6 Ways to Extend the Life of a Glucose Sensor

If you are living with type one or type two diabetes, you know that wearing a continuous glucose monitor makes managing your diabetes a whole lot easier. It also keeps you safe and gives you peace of mind. Unfortunately, it is a tremendous expense. Transmitters can cost around $300 dollars and they might expire every few months. A three-pack of sensors might cost around $400 but you will need them more often as they only last for so many days per FDA regulations. Keep in mind the price varies depending on the specific CGM, and insurance, copays, and deductibles.

The longer we can preserve a sensor, the less money we will have to spend. This is sometimes challenging, especially if a young child is wearing the sensor. But there are measures we can take to get more life out of our sensors. Please keep in mind that this is not recommended by the CGM companies, so extend the sensor at your own risk.

Here are six ways to get more life out of your CGM sensor:

1. Extend the Sensor Life

Clever technologists have discovered how to restart a Dexcom sensor to extend its life beyond ten days. The process works by exploiting a bug in the sensor pairing process. We recently updated our article, How to Extend the Dexcom G6 Sensor Beyond the Ten Day Hard Stop, and will continue to do so as any changes arise. And if you are using the Dexcom G5 sensor, here are instructions on how to extend that one.

2. Keep It Dry

While this isn’t necessarily realistic, the less moisture that touches and goes under the Dexcom sensor, the better. If you can dry your Dexcom thoroughly after showering or swimming, it is more likely to continue to stay intact and last longer. Some people even go as far as blow-drying it before putting on their clothes. Has anyone else noticed a Dexcom wet spot on their jeans after putting them on soon after showering?

3. Location Is Everything

Just like diabetes is different for everyone, so is the most optimal placement of their Dexcom. I personally love wearing mine on my thigh, I find it doesn’t get in the way during CrossFit and I no longer have compression lows. Once I got used to being conscious of it while dressing, this has been the best location for me.

Many parents of small children living with diabetes prefer to put it on their abdomen but others have better luck placing it on the child’s upper buttocks. This is an area that usually has the most fat and when it is out of sight, it is out of mind. This is helpful with young kids who might constantly touch or play with it.

For some people who wear pumps and Dexcom, finding a location for all their sites, while also being sure to rotate sites, can be very challenging. Many of my diabadass friends prefer their arms and find they get their longest life there!

4. Create a Barrier

By using a product like Skin Tac, you can create a barrier between the tape and skin. This will make for less irritation leading to longer life. It is also non-latex and hypo-allergenic but people with sensitive skin should always test the product first. It also removes easily with alcohol, making it an easier process for children.

There are also many products on the market that are overlay adhesives that are guaranteed to get you more life out of your sensor. One of my favorites is Pump Peelz as pictured below.

where to put dexcom

5. Keep It Clean

Avoid applying lotion to the adhesive, it will only saturate and soften up the material causing it to start to peel. Also, this time of year be conscious of where you apply your suntan lotion, this will also lessen the life of your sensor and additional adhesive if you have one on.

6. Be Cautious

No matter where you decide to place your sensor, there will be nuances that come with it. For me, being aware of its placement on my thigh has become second nature and I rarely have issues with ripping it off. The more aware you are, the better.

Getting the most life of your sensor means fewer insertions and more cost savings. Taking a few simple measures can make a huge difference for your sensor life!

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Have you found any other creative ways or have any tips to share on how to extend the life of your sensor? Please comment and share below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

What’s Coming and What’s Delayed in Continuous Glucose Monitoring?

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Albert Cai

Updates and delays from Abbott, Dexcom, Medtronic, and Senseonics

With several clinical trials on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re bringing you a roundup of the latest updates on future continuous glucose monitors (CGM). Understandably, the FDA also announced a few months ago that it would focus its efforts on devices related to COVID-19. With the disclaimer that it’s impossible to know exactly when the pandemic will subside, when trials might resume, and how FDA reviews might be affected, here is the latest news we’ve heard from companies.

Click to jump to a product, which are organized alphabetically.

