Cracking the Code: CEO Eran Atlas Talks Dreamed’s Revolutionary Tech

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Jordan Dakin

Beyond Type 1: Can you talk about the founding of DreaMed?

Eran: DreaMed started as part of one of the biggest institutes for people with type 1 diabetes in Israel. The director of this institute is Professor Moshe Philip (co-chairman of ATTD). His vision was to bring in technological people to try to develop solutions to help the needs of people with diabetes. One of our first projects was to create an algorithm for automated insulin delive­ry… We were the first in the world to do automated insulin delivery clinical trials outside of a hospital and we published these results in the New England Journal of Medicine. This was the first manuscript about people looping and then we were the first to send people home with automated insulin delivery in 2012.

We created a relationship with Medtronic Diabetes, which allowed us to communicate with their insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor. After we finished a lot of sessions of clinical trials, we decided we wanted to regulate our technology software as a standalone medical device. That’s why we established DreaMed in 2014. Since then, we’ve made a licensing deal with Medtronic. They were the first investor in the company and our technology will be part of their next-generation advanced hybrid closed loop system: the 780G. But working on the closed loop project, we always knew that not all the people with diabetes would have access to closed loop, but we very much believe that the majority will have access to continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology.

The thing that we were focused on is how we can use our expertise to create something that will be able to help the providers and the patient better dose insulin based on data that comes from CGM and from insulin delivery devices. For that purpose, we started to develop a technology that we call today the DreaMed Advisor. DreaMed Advisor is a decision support system that captures all data and recommends very precise, personalized insulin delivery for that specific patient. Not in a real-time manner, but in the manner of a treatment plan.

BT1: Can people on MDI utilize DreaMed advisor?

E: It’s not regulated for MDI patients at the moment. Our MDI version is on clinical trials, and I really hope that during this calendar year, we’ll be able to share the status of these programs and how fast we think it will be available on the market.

Do you think part of the reason people are sometimes slow to adopt technology is because there are some who question using it for matters like medical decisions?

I think what we’re experiencing right now are more logistical issues – how the data flows from the devices to the platform, the fact that clinics are using multiple platforms to download the data from the patient devices, and the fact that most of what we see today is not digitalized. Clinics are still printing reports – about 20 to 30 pages every visit. They don’t have the manpower because they are so overloaded with work: all the documentation, mailing the claims, dealing with that download of the data when the patient arrives at the clinic, etc.

But what I see when I visit clinics and when I talk to people and I hear lectures is that 2020 might be a moment where some of the barriers can be solved. Not all of them, but some of them can be overcome to allow us to implement such a program.

One of the things that is very interesting to me is the role of the people with diabetes in this. Everybody knows that people with diabetes pay a lot of money for healthcare costs, right? The majority of that is from the insulin costs, but even to see a doctor, there is a certain co-pay and co-insurance that patients are paying each visit. The question is how much patients will be open to removing the barriers, and saying, “I prefer to pay out of pocket for a service that will allow me to get the titration of my data with technology, together with a healthcare provider that is considered a top doc because they have clinical studies behind them. For that, I’d be willing to pay out of pocket and eventually, I will save costs because I will pay less, and I will get better outcomes, and I will spare my other costs of going to the ER in hypoglycemia and DKA because of that.” I think that patients are playing an important role in this equation.

I’m sure a big goal for DreaMed is to lessen the burden on physicians in terms of needing to see patients so frequently.

In no way are we trying to make providers obsolete. We think that they are an essential part of patient care because at the end of the day, caring for a patient with type 1 diabetes or any type of diabetes is not just about numbers, it’s not just about the type of insulin. There are a lot of things behind it and we need our providers in the game.

Dr. Greg Forlenza from the Barbara Davis Center very nicely told me, “With your technology, I’ll finally be able to go back and practice the art of medicine and not be a technician.” I think that this is the service that we would like to bring to providers because if we’re able to let them go back to dealing and practicing the medicine, and we can take away some of the barriers, all the technicality and calculations, and we’re going to provide better, more frequent care for their patients. I think that everybody will be happy about that. One of the goals that we have for this year is to try to build the right model in order to make that happen.

