Hydrate and Refuel: Best Low-Sugar Sports Drinks

There are many sports drinks on the market that promise numerous health benefits but come with a price tag and are loaded with calories and sugar. As people living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, we are mindful of what we are eating and drinking. Often times we are looking for a drink that can help give us a boost of energy before we exercise or one that will replenish us after a rigorous workout. The last thing we want is to mess with our blood sugar after doing something good for our body, so a drink with minimal sugar is ideal.

To give you an idea of what these so-called sports drink typically contain, regular Gatorade has 140 calories and 34 g carbs in a 20-oz bottle; yet it is the most popular sports drink on the market. However, high-carb drinks will make the absorption of fluids take longer. Opting for a lower-carb alternative will help hydrate you quicker. Make sure you read labels and pick a drink that fit with your own personal health goals.

Here are some of the sports drink I found with the lowest sugar and the most health benefits:

Photo credit: Propel Water

Propel

By the makers of Gatorade, this brand has quickly become a fan favorite. It is a great option for many because it contains zero grams of sugar and zero calories. This drink can be beneficial both pre- and post-workout and is packed with electrolytes and vitamins. While some may shy away from it due to artificial flavors, they offer an unflavored version as well.

You can purchase Propel at many grocery chains, including Walmart, Target, and Kroger. You can find a store near you using their store locator.

Photo credit: Gatorade

Gatorade Zero Sugar Thirst Quencher

This drink comes in four tasty flavors-glacier cherry, orange and lemon-lime. With just 5-10 calories and zero sugar per serving, this is a delicious option that will fuel your body and hydrate you too.

You can look specifically for this product on their website to find out where it is sold by you.

Body Armor

Photo credit: Body Armor

Body Armor Lyte

The secret ingredient to this refreshing sports drink is that it contains 10% coconut water. It comes in a variety of flavors, including blueberry pomegranate, peach mango, orange citrus and coconut. This drink delivers 200% of your daily recommended dose of vitmains B3, B5 and B12 as well as vitamins A, C and E to help you refuel. This drink is also packed with potassium and is a great option for those looking for a low-sugar drink that delivers multiple health benefits.

I have seen this product in Target but be sure to check their store locator to find a store near you.

Nooma

Photo credit: Nooma

Nooma Organic Electrolyte Drink

Made with organic coconut water and sea salt, and loaded with electrolytes, potassium and sodium, Nooma will be sure to keep you hydrated through your workout. Each drink is organic and non-GMO with only 30 calories and 5 grams of sugar, all of which come naturally from the coconut water. Nooma comes in five great flavors- blueberry peach, mango, watermelon lime, lemonade and chocolate mint. All have no artificial ingredients or sugar added.

You can purchase Nooma Organic Electrolyte Drink at Amazon starting at $29.99 for a variety pack of 12 16-ounce bottles or directly through their website, where shipping is free if in the United States!

Nuun Life

Nuun Sport: Electrolyte Drink Tablets

Nuun Sport created an electrolyte-rich sports drink tablet that is packed with electrolytes, and is low-calorie and low-sugar. There are no artificial flavors or sweeteners (uses high-quality Stevia) and is keto-friendly and gluten-free. Nuun’s Drink Tablets come in four tubes of 10, with each tube containing one of the following tasty flavors: Lemon Lime, Tri-Berry, Citrus Fruit, and Orange. These tubes are extremely easy to take on-the-go and make staying hydrated super easy.

You can purchase Nuun Drink Tablet’s on Amazon or directly through their website where you can by individual tubes as well.

BCAA

Photo credit: Celsius

Celsius BCAA + Energy

This brand keeps on gaining traction, likely due to the great taste and price. With 200 grams of caffeine, this drink is a refreshing alternative to tea or coffee and ideal for both pre and post-workout. Celsius BCAA + Energy has zero sugar and contains no artificial flavors, colors or preservatives. It comes in 3 flavors: Sparkling Tropical Twist, Sparkling Tart Cherry Lime, and Sparkling Blood Orange Lemonade. This drink is made with a blend of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), tart cherry, vitamin D3, electrolytes and caffeine, to reduce inflammation and will also help to replenish your body during and after a rigorous workout

You can purchase Celsius directly off their website or use their store locator to find a retailer by you. I was surprised to see so many drugs stores and grocery stores carrying this product.

Photo credit: Powerade

Powerade Ultra

Powerade Ultra helps to build strength and muscle as it contains both creatine and BCAAs. Since amino acids are the building blocks of protein, they are essential for new muscle growth. And supplementing with creatine, you can help aid muscle growth as well. This product contains zero sugar, and is available in Mixed Berry, White Cherry and Citrus Blast flavors. These drinks are sure to keep you hydrated and give you energy while helping you make progress in the gym.

You can purchase Powerade Ultra on their website or use their store locator to find a retailer by you.

When choosing a sports drink, consider your nutritional goals, fitness level and energy needs. All the sports drink mentioned above will hydrate your body and replenish the minerals lost, without adding back the calories you just burned. And even better, none of them will mess with your blood sugar!