Abbott FreeStyle Libre 2

CGM

Image source: Abbott FreeStyle

What’s new? FreeStyle Libre 2 keeps the same “scanning” feature as the original FreeStyle Libre, but adds Bluetooth connectivity. This is important because it enables optional high and low glucose alerts. Users who enable these alerts will be able to get a notification on their reader or phone whenever their glucose reading goes above or below their specified ranges. Looking ahead, the Bluetooth feature will also allow FreeStyle Libre 2 to be part of automated insulin delivery systems (AID), like Insulet’s Omnipod Horizon.

Like the original FreeStyle Libre, FreeStyle Libre 2 has 14-day wear, is factory-calibrated (no fingerstick calibrations required), and can be scanned with either a phone or a reader device (the reader for FreeStyle Libre 2 is blue, instead of black). Importantly, FreeStyle Libre 2 will be offered at the same price as the original FreeStyle Libre.

When’s it coming? The FreeStyle Libre 2 has already launched in a few European countries (we know of Germany and Norway) and will launch in others soon. In the US, FreeStyle Libre 2 has been under FDA review for over a year. In March, Abbott said that it was working through “some finishing items” and was “very confident” the device would be cleared soon.

Dexcom G7

Dexcom

Image source: Dexcom

What’s new? Dexcom’s G7 will be fully disposable (the transmitter and sensor are combined and thrown away together) and have longer wear (we believe somewhere around 14-16 days). Remember that the Dexcom G6 sensor lasts for 10 days but has a transmitter that is re-used for 90 days. The G7 will be considerably slimmer than G6 and will have a lower cost of manufacturing in bulk, though consumer pricing is not yet determined – we imagine it will be similar. The G7 will keep the same accuracy, no fingerstick calibrations, and Bluetooth connectivity as the G6.

Dexcom has been developing G7 in partnership with Verily, the division of Alphabet formerly known as Google Life Sciences. There has been mention from Verily that an accelerometer may also be built-in to the G7 device, but we aren’t sure if that feature made it into the final version of G7. Having a built-in accelerometer could allow the G7 to also track physical activity, like a Fitbit or other fitness tracker.

When’s it coming? Dexcom planned on launching G7 in “early 2021,” but with most clinics placing new trials on hold, Dexcom is expecting a “minimum delay of approximately six months.” It’s difficult to know when clinics will be able to conduct trials (and when people will feel comfortable enrolling in trials), but assuming a six-month delay, G7 could be on the US market sometime in the second half of 2021.

Medtronic “Project Zeus” CGM

Abbott FreeStyle

Image source: Medtronic

What’s new? Medtronic’s next CGM, referred to as “Project Zeus,” will reduce the number of required fingerstick calibrations and have improved accuracy (compared to its current offering, Guardian Sensor 3). The new CGM will require day-one calibration (unclear on the number of fingersticks that will be required on day one), compared to Guardian Sensor 3, which requires at least two fingerstick calibrations every day. Medtronic expects Project Zeus to launch with a “non-adjunctive” indication, meaning users will be able to bolus insulin based on CGM reading alone, and not have to perform a confirmatory fingerstick. the new CGM will keep the same seven-day wear, size and shape, and reusable transmitter component as the Guardian Sensor 3 (pictured above).

When’s it coming? The trial for Project Zeus began in June 2019 and is expected to wrap up within the next month. Medtronic expects to submit the CGM to the FDA by the “end of the summer.”

Senseonics Eversense XL (180-day)

Eversense XL

Image source: Eversense XL

What’s new? The “XL” extended life-version of Senseonics’ Eversense in the U.S. will have the same size and features as the original Eversense, but the Eversense XL is implanted for 180 days, rather than the 90-day Eversense. As a reminder, the Eversense sensor is implanted in the users’ upper arm in a clinic and remains there for the sensor duration; a silver-dollar sized on-body transmitter is worn on the outside of the arm to deliver readings to a smartphone. Senseonics is targeting reducing calibrations from 2 per day to 1 per day with same non-adjunctive indication.

