Accepting a New Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis

One of the toughest transitions in life can be a new diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Either for yourself or a family member, the initial shock of diagnosis is sometimes hard to take and can require some getting used to.

In this first installment of a four-part series on type 2 diabetes, here are five ways to adapt to a new diagnosis in your family and the best ways not only to cope, but to thrive with type 2 diabetes:

There’s No Shame in a Diagnosis

There is nothing to be ashamed of with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Type 2 diabetes is simply the body’s response to becoming insulin resistant or the body’s inability to produce enough insulin naturally (more symptoms listed here). There are many risk factors that contribute to a type 2 diabetes diagnosis, but genetics and environmental factors do play a role. You may be discouraged upon diagnosis, but there’s no shame in having diabetes, and there’s no shame in taking charge of your health and taking care of yourself.

Today Is the Perfect Day to Be Healthy – Start Now

Not next week or next month, or even next year. Today is the perfect day to begin. Once you have a diagnosis, make sure you’re prepared with a glucometer, test strips, and a lancet device to start monitoring your blood sugar. You may also have a prescription for metformin or insulin that should be filled. Your doctor probably referred you to a nutritionist to come up with a meal plan, and maybe they’ve recommended regular exercise. Start small. Include more vegetables at your next meal, and aim for a short walk before bed. Taking small steps to improve your health today will lead to lasting health benefits down the road.

Assemble Your Care Team

This includes both professional and community support. Diabetes affects the whole family, and it’s important to have their physical and emotional support. You will need to enlist the expertise of not only your physician, but also an endocrinologist, and perhaps a nutritionist or maybe even a therapist. Caring family members can offer emotional support during this time of transition, and researching local support groups or diabetes advocacy organizations where you can find community will be a tremendous help in the weeks and months to come.

Don’t Operate from a Position of Fear

Make no mistake, type 2 diabetes is a serious disease that can cause devastating complications if left untreated, but it does not necessarily need to incite fear. You can live a long, happy, and healthy life with type 2 diabetes. This is an opportunity to tune into your body and make healthy, positive changes for the road ahead. Healthy lifestyle choices you make now can prevent complications later on in life.

Think of What This Adds to Your Life

A type 2 diabetes diagnosis is not the end of your life. Instead of thinking in terms of deprivation, think of what this adds (and can add!) to your life. More exercise. More opportunities to go outside. More excuses to walk your dog, or play with your children or grandchildren. More vegetables on your plate. More reasons to see your doctor and keep a closer eye on your health. More reasons to be thankful that you have the opportunity to get a firm grasp on your health in the here and now. Think in abundance and be grateful.

A type 2 diabetes diagnosis does not need to bring misery and sadness to your life. It can be an opportunity to connect with yourself, get in tune with your body, and lead you to start or continue to make healthy choices to prevent complications later on in life. And that’s something to cheers to.

Have you recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes? How has the diagnosis affected your life so far? Share this post and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Type 2 What To Do: Tips for the Newly Diagnosed

This content originally appeared on Blood Sugar Trampoline. Republished with permission. ***Note: Some of this content may be specific to the residents of Ireland. My blog posts are usually about living with type 1 diabetes, however, and some of you might not know this but, I facilitate a diabetes support group for people with type […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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