Do you have any low-sugar sports drinks that you love? Share and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

8 Spooky but Diabetes-Friendly Halloween Recipes

Everyone talks about treats during Halloween, which can be frustrating for those who regularly carb count. Fortunately, you can still celebrate the occasion without the sugar overload. You just need to get your creative juices flowing while preparing any of the low-carb recipes below.

Photo credit: Corina Nielsen

Spooky Mini Cheesecake Ghost Bites

If you’re looking for an alternative to candies and sweets during Halloween, these no-bake, fluffy, and flavorful ghost bites won’t disappoint. It takes 15 minutes to prepare them and an hour or two to set in the refrigerator. If you have kids, let them add the chocolate chips for the eyes.

Bloody Pumpkin Peppers

Carve a face into your bell pepper before filling it with the ground meat mixture. When cooked, it will look like an aging Jack-o-Lantern. Top it with mozzarella and marinara sauce, and you seemingly have brains and blood oozing out of Jack’s head.

sugar-free mummy recipe

Photo credit: Cat Martin

Halloween Cookie Dough Mummy Treats

Turn your edible cooking dough into something creepy but fun. Shape the dough into small ovals and cover them with layers of melted sugar-free white chocolate. You can make them ahead of time and store them in the fridge for your trick-or-treaters!

Graveyard Chicken Enchilada Dip

If you opt for something Mexican to celebrate Halloween, try this chicken enchilada dip. It’s easy to make, flexible, and addictively delicious. Decorate it with keto or low-carb crackers as tombstones for the eerie feel.

witches finger breadstick

Photo credit: Denise Wright

Witch Finger Breadsticks

Make these witch finger breadsticks with fathead dough, basil, and garlic for snacks. The breadsticks are tasty as they are, but if you’re craving for tomato flavor, you can dip them in marinara sauce.

Halloween Cucumber Spiders

This may seem fiddly to prepare, but your kids will love decorating your sliced cucumbers with olive spiders. If you want to divert their attention from sweets to something equally fun and delicious, a kitchen session with this recipe can be a terrific way to go.

spooky deviled eggs

Photo credit: Lindsay Cotter

Deviled Egg Eyeballs

If you’re thinking of having deviled eggs as a healthy appetizer for Halloween, you might as well get creative and make its spooky version. You only need to add green or black olives for the eyes, and then sprinkle paprika or add chili sauce to make it look bloodshot.

Eggplant Jack-O-Lantern Pizzas

This is another recipe your kids will love. Bake eggplant slices, add sauce and cheese for flavor, and then decorate them with Jack-o-Lantern faces using sliced pepperoni, ham, or bacon. The best thing about this nutritious pizza? No kneading and rolling needed!

What other interesting Halloween recipes do you recommend for those following a low-carb diet? Share with us how you celebrate this occasion at the dining table.

Diabetes-Friendly Halloween Recipes

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How to Handle Halloween for Children with Diabetes

It’s that time of year again: the leaves are falling, the temperatures are dropping, and all things scary and spooky are on store shelves. While pumpkin picking and catching a hay ride are (for all intents and purposes) “low carbohydrate” activities, trick-or-treating can be anything but. So, how do you handle Halloween with a young child with diabetes? Do you allow them to “be a kid” for an evening, and go all out on the chocolate and sugar spike? Or do you limit them to a few, portion-controlled treats, with a food scale nearby? While there’s no one right answer to this question, here are some helpful tips to make your Halloween a little less spooky this year.

Take the Focus Away from Food

This is helpful for all children, for all holidays. No holiday needs to be 100% about the food, especially for a child with diabetes. For Halloween specifically, focus on carving pumpkins, watching scary movies, dressing up in really elaborate Halloween costumes, and yes, if you and your child wish, some candy, too.

Noelle from California says, “Our kiddo is three so our main focus is on creating traditions that will be helpful for her later on with type 1. For parties, I create treats that aren’t food-related.”

Lila from New York City says, “We completely avoid the candy thing. Trick or treating isn’t a huge deal in our neighborhood, so this hasn’t been an issue yet.”

Kate, from Pennsylvania, says, “We go out a little, but limit the number of stops. After we get home, we go through our candy, keeping only what we really, really like. The rest, we give to the Switch Witch, and she brings the girls a little present in the morning as an exchange for giving her their candy.” There’s even a book you can buy that helps explain the magic of the Switch Witch.

Create Unique Traditions

Perhaps you have a spooky, scary dance party or movie night on Halloween, or the whole family dresses up in matching costumes to go walking around the neighborhood. Maybe you bob for apples or roast pumpkin seeds after carving, or let your child have a few friends sleepover. Creating unique family traditions that are inclusive will be beneficial not only for your child now, but will be helpful as they grow up with type 1 diabetes.

Be Wary About Restrictions

Be cognizant about putting too many restrictions on candy for your child. Children with diabetes are much more likely to develop an unhealthy relationship with food. If your child really wants to indulge, just make sure they’re carbohydrate counting appropriately, and let them enjoy themselves (within moderation, of course). Most of the time children intuitively eat anyway, and don’t actually end up eating that much candy.

