COVID-19 Vaccine: Experience and Thoughts from the Diabetes Community

We are almost one year into the COVID-19 pandemic and while it is still causing devastation, there is light at the end of the tunnel thanks to two companies, Pfizer and Moderna, now offering a vaccine.

It varies by state but healthcare workers and people over 75 years (over 65 in some states) are the first in line. After that, people with high-risk, pre-existing conditions will be next. See here to find out your exact eligibility per state.

Many people have mixed feelings about the vaccine. Some are certain they will get it, not only because they don’t believe the vaccine is at all harmful but because they want life to go back to normal as soon as possible, while also protecting their health. Others are reluctant, possibly questioning the novelty and quick turnaround of the vaccine and wondering if there may be unforeseen side effects.

We thought it would be nice to hear from people like ourselves, who also live with diabetes, and see how they feel about getting vaccinated. We also spoke to some people who have already received the vaccine and heard about their experiences with side effects.

We asked our own Diabetes Daily forum members and the diabetes online community and here is what they had to say:

My wife with type 2 diabetes also suffers from COPD, bronchitis, and asthma. Accordingly, she would have a problem surviving COVID, so we have both registered with the NJ Covid Registry and will take the vaccine as soon as it becomes available. ~ Don1942

As I see it, two of these vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna) use a completely new and untested approach called mRNA. They were tested for only a short term on young, healthy adults. Animal, medium, and long-term testing were bypassed entirely. No testing on those with various health issues, and no testing for drug interactions. They only claim to reduce the number of symptoms. Zero claims are made about keeping you from getting or transmitting the virus. Last statement verified by Fauci saying anti-social distancing, lockdowns, and masking will still apply once you have had the vaccine. Then there are the 3+% of those who are vaccinated who suffer worse side effects than the symptoms the drug is supposed to reduce, keeping in mind that in the age groups tested only 1% would ever show any symptoms at all.

Finally the manufacturers take zero fiscal responsibility for bad outcomes. If they don’t believe their drugs are safe, why should I? ~ BobCan2

I have a nephew that has a doctorate in biochemistry (currently working on gene therapy). Said “I would take any of the vaccines in a second.” His wife also an MD has had the Moderna vaccine. I have a niece that is working on her doctorate in microbiology who has had the vaccine. So yes, I will take it. ~ 1986

I’m a no. Given my recent extended exposure, I’m not concerned. I’ll gladly wait for herd immunity. ~ HaoleBoy

I am a surgeon. I got the first dose of the Moderna vaccine. Just a sore arm. I have reviewed all of the science presented to the FDA and have no concerns. Glad to have access! ~ Dr. Carrie D.

So I voted yes… I’ve stated before that I used to be in the vaccine industry and I trust the science and the process. It’s not new technology being used. ~ Jughed

I’m getting the Moderna vaccine on Monday. I am a special education teacher in WI and we are the first group identified in the school district. Blessing! ~ Melissa R.

I think most people of my age remember friends getting polio, and I also remember giving my father chickenpox, which made him very, very ill; so having seen the miracles these vaccines did for quality of life, and preventing unnecessary deaths, I know I am very much pro-vaccination. My name will go down for a vaccine when it finally arrives here, hopefully, next month. I’m eligible for priority vaccination because of my age and a couple of chronic conditions.

I am 81 years old and a type 1 diabetic for 75 years. I am very high risk if I have the COVID virus. I am scheduled for the vaccine on Wed, Jan 21. My only hesitance is that the vaccine is being given in the gym complex at the local high school. I will probably encounter several individuals in the parking lot, while entering the building, inside the building, etc. In some states, people are receiving the vaccine without getting out of their cars. I wish it was done that way here where I live. ~ Richard `57

I am getting mine next weekend. I am 100% behind the science and haven’t given it a negative thought. Bring it on! ~ Susan K.

I’ll have it as soon as it’s offered. I am just recovering from COVID and it is awful. Sugars were terrible. I never want it again if I can help it. ~ Michelle R.

I will not be getting one. Mostly because I can’t help but think childhood vaccines play a major role in type 1 diabetes in the first place as vaccines are designed to trigger the immune system. ~ Fabian B.

I plan on getting the J&J one once it’s approved. I’m uncomfortable with the speed of the first two on the market, despite all I know everyone is saying. I feel better about the slow poke even if it’s irrational. ~ Caroline L.

Nope, nope and nope again. ~Kristin R.

I won’t be giving it to my son or myself. ~ Julie P.

I plan on getting one. In Nebraska, people living with diabetes are now eligible. ~ Wendy G.

My daughter is type 1 but it is not approved for children yet but she will not receive one and will remain not vaccinated as she always has been. ~ Stefanie R.

Here is what the people who have already received the vaccine had to say:

I had both doses. I’m 10 days out and still feel very run down. I was COVID-tested yesterday because it felt like a mild case but was negative. I received the vaccine 2 weeks ago and no side effects. Type 1 for 55 years. ~ Cindi H.

Tolerated both injections. Side effects were mild, with some deep muscle soreness, at least for me. I did note some insulin resistance post injections. ~ Chris A.

I got my first dose a couple of weeks ago and will get my next one in two weeks. I just had a sore arm and a little fatigued the next day. By the third day, I felt pretty normal. I didn’t notice any changes to my insulin sensitivity or blood sugar levels. ~ Karissa G.

I received both doses. My only issues were headache, fatigue, and chills.

COVID vaccine update #2: 24 hours later, I don’t feel horrible, but definitely off. Some body aches, headache and overall sluggishness. I went to bed at about 8:30 and “slept” till 10:30. (with my saul dog interruptions and the baby kicking my bladder, etc.)” ~ Nicole M.

I had mine because I work for the National Health Service and I had no side effects at all. ~ Kate B.

I was nauseous after my first dose for about 12 hours. I took a Zofran and was fine. ~ Jamie B.

I did have side effects (pain, mild fever) but I won’t hesitate to go for the second shot.

I have completed the series and just had a sore arm for a couple of days each time.

No side effects beyond a sore arm. I like the peace of mind and I did extensive research before getting it to fully understand what I was getting into. ~ Sarah R.

My 82-year old identical twin sisters each received the first dose. One got the Pfizer and the other the Moderna. No adverse reactions thus far. The one that got the Pfizer has allergies so was a bit concerned but had no reaction. ~ Auburn75

It should be mandatory that vaccines like this are taken. It’s not a conspiracy theory. There aren’t robots in the vaccine. This whole virus story isn’t a hoax, and this hasn’t been started because some people are simply trying to make some money. The sheer lunacy I’ve seen out there is beyond description. Some people think the world is flat. I’ve gotten both doses and have had zero side effects. ~ Sheralyn B.