We’ve heard that certain endos are starting to charge a co-pay for visits where they review CGM technology, which hasn’t previously been the case. So costs in terms of things like that seem to only be going up for these patients.

I understand what you’re saying, I think that we need to look at that. We have two sides to this. Number one: there’s the side of the provider that spends a lot of hours caring for their patients and the majority of these hours are non-billable time. In the end, we want to find a way for the providers to collect some of this money because we don’t want our doctors to lose money. We want them to sustain their business so they will be able to provide us better care.

But the magic here is creating that without significantly increasing the costs on the patient side. Because if it will increase the cost from the patient’s side, the patient will say, “I don’t want to download my data, don’t charge me for that” and that means we lose because then they’re not going to get that same tight control. These are some of the questions that we are trying to find answers to. How can we be innovative not just on the technology side but also on the commercial side to find a model that will be good for providers but also good for patients?

If someone is interested in utilizing DreaMed’s technology, where do they go from there? Do they just contact their physician and ask if they can use DreaMed?

Right now, that’s the right process. They need to go to the doctor and tell them, “I’ve heard about this cool technology, here’s the information,” and put some polite pressure on the doctor to explore the technology and see if they can implement it. If the clinic is using Glooko, we are integrated, so they can continue to use their Glooko account and we will be able to get into agreement with the clinic and open Advisor on top of Glooko.

If the clinic is using Tidepool, or if the patient has an account, we are also integrating data from Tidepool, so we will be able to just provide a clinic our standalone platform and then connect the clinic’s Tidepool account. From there, every time that a patient downloads his data through Tidepool, we would be able to pull that data and analyze it, then provide recommendations for the provider.

What do you envision as the next step? What’s ahead for DreaMed?

I think that next step from our end is to develop more technologies so we will be able to expand our intended users. We’re working to reach patients on multiple daily injections – that’s our first goal. Then we’ll go to those on insulin with Type 2, either multiple daily injections or basal only. That’s from the development side. For 2020, our main goal is to try to find the right commercial model and how we can have as many patients as possible enjoy this technology as fast as possible.

Can you talk a bit more about the importance of patients having access to any and all options?

I think that patients should have the right to get access to the top tier docs anywhere, anytime that they want to. But that doesn’t mean that they will be able to make all of their treatment decisions alone. I think that there is a great deal of importance in having healthcare providers as part of patient care. But I do think that it’s wrong for patients to have to wait for six months to see a doctor in order to change something in their treatment.

We need to find ways to make top tier treatment accessible to everyone… This is what we believe in. It’s in our mission to provide the best solutions for people with diabetes with our technology.

Do you have a personal connection to type 1 diabetes?

Nope. I don’t have a personal connection. I’ve been working in this business for 14 years. Seven years of my career was spent in the hospital. I was the technical guy in the clinic sitting in the corridors, talking to patients. We did closed loop studies and in those closed loop studies, we did 24-hour studies, stayed overnight, and took care of patients. So I have a very strong connection to people with diabetes.

The fact that we have the ability to provide something to improve their care is a privilege. It’s not something that everybody gets the chance to do in their lifetime. That’s why I’ve been a part of this for so long, this same type of work, because I don’t have a personal connection, but I have an emotional connection to people with diabetes.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Imagine 288 Fingersticks a Day: The Power of CGM

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Michael Hattori

Michael writes about his diagnosis with type 2 diabetes, and how he used a CGM to put his type 2 diabetes into remission

My name is Michael, and I have type 2 diabetes. In remission. This means that my body no longer experiences unusually high blood sugar levels, and I don’t have to take diabetes medications.

Diabetes remission would not have been possible for me without the help of a miraculous tool called a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). Let me tell you how and why.

I have been a nurse for almost 22 years. Although most of my time has been in the operating room, I started my career taking care of people with diabetes, most of whom were faced with complications from diabetes. I realized early on how immensely complex and challenging diabetes is – I never imagined that I would be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

Well! About six months ago, my weight had reached 200 pounds (I’m 5’3”), my appetite was growing, I began experiencing extreme thirst. The huge amounts of water I was drinking seemed to do nothing but drive me to the bathroom seemingly every five minutes. Now, as a nurse, I knew exactly what was happening. But it couldn’t be happening to me!