Melissa, from Iowa, says, “We bring any candy home and carb count it ahead of time, and then put a post-it note on each piece, so our daughter can dose appropriately whenever she’s hungry or wants a treat.”

Plan Ahead

Like all things diabetes-related, it helps to plan ahead. Make sure your child eats dinner with some protein and fat before going trick-or-treating, so they’re not just eating sugar on an empty stomach, which can cause the roller coaster effect. Make sure you know where and how far they’ll be walking, or better yet, walk along with them. Have your child carry low snacks (they shouldn’t solely rely on candy that won’t have any nutrition facts or carbohydrate information on it), and make sure they’re drinking plenty of water. It’s helpful if your child also has fresh continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and insulin pump sites on, but not absolutely necessary.

Hannah says, “Planning ahead a learning to navigate holidays with type 1 diabetes is critical and so empowering once you find what works for you and your family.”

Don’t Stress the Small Stuff!

It’s important to remember that Halloween is only one night, and you shouldn’t stress the small stuff. Some parents of children with diabetes shy away from candy, while others let them indulge, and there is no one right answer. Do what works for you and your family, but don’t let the stress of one holiday ruin the evening for you and your child. Relax and let them have fun! They’ll be doing so much running around anyway that you’ll be glad they had the extra “low snacks” on them anyway.

Lija, from Minnesota, says, “We don’t do anything different for my type 1 and non-type 1, and it works out fine. We find that she tends to go low while out trick or treating, so she just eats and boluses a little while out; it isn’t actually a difficult holiday for us!”

The key is finding what works for you. There are no right or wrong answers. Here’s to a happy, spooky Halloween! Hopefully the candy (and subsequent blood sugars) are the least scary part.

How do you and your family handle Halloween in a household affected by diabetes? What tactics and strategies have helped you manage appropriately? Share your experience in the comment section below; we love hearing from our readers!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Pumpkin Lasagna Recipe with Spinach and Meatza

This content originally appeared on Low Carb Yum. Republished with permission.

The first thing that comes to mind when you talk about pumpkin as food is usually pumpkin pie or some other sweet dish. However, I came across a recipe for pumpkin lasagna a couple of weeks ago that I really wanted to try.

Low-carb lasagna noodles are available, but I have started to get away from using wheat products as I believe there are many benefits to eating gluten-free. Therefore, I decided to try a “meatza” layer in the lasagna in place of the noodles where I used the meat part of the Spinach Tomato Meatza Pizza Recipe.

I made a few other changes to the original recipe to suit my taste and lower the carbs. Since there aren’t any actual lasagna noodles in this dish, some may argue that it’s really a casserole versus true lasagna.

However, it looks and tastes like lasagna using a pumpkin sauce rather than the traditional tomato-based sauce. Therefore, I have kept the title of this recipe as a lasagna rather than a casserole.

Pumpkin Lasagna

Print

Pumpkin Lasagna with Spinach

.wprm-recipe-rating .wprm-rating-star.wprm-rating-star-full svg * { fill: #343434; }

A low carb lasagna featuring pumpkin, spinach, and meatza noodles. The pasta noodles in this dish have been replaced with pre-baked seasoned ground beef.
Course Main Course
Cuisine American, Italian
Keyword fall, lasagna, pumpkin
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Total Time 55 minutes
Servings 12 squares
Calories 401kcal

Ingredients

Meatza ingredients:

  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup parmesan cheese grated
  • 2 teaspoons Italian seasonings
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 pounds ground beef

Lasagna ingredients:

  • 1-2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 6 cups fresh baby spinach
  • 15 ounces canned pumpkin puree
  • 1 1/2 cups almond milk or half almond milk half heavy cream
  • 2 teaspoons dried rubbed sage
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • dash ground nutmeg
  • 15 ounces whole milk Ricotta cheese
  • 2 cups mozzarella cheese shredded
  • 1 cup parmesan cheese shredded or grated
  • Prepared Meatza

Instructions

Prepare the meatza:

  • Beat the eggs with the parmesan cheese and all seasonings. Add the ground beef and mix until well combined.
  • Spread mixture out onto a jelly roll pan. Bake for about 15-20 minutes in a 450°F oven.
  • Drain off any grease after removing from the oven. Slice into rectangular pieces to fit into lasagna pan.

Lasagna directions:

  • Heat olive oil in a large pot over medium high heat. Add spinach and stir until spinach is wilted. Remove from heat.
  • Combine pumpkin, almond milk, sage, salt, pepper and nutmeg in bowl.
  • Spread 1/2 cup pumpkin sauce onto bottom of 9×13 baking pan. Top with half of the cut up meatza.
  • Spread 1/2 of the remaining pumpkin sauce on top of the meatza layer then cover with spinach. Top with half of the ricotta, half of the mozzarella, and half of the parmesan cheeses. Repeat layers. Cover with foil.
  • Bake at 375 °F for 30 minutes.
  • Remove foil and bake uncovered for an additional 10 minutes or until cheese is melted and browned.

Notes

Baking the meat into thin meatloaf pieces is what holds the lasagna together. The meat should be pressed into a rimmed baking sheet to be as thin as possible.