When’s it coming? Eversense XL is already available in Senseonics’ European markets. The trial for Eversense XL in the US wrapped up in late March, and Senseonics has previously aimed for FDA clearance in “late” 2020. We aren’t sure whether that timeline has been pushed back due to COVID-19, but the fact that the trial has already completed is encouraging.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

The Truth About Diet Soda

Living with diabetes comes with many challenges; we need to constantly know what and how much we eat and drink, and continuously calibrate our medications, like metformin or insulin, accordingly. It can be exhausting. One shining beacon of light (and a delicious thirst-quencher) is diet soda. It’s sweet, it’s refreshing, and it has zero carbohydrates! But recently, more and more research has been released linking diet soda to a plethora of GI issues and health problems (including, surprisingly enough, obesity). So, what’s the deal? Is diet soda a harmless, carbohydrate freebie treat or a danger to one’s health and well-being? Read more to get the scoop.

Many people with diabetes yearn to have a refreshing beverage that won’t affect their blood sugars, and sometimes water just won’t cut it. On days when it feels as though the wind will cause hyperglycemia, nothing is crisper or more enjoyable than enjoying a diet soda–and they’re typically known as “free” food–meaning they don’t require an insulin dose, nor do they raise one’s blood sugar. Seems innocent enough, right? About 1 in 5 Americans drink at least one diet soda per day, according to the CDC, but few can figure out if they’re good or bad for us. What gives?

The Problem

Unfortunately, diet sodas are full of artificial flavors and chemicals, as well as artificial sweeteners, like aspartame and saccharin. A growing body of research links consumption with an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, dementia, stroke, and non-fatty liver disease.

On the other hand, many studies correlating diet soda consumption with chronic health issues have failed to control for other risk factors, like lifestyle (sedentary vs. active) and body mass index (BMI). This causes a selection bias, as the type of person that may be more likely to drink diet soda may already be trying to lose weight (higher BMI) or better control their type 2 diabetes (chronic inflammation from higher glucose numbers). On the whole, no studies have proven causation between diet soda consumption and cancer.

Does Diet Soda Make You Gain Weight?

In short, no, but they can lead to it. A  2012 study showed that the artificial sweeteners in diet soda may change the levels of dopamine in the brain, thus changing the way one’s brain responds to (and craves) sweet flavors. Artificial sweeteners are hundreds of times sweeter than actual sugar, and if you’re used to drinking the sweet flavor of diet soda, your brain will naturally adapt, and you may start craving sweeter foods as a result. Equal (aspartame) is 160-200 times sweeter than sugar, and Sweet’n’Low (saccharin) is 300-500 times sweeter than natural sugar. This can cause you to eat more foods made with sugar, and gain weight as a result, although these sweeteners have been deemed safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Christoper Gardner, Ph.D., Director of Nutrition Studies at the Stanford Prevention Research Center says, “You may find fruit less appealing because it’s less sweet than your soda, and vegetables may become inedible” causing people to reach for more processed foods that contain added sugar and calories.

Additionally, if you’re drinking diet soda, you may feel as though you’re doing something “healthy”, and make up for it by not being as stringent about a healthy diet. A 2014 study showed that overweight and obese people who drank a diet soda ate between 90-200 more calories per day than those who drank sugar-sweetened soda. This explains the phenomenon of patrons ordering fries with their diet soda at fast-food restaurants.

“Diet sodas may help you with weight loss if you don’t overcompensate, but that’s a big if,” Gardner adds.

What Research Is Telling Us

A 2014 study out of Japan found that men who drank diet soda were more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who didn’t. The study findings even controlled for age, BMI, family history of the disease, and other lifestyle factors. Additionally, a 2017 study of over 2,000 people showed that drinking one diet soda per day tripled one’s risk of stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.

Additionally, in 2014, a meta-analysis published in the British Journal of Nutrition revealed that one’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes rose by 13% for every 12oz can of diet soda they consumed in a day.