I received my first vaccine on Jan 8 with minimal side effects being a sore arm and mild low blood sugars. On Jan 27 I received my second vaccine. Initially only had a sore arm and headache but after 36 hours, developed mild fever of 99.7, body aches, headache, continued low blood sugars, and a grape side swollen lymph node in my armpit, the arm I received my vaccine in. Fever and swollen lymph node improved with Tylenol and Ibuprofen! ~ Carlie W.

Will you be getting the vaccine once it is available to you? Have you had one or both doses and experienced side effects? Share and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Tech on the Horizon: Where Will Automated Insulin Delivery (AID) be in 2021?

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Albert Cai

What AID systems are currently available, what can we expect in the next year, and where is AID technology headed?

Want more information just like this?

As we enter 2021, we’re taking a look at what’s ahead for automated insulin delivery (AID) systems. Because the COVID-19 pandemic delayed many clinical trials and FDA reviews in 2020, several companies are expecting to launch new AID systems in 2021. This list covers many of the most notable upcoming products, but there are likely others on the horizon – if you know of a system you think we should track, please let us know.

Click to jump to a product, organized by expected launch date. You’ll find detailed descriptions and possible launch timelines for each, reflecting US availability.

What is automated insulin delivery (AID)?

Automated insulin delivery has many names – artificial pancreas, hybrid closed loop, bionic pancreas, predictive low-glucose suspend – but all share the same goal: combining continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) with smart algorithms to automatically adjust insulin delivery via an insulin pump. AID systems aim to reduce or eliminate hypoglycemia, improve Time in Range, and reduce hyperglycemia – especially postmeal and overnight.

When thinking about the development of AID technology, it’s often helpful to think in stages.

  • Stage 1: The most basic AID system might shut off the insulin pump whenever the user’s CGM readings drop below a certain number, such as 70 mg/dl, to reduce time spent in hypoglycemia and help prevent severe hypoglycemia.
  • Stage 2: The AID system could predict when glucose is going to go low and automatically reduce or stop insulin delivery to further help prevent hypoglycemia.
  • Stage 3: The AID system may be able to automatically adjust basal insulin delivery depending on whether the user’s glucose is trending up or down, and taking into account other factors, such as insulin on board. This adjustment of basal insulin would aim to increase Time in Range (TIR), and help prevent both high and low glucose levels. At this stage, the user would still have to manually give meal boluses and correction boluses.
  • Stage 4: The AID system will be able to deliver correction boluses when glucose values are high. These small adjustment boluses would be a further step in improving TIR, with less time with hyperglycemia.
  • Stage 5: The systems will be able to detect meals and automatically deliver a system-calculated meal bolus to reduce postmeal high blood glucose levels. With the elimination of manual meal bolusing, the system is considered to be a “fully closed loop” System.

Currently available products are in stages 3-4. By the end of 2021, we may have multiple stage 4 systems available.

Medtronic MiniMed 670G and 770G – already available 

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Now available for people over the age of two.

What is it? Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G has been available since spring 2017 and was the first stage 3 AID system to be cleared by the FDA. Prior to the 670G, Medtronic released stage 1 and stage 2 systems (Medtronic MiniMed 530Gand 630G, respectively). More recently, the MiniMed 770G system was cleared in the US in September 2020. Both the MiniMed 670G and 770G systems use the same insulin adjustment algorithm, which adjusts basal insulin delivery every five minutes based on CGM readings, targeting 120 mg/dl. The target glucose level can be temporarily raised to 150 mg/dl when low blood sugar (is a concern, such as during exercise or sleepovers for children. Both systems come with Medtronic’s Guardian Sensor 3 CGM, which has seven-day wear and requires two fingerstick calibrations per day (although four are recommended). See our article from 2016 for a full breakdown on the MiniMed 670G and from September for more on the 770G.

What’s the difference between the MiniMed 670G and 770G? As mentioned, both the MiniMed 670G and 770G systems use the same insulin adjustment algorithm and the same CGM. However, the newer MiniMed 770G has an improved pump: the 770G pump includes Bluetooth connectivity and can be paired to the MiniMed Mobile smartphone app (available for the iOS and Android) for users to view their CGM and pump information without pulling out their pumps. The app also allows users to share their data with others in real-time. Note: users can only view information but cannot control the pump (e.g., deliver a bolus, adjust basal rates) from the app. Bluetooth connectivity also means the system’s insulin adjustment algorithm can be updated. Medtronic has promised current MiniMed 770G users a free upgrade to the MiniMed 780G when that system becomes available (more below). Finally, the MiniMed 670G is only cleared in the US for people over the age of seven, while the MiniMed 770G is cleared for people over the age of two.

Medtronic management recently shared that algorithms will become an increasingly important part of the diabetes ecosystem, and presumably, a key differentiator for companies – lots of exciting times ahead with AID, that is for certain.

Tandem Control-IQ – already available in US

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Now available for people six years and older.

What is it? The Control-IQ system from Tandem was cleared by the FDA at the end of 2019 and launched to customers in January 2020. It’s precursor – Basal-IQ – was cleared in 2018. The Control-IQ system uses Tandem’s t:slim X2 pump, Dexcom’s G6 CGM which requires no fingerstick calibrations, and the Control-IQ insulin adjustment algorithm. In addition to automatic basal rate adjustments and predictive insulin suspension, the Control-IQ system is the only AID system with automatic correction boluses: when it predicts glucose to be above 180 mg/dL in 30 minutes, the system will deliver 60% of the correction bolus needed to reach a target of 110 mg/dL. Control-IQ targets glucose values between 112.5 and 160 mg/dL, though users can turn on or schedule “Sleep Activity” mode to achieve 112.5-120 mg/dL by the morning. This past summer, Tandem launched the t:connect smartphone app (for iOS and Android), which allows users to check their pump and CGM data on their phones.

What’s next? With the current t:connect smartphone app, users can view information but cannot control the pump (e.g., deliver a bolus, adjust basal rates). Tandem has already submitted an updated app with pump control to the FDA and expects to launch that functionality in 2021. Tandem has also mentioned enhancements to the Control-IQ algorithm that are expected in 2021. While we haven’t heard many specifics, we believe it’s likely that these enhancements will focus on improving glycemic outcomes, personalization, and usability of the system.

Insulet Omnipod 5 – expected early-to-mid-2021 

AID

Image source: diaTribe

FDA submission is likely coming soon (if it hasn’t occurred already), and Insulet aims for a “limited” launch in early-to-mid 2021. Insulet has completed the clinical trial for Omnipod 5 but has not shared the results.

What’s new? Omnipod 5 is Insulet’s AID for its popular Omnipod disposable pumps, also called patch pumps. If you’ve been following the field, you’ll know that Insulet previously called the new system Horizon – same system, new name. Omnipod 5 uses Dexcom’s G6 CGM, and Insulet expects to launch the system with smartphone control capability; users can still opt for a dedicated controller device, since smartphone control will be available for Android users first. Insulet is working on an iPhone version for Omnipod 5, though that will not be available at launch. Insulet is also working with Tidepool (more below) on an iPhone-based AID system. Omnipod 5 will have adjustable targets between 100 to 150 mg/dl. Because the Omnipod pump will store the algorithm and communicate directly with Dexcom G6, the system will work even without the smartphone or pump controller nearby.