To prevent over-browning the cheese, cover the casserole pan with foil while baking. Then remove the foil during the last ten minutes of baking to brown the cheese.

Nutrition

Calories: 401kcal | Carbohydrates: 5g | Protein: 27g | Fat: 29g | Saturated Fat: 13g | Cholesterol: 122mg | Sodium: 850mg | Potassium: 441mg | Fiber: 1g | Vitamin A: 7350IU | Vitamin C: 5.7mg | Calcium: 400mg


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Pumpkin Lasagna With Spinach and Meatza Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

What I Wish People Knew About Type 3C Diabetes

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Jen M.

What do you think of when you think of a diabetes diagnosis story? It could be a type 1 diagnosis story when someone experiences diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) symptoms and gets admitted to the hospital. It could be a type 2 diagnosis story of someone diagnosed through blood work at a routine doctor’s appointment. My story is a little bit different.

I am a type 3c diabetic. Most people I converse with have never heard of my type, and that’s okay. Since my diagnosis, I have found a passion for educating the general public and the diabetes community about type 3c and what life is like living without a pancreas.

You read that right, I don’t have a pancreas at all!

In December 2015, I woke up with severe abdominal pain. At first I thought it may have been a stomach ache and tried to rest. As the day went on, the pain continued to get more severe. And when I say severe, I mean the worst pain I have ever felt. It is difficult to even put the experience into words. I was visiting my parents for Christmas and my mom drove me to the local emergency room. What I thought would be a quick trip turned into a 4 week stay. I was diagnosed with pancreatitis and they spent those weeks trying to get the pain under control and figure out why this was happening.

The journey to figure out why I, a 25 year old with no family history and no alcohol use, was having repeated episodes of pancreatitis took about 7 months. I was in and out of the hospital every few weeks with recurring flares. I’ll spare all of the details, but it was finally determined that I had two genetic mutations in the SPINK gene and the CFTR gene. The combination of these gene mutations explained why I had chronic pancreatitis. I consulted with several doctors at different hospitals and they all agreed that the best plan of action to improve my quality of life would be to perform a total pancreatectomy.

I had my surgery on February 2, 2017, a little over 1 year after my first diagnosed pancreatitis flare. The surgery is called a total pancreatectomy with autologous islet cell transplant (TPAIT). The surgeon removed my pancreas, spleen, gall bladder, duodenum, and lower portion of my stomach. As people with diabetes know, insulin is incredibly important, so in an ideal case, the surgeon would remove the pancreas and isolate the islet cells from the pancreas and transplant them into my liver. According to my surgeon, 36.9% of patients in his research studies became independent from insulin after islet transplant. Hearing this before surgery made me optimistic, however there was extensive damage and calcification to my pancreas when they removed it and the islet cell yield made my transplant unsuccessful. I have been fully insulin-dependent since the second my pancreas was removed from my body.

So I want to explain briefly exactly what type 3c diabetes is. It is referred to as “pancreatogenic” diabetes, which means diabetes that results from a pancreatic condition. Examples of pancreatic conditions could be exocrine insufficiency, pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, pancreatic cancer, or partial or total pancreatectomy. As you can imagine, it is a complex condition that is not widely researched or even recognized by many medical professionals. After asking my close TPAIT friends, most of us don’t even have the diagnosis of type 3c in our charts, because insurance won’t cover devices and supplies under that diagnosis code. Most of us have type 1 diabetes as our chart diagnosis, an entirely different autoimmune condition.

Type 3c may have similarities to type 1 due to the fact that both conditions require insulin, but that’s the only similarity. There are a few big differences to note. With TPAIT related type 3c specifically, since our pancreases are completely removed we have no alpha cells. In the most simplified definition, alpha cells secrete glucagon, which works opposite to insulin by increasing the amount of glucose in the blood. Without these alpha cells we are at risk for “brittle” diabetes and large swings in our blood sugar. Another big difference between TPAIT type 3c and other types is the malabsorption issues that we can face after surgery. Since we have large portions of our digestive systems removed, including the lower stomach and duodenum, the way our food and nutrients are digested may impact our insulin needs.

The pancreas has both endocrine and exocrine function. The endocrine function is secreting hormones, such as insulin, into the blood and the exocrine function is secreting digestive enzymes, bicarbonate, and water into the duodenum to begin the digestion of food. Most type 3c diabetics require prescription digestive enzymes when eating. Pancreatic conditions typically affect the exocrine function of the pancreas so we have to supplement these enzymes to aid with digestion. Without the proper dosage and timing when taking the capsules, we cannot properly digest food and can face serious gastrointestinal complications and malabsorption of nutrients.

When it comes to the diabetes community, there is not a large representation of people with type 3c. Type 3c is rare and often misdiagnosed. When someone is suffering from a pancreatic condition and they develop diabetes as a result, doctors often just call it type 2. I imagine this is due to a lack of information, research on type 3c, and insurance coverage.

There are a few things that I wish people knew when it comes to type 3c. The most important to me is that, when you have diabetes alone, your pancreas isn’t “dead”. The pancreas is often referred to as dead or useless in the diabetes community. Using these terms is false and misleading.