Moderation Is Key

While all of these artificial sweeteners are chemicals, they can be part of a healthy diet, per the American Dietetic Association. If you’re replacing sugar-sweetened soda with diet soda, it can be a remarkably easy way to cut down on sugar and calories, but try and maintain a healthy diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables as well, and don’t “treat” yourself to fast-food or sugared goodies for “being good” by having a sugar-free soda.

If you’re looking for an afternoon caffeine hit that soda normally provides, try opting for black coffee or tea to avoid the artificial sweeteners. Better yet, try weaning yourself off of soda completely and opting for a healthier, and more natural seltzer water, like La Croix, that doesn’t contain any artificial additives or chemicals.

All told, diet soda isn’t the absolute healthiest thing you can be drinking (read: that’s water), but in moderation, with a healthy diet and plenty of exercise, it can be a delightful, carb-free treat. Cheers!

What are your thoughts on diet soda? Are you addicted to the stuff, or try to avoid it at all costs? Share this post and comment below; we love hearing from our readers!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

What to Do If You Need Insulin Right Now

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Lala Jackson

What to Do If You Have No Insulin at All

Go to the emergency room. Under US law (The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act), the emergency room cannot turn you down in a life-threatening emergency if you do not have insurance or the ability to pay.

If Emergency Room staff is telling you they cannot treat you, stay put. Be clear that you are in a life-threatening emergency because you have type 1 diabetes (T1D) but do not have insulin. Do not leave. Please note that urgent care centers are not required to abide by the same laws.

Once you are stabilized and before you leave the hospital, hospital staff is required to meet with you to make sure you understand that you are leaving the hospital of your own accord. At this time, let the hospital staff person know about any financial situation you are in. Some hospitals are aligned with charities that can help you pay. Other hospitals offer payment plans based on your situation. No matter your financial situation, know that your life is the most important thing.

What to Do If You Have Some Insulin, But Are About to Run Out

Utilize Kevin’s Law

If you have an existing prescription at your pharmacy, but have not been able to get ahold of your healthcare provider to renew the prescription, you may be able to take advantage of Kevin’s Law. Kevin’s Law was named for a man with T1D who passed away after not being able to access his insulin prescription over the New Year’s holiday. Under the law, pharmacists are able to provide an emergency refill of insulin in certain states, without the authorization of a physician to renew the prescription. Rules around the law vary from state to state and not all states have the law in place. Kevin’s Law only applies to those who have an existing prescription and, depending on where you live, your insurance may or may not cover the refill. Learn more about Kevin’s Law, including whether or not your state has it, here. Please note, your pharmacist may not know the law by name, or know that the law exists. If you are in a state with Kevin’s Law and working with a pharmacist who is unaware, stay put and ask to speak to someone else in the pharmacy.

Ask Your Physician for Samples

While this is not a long-term access option, your care provider may be able to provide you with a few vials/pens for free, and bringing your HCP into the access conversation means that they can help direct you to other options that might be available to you, like local community health centers with insulin available.

Utilize Patient Assistance Programs – Standard out of Pocket Cost $0

  • If you take Lilly insulin (Humalog, Basaglar) call the Lilly Diabetes Solutions Call Center Helpline at 1-833-808-1234
    for personalized assistance. You may be eligible for free insulin through LillyCares.
  • If you take Novo Nordisk insulin (Fiasp, NovoLog, NovoRapid, Levemir, Tresiba) and demonstrate immediate need or risk of rationing, you can receive a free, one-time, immediate supply of up to three vials or two packs of pens by calling 844-NOVO4ME (844-668-6463) or by visiting NovoCare.com
  • If you take Sanofi insulin (Admelog, Lantus, Toujeo): the Patient Connection Program provides Sanofi insulins to those who qualify, which is limited to those with no private insurance and who do not qualify for federal insurance programs and who are at or below 250% of the federal poverty level – with a few exceptions.