Medtronic MiniMed 780G – expected mid-2021

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Pivotal trial completed for 780G and presented at ADA 2020. Medtronic aims to submit the system to the FDA by January 2021 with launch coming around mid-2021 for adults (either ages 14+ or 18+).

What’s new? The MiniMed 780G will be Medtronic’s second AID algorithm and a significant upgrade over the MiniMed 670G and 770G systems. In addition to automatic basal rate adjustments, the MiniMed 780G will include automatic correction boluses and an adjustable glucose target down to 100 mg/dl. The system will also have fewer alarms and simpler operation with the goal of further increasing Time in Range. The MiniMed 770G and MiniMed 780G pumps are identical, meaning MiniMed 780G users will also be able to use the MiniMed Mobile smartphone app for viewing pump data, uploading pump data wirelessly, and updating their pump wirelessly. As the pumps are identical, Medtronic has promised that those who purchase the MiniMed 770G now will be able to wirelessly upgrade to the MiniMed 780G for free when 780G does become available. Finally, the MiniMed 780G will use the same Guardian Sensor 3 CGM as the 670G and 770G, which requires two fingerstick calibrations per day and has a seven-day wear time. As a sidenote, an improved CGM sensor is in development by Medtronic, but isn’t expected to be available when MiniMed 780G launches.

The MiniMed 780G is already available in many countries in Europe, and data from a clinical trial was presented at the ADA 2020 conference. On average, the 157 participants in the study (ages 14-75) saw their Time in Range improve by 1.4 hours per day (69% to 75%) while using the system – that’s particularly notable given the low baseline of the A1C. Speaking of A1C, the A1C improved by 0.5% (7.5% to 7%) after using the system.

Beta Bionics insulin-only iLet – expected mid-to-late-2021

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Pivotal trial underway with completion expected in the first half of 2021. Launch expected mid-to-late-2021, though this is subject to change.

What’s new? Beta Bionics is a Massachusetts-based startup developing an AID pump and algorithm called iLet. iLet will work with Dexcom and Senseonics’ CGMs (and possibly others in the future) and is designed to be especially user-friendly. diaTribe founder Kelly Close participated in an early Beta Bionics trial (2013!) and raved about the system and how easy the pump seems. At set up, users only need to enter body weight (no insulin-to-carb ratio, sensitivity factor, basal rates, etc.), and the system will learn more over time. To bolus, users will use icons to describe meals as containing more, less, or the same amount of carbs as usual (no carb counting). The insulin-only clinical trial for iLet began in the summer of 2020 and is expected to wrap up in the first half of 2021. Beta Bionics aims to launch iLet mid-to-late-2021, though this could be delayed as the FDA continues to prioritize COVID-19-related devices.

What’s next? Beta Bionics’ iLet is unique from the other pumps on this list, because it is designed to work in either insulin-only or insulin-and-glucagon configurations. With glucagon, Beta Bionics believes the system can reduce hypoglycemia while maintaining stable glucose levels and potentially even better-than-average, lower glucose levels due to availability of glucagon. Currently, there are different views on using glucagon in an AID system – in addition to the potential for improved glycemic management, there are uncertainties around glucagon pricing and availability. Regardless, the insulin-and-glucagon version of iLet is still a few years away.

Tidepool Loop – launch timing unclear

AID

Image source: diaTribe

Online observational study completed, and launch timeline depends on FDA progress.

What’s new? Unlike the others in this list, Tidepool is a non-profit and is working on the AID algorithm only; Tidepool does not have its own insulin pump or its own pump and CGM combination (like Medtronic). About two years ago, Tidepool announced plans to submit the do-it-yourself (DIY) Loop app to the FDA to become an officially supported app available on the Apple App Store, compatible with in-warranty, commercially available pumps and CGMs. For now, DIY Loop is a free, publicly available, open-source, non-FDA-approved AID system that works with Dexcom and Medtronic CGMs and old Medtronic and Insulet pumps. Read about Adam Brown’s experience using DIY Loop here. For those who are very interested in the project, there is a great deal to learn from notes that Tidepool shares about its communications with FDA – the latest notes are from a mid-2020 meeting.

Initially, Tidepool plans to launch with Insulet Omnipod and Dexcom G6 compatibility. To set it apart from the DIY-version, Tidepool Loop will have different colors, guardrails around certain settings, and a built-in tutorial for new users. A 12-month, completely virtual study was performed with Loop users and will support Tidepool’s submission of Loop to the FDA. The six-month data was presented at ATTD 2020 showing a Time in Range increase of about 1.4 hours per day (67% to 73%) with Loop. Tidepool also announced in November, 2020 that its human factors study had also been completed – this is another required step of the FDA submission. Much of what Tidepool is doing is unprecedented, so the launch timing is unclear.  In an update on January 8th, Tidepool shared that it has now completed FDA submission of Loop.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Person with Type 1 Diabetes in the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Trial

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Zoe Cook

Here’s the quick version for all of those who don’t have time to read my full experience below — I trialed the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and *spoiler alert* had a great experience.

If you had asked me ten months ago where I thought life would be now, it would be anywhere but here. I was preparing to graduate from UT Austin, finalizing my application to medical school, and planning my gap year. I had planned to spend the year traveling, working as an EMT, and living life to the fullest before I commit myself to my career for good. It was only a few weeks after the news first broke of COVID-19 that I was emailing my professors and voluntarily studying from home. Quickly realizing that our entire family is high-risk, we decided to air on the side of caution. The first week of March we decided to lock down and we’ve barely left since.

Why I Participated

In early August, I found out that a local research center was conducting a trial for the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and that they were looking for high-risk frontline workers to participate (at the time, I was working at a children’s hospital). Many people questioned my choice to participate, but here’s why I decided it was right for me:

  1. My entire family is high-risk and not only was I the only one leaving the house, but I was leaving to work at a hospital.
  2. Thanks to my pre-med studies, I understand mRNA technology and the FDA clinical trial safety measures enough to feel comfortable in making an educated decision.
  3. I participated in the blinded Teplizumab trial when I was first diagnosed at the age of ten, so I am no stranger to the clinical trial process.
  4. I wanted to be a part of the solution. My nature is to help others in any way that I can; someone has to trial it for other type 1s, why not me?

Sure, my hands were shaking and I was sweating as I signed the final consent form, but it was something I felt I just needed to do.