Endocrine cells make up 5% of the overall pancreas. Diabetes is an endocrine disease, and diabetes doesn’t necessarily mean you have zero pancreatic endocrine function. Many people with type 1 diabetes may have functioning alpha cells (producing glucagon) because the initial autoimmune attack is limited to the beta cells of the pancreas. Exocrine cells make up the other 95% of the pancreas, and for people with type 1 diabetes and no other pancreatic condition, this function is still working smoothly. Both endocrine and exocrine functions are vital in their own way to the body. Your pancreas could be considered “useless” if you are missing both of those functions. In any other context, it spreads misinformation.

I feel that most people with diabetes, of any type, want the general public to better understand our condition. We want them to understand the differences between the types. We want them to understand what causes or doesn’t cause diabetes. If that’s the case, why would we want to give them misinformation in the process? It’s not helping society understand diabetes. It’s not helping people with diabetes to understand diabetes. I honestly think that some people who say their pancreas is useless believe it to be true, because it’s what they’ve heard others say. And I know the diabetes community can do better to help educate within our community and also to the general public. I know the type 3c community would appreciate being recognized and validated. We haven’t had many opportunities to have our voices heard from large diabetes organizations or within the community. I know I will never stop using my voice to advocate for us. I can only hope to have the support of the diabetes community behind us.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Flying with Diabetes During COVID-19

While not currently especially recommended for people living with diabetes, air travel is sometimes necessary, and people with diabetes will inevitably have to fly from time to time (for work, a funeral, or a family or medical emergency) during the current COVID-19 pandemic. It is helpful to know the proper precautions to take to make sure that you stay happy and healthy in the friendly skies, should you have to use air travel in the coming months.

The COVID-19 virus actually does not spread as easily on flights as originally reported, because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes. However, social distancing can be difficult on crowded flights (some airlines are promising to keep middle seats open to help with this), and sitting within 6 feet of others, sometimes for hours, may increase your risk of being exposed to the virus. Air travel however does require spending time in security lines and airport terminals, bringing you closer to other people and having to frequently touch common surfaces. These precautions can help you stay healthier for your trip.

Precautions to Take

  • Wear a cloth mask at all times while at the airport and on a flight (removing your mask to eat a low snack is always okay).
  • Wash your hands often (this is especially important after going through airport security, using the bathroom, and before eating).
  • Carry and use hand sanitizer liberally. As part of their “Stay Healthy. Stay Secure” campaign, The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is temporarily suspending their 3-1-1 rules around liquids; TSA is allowing one oversized liquid hand sanitizer container, up to 12 ounces per passenger, in carry-on bags (all other liquids, gels, and aerosols brought to a checkpoint continue to be limited to 3.4 ounces/100 milliliters carried in a one quart-size bag).
  • Physically distance yourself from other travelers as much as possible. Staying 6 feet away from anyone not in your party is ideal. Paloma Beamer, associate professor of environmental health sciences at University of Arizona, says, “Six feet 1 inch doesn’t make you safe, neither does 5 feet 10 inches make you not safe; it’s kind of a range. Some people are going to release a lot more virus when they’re sick than other people,” she said.
  • Bring disinfectant wipes and use them to wipe down the storage trays during airport security, as well as wiping down your seat, armrests, and tray table once you board the plane.
disinfectant airport

Photo credit: Adobe Stock

Helpful Tips

  • As a person living with diabetes, you are allowed to pre-board all flights (COVID-19 or not). Use this to your advantage, to give yourself extra time to organize and have easy access to any low snacks and pump/CGM supplies you may need. Check out our other tips for flying here.
  • In addition to wearing a cloth mask, it may be helpful to wear an N95 or KN95 mask underneath that, to make sure the air you’re breathing is more filtered. Additionally, face shields are helpful to prevent the virus from jumping into your eye, and catching the disease that way.
  • Aim for a window seat, near the front of the plane, if you’re able to choose your seat when flying. “Because people are walking by you in the aisle seat, it’s shown in outbreaks of norovirus that people are more likely to get ill if they sit on the aisle because people are touching surfaces and walking by,” Charles Gerba, a professor of virology at the University of Arizona said. “So based on norovirus outbreaks, the window seat is better.”
  • Talk to your healthcare provider about adjusting your medication doses for travel to stay in range as much as possible. Also, aim to eat and drink before arriving at the airport, so you can keep your mask on as much as possible.
  • If possible, avoid public transportation or ride shares to and from the airport. Opt to have family drop you off, or pay to park at the airport to avoid more crowds and close proximity to strangers.
  • Book a morning flight. Aircrafts are now being thoroughly cleaned every night, so aiming for a morning flight is a better guarantee that your vessel is free of viral particles than a flight going out later in the day.
  • Don’t make friends with your seatmate: talking can spread viral particles in the air. The fewer people you talk to, the better. Bring a book, podcast, music, or get some shut eye instead.
  • Don’t panic! By taking these necessary precautions, you can greatly reduce your risk of being exposed to the virus, and there is no need to panic.