Utilize CoPay Cards – Standard out of Pocket Cost $35 – $99 per Month

Copay cards that reduce the out-of-pocket cost you pay at the pharmacy exist for most types of insulin. Some copay cards can be emailed to you within 24 hours. Currently, copay programs exist for:

  • Lilly, capping copays at $35 per month for those with no insurance or with commercial insurance
  • Novo Nordisk, capping copays at $99 for those with no insurance or with commercial insurance
  • Sanofi, capping copays at $99 for those without prescription medication insurance
  • Mannkind, capping copays at $15 for some of those with commercial insurance

Unfortunately, copay cards are typically not available for those insured through Medicaid or Medicare. Use the tool from the Partnership for Prescription Assistance to search in one place for discount programs and copay cards you qualify for here. Please be aware that you will need to search by brand name (i.e. Humalog, Novolog), not just “insulin.”

Get R & NPH Human Insulins – Standard out of Pocket Cost $25-$40 per Vial

R (Regular) and N (NPH) human insulins are available over-the-counter in 49 states and cost much less ($25-$40 per vial at Walmart) than analog insulins such Novolog, Humalog, Lantus, or Basaglar. They also work differently than analog insulins – they start working and peak at different times – but in an emergency situation can be a resource. Speak with the pharmacist or your healthcare provider if possible before changing your regimen and keep a very close eye on your blood sugar levels while using R & N insulin.

Research Available Biosimilar (Generic) Insulins

The biosimilar insulin market is changing rapidly as the FDA adopts new regulatory pathways to more efficiently approve interchangeable insulins that may be available for a lower price. Ask your healthcare provider for the most up-to-date options for you. A few options available are:

  • A generic version of Humalog — Insulin Lispro — is available at pharmacies in the U.S. for $137.35 per vial and $265.20 for a package of five KwikPens (50% the price of Humalog.) If you have a prescription for Humalog, you do not need an additional prescription for Lispro; your pharmacist will be able to substitute the cheaper option. Insulin Lispro is not currently covered by insurance.
  • Authorized generic versions of NovoLog and NovoLog Mix at 50% list price are stocked at the wholesaler level. People can order them at the pharmacy and they’ll be available for pick up in 1-3 business days

If you have enough insulin to last you a few days, but need to figure out where to get a more reliable, consistent supply, visit our Get Insulin page to find further resources.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How to Extend the Dexcom G6 Sensor Beyond the Ten Day Hard Stop

Some clever technologists have discovered how to restart a Dexcom sensor to extend its life beyond ten days. The process works by exploiting a bug in the sensor pairing process.

Katie DiSimone walked us through the process. Katie is involved in the community of people who are building homemade automated insulin delivery systems using current insulin pumps and continuous glucose meters. Since the original article was written, Katie has joined the Tidepool organization which is dedicated to making diabetes data more accessible, actionable, and meaningful for people with diabetes, their caretakers and for researchers as well.

Since our last update, new transmitters have been released. These newer models are more stubborn and are more challenging to “hack”. The specific transmitter ID  will dictate which restart sensor method you should use.

Please see Katie’s instructions to determine which is the preferred method for your transmitter ID.

The method that seems to be working amongst the diabetes online community (and myself; I currently have the transmitter starting with “8G”) is the “pop-out method.” This means you need to physically pop out the transmitter, which can be a little tricky but doable. Here is a video on how to do it, I have had luck with an old credit card.

For this method you will need to:

  • Stop session (it does not matter if the sensor expires on its own first or not)
  • Pop out the transmitter (Some people cover the site during the 30 min period or even insert an old transmitter to prevent stuff from getting in there/ also the wire moving, as the transmitter holds it in place)
  • Set a timer for 30 minutes (I’ve heard that 15-20 minutes works, but have not tried this)
  • Pop the transmitter back in
  • Restart the sensor (make sure to save the previously used code; I snap a picture of it so this way you will not have to calibrate)

There are instructions on how to restart the sensor using the receiver so that you continue to receive current glucose values throughout the 2-hour wait. Here are the instructions on how to do so.

Caveats

The Dexcom G6 has not been tested or approved by the FDA for restarting sensors. There is no guarantee of sensor accuracy. Extend the sensor life only at your own risk.