The Doses

I went in for my first dose in mid-August. It was a long first appointment filled with lots of signatures, tests, and questions. I received my first dose that same day, with a 50/50 chance that I had the vaccine or placebo. The next day I had some arm soreness, but nothing else. I was secretly hoping for at least a little chill or body ache to try and confirm that I received the vaccine, but nothing. I was disappointed with the uncertainty, but also knew that symptoms were expected to be worse after the second dose and that I had a slightly swollen lymph node in my neck. A month later in mid-September, I had a second dose, which again resulted in no immediate side effects and didn’t even make the lymph node swell up again. Interestingly, after both doses, my insulin needs dropped slightly over four days, with the fourth day needing ~30% less insulin. I also developed eczema on my face, which is something I likely would have developed at some point in my life since we have a family history of many skin issues.

In October, I got my antibodies tested and was surprised to find out that I did indeed have antibodies. I can’t say for sure yet whether I had the vaccine, but based on the lymph nodes, sore arm, and antibody tests, it seems fairly certain. As I’m isolated and no one I know has had COVID symptoms, it would be highly unlikely that I got antibodies from anywhere else.

Editor’s Note: According to interim guidance from the CDC, COVID-19 antibody tests are not 100% accurate can result in both false negatives and false positives.

Even though I have antibodies and could assume I had the vaccine, I didn’t know how truly effective the vaccine was. I decided to still treat myself as though I was unvaccinated and not take any chances. Now that it’s been announced that the vaccine is 95% effective, I can feel more comfortable returning back to some form of normal-ish life. Even then, it’s been hard to undo the anxiety and fear that seem to have become a part of daily life over the past ten months. I still get uncomfortable when I see someone without a mask, don’t even begin to consider large gatherings, and stay home as much as possible. The changes for me have been small — being able to go to the grocery store, have a cup of coffee with a close friend, and start looking for jobs again. For our family, it was just the simplicity of going to bed with peace of mind that is priceless.

What’s Next

Within the next few days, trial participants should find out about the process of being unblinded if we are offered a vaccine elsewhere. I will most likely choose to stay blinded to keep the study valid. As long as I continue to test positive for antibodies, I personally don’t feel a need to be officially unblinded, as I imagine this means we will have to be removed from the trial.

For privacy reasons, I won’t say which trial center I participated with, but I can say that they were amazing. The staff and study coordinators made the expectations of me as a participant crystal clear and were responsive to any (and all) questions and concerns. I am very grateful that I had the opportunity to receive a vaccine early on and that I was able to potentially help others in the process. I cannot thank Moderna, their scientists, or their research teams enough for the peace of mind and protection they have provided both me and my family.

Originally I thought 2020 was going to be my year — the year I graduated, did an IronMan, traveled, lived life, worked hard, and visited my dream medical schools. Now, 2020 has been the year that reminded me to be grateful for all of the things I already had. I still got to wear a cap and gown, even if it was at home. I found a different way to work, a different way to interview at schools, and planned my own triathlon. Life being “paused” has reminded me how precious quality time with family is, the enjoyment of a good book, and how easy it is to take things for granted.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Great News: Trials Show Some Diabetes Drugs Can Actually Protect Your Kidneys

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Matthew Garza, Eliza Skoler, and Rhea Teng

More people with diabetes are taking drugs like Jardiance and Farxiga, originally developed to lower glucose in people with type 2 diabetes, because the latest data confirms that these drugs can protect your kidneys. A therapy still under investigation, finerenone, has been developed to protect the kidneys of people with and without diabetes

Recent research is showing that certain drugs can benefit your kidneys if you have type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and many people don’t receive adequate treatment for this condition, so advancements in therapy to treat and prevent kidney disease are important for the 800 million people worldwide who live with chronic kidney disease. We bring you some of the newest findings on finerenone, Jardiance, and Farxiga – three medications that have been shown to protect the kidneys in people with decreased kidney function, including those with diabetes and CKD.

Note: The latest results on Jardiance and Farxiga confirm earlier findings on two other SGLT-2 inhibitors – Invokana and Steglatro – which clearly show the kidney and heart benefits of this class of medication. As a result, SGLT-2 inhibitors are recommended for treating kidney disease in many people with diabetes. SGLT-2 inhibitors were a focus of the recent American Society of Nephrology’s virtual kidney conference. As research has shown an increased number of benefits of these medications – in terms of glucose levels, weight loss, hypoglycemia reduction, and heart and kidney health – new guidelines have rapidly developed (since 2013) for the use of these drugs in people with type 2 diabetes. And, in the case of Farxiga, SGLT-2s can also protect the kidneys in people without diabetes.

Finerenone

Finerenone is currently being tested to treat CKD in people with type 2 diabetes – it’s a new type of drug (called a non-steroidal MR antagonist) that interferes with the receptors that cause kidney cells to retain, or hold onto, excess salt and water. In the FIDELIO-DKD trial, almost 6,000 people with type 2 diabetes and kidney disease received either finerenone or placebo (a “nothing” pill) and were enrolled in the study for over two and a half years. The results from the trial demonstrated the benefits of finerenone:

  • Finerenone significantly reduced the risk of severe kidney outcomes by 18% over two and a half years.
  • Finerenone reduced the risk of severe heart outcomes by 14%, compared to the placebo.

The FIDELIO-DKD trial showed this medication to be helpful for people with type 2 diabetes. Given these positive results, finerenone has been submitted to the FDA and the European Medicines Agency for approval as a CKD treatment option for people with type 2 diabetes.

Jardiance

New findings from the EMPEROR-Reduced trial showed that Jardiance, an SGLT-2 inhibitor, improved heart and kidney outcomes in adults with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF, or a reduced ability to pump blood out of the heart), regardless of whether they had chronic kidney disease at the start of the trial. Of the 3,730 people enrolled in the trial – with or without type 2 diabetes – participants taking Jardiance showed:

  • A 22% reduced risk for severe heart outcomes among people with CKD, and a 28% reduced risk in those without CKD.
  • A 47% reduced risk for severe kidney outcomes in those with CKD, and a 54% reduced risk in those without CKD.

The variation in risk reduction was determined to be due to chance, rather than a difference in health outcomes between people with and without CKD. These results show that even though CKD increases a person’s risk for heart issues, Jardiance lowered that risk to the level of people without CKD.

Farxiga

New analysis of the DAPA-CKD trial found that Farxiga, another SGLT-2 inhibitor, protects the kidneys regardless of the cause of kidney disease, in people with or without type 2 diabetes. This builds on the positive results presented earlier this year on Farxiga’s ability to treat people with heart disease and CKD.

Why is this important?

More than 800 million people around the world live with chronic kidney disease, including 45 million people in the US (almost 14% of the US population). The need for effective medications that work for everyone, including those with or without diabetes, is high. Treatment with SGLT-2 inhibitors – or non-steroidal MR antagonists – could be key to helping these people.

Organizations like the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes now recommend that people with type 2 diabetes and kidney issues be treated with SGLT-2 inhibitors or GLP-1 agonist medications. If you have diabetes or kidney disease, talk with your healthcare team about which of these treatment options may be helpful for you.