If you plan to or need to travel by air, it’s best to check your state’s travel advisories as well as the CDC’s travel recommendations by country to assess your risk. After traveling, make sure to quarantine for at least 14 days to minimize spreading the virus to others (you may be asymptomatic but have the virus), or get tested if able.

By following these guidelines and the CDC’s precautions, you can stay healthy and safe should you need to travel during this time.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

FreeStyle Libre 3 Cleared in Europe – Smaller, Thinner, and No More Scanning!

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Matthew Garza and Katie Mahoney

The FreeStyle Libre 3 has been cleared in Europe for anyone ages four and older. The new continuous glucose monitor is as small as two stacked US pennies, provides real-time readings directly to the mobile app via Bluetooth, and has the same low list price

Abbott announced that the new FreeStyle Libre 3 has been cleared in Europe – see 40-second video here. This third-generation continuous glucose monitor (CGM) has many of the same features that make the FreeStyle Libre 2 so popular, including optional alarms, 14-day wear, and high accuracy. The FreeStyle Libre 3 also adds several new features:

  • Real-time, minute-by-minute readings are sent directly to the FreeStyle Libre 3 app via Bluetooth – moving this CGM from “on-demand” to “always-on,” so there is no need to scan the sensor every eight hours.
  • It is 70% smaller than previous models, making it the “smallest and thinnest” CGM sensor yet – it’s said to be about the size of two stacked pennies. Importantly, this new model will reduce the amount of plastic and carbon paper used, improving the production of the device significantly from an environmental perspective.
  • It is cleared for people with diabetes as young as four years old.
  • It is cleared for use in gestational diabetes and pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. We suggest that everyone who is pregnant and has type 1 diabetes try to get CGM, and that everyone else who is pregnant be tested for gestational diabetes as early on as possible.
  • It is cleared as an iCGM, meaning it can be used for automated insulin delivery (AID) development in Europe.
  • The new FreeStyle Libre 3 app, available for both iOS and Android devices, will contain many of the same features as the FreeStyle Libre 2 app (Libre View) including the all-important time in range graphs and ambulatory glucose profile (AGP). You can learn all about the AGP here.

Currently the FreeStyle Libre 3 is cleared for upper-arm wear, though we imagine people may try to use it “off-label” on their abdomen or other spots. There is no separate reader for collecting and monitoring sensor data, so people will use smartphones with the FreeStyle Libre 3 app in order to connect to the sensor.

The FreeStyle Libre 3 will be available at the same price as previous versions of the CGM ($109 for a one-month’s supply, without insurance); Abbott will continue to offer the FreeStyle Libre 2 at the same price for people who prefer the to scan their CGM. The FreeStyle Libre 3 is expected to launch in the coming months in Europe, and though we don’t yet know where it will first launch, we expect it may be Germany, like Abbott’s other CGM launches. In the US, Abbott has not announced any potential timeline for FDA submission or clearance. With the recent Libre Sense clearance in Europe, there is lots happening with this brand – stay tuned for more. Readers in European countries, we’d love to hear your early thoughts once you try the FreeStyle Libre 3!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How to Get More Protein in Your Diet 

Protein is an essential macronutrient made up of amino acids that helps to build bones, muscles, cartilage and skin but it is also responsible for so much more. Protein plays a role in almost every process of a cell, from metabolic reactions, fighting infection, providing us with energy, repairing cells, etc.

There are 20 total amino acids with 9 of them considered essential since our body does not create them on their own; therefore we need to consume them daily. The amount of protein an individual needs is based on many factors and it is best to consult with your healthcare team before making any changes to your diet. Also, if you have kidney disease or other kidney issues,  you should consider that as well.

There are online calculators you can use to give you an idea of how much protein you should take in. Also, if you are an athlete, do strenuous exercise such as lifting weights, or are looking to put on weight or build more muscle mass, you may want to add more protein than the recommended amount.

Many people find it hard to fit in the recommended amount of protein per day. With a few tips and tricks, you can easily be on your way to meeting your protein goals.

Here are 5 ways to get more protein in your diet:

1. Start Your Day Off Right

Many breakfast foods are packed with protein which will keep you satisfied way past lunchtime. Experiment with egg omelets and muffins, protein pancakes, Greek yogurt or even a protein shake and you’ll be well on your way to hitting your daily protein requirement. My favorite protein shake to make is easy: 1 scoop of protein powder, 1/3 almond milk, 1/2 tin Greek yogurt, one tablespoon of your favorite peanut butter (or PB2 for less calories, carbs and fat), a drizzle of sugar-free chocolate syrup and blend with ice.

2. Plan Your Plate

When preparing your meal focus on having half your plate consist of a protein, 1/4-1/2 containing vegetables, and the other quarter for whole grains or other carbs if you so desire. If you’re watching your weight, it’s a good idea to focus on leaner proteins, like chicken and fish, as a lot of fat and calories can come along with some richer protein choices. Keeping this mentality will help you hit your protein goals and also keep you from eating empty calories.