At first I thought, “Oh, this will go away. It’s temporary.” But after several weeks of symptoms, I realized I needed to do something. I asked one of my colleagues at work to check my blood sugar, and it was 298 mg/dl. I could not believe it. We checked again, and it was 300 mg/dl. Lab tests a few day later showed a fasting glucose of 305 mg/dl and A1C of 10.5%. I had diabetes.

Now, you may be thinking, “You’re a nurse, for crying out loud! How could this happen to you?” But the fact is, I’m also a human being, just like you. Having worked outside of diabetes care for over 18 years, I was as uninformed as most people, and just as frightened.

One of the general surgeons I work with was standing next to me, and I asked him what he thought I should do. He was genuinely shocked, and said, “I think we need to get you on metformin, an SGLT-2 inhibitor, and a DPP-4 inhibitor.” Fortunately, my friend and colleague, Jennifer, immediately interjected, “No! You have to try this CGM first!”

I had no idea what a CGM was, but I soon found out. And it changed my life – saved my life, really.

Jennifer said, “This [CGM] is the greatest thing ever! It measures your blood sugar every five minutes, 24 hours a day, and you don’t have to stick your finger to see the results!” I was intrigued, as I had heard rumors of such devices (and also hated sticking my finger). She said that it had become her “best friend” and that it helped her mother, who had type 2 diabetes for 20 years, to manage her blood glucose. The next day I spoke with my primary care provider, and one day later I had a Freestyle Libre CGM sensor on my arm and the determination to manage my type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise alone.

Over the next six weeks, I came to rely on my CGM as my personal blood sugar “GPS.” It allowed me to see how every single thing I did affected my blood sugar, and not only during waking hours, but also while I was asleep. I kept a log of everything I ate; the CGM helped me to see how it affected my blood sugar, both immediately and over many hours. Can you imagine how powerful a tool that is for people with diabetes? To see in real time what effect food has? And not for just one point in time, like a fingerstick, but every five minutes after you eat. Imagine, if you are taking insulin, how valuable that information would be to help with dosing. No more guessing – incredible!

I had also heard about intermittent fasting but was skeptical until I started reading and found agreement that it is not only effective in helping to manage blood sugars and lose weight, but that there are other long-term health benefits. Jennifer had been doing intermittent fasting for over a month and was very positive about it, so I decided to give it a try. One of the main reasons I was willing to try it was because I had my friend, the CGM, as my guide. Being able to check my blood sugar at any time provided me with the safety net I needed to try something as radical (to my mind, at least) as fasting. And guess what, it worked!

I am now a huge advocate of intermittent fasting. But– and this is a big but – it is not for everyone. Anyone using insulin or medications that might cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) must consult with their healthcare professional, and also preferably a diabetes care and education specialist, before starting any kind of fasting program.

Along with helping me with my diet, the CGM gave me immediate feedback on exercise. I knew that exercise would help manage my diabetes, but I had no idea just how big a difference it could make. I’m not talking about hours of hard, furious sweating and exhaustion; all I did at the beginning was walk. The diabetes care and education specialist who led my class told us that even a 10-15 minute walk after a meal can bring your blood sugar down significantly. Many of the people in the class were skeptical, but she made us promise to walk at least ten minutes after every meal, and to check our blood glucose before and after the walk. Everyone was amazed at how much it really did bring down blood sugars.

For those of us with CGM, we could monitor our blood glucose throughout the walk, without any fingersticks. For me, a 20-minute brisk walk after dinner would often bring my blood sugar down 60 points or more. It was so gratifying to be able to watch my blood sugar go down and down. It motived me to make walking part of my daily routine – I still try to walk at least ten minutes after every meal, especially dinner.

Having so much CGM knowledge at my fingertips 24 hours a day gave me the power to make informed decisions about exactly what and how much to eat, to experiment with favorite foods, and to see, in real time, the benefits of exercise. How could you ask for a better tool? Within a month, I was able to get my fasting blood sugar down from over 300 mg/dl to less than 150 mg/dl. After three months it was under 120 mg/dl, and after four months under 100 mg/dl, with an A1C of 5.2%. I lost 35 pounds and still plan to lose 20 more.