It’s important to catch kidney disease early so that it can be treated. If you have diabetes, ask your healthcare team to test your kidney function every year. To learn more about preventing kidney disease, view diaTribe’s helpful infographic. You can also read about UACR and eGFR, the two lab tests that are commonly used to evaluate kidney health.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Dexcom’s Chief Technology Officer Reveals Updates on the G7

We are almost through to the end of this year and we are all looking forward to new diabetes technologies coming out in 2021! Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology is an incredibly useful tool that can improve diabetes management, and the release of Dexcom’s new CGM, the G7 is certainly one to look out for. For me, the sheer difference in size alone (the G7 will be about the size of a quarter, certainly an improvement over the G6!) is something to get excited about. Moreover, the company has completely redesigned the product, which will now be completely disposable, as opposed to previous iterations that included a reusable transmitter.

I recently talked to Dexcom’s Chief Technology Officer, Jake Leach to get the most recent scoop on what’s to come with the release of the highly anticipated new product.

When Will the G7 be Released?

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the start of clinical trials was delayed. Leach explained that the company used that time to integrate in even more technology with the G7. Clinical studies needed to get FDA approval for the G7 are currently in the process of getting started. Although they could not disclose specific details on timing, Dexcom confirmed that will see the product come to market in 2021. A broader launch is expected to come in 2022.

What About the Accuracy?

Dexcom has taken a lot of technologies of the G6 and made improvements on them. It will need to meet stringent accuracy requirements to be approved by the FDA. It is expected that the product will perform well and offer improvements over existing technologies.

What About the Wear Time?

Currently, the Dexcom G6 is approved for 10-day wear. However, many users try to circumnavigate this. Dexcom’s CTO had this to say about advancements for the G7:

“The platform is designed to extend the wear beyond 10 days, so the electronics, etc. are compatible with that. We are striving for a very high level of reliability for both the sensor and the adhesive patch. [So far, early studies have shown that] the right time frame for our customers is 10 days with this product, but we do intend to continue working to expand both the sensor and adhesive performance to go beyond 10 days. We feel that our customers deserve a sensor that is highly reliable for the full wear duration, and so 10 days is where we’re at with G7.

What About the Cost?

“We know that for CGM to be accessed by many many people, we need to continue to remove cost from the general system. So, G7 is designed to be highly manufacturable in very large volumes. We have our first G7 line up and running. We are using a fully automated assembly line. The product is not only highly reliable but also lower cost to manufacture. Providing users with the product that is disposable, there were hurdles that we had to overcome in engineering, to be able to provide a product where you are throwing away more components, but we are able to do that at a cost-point equal to or lower than G6.”

What About the Sensor Insertion?

The sensor insertion will be fully automated. Dexcom stated that the product will be even easier to apply than the G6, and that the applicator will be much smaller than the G6, reducing the environmental footprint.

“We specifically designed it to be as small as possible [but still large enough to ensure a comfortable insertion process]. Definitely smaller than G6…”

What About the Adhesive?

In the diabetes online community, I have recently been hearing more reports of adhesive-related allergic skin reactions, and speculations that perhaps there was a change in the adhesive formula being used. Here is what Dexcom had to say about that:

“Some very small number of users do have issues with irritation, and there is a number of different ways that can be addressed. It’s a balance between the adhesive properties of making the sensor stay on for the full duration and there are so trade-offs with irritation. We are very focused on minimizing irritation. We have made improvements to the patch where many users are seeing their sensors last longer, but we have seen a small number of irritation complaints and we are focused on [for both the G6 and the G7] always making improvements. We are focused on investigating what possibly could be causing these irritant properties. The G7 does have a different adhesive than G6 and we are looking to ensure that [causes] very little, if any, irritation.

What About New Integration with Other Systems?

“The way that we’ve designed our system is so that it can integrate with many different types of systems.”

In addition to integration with the Tandem’s Control IQ and Insulet’s OmniPod system, integration has also been developed for Companion Medical’s InPen as well as over 25 commercially-available apps. Leach also highlighted that as of now, the Dexcom CGM is the only product that has been approved for use with hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery systems.

What About New Predictive Modeling Algorithms?

Recently, Dexcom has partnered with the University of Virginia to conduct research on a variety of automated insulin delivery models and algorithms. Dexcom has also partnered with the European company Ypsomed to further develop CGM integration for automated insulin delivery systems. In addition, Dexcom is working to investigate the use of CGM data, in general, to provide users with key insights on blood glucose trends and potential therapy optimizations.

“Our general approach is to provide many options to our users. We know diabetes is a personal disease and everyone has different opportunities to connect with different devices, and what they feel fits into their lifestyle. We try to support as many options as possible so we do that through the pump integration, as well as the digital ecosystem of the app partners.”

What About the Data Display and Device Compatibility?

“It will be compatible with both Android and iOS. One thing we are doing with the G7 app is we are integrating more insights into the app. So, G6 does a great job of showing glucose information, trends, as well as the ‘urgent low soon’ alert. G7 is taking that even farther and starting to integrate in a lot more of the some of the functionality from Clarity, some of those insights you get will be built into the G7.”

Dexcom is also working to enhance some features of their apps for data sharing with support people and clinicians. In addition, a receiver will still be a part of the new system, for those users who want an alternative to using their smartphone for data display.

Staying Ahead of the Competition

The CGM market is growing rapidly, with more and more companies coming out with competitive products. We asked Dexcom where they view themselves and what their advantages are over other systems.

“We feel that G7 is going to be a whole new level of comfort and convenience in the CGM ecosystem and the integration that we can build on with both insulin pump partners and the digital ecosystem of  apps… is a significant differentiator between [us] and some of the other competitors. We’ve been providing real-time CGM data since day 1, and we want to continue to expand and improve and provide users with new tools that enable them to take control of diabetes.

Moreover, the use of CGM technology is also expanding in the clinical setting, and Dexcom is a big player there.

“With COVID, we got approval for emergency authorization use for Dexcom CGM in the hospital. During the pandemic, since the beginning, hospitals have been acquiring the G6 from us and using the device in the hospital setting. It has performed very well. It also limited the need for interaction between healthcare providers and the patients [with COVID].”

We thank Jake Leach for taking the time to provide us with the most updated information. Sounds pretty great to us, and we look forward to learning even more and updating our readers as more details come to light!

Do you use a Dexcom CGM? What are your thoughts on the advances in CGM tech? Please share your thoughts in the comments.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

FreeStyle Libre 3 Cleared in Europe – Smaller, Thinner, and No More Scanning!