3. Find New Options Online

There are so many health blogs and websites that offer delicious recipes for free. Have you ever had a protein ball? Some can contain as many as 10 grams of protein. It’s a great snack to take on the go, freezes well, and will keep your blood sugars in check too. Also, shop for specialty items, like low-carb flours online. Look out for promotions and special deals to buy in bulk, or save some money if it’s your first time buying — many online shops will offer such discounts!

4. Buy in Bulk

If you’re focusing on increasing your protein, you’ll likely need to add more lean meat, fish or other plant-based protein sources so buying in bulk will help you save money and allow you to meal prep too. Consider prepping and freezing too, it makes deciding what for dinner much easier. Whether you’re going to your local Costco, or finding a great deal on the internet (see above), buying staples in bulk is sure to save you some cash.

5. Preparedness Is Key

If you are actively trying to increase your protein, you are likely tracking what you eat. Preparing meals ahead of time allows you to customize your meals to the exact macros you set. This will also help avoid last-minute food runs that offer little to no nutrition at all. Some great apps to help you track your macros are MyFitnessPal and MyPlate.

Eating more protein will make you feel fuller longer, build and strengthen muscles, along with many other health benefits. Make sure to discuss with your doctor how much protein is right for you and you will be well on your way to a healthier version of you!

Do you find it hard to get in your daily recommended dose of protein? What tips and tricks can you share?

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Sous Vide Mini Keto Pumpkin Cheesecakes

This content originally appeared on Caroline’s Keto Kitchen. Republished with permission.

It’s fall, y’all! And that’s pretty much synonymous to pumpkin for me. Lolli has launched their seasonal Pumpkin Spice Cookie Clusters and given their clusters make such an amazing crust, mini cheesecakes made their way to the top of my (177 item!) to-bake list.

Historically when I’ve made cheesecake I’ve always used springform pans (or mini springform pans). While occasionally I’ll get lucky, more often than not I either have trouble getting the cheesecake out of the pan perfectly and/or the top of the cheesecake cracks while baking. I recently got a sous vide, and when I was searching for ideas of things to make with it, I saw a few articles rave about sous vide cheesecake. So I ordered 4oz mason jars from Target and decided I’d give it a go. And I’m certainly glad I did – these are what my pumpkin dreams are made of!

This recipe makes 6 mini cheesecakes, and there are only 3g net carbs per cheesecake!

pumpkin cheesecake

Print

Sous Vide Mini Keto Pumpkin Cheesecakes

.wprm-recipe-rating .wprm-rating-star.wprm-rating-star-full svg * { fill: #343434; }

This pumpkin cheesecake in a mason jar might be the next recipe you'll fall for. With only 3g of net carbs per serving, it's definitely worth a try!
Course Dessert, Snack
Cuisine American
Keyword cheesecake, fall, pumpkin
Servings 6 cheesecakes
Calories 209kcal

Ingredients

  • 8 oz cream cheese softened
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1/2 cup powdered Swerve
  • 1/4 cup canned pumpkin
  • 1/2 tsp pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp monk fruit juice concentrate
  • 1 cup Lolli's Pumpkin Spice Cookie Clusters

Instructions

  • Mix together the softened cream cheese, egg, vanilla, powdered Swerve, pumpkin, pumpkin pie spice, baking powder and monk fruit juice concentrate. (If your cream cheese is clumping, use an immersion blender to get it super smooth).
  • Fill your sous vide container with water up to the minimum line, clip on your sous vide, and pre-heat to 80 degrees Celsius/176 degrees F.
  • Use a Ninja/Magic bullet to pulse the Pumpkin Spice Cookie Clusters to crumbs.
  • Divide the Cookie Cluster crumbs evenly among six 4-oz mason jars. Press crumbs down using a spoon to make a compact crust.
  • Divide the cheesecake batter evenly among the mason jars on top of each crust.
  • Secure the lids. It’s important they’re tight enough that water does not get in, but don’t screw them on too tight or they could explode in the sous vide (or at least that’s what I read – thankfully I have no firsthand knowledge here).
  • Use tongs to place the mason jars in the sous vide container. Make sure they’re all right side up and side-by-side (versus on top of one another).
  • Keep in the sous vide for two hours. Remove with tongs and set on a wire cooling rack with a kitchen towel beneath to collect any water.
  • Allow mason jars to cool fully to room temperature, and then place in fridge.
  • Keep in fridge for at least two hours – though ideally overnight – before eating.

Notes

Net carbs per cheesecake: 3g

Nutrition

Calories: 209kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 20g | Saturated Fat: 8g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 69mg | Sodium: 131mg | Potassium: 61mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 2g


Please note that the nutritional information may vary depending
on the specific brands of products used. We encourage everyone to check specific
product labels in calculating the exact nutritional information.

Sous Vide Mini Keto Pumpkin Cheesecakes Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Mark Andrews: A Tight End with Type 1 Diabetes

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Katie Doyle

The Baltimore Ravens didn’t choose just any offensive lineup during the 2018 NFL draft – a key part of their strategy is Mark Andrews, a tight end from the University of Oklahoma who has been managing his type 1 diabetes since before he started playing football and into his rookie season.