I don’t think I could have achieved this without a CGM. My CGM gave me the equivalent of 288 fingersticks a day! A CGM puts that huge amount of information right at your (now not sore) fingertips. Of course, it’s up to you to use that information. But as they say, knowledge is power, and this gives you the power to manage your diabetes, and not the other way around. The CGM is the ultimate tool to show you just how your behavior affects your blood sugar, all day long.

Michael Hattori

Image source: diaTribe

Diabetes was a wake-up call for me to improve my lifestyle, and the CGM was the tool that allowed me to do so quickly and effectively. I am now in remission and intend to stay that way.

I am now on the path to becoming a certified diabetes care and education specialist, so that I can share my story and help others understand and manage their diabetes. Surprisingly, the CGM is not available to all people with diabetes. I can’t imagine a single person with diabetes who wouldn’t benefit from this amazing technology: it is like going from seeing through a tiny pinhole to having a full 360-degree view. And the view is incredible!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diasome Pharmaceuticals: A Future Without Lows?

Recently, Diasome Pharmaceuticals announced positive results from its Phase 2 OPTI-1 study on the efficacy of its hepatocyte directed vesicle (HDV) technology for preventing low blood sugar in patients with type 1 diabetes. The study results showed that this liver-targeted insulin may allow patients to reduce the amount of time they spend in hypoglycemia by using HDV technology and optimizing their relative basal and mealtime insulin doses.

What is HDV?

HDV, or hepatocyte directed vesicles, are microscopic lipid discs that can be added in liquid form to any currently available insulin and direct that insulin to the liver, where it can help to regulate blood sugar. In healthy individuals, insulin is secreted and delivered first to the liver, which plays a critical role in blood glucose regulation. Without HDV technology, injected insulin rarely reaches the liver, likely resulting in more frequent highs and lows in the user.

Diasome’s hepatocyte directed vesicle (HDV) technology is the only pharmaceutical insulin additive being developed with the intent to prevent hypoglycemia by restoring normal liver physiology in patients with diabetes. HDV technology is a Phase 3-ready asset designed to improve the safety and efficacy of various insulin formulations.

One of the trial’s investigators, Bruce Bode, M.D., a diabetes specialist with Atlanta Diabetes Associates and clinical associate professor in the Department of Medicine at Emory University, said, “The OPTI-1 study may be the first clinical trial to demonstrate the impact of the combined effects of liver targeted insulin and physiologically driven changes in the ratio of mealtime to long-acting insulin regimens. These results provide additional evidence that targeting insulin to the liver induces a more physiological response. When added to insulin, HDV may allow patients to optimize the amount of short-acting and long-acting insulin they need to reduce the incidence of hypoglycemia while still achieving positive long-term health outcomes.”

Study Design

This study was designed to evaluate the effect of HDV added to rapid-acting mealtime insulin on HbA1c, hypoglycemia, and bolus and basal insulin dosing in adult type 1 diabetes patients with baseline hba1cs  between 6.5% and 8.5%. Patients underwent a three-month period on standard-of-care therapy followed by three months of treatment with HDV added to mealtime insulin in conjunction with optimized basal insulin doses.

A total of 61 patients with type 1 diabetes were enrolled at eight trial sites across the United States. After patients were treated with standard-of-care Lispro or Degludec during the run-in period, they were randomized into one of two groups: HDV-Lispro (HDV-L) in conjunction with a 10% reduction in Degludec or HDV-L in conjunction with a 40% reduction in Degludec.

Results

The study saw positive results for preventing low blood sugar in patients with type 1 diabetes. Liver-targeted insulin may allow patients to reduce the amount of time they spend in hypoglycemia by using HDV technology and optimizing their relative basal and mealtime insulin doses.

When Will This Insulin Become Available?

Diasome hopes to begin dosing patients in phase 3 no later than Q1 2021. Assuming the Phase 3 program takes 18-24 months to complete, the company hopes to file for approval in late 2022 or early 2023.

