UK Study Under Review Finds People With Type 1 Diabetes More at Risk to Die of COVID-19 Than People With Type 2 Diabetes

There’s a large UK study (2 million people) under peer review that’s gaining traction on social media. Why? Because it defies our – already overtaxed mental states – of what’s possible.

Covid-19: people with type 1 diabetes more likely to die than those with type 2.” This is how The Guardian, among other publications, headlined it.

NHS (United Kingdom National Health Service) research reports that people with type 1 diabetes are at 3.5x higher risk for death if they get COVID-19 than people without diabetes. In contrast, people with type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to die as people without diabetes.

Surprised? I was. And even though the research is currently being reviewed, and nothing’s yet been proven, the data has a strong statistical basis.

If you’re curious what all this means, I can share with you information I’m privileged to have access to. I am part of a team of global diabetes experts – MDs, researchers, scientists, heads of the university, and hospital departments. The group was formed a few months ago under the leadership of Professor Itamar Raz, diabetologist and former head of Israel’s national diabetes health policies and Guang Ning, Head of Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Disease.

The team is digesting a barrage of information, sharing their expertise and experiences and brainstorming prevention and treatment guidelines that they can safely, and quickly, recommend to health professionals and the public.

Unnerved by The Guardian article, I reached out to the group immediately. Philip Home, Emeritus Professor at Newcastle University, UK responded within an hour. It was 10:30 PM in the UK.

Here’s what I can tell you with the proviso, as Home emphasizes, that currently this research presents an interpretation of the data, which is dependent on a rapidly changing situation in the UK. This means its application to other people, in other circumstances, is not easy – medicine is as much art as it is science. And, it’s hard to know whether there have been any population and/or calculation errors. For instance, some people with type 2 diabetes on insulin may have been incorrectly counted as type 1s.

Below (in italics) is a summary from my email exchange with Professor Home.

Those Not Necessarily at Higher Risk:

This comment is currently a hypothesis, but we do think people who have no evidence of vascular damage, no retinopathy, no albuminuria (including microalbuminuria) and no cardiovascular disease, are likely not at greater risk to be hospitalized or die if they get COVID-19 than people without diabetes.

Further, if one’s blood sugar is also well managed, A1c under 7.5%, they are probably at no greater risk of getting COVID-19 in the first place than someone without diabetes.

Those at Higher Risk for Poorer Outcomes:

People who have type 1 diabetes who show evidence of vascular damage, should they get COVID-19, would be at higher risk of severe outcomes including hospitalization and death. The risk for vascular damage is higher the longer you’ve had diabetes, particularly if glucose levels have been high.

Further, if you have poor glucose management you may be at greater risk to contract the virus.

People can check with their health professionals whether their markers that indicate vascular damage are in range, that includes CRP, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and liver enzymes (ALT). They can also check if they have any albumin leakage through the kidney. Also, they can check with their eye professional whether they have any retinal damage.

Understanding that this is a vascular issue and that vascular damage increases risk for comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease, I better understand why it’s possible someone with longer duration type 1 diabetes, who gets COVID-19, may be at higher risk for worse outcomes than someone with type 2 diabetes.

What else can you do now to protect yourself should you get COVID-19? First, don’t panic. As Home says, the data is not yet in. Second, use this time to build your nutritional and metabolic health. In other words, follow the common recommendations:

  1. Do your best to keep your blood sugar in target range
  2. Eat as healthily as you can – vegetables, whole, not processed foods, some fruit, dairy if you can tolerate it, beans, seeds, nuts, healthy fats
  3. Be active, even if you’re in lockdown

Like everyone, diabetes or no diabetes, wear a mask when out in public, stay six feet away from others and wash, wash, wash your hands. My personal prescription includes using those clean hands to then pour a glass of antioxidant-rich red wine.

Note: I wish to gratefully acknowledge Professor Home who responded to my query immediately, answered my questions, lowered my stress level and helped me interpret the medical data.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Advancements in Treatment: The Use of Adjunctive Therapies in Type 1 Diabetes

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Paresh Dandona and Megan Johnson

Read on to learn about the research around GLP-1, SGLT-2, and combination therapy use in type 1 diabetes. Dr. Paresh Dandona is a Distinguished Professor and Chief of Endocrinology at the University of Buffalo, and Megan Johnson is a fellow on his team

For people living with type 1 diabetes, new treatments are finally on the horizon. The University at Buffalo (UB) Endocrinology Research Center is helping to revolutionize the treatment of this condition. Among the most promising new therapies are two non-insulin medications currently used in type 2 diabetes, SGLT-2 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists.

SGLT-2 inhibitors, such as Farxiga, act the kidney to help the body excrete more glucose in the urine. Meanwhile, GLP-1 receptor agonists like Victoza work in several different ways: increasing the body’s natural insulin production, decreasing the release of the glucose-raising hormone glucagon, slowing the emptying of the stomach, and curbing excess appetite. Some people with type 1 diabetes take these medications as an addition to insulin treatment as an “off-label” drug. To learn more about off-label, check out the article: Can “Off Label” Drugs and Technology Help You? Ask Your Doctor.

Why consider these medications?