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Matthew Garza and Katie Mahoney

The FreeStyle Libre 3 has been cleared in Europe for anyone ages four and older. The new continuous glucose monitor is as small as two stacked US pennies, provides real-time readings directly to the mobile app via Bluetooth, and has the same low list price

Abbott announced that the new FreeStyle Libre 3 has been cleared in Europe – see 40-second video here. This third-generation continuous glucose monitor (CGM) has many of the same features that make the FreeStyle Libre 2 so popular, including optional alarms, 14-day wear, and high accuracy. The FreeStyle Libre 3 also adds several new features:

  • Real-time, minute-by-minute readings are sent directly to the FreeStyle Libre 3 app via Bluetooth – moving this CGM from “on-demand” to “always-on,” so there is no need to scan the sensor every eight hours.
  • It is 70% smaller than previous models, making it the “smallest and thinnest” CGM sensor yet – it’s said to be about the size of two stacked pennies. Importantly, this new model will reduce the amount of plastic and carbon paper used, improving the production of the device significantly from an environmental perspective.
  • It is cleared for people with diabetes as young as four years old.
  • It is cleared for use in gestational diabetes and pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. We suggest that everyone who is pregnant and has type 1 diabetes try to get CGM, and that everyone else who is pregnant be tested for gestational diabetes as early on as possible.
  • It is cleared as an iCGM, meaning it can be used for automated insulin delivery (AID) development in Europe.
  • The new FreeStyle Libre 3 app, available for both iOS and Android devices, will contain many of the same features as the FreeStyle Libre 2 app (Libre View) including the all-important time in range graphs and ambulatory glucose profile (AGP). You can learn all about the AGP here.

Currently the FreeStyle Libre 3 is cleared for upper-arm wear, though we imagine people may try to use it “off-label” on their abdomen or other spots. There is no separate reader for collecting and monitoring sensor data, so people will use smartphones with the FreeStyle Libre 3 app in order to connect to the sensor.

The FreeStyle Libre 3 will be available at the same price as previous versions of the CGM ($109 for a one-month’s supply, without insurance); Abbott will continue to offer the FreeStyle Libre 2 at the same price for people who prefer the to scan their CGM. The FreeStyle Libre 3 is expected to launch in the coming months in Europe, and though we don’t yet know where it will first launch, we expect it may be Germany, like Abbott’s other CGM launches. In the US, Abbott has not announced any potential timeline for FDA submission or clearance. With the recent Libre Sense clearance in Europe, there is lots happening with this brand – stay tuned for more. Readers in European countries, we’d love to hear your early thoughts once you try the FreeStyle Libre 3!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

What Are SGLT-2 Inhibitors and How Can They Help Your Heart?

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Mary Barna Bridgeman

SGLT-2 inhibitors can protect your heart! This type of medicine is recommended for people with type 2 diabetes who have heart disease or risk factors related to heart disease. Learn about the use of these medicines, including side effects, their effect on A1C, and their role in supporting heart health

Diabetes is a risk factor for heart disease: people with diabetes are twice as likely to have heart disease or a stroke compared to those without diabetes. Heart disease is often a “silent” condition, meaning that symptoms are not necessarily present until a heart attack or a stroke actually happens. It is important for people with diabetes to realize they may be at risk – click to read more about the link between diabetes and heart disease from Know Diabetes By Heart.

There are many ways to take care of your heart and to reduce the risk of heart disease while living with diabetes. New medicines, including sodium-glucose cotransport 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists, have been shown to protect the heart and reduce the risk of many specific heart-related outcomes. This article will focus on SGLT-2 medications, and our next article will focus on GLP-1 medications.

Heart diseases

Image source: diaTribe

Click to view and download diaTribe’s helpful infographic on preventing heart disease.

What are SGLT-2 inhibitors?

There are currently four medicines that are categorized as SGLT-2 inhibitors:

These medicines help people with type 2 diabetes manage their glucose levels: they work in the kidneys to lower sugar levels by increasing the amount of sugar that is passed in the urine. SGLT-2s increase time in range and reduce A1C levels while also lowering blood pressure and supporting weight loss. For people with diabetes who have had a heart attack or are at high risk of heart disease, or who have kidney disease or heart failure, these medicines could be considered regardless of A1C level. While SGLT-2 medications are expensive, some assistance programs are available to help with cost – see one of diaTribe’s most popular articles, “How to Get Diabetes Drugs For Free.”

What do you need to know about SGLT-2 inhibitors?

SGLT-2s have a low risk of causing hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels). Because they increase sugar in the urine, side effects can include urinary tract infections and genital yeast infections in men and women. Dehydration (loss of fluid) and low blood pressure can also occur. Symptoms of dehydration or low blood pressure may include feeling faint, lightheaded, dizzy, or weak, especially upon standing.

Before starting an SGLT-2 inhibitor, here are some things to discuss with your healthcare team if you have type 2 diabetes:

  • How much water to drink each day
  • Ways to prevent dehydration and what to do if you cannot eat or you experience vomiting or diarrhea (these are conditions that may increase your risk of developing dehydration)
  • Any medicines you take to treat high blood pressure

When prescribed for people with type 2 diabetes, SGLT-2s rarely cause diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. For people with type 1 diabetes, DKA is a well-known risk when SGLT-2s are prescribed. Call your healthcare professional if you have warning signs of DKA: high levels of ketones in your blood or urine, nausea, vomiting, lack of appetite, abdominal pain, difficulty breathing, confusion, unusual fatigue, or sleepiness. When you are sick, vomiting, have diarrhea, or cannot drink enough fluids, you should follow a sick day plan – see Dr. Fran Kaufman’s article on developing your sick day management plan. Your healthcare professional may instruct you to test your urine or blood ketones and stop taking your medication until symptoms go away.

If you have type 1 diabetes or chronic kidney disease, depending on your level of kidney function, these medicines may not be for you. Additionally, SGLT-2s are associated with increased risk of lower limb amputation.

SGLT-2 inhibitors are usually taken as a pill once a day – often in the morning before breakfast – and can be taken with or without food.

What do SGLT-2 inhibitors have to do with heart health?

Results from clinical studies suggest SGLT-2 inhibitors may play an important role in lowering heart disease risks.

Jardiance was the first SGLT-2 inhibitor to show positive effects on heart health in the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial. In this study, more than 7,020 adults with type 2 diabetes and a history of heart disease were followed. Participants received standard treatment for reducing heart disease risk – including statin medications, blood pressure-lowering drugs, aspirin, and other medicines – and diabetes care, plus treatment with Jardiance. Over a four-year period, results from the study showed that, compared to placebo (a “nothing” pill), Jardiance led to:

  • a 14% reduction in total cardiovascular events (heart attacks, strokes, heart-related deaths)
  • a 38% reduction in risk of heart-related death
  • a 32% reduction in overall death
  • a 35% reduction in hospitalizations from heart failure

Read diaTribe’s article on the results here.

Similarly, the heart protective effects of Invokana have been shown in two clinical studies, CANVAS and CANVAS-R. These two studies enrolled more than 10,140 adults with type 2 diabetes and a high risk of heart disease, randomly assigned to receive either Invokana or placebo treatment. In the CANVAS studies, treatment with Invokana led to the following:

  • a 14% reduction in total cardiovascular events (heart attacks, strokes, heart-related deaths)
  • a 13% reduction in risk of heart-related death
  • a 13% reduction in overall death
  • a 33% reduction in hospitalizations from heart failure

Read diaTribe’s article on the results here.