The Importance of This Study

Robert Geho, CEO of Diasome (who lives with type 1 himself), says, “The biggest benefit for patients who use HDV insulin should be that they will finally have an insulin therapy that actually prevents hypoglycemia.  In people without diabetes, insulin from the pancreas enables two key things. First, it signals the liver’s hepatocytes to store 30% – 65% of ingested glucose during a meal, thereby preventing peripheral hyperglycemia.  Then, the liver is entirely unique in the body because it is the only tissue in the body that can release stored glucose into the blood to prevent hypoglycemia. 100 years after insulin was discovered, all currently prescribed insulins still struggle to reach the liver after injection, and no insulin therapy today can enable this normal storage and release of glucose.”

Diasome’s HDV system is the world’s most advanced clinical stage system for fixing this basic and critically important gap in therapy.

Keep your eyes peeled for this exciting technology that may reach your pharmacy counter in the next few years!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Automated Insulin Delivery: Six Universal Observations and Understandings

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Laurel Messer

Six universal facts about automated insulin delivery systems, and the things you should keep in mind about this revolutionary technology

Automated insulin delivery (AID) systems are moving towards the forefront of diabetes management. AID systems combine continuous glucose monitors (CGM) with smart algorithms to automatically adjust insulin delivery.

The Tandem Control-IQ system was recently cleared by the FDA, and the Insulet Horizon and Medtronic Advanced Hybrid Closed Loop systems are beginning pivotal trials. These are encouraging developments. As more systems move through the pipeline and eventually into the commercial market, important patterns are emerging in user expectations and user experience. As a diabetes nurse, certified diabetes educator and research investigator, I, along with my team at the Barbara Davis Center, have worked with nearly every AID system in the pipeline, and other systems that will never make it to market. Here are six insights we have gleaned, which seem to be universal (thus far) to all AID systems:

1. You can always beat an AID system with compulsive diabetes management

Many people with diabetes compulsively attend to diabetes care in order to achieve ultra-tight glucose ranges – and are the first to ask about automated systems. What ends up happening is that these “super-users” are invariably frustrated that the system is not yielding the same results that they were able to achieve with their own calculations and management. An important point is that many automated systems are excellent at reducing mental burden for taking care of diabetes, excellent at reducing hypoglycemia, and adequate at improving glucose levels. Humans can beat automated systems if they attend to diabetes care near-constantly. The individuals who will likely be satisfied with AID are those who are comfortable with an A1C in the 7s or above, but they want to reduce the mental load of adjusting settings and micromanaging high glucose levels. The most important question to ask is, “Why do I want to start using an automated system?” If it is to achieve near-perfect glucose levels, the system will likely disappoint. If it is to reduce the burden of “thinking like a pancreas” all the time, it may be a good option. AID will excel at the marathon of diabetes care but may disappoint in the hour-to-hour sprint.

2. Systems work best when you let them work

Using both research and commercial systems, we have seen all the ways to “trick” AID systems—entering phantom carbohydrates, changing set points, performing manual corrections, overriding recommended doses. More often than not, these behaviors lead to glucose instability – reactionary highs and lows from the system destabilizing. All systems will perform best if they are used according to user instructions. This is difficult for the individual who would prefer to micro-adjust settings or desire control over all insulin delivery. Most systems work best when users learn to trust them.

3. Give the system a chance – 2-4 weeks before deciding long term potential

It may benefit us to think about AID like a new significant relationship – it can take some time to “settle.” I mean this both on an interaction level (learning how to respond to alerts, when to intervene, when to let it ride) and on an algorithm level (allowing the system to adjust internal algorithm parameters based on usage). In addition, programmable user settings may need some adjustment in the first few weeks of use, so working with diabetes educators can be helpful for initial set-up and early follow-up.

4. Bolusing is still king

If I could go back in time, I would caution device manufacturers against any whisper of not needing to bolus with AID systems. Bolusing is the singular most important action a person with diabetes can do to optimize insulin delivery on current and near-future automated systems. This will be true until insulin action time gets exponentially faster or artificial intelligence gets better at predicting human behavior, neither of which is on the immediate horizon. In order for people with diabetes to see the best performance on any system (automated or manual), they need to bolus before carbohydrates are consumed. Specific to AID, the timing of the bolus (prior to carb intake) is especially important, as the system will automatically increase insulin delivery after an initial rise of glucose levels, so a late bolus (e.g., after the meal) could lead to insulin stacking and hypoglycemia.