In people without diabetes, the body is constantly releasing more or less insulin to match the body’s energy needs.  People with type 1 diabetes do not make enough insulin on their own and have to try to mimic this process by taking insulin replacement – but it isn’t easy.

People with type 1 diabetes often have fluctuations in their blood sugars, putting them at risk for both low blood sugars (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugars (hyperglycemia). Many individuals are unable to manage their blood sugars in a healthy glucose range with insulin alone. In fact, less than 30% of people with type 1 diabetes currently have an A1C at the target of less than 7%.

Can GLP-1 agonists be safely used in type 1 diabetes?

Over the past decade, the endocrinologists at the University at Buffalo and other research groups have been conducting studies to see whether GLP-1-receptor agonists can safely be used in type 1 diabetes.

  • The first of these was published in 2011 and showed a decrease in A1C within just four weeks of GLP-1 agonist treatment. Importantly, people given GLP-1 agonists plus insulin also had much less variation in their blood sugars, as measured by continuous glucose monitors (CGM).
  • Another study involved 72 people with type 1 diabetes who took GLP-1 agonist or placebo (a “nothing” pil) in addition to insulin for 12 weeks. The GLP-1 group had decreases in A1C, insulin requirements, blood sugar fluctuations, and body weight. People in this group did report more nausea – a common side effect of GLP-1 agonists.
  • Since then, multiple studies, some involving over 1000 people and lasting up to 52 weeks, have shown that GLP-1 treatment in people with type 1 diabetes can reduce A1C and body weight, along with insulin dosages.

Many of these studies, but not all, have suggested that GLP-1 agonists can do this without increasing the risk for hypoglycemia or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). There is also some evidence that GLP-1 agonists can improve quality of life in type 1 diabetes.

Who should consider GLP-1’s?

The effects of GLP-1 agonists seem to be especially strong in individuals who are still able to make some insulin on their own, although it also works in people who do not.

In one notable study, researchers gave a GLP-1 agonist to 11 people with type 1 diabetes who were still able to produce some insulin. To get an estimate of insulin production, they measured levels of a molecule called C-peptide, which is produced at the same time as insulin. In these 11 individuals, C-peptide concentrations increased after GLP-1 treatment. By the 12-week mark, they had decreased their insulin dosage by over 60%. Incredibly, five people were not requiring any insulin at all. Even though the study was very small, the results were exciting, because it was the first study to suggest that some people with type 1 diabetes had sufficient insulin reserve and thus, could – at least temporarily – be treated without insulin.

Can SGLT-2 inhibitors be used in type 1 diabetes?

SGLT-2 inhibitors like Farxiga have also shown tremendous potential. In two large studies called DEPICT-1 and DEPICT-2, adults with type 1 diabetes were randomly assigned to take either placebo or SGLT-2 inhibitor in combination with insulin. Over 700 people from 17 different countries participated in DEPICT-1, and over 800 people with type 1 diabetes participated in DEPICT-2. At the end of 24 weeks, people taking dapaglifozin had a percent A1C that was lower, on average, by 0.4 compared to people who had received placebo, and it was still lower, by over 0.3, at 52 weeks. The number of hypoglycemic events was similar in both groups.

As with GLP-1 agonists, people taking SGLT-2 inhibitors had weight loss and decreased insulin requirements. People taking SGLT-2 inhibitor, however, did have an increased risk of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). If individuals consider this therapy, they should be cautious about not missing meals or insulin, and not drinking large amounts of alcohol, as these behaviors can lead to increased ketone production.

Several other research groups, in trials recruiting up to 1000 individuals, have seen similar results when using this class of medications.  Researchers have been conducting additional studies to try to determine how best to minimize the risks associated with them. Farxiga (called Forxiga in Europe) has now been approved as the first oral agent as an adjunct treatment for type 1 diabetes in Europe and Japan.

Promising Combination Therapy

Now, endocrinologists are also looking at whether GLP-1 agonist and SGLT-2 inhibitor combination therapy could increase the benefits of each of these treatments. A study conducted on a small number of people showed that GLP-1 agonists can help prevent ketone production, so it is theoretically possible that this medication could reduce the risk of DKA that was seen with SGLT-2 inhibitors.

In an early study involving 30 people with type 1 diabetes who were already on GLP-agonist and insulin were randomly assigned to take SGLT-2 inhibitor or placebo, as well. People who received both drugs saw an 0.7% reduction in A1C values after 12 weeks, without any additional hypoglycemia. People on the SGLT-2 inhibitor did make more ketones, though, and two individuals in the combination group experienced DKA. Larger studies are now being conducted to expand on these results and learn more about how to give these drugs safely. The hope is that non-insulin therapies will soon be approved for type 1 diabetes. By unlocking the potential of these therapies, we can do more than manage blood glucose levels – we can improve people’s lives.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

STUDY: Link Between Jaundice at Birth and Type 1 Diabetes Risk

An association between high bilirubin levels at birth and a higher risk for developing type 1 diabetes has been previously suggested. Now, a large study has further confirmed the association. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Jaundice happens when a chemical called bilirubin builds up in the baby’s blood. During pregnancy, the […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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