Farxiga may also reduce heart disease risks. In the DECLARE-TIMI 58 study, more than 17,000 people with type 2 diabetes received Farxiga; 40% of participants had known heart disease and 60% had risk factors for heart disease. Importantly, more than half of the people included in this study did not have existing heart disease. While Farxiga was not found to significantly reduce total cardiovascular events (heart attacks, strokes, heart-related deaths) compared with placebo, its use did lead to a 17% lower rate of heart-related death or hospitalization for heart failure. Read diaTribe’s article about the results here.

More recently, the DAPA-HF study evaluated the use of Farxiga for treating heart failure or death from heart disease in people with or without type 2 diabetes. The study included more than 4,700 people with heart failure; about 42% of those enrolled had type 2 diabetes. Farxiga was shown to reduce heart-related death or worsening heart failure by 26% compared to placebo, both in people with type 2 diabetes or without diabetes. Learn more about these results here.

All of the available SGLT-2 inhibitors have evidence suggesting benefits of this class of medications for people with established heart failure. Click to read diaTribe’s article on SGLT-2 Steglatro and heart health.

Other possible benefits of SGLT-2 inhibitors

InvokanaFarxiga, and Jardiance have also been shown to reduce the progression of kidney disease. Learn more about diabetes and kidney disease here.

SGLT-2s have been studied in people with type 1 diabetes, but are not yet approved for use by the FDA – you can learn about SGLT-2s for people with type 1 diabetes here.

What’s the bottom line?

You can reduce your risk of heart disease and promote heart health while living with diabetes. You and your healthcare team should develop a personalized plan to determine what ways are best for reducing your risk of heart disease. According to the latest evidence and treatment recommendations, SGLT-2 inhibitors may be most useful for people with type 2 diabetes and heart disease or at high risk of heart disease.

About Mary

Mary Barna Bridgeman, PharmD, BCPS, BCGP is a Clinical Professor at the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University. She practices as an Internal Medicine Clinical Pharmacist at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

This article is part of a series to help people with diabetes learn how to support heart health, made possible in part by the American Heart Association and American Diabetes Association’s Know Diabetes by Heart initiative.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Semglee, A Low-Cost Basal Insulin, Comes to the US

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Karena Yan and Joseph Bell

A more affordable alternative to Lantus (insulin glargine) will cost $148 for five pre-filled insulin pens

Mylan and Biocon Biologics announced last month the long-awaited US launch of Semglee, a new insulin aiming to be deemed “biosimilar” to insulin glargine (basal insulin) by the FDA. A biosimilar drug is a biological product that is highly similar in structure and function to a product already approved by the FDA, known as the reference product. Semglee is said to be similar to Sanofi’s basal insulin Lantus; it has the same protein sequence and has a similar glucose-lowering effect. The FDA has yet to classify Semglee as “biosimilar” or “interchangeable” to Lantus due to the need for additional review – so for now, Semglee should be considered a new basal insulin option for people with diabetes. Semglee was previously approved in 45 countries, including Australia, Europe, Japan, and South Korea. We aren’t positive how “interchangeable” will go – would someone using Tresiba or Toujeo “next-generation basal” insulin want to go with Semglee instead? This is unlikely in our view.

Semglee is currently available by prescription in either a pen or a vial and can be used by people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It costs $147.98 for five 3 mL pre-filled pens or $98.65 for one 10 mL vial. Semglee is reported to be the cheapest available insulin glargine-equivalent on the market, with a 65% discount from the list price of Lantus. That calculation is a bit misleading as does not take into account discounts and rebates available with a variety of insulin brands; actual out-of-pocket costs can differ dramatically for individuals.

Happily for people who don’t qualify for patient assistance programs, Semglee represents a far more affordable option for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who take basal insulin. While biosimilars are usually not as inexpensive as “generic” versions of drugs, because biosimilars are more expensive to manufacture, they do provide cheaper alternatives to brand name drugs, in this case, Lantus (and Levemir, Tresiba, and Toujeo). Further, because Semglee is thought to be essentially equivalent to Lantus, it should provide an important and practical option for basal insulin users who are concerned about insulin costs and do not have a route to pay less – this is far more people than often considered.

It’s also key to note that Semglee is not technically considered a “biosimilar” drug – it is currently under FDA review to gain approval of this designation. The biosimilar designation would mean that Semglee officially has bioactivity and clinical efficacy that are not different from Lantus, but are not necessarily exactly the same. If it earns an “interchangeability” designation, pharmacists would be able to substitute Semglee for Lantus without consulting the prescribing healthcare professional. Semglee might also be substituted for Tresiba or Toujeo, two “next generation” more stable basal insulins.

Two biosimilar insulins are currently approved in the US: Basaglar, a basal insulin glargine approved in 2016, and Admelog, a rapid-acting insulin lispro approved in 2018. If Semglee gains an FDA biosimilar designation, it will become the third biosimilar insulin available in the US.

Mylan is offering a co-pay discount card and a patient assistance program to help people afford Semglee. The co-pay card is available to people with commercial health insurance – you may be able to receive up to $75 off each 30-day prescription. Learn more here. For people without prescription insurance coverage, you may be able to get Semglee for free – access the patient assistance program by calling Mylan customer service at (800)796-9526.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Tackling Carbs with Tech

Many people who live with diabetes avidly avoid eating carbohydrates, as historically speaking, it has been notoriously difficult to cover carbohydrates appropriately with exogenous insulins. But with access to better, faster insulins and the uptick in the use of patient-friendly technology, things are changing, and people’s diets (and their feelings of freedom) have expanded more than ever. Here are the best tech-friendly hacks to tackle the carbohydrate conundrum.

MyNetDiary

This popular app has a searchable database with nearly a million food entries for people to access and look up carbohydrate counts on the go. The company also has a separate Diabetes app that allows users to track blood glucose levels, HbA1c results, and insulin doses, to track their progress over time. If you’re looking to lose weight, MyNetDiary can create a diet plan to meet your needs. You never have to feel restricted when eating meals with family or friends, having all your carbohydrate counting needs right at your fingertips.

Photo credit: GreaterGoods

GreaterGoods Nourish Digital Scale

This food scale is a game changer for those who cook with lots of fresh produce, where carbohydrate counts can vary quite a bit. This scale lets the user view nutrition facts for over 2,000 foods in the scale’s built-in database, and create up to 99 more custom entries. Measure individual ingredients, track full meals, and calculate daily carbohydrate intake much easier with this digital scale.