A previous version of this post has been updated.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Automated Insulin Delivery: Six Universal Observations and Understandings

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Laurel Messer

Six universal facts about automated insulin delivery systems, and the things you should keep in mind about this revolutionary technology

Automated insulin delivery (AID) systems are moving towards the forefront of diabetes management. AID systems combine continuous glucose monitors (CGM) with smart algorithms to automatically adjust insulin delivery.

The Tandem Control-IQ system was recently cleared by the FDA, and the Insulet Horizon and Medtronic Advanced Hybrid Closed Loop systems are beginning pivotal trials. These are encouraging developments. As more systems move through the pipeline and eventually into the commercial market, important patterns are emerging in user expectations and user experience. As a diabetes nurse, certified diabetes educator and research investigator, I, along with my team at the Barbara Davis Center, have worked with nearly every AID system in the pipeline, and other systems that will never make it to market. Here are six insights we have gleaned, which seem to be universal (thus far) to all AID systems:

1. You can always beat an AID system with compulsive diabetes management

Many people with diabetes compulsively attend to diabetes care in order to achieve ultra-tight glucose ranges – and are the first to ask about automated systems. What ends up happening is that these “super-users” are invariably frustrated that the system is not yielding the same results that they were able to achieve with their own calculations and management. An important point is that many automated systems are excellent at reducing mental burden for taking care of diabetes, excellent at reducing hypoglycemia, and adequate at improving glucose levels. Humans can beat automated systems if they attend to diabetes care near-constantly. The individuals who will likely be satisfied with AID are those who are comfortable with an A1C in the 7s or above, but they want to reduce the mental load of adjusting settings and micromanaging high glucose levels. The most important question to ask is, “Why do I want to start using an automated system?” If it is to achieve near-perfect glucose levels, the system will likely disappoint. If it is to reduce the burden of “thinking like a pancreas” all the time, it may be a good option. AID will excel at the marathon of diabetes care but may disappoint in the hour-to-hour sprint.

2. Systems work best when you let them work

Using both research and commercial systems, we have seen all the ways to “trick” AID systems—entering phantom carbohydrates, changing set points, performing manual corrections, overriding recommended doses. More often than not, these behaviors lead to glucose instability – reactionary highs and lows from the system destabilizing. All systems will perform best if they are used according to user instructions. This is difficult for the individual who would prefer to micro-adjust settings or desire control over all insulin delivery. Most systems work best when users learn to trust them.

3. Give the system a chance – 2-4 weeks before deciding long term potential

It may benefit us to think about AID like a new significant relationship – it can take some time to “settle.” I mean this both on an interaction level (learning how to respond to alerts, when to intervene, when to let it ride) and on an algorithm level (allowing the system to adjust internal algorithm parameters based on usage). In addition, programmable user settings may need some adjustment in the first few weeks of use, so working with diabetes educators can be helpful for initial set-up and early follow-up.

4. Bolusing is still king

If I could go back in time, I would caution device manufacturers against any whisper of not needing to bolus with AID systems. Bolusing is the singular most important action a person with diabetes can do to optimize insulin delivery on current and near-future automated systems. This will be true until insulin action time gets exponentially faster or artificial intelligence gets better at predicting human behavior, neither of which is on the immediate horizon. In order for people with diabetes to see the best performance on any system (automated or manual), they need to bolus before carbohydrates are consumed. Specific to AID, the timing of the bolus (prior to carb intake) is especially important, as the system will automatically increase insulin delivery after an initial rise of glucose levels, so a late bolus (e.g., after the meal) could lead to insulin stacking and hypoglycemia.

5. Rethinking low treatments

Low glucose levels (hypoglycemia) still happen when using automated systems. What is different with AID is that the system has been trying to prevent the low by reducing/suspending insulin, possibly hours before the low occurs. This means that an individual may need to consume significantly fewer carbs to bring glucose levels back into range – perhaps 5-10 grams of carb at first, reassessing 15-20 minutes later. This can be difficult when wanting to eat everything in sight; however, it can reduce the chance of rebounding into the 200s after over-treating.

