene

Keep your hands and face (eyes, nose, mouth) clean. The CDC continues to advise washing your hands after treating someone who is sick, eating, preparing food, using the bathroom, tending to a wound or sore, touching pet litter, food, or treats, touching the garbage, interacting with out-of-home surfaces, and so on. Wet your hands with clean running water each time you wash them, and lather your hands, covering all areas of them, for at least 20 seconds. Dry them well using a clean hand towel each time.

Hand sanitizer with at least a 60% alcohol volume is good to use in the interim if you do not have immediate access to soap and water, but the best method is still washing your hands, as hand sanitizer doesn’t eradicate all types of germs. Be mindful of this standard amid all of your summer activities to stay safe.

Regularly launder your clothes and shower. Cough or sneeze into a tissue or your clothing, and then throw away your tissue or change your clothing. When cleaning, use an EPA-approved disinfecting product. Frequently clean high-touch surfaces.

Masks

Though many of us are growing eager to be close to friends and family again, suffering from lockdown burnout and fatigue, it’s still important to remember that masks do not replace the six feet apart social distancing rule. If you are slowly working on re-emerging, keep in mind that not everyone will practice mask safety in a compliant fashion, which puts you at risk.

Some do not know how to wear masks properly, while others still do not have access to compliant masks, and some may choose not to wear a mask at all. To ensure your safety, continue to wear a mask in public settings, such as the grocery store or your workplace if you are returning, and keep staying six feet apart. Experts have commented there are no known grocery store linked cases, indicating that grocery store shopping remains a low risk so long as you follow social distancing guidelines.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Keto Strawberry Fudge Pops

This content originally appeared on Sugar-Free Mom. Republished with permission.These Creamy Keto Strawberry Fudge Pops are Dairy-Free, Low-Carb, Sugar-Free, Gluten-Free, and are made with just six ingredients! Summer is here and that means kids are home and want all the things! These easy strawberry fudge pops are the perfect snack for kids and adults! The […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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