5. Rethinking low treatments

Low glucose levels (hypoglycemia) still happen when using automated systems. What is different with AID is that the system has been trying to prevent the low by reducing/suspending insulin, possibly hours before the low occurs. This means that an individual may need to consume significantly fewer carbs to bring glucose levels back into range – perhaps 5-10 grams of carb at first, reassessing 15-20 minutes later. This can be difficult when wanting to eat everything in sight; however, it can reduce the chance of rebounding into the 200s after over-treating.

6. Infusion sets are still infusion sets

While AID algorithms are revolutionary, the infusion set is not. It is the same plastic or steel cannula that occludes, kinks, or inflames. This hardware limits automated systems and can very quickly lead to hyperglycemia or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). It is important for people using AID to recognize signs of infusion set failure – persistent hyperglycemia, boluses that do not bring glucose levels down, ketones, vomiting, etc. Knowing how to treat ketones (via syringe injection of insulin and set change) can prevent a hospital admission or worse.

I love that the diabetes community learns from its members and experiences. Check out our Barbara Davis Center PANTHER (Practical Advanced THERapies for diabetes) website for our team’s latest insights on automated insulin delivery, and tools for people with diabetes, clinicians, and engineers.

Are you considering AID? Feel free to share this article with your healthcare team. For more information about AID systems that are currently available or in the pipeline, click here.

About Laurel

Laurel H. Messer is a nurse scientist and certified diabetes educator at the Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO. She has spent the last 15 years studying how to best utilize new diabetes technologies, and remembers fondly teaching families to wrap up their corded CGM system in a plastic shower bag for bathing. Ok, not that fondly, but look how far we have come! Dr. Messer works with the Barbara Davis Center PANTHER team (Practical Advanced Therapies for diabetes), conducting clinical research trials on promising technologies to make life better for children, adolescents, and adults living with type 1 diabetes. Get in touch at Laurel.Messer@cuanschutz.edu

Source: diabetesdaily.com

New Implantable Device Gains Attention

We have seen major advancements in the world of continuous glucose monitors in recent years, including Eversense, the first implantable device. This implanted device is able to monitor blood glucose, as well as alert the person when their levels get too low or high. One issue with implantable devices is how to continuously power them. Excitingly, a new prototype was recently developed that can power itself by using our own glucose.

With implantables being the way of the future, having to remove the device to charge is counterproductive. Researchers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) created this device that is able to directly utilize the energy within our bodies. It is made up of n-type semiconducting polymer along with the enzyme glucose oxidase. When the glucose oxidase detects glucose in its surroundings, it removes electrons and transports them through the connected polymer. The device can detect glucose levels in saliva and likely other bodily fluids, while the same polymer also helps convert glucose and oxygen into electrical power, which runs the device.

While more research is needed to see if this method is practical and safe, so far it has shown to be promising. According to the recent press release,

“This fuel cell is the first demonstration of a completely plastic, enzyme-based electrocatalytic energy generation device operating in physiologically relevant media,” says Sahika Inal, principal investigator of the study. “Glucose sensing and power generation are only two examples of the applications possible when a synthetic polymer communicates effectively with a catalytic enzyme-like glucose oxidase. Our main aim was to show the versatile chemistry and novel applications of this special water-stable, polymer class, which exhibits mixed conduction (ionic and electronic).

Have you considered an implantable device? If insertions were minimal due to this new technology, would it pique your interest?

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Time Flies! Don’t Wait to Use Your Year-End Insurance Benefits on a New Insulin Pump

Time for a new insulin pump? Regardless of the time of year, with the t:slim X2™ insulin pump, you won’t need to replace it when the next big features arrive. Stacey Simms shares how using your year-end insurance benefits can be your best option to pay less.
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes, Just Tell Me!

This content originally appeared on Test Guess and Go. Republished with permission.Lately, I have been having days, well actually weeks when I am starting to question how I deal with my diabetes. I have used an insulin pump for 15 years and don’t really want to change back to injections. For me a pump is […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Diabetes Tech Updates: Spring 2019

This content originally appeared on Type 1 Writes. Republished with permission.A couple of Saturdays ago, I was lucky enough to attend the Type 1 Tech Summit in Perth, where I had the opportunity to catch up with some of the reps from the diabetes device companies to find out what’s new. Mylife Diabetescare Last May, […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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