6. Infusion sets are still infusion sets

While AID algorithms are revolutionary, the infusion set is not. It is the same plastic or steel cannula that occludes, kinks, or inflames. This hardware limits automated systems and can very quickly lead to hyperglycemia or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). It is important for people using AID to recognize signs of infusion set failure – persistent hyperglycemia, boluses that do not bring glucose levels down, ketones, vomiting, etc. Knowing how to treat ketones (via syringe injection of insulin and set change) can prevent a hospital admission or worse.

I love that the diabetes community learns from its members and experiences. Check out our Barbara Davis Center PANTHER (Practical Advanced THERapies for diabetes) website for our team’s latest insights on automated insulin delivery, and tools for people with diabetes, clinicians, and engineers.

Are you considering AID? Feel free to share this article with your healthcare team. For more information about AID systems that are currently available or in the pipeline, click here.

About Laurel

Laurel H. Messer is a nurse scientist and certified diabetes educator at the Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO. She has spent the last 15 years studying how to best utilize new diabetes technologies, and remembers fondly teaching families to wrap up their corded CGM system in a plastic shower bag for bathing. Ok, not that fondly, but look how far we have come! Dr. Messer works with the Barbara Davis Center PANTHER team (Practical Advanced Therapies for diabetes), conducting clinical research trials on promising technologies to make life better for children, adolescents, and adults living with type 1 diabetes. Get in touch at Laurel.Messer@cuanschutz.edu

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Review: Genteel Lancing Device

Regularly checking blood glucose levels is an integral part of optimizing diabetes management, and in particular for patients who use insulin. However, frequent finger pricks can be uncomfortable and even painful for some, especially for children, which may be a deterrent to regular blood glucose testing. Genteel is the only currently-available lancing device on the market that is FDA-approved for both finger and alternative site testing and uses a unique technology to minimize the pain of finger pricks for blood sample collection.

Who They Are

Genteel was founded by Dr. Christoher Jacobs, a biomedical engineer. A friend of his was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and expressed the challenges of the condition, including the pain he experienced from frequent testing. As a result, Dr. Jacobs set out to develop a device that would minimize the pain of obtaining a blood sample, and the Genteel device was born.

What It Is

The Genteel lancing products make use of several ways to minimize the pain of fingersticks. They allow users to select a variable “contact tip” size to minimize the penetration of the lancet under the skin. Also, the products make use of vacuum technology to help draw out a drop of blood for testing automatically, instead of having to squeeze the site.

Image by Genteel

There are two products available — the Genteel Lancing Device and the Genteel Plus Lancing Device. The basic lancing device is only compatible with the provided “butterfly touch” lancets, whereas the upgraded version is compatible with many other lancet types.

Check out the video below that explains exactly how the device works:

My Review

Personally, I found the device to be a bit elaborate and not very practical in terms of ease of use. When the product was first brought to the market, it was reviewed by Ginger Vieira, and I agree with much of her commentary regarding the product size, appearance, and lack of discreteness in use.

However, I can confirm that obtaining a blood sample was not painful for me, whether sampling from the fingertip or from the alternate site (my palm). While I still felt the contact of the lancet, it was definitely not painful and was certainly much more comfortable than many of the fingersticks I have experienced in almost 13 years of testing my blood sugar on a daily basis.

I can see that for some patients, for example, small children, this device may help to eliminate the fear and discomfort of checking blood sugar levels, and hopefully help the user achieve more frequent tests, and as a result, better glycemic control. The stickers included for decorating the lancing device are sure to be a hit with the kids, too.

The products aren’t cheap though! The base model costs $49.99 and the upgraded version $99.99.

Where to Buy

Both the basic and plus models can be purchased directly from the Genteel website. You can read more about each device before making the decision here:

Conclusions

While the Genteel lancing device may not be everyone’s favorite choice, it certainly helps with comfortably and painlessly obtaining a blood sample for testing, which might be a huge consideration for some patients, and in particular, for small children.

Have you tried Genteel products? Please share your thoughts and experiences in the comments.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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