Beyond Type 1 spoke with Mark about his pre-game rituals, how technology like the Dexcom G6 helps him stay on top of type 1 on long Sunday afternoons, and why it’s important to use his high-profile career to educate and advocate with National Diabetes Awareness month coming up.

How have you managed your diabetes through major life changes, like going away to college, playing a division 1 sport, or going through the NFL draft?

I was diagnosed at 9 years old, and it was the first time I ever saw my dad cry. At that moment, I knew it was serious because it wasn’t something my dad did very often. And since then, my family has been my rock. I was lucky enough to have a dad who was also a doctor and had an understanding of diabetes when I first was diagnosed.

Personally, I wasn’t very nervous. I knew that one day I wanted to move out, play football at a Division 1 level and ultimately play in the NFL. It’s something I was always very diligent about. I wasn’t going to let my nerves or anything else get in the way of that. My mom probably worried most, but my dad was instrumental in instructing my whole family in what to expect and what to know. I rely on them a ton. Using a CGM allows them to be a part of it and know my numbers at all times. It gives them peace of mind to be able to check in on me.

Mark

Image source: Beyond Type 1

How does your family support you from across the country?

My mom will always be my mom, so she still checks on me regularly. Last week, she texted me and said, ‘Hey, I don’t think you have enough complex carbs on board, you’ve been going low and trending low a lot. Just want you to eat something that gives you more complex carbs. I love you, hope you’re having a good week; I’ll talk to you soon!”

It’s awesome to get a text message like that and know my family has my back. After that, I ate a peanut butter and jelly sandwich just to have that background complex carb and went about my day. It’s always good having people look out for you — the more eyes you have on someone with diabetes, the better.

I’ve got a teammate right now named Orlando Brown whose dad had diabetes so he’s incredibly well-informed. He was my college teammate and now he’s my NFL teammate with the Ravens. He’s always wondering what my numbers are, and I actually share my numbers with him from my Dexcom.

When did you feel comfortable enough to talk to your friends and teammates about diabetes?

At first, I remember feeling a little bit reserved and not being totally open about it. I’d go hide in a corner to test. I also remember the first time my friends saw me testing my blood sugar. I was 10 or 11 years old, and they saw blood and thought it was cool. I was kind of in the spotlight because they were so interested in what I was doing.

That opened me up to be more vocal and to share what I’m doing and how I deal with things. After that, I became really comfortable sharing what I deal with having T1D and how I deal with it and sharing with others. I was very open talking to my coaches, and I had my parents to help me out with that, and they still do that to this day. Ever since then, I’ve always wanted to talk about it and shed light on what people with diabetes have to do.

Tell us about your pre-game ritual.

I do something a little bit different: I wear a pump, so I use that for basal (25%) and I use Lantus for my other type of basal (75%) on a normal day. But on a game day, I’ll go 100% Lantus — that allows me to be off the pump for long periods of time but not have to worry.

Knowing your body is key. Knowing what I put in my body and how it will affect me is something that I feel has been instrumental for my health. I’m a big fan of complex carbs; I eat peanut butter and jellies, especially on game days or the day before a game, just allowing myself to have that complex carb to hold me over while I’m exerting a lot of energy.

Having my Dexcom, and the way it allows me to see my blood glucose trends and see what foods react a certain way has been huge for me. There’s a lot that goes into diabetes management, and I think it’s incredible that I can rely on Dexcom and not have to prick my fingers all the time. It really sets me up for success on the field.

Who are your role models?

I didn’t know anyone else with diabetes growing up, but I have my dad, who is extremely knowledgeable and always researching different things. He’s the reason I went to 100% Lantus for game days.

I can remember, at a young age, having diabetes and seeing Jay Cutler in the League, and being able to tell myself that it’s possible. I adopted a mindset that this disease is a part of who I am, but it’s not going to define me and it’s never going to stop me in achieving my dreams. Football is my passion, it’s what I love, but now it’s my job, and diabetes is something I refuse to let affect my job.

You seem like you have a ritual down for games, but how about during the NFL draft? How were you feeling then?

There’s so much work that had been put into that moment, from my mom driving me to soccer practice, to all those hard hours put in on the field, it all lead to that moment of actually playing in the NFL. It was kind of scary to know that that you’re putting your future into someone else’s hands — into 32 organizations’ hands — but this has been my dream for a very, very long time.

Why is it important for young athletes with type 1 to have role models?

To be put on this stage, I’ve always wanted to give back and for me, that’s with diabetes — that hits home for me. Helping kids with diabetes is something that I’ve found has given me the most reward: raising awareness and talking to people about how I use technology and what I do with it, it’s to help people with everyday life and share some of that.

I’m going to work as hard as I can to be the best tight end that I can be, and hopefully one of the premiers tight ends in the League. I want kids to see where I’m at today, like I saw Jay Cutler, and I hope it inspires them to go out there and play sports and be active — to follow their dreams, no matter what they may be. A professional football player? Great! Go out and achieve it. Or if anything else, you know, This guy’s playing football at the highest level, then I can do anything else!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

1 2 3 45

Search

+