InPen

This revolutionary device is the only FDA-approved smart pen insulin system that helps prevent users from “stacking” their insulin doses and take the right amount of insulin at the right time. This device works in tandem with a phone app, where users can track insulin on board/active insulin, personalize your doses, sync with continuous glucose monitor (CGM) or glucometer data, and share reports with others. The pen itself is compatible with Humalog, Novolog, and Fiasp, and will even dose in half units. Eating carbohydrates has traditionally been much harder on multiple daily injections, but advancements such as the InPen are making strides to make life much easier for people with diabetes.

Use Alternative Pump Boluses

If you are an insulin pump user, dosing for a high carbohydrate meal can also be difficult, especially if the meal also has a moderate amount of protein and fat (which can delay the absorption of the glucose in the meal). To handle that, try opting for a combination bolus (a.k.a. Combo Bolus or Dual Wave Bolus,  for Animas or Medtronic users, respectively; Omnipod, Tandem t:slim users will use “Extended Bolus”). This is a hybrid delivery mode: a specified portion of the total insulin bolus is delivered upfront, as a normal bolus, while the rest is delivered over a specified period of time as an extended/square wave bolus.

For example, given a 12U dose delivered as a 60/40 combination/square wave bolus over 3 hours: 60% of the total dose (7.2U) will be delivered within seconds of pressing the “deliver” button; the remaining 40% (4.8U) will be delivered equally every few minutes over the next three hours. The result is an initial dose to cover faster-digesting foods, plus an extended amount of insulin action to deal with the slower-digesting foods (which tend to be fattier or have more protein), and to prevent postprandial spikes in blood glucose. Utilizing these settings can be extremely helpful when you’re eating foods like pizza, pasta, Chinese food, Mexican food, or ice cream. Always consult with your diabetes healthcare provider before making any changes to your dosing routine.

Dexcom CLARITY Diabetes Management Software

Photo credit: Dexcom

Dexcom Clarity App

This software can be helpful for patients already using the Dexcom continuous glucose monitoring system, but are wanting to track and change problematic patterns in their blood glucose. This app lets you set target goals for your blood sugars, will track time-in-range, detects patterns of highs and lows and will alert you to them, and will even give the user a predicted HbA1c result. You can also choose to share your data with your health clinic to make changes to your insulin routine or insulin to carbohydrate ratio in real time, and to really find what will work best for you for optimal management.

Living with diabetes is never easy, but thankfully technology has made counting carbohydrates and eating easier than ever before. What apps or tech has helped you to navigate food, eating, and counting carbohydrates? What’s worked best and what hasn’t? Share this post and comment below; we love hearing from our readers!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

10 Ways to Reduce the Sugar in Your Diet

Eating too much sugar is known to contribute to heart disease, obesity, tooth decay, cancer and numerous other health problems. Yet, the average American eats 22 teaspoons of added sugar per day, according to the American Heart Association. Many studies have linked high-sugar intake to an increase in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality due to CVD.  As people living with diabetes, we must be especially mindful of the amount of sugar we take in. Limiting our added sugar can help us manage our blood sugar, avoid weight gain and improve our overall health.

Here are some realistic and manageable ways to cut back on your sugar intake. Making these small changes can lead to a healthier version of you!

1. Step Back and Re-evaluate

Make healthy changes in other areas of your life. For instance, make sure to get adequate sleep so you’re not relying on coffee laden with sugar to get you through the day. Also, adding some structure to your day can help you avoid making last-minute food choices that are usually out of convenience and less healthy than those snacks and meals we eat at home. Being prepared means less haphazard choices that may not be the best for your overall health.

2. Don’t Fall for the Low-Fat Trick

Many food companies love to boast their low-fat products but what they don’t tell you is that these foods often contain more sugar and calories than their low-fat alternatives. When fat is removed from a food, it takes away from the natural flavor, therefore they add sugar to sweeten it up. Opt for full-fat versions, and keep in mind that there are also plenty of benefits of adding fat to our diet!

3. Cut Back on Sugar-Filled Drinks

Thankfully, there are so many healthy beverage options now on the market. With options like Vitamin Water, Kevita probiotic drinks, a host of flavored sparkling seltzers, and many more, it is a lot easier to avoid those more sugary drinks that can quickly lead to both weight gain and high blood sugars. If you are a fan of coffee and/or tea, its best to keep it black or use a natural sweetener such as Lakanto’s Monkfruit Sweetener.

4. Experiment with Rubs Instead of Sauces

Condiments like ketchup and barbecue sauce are commonly used but come loaded with sugar. One tablespoon of ketchup usually contains about 1 teaspoon of sugar. Check for reduced-sugar or sugar-free versions which still pack the flavor. Also, when cooking your own food, try using dry rubs of flavorful herbs and spices instead of sauces. Some other low sugar options to consider are pesto sauce, mayonnaise and even avocado. They are absolutely delicious and can spice up any meal, even a slice of bread!

Pesto sauce is a low-carb option. Photo credit: Adobe Stock

5. Consider Diet-Friendly Sugar Substitutes

While some people can take their coffee black others may cringe at the thought. Thankfully there are plenty of healthy sugar substitutes that you can use in place of the real deal. This doesn’t only go for your morning coffee but for your cooking and baking needs too. You can easily take a high sugar dessert and replace it with one of these flavorful and healthier options. And the best news is we longer have to be tempted by sugar-free treats that contain sorbitol or maltitol and are known for causing stomach upset.

6. Change Your Mindset When It Comes to Snacks

We are all quick to grab packaged goods when we need something quick to eat. Processed foods are loaded with sugar so are not the best choice for a snack to help fuel you. Consider opting for cheese, nuts, hard-boiled eggs, and beef jerky to name a few. And if you are hosting a get-together or need an idea to bring elsewhere, consider healthy options that are low in sugar such as hummus and vegetables, shrimp skewers and meat and cheese charcuterie boards.

7. Moderation

It is important to remember that some sugar in moderation is okay. And some people may be able to better manage eating sugar in moderation than others. Listen to your body and do what works for you. Having a healthy mindset when talking about any type of food group will help to avoid any negative feelings or emotions that could come along with eliminating something altogether.

8. Technology Is Your Friend

Some like to take advantage of apps like Myfitnesspal to track their calories and track macros. It is eye-opening to track a day of eating and see how much you are really consuming. For example, when I did this exercise I learned that I wasn’t taking in nearly enough fiber so I was able to adjust my daily intake. Another great app is by Companion Medical for the use of InPen. Here you will be able to enter the number of carbs and it will tell you exactly how much insulin you need based on your doctor recommended settings. Use technology as your guide and keep the sugar to the amount that you are comfortable with while still feeling in control.

9. Increase Your Protein Intake

The benefits of protein in your diet are endless, and it is vital in helping fuel our body and give us energy. It also helps us build muscle mass, helps keep our bones strong, and helps keep us satiated. By adding more protein to your diet you can avoid those sugar-laden snacks since you will be fuller for longer. Try making all meals protein-dominant, with a small portion of any foods that may spike your sugar or add on pounds if you are weight conscious.

10. Know What to Look for on the Label

Back in 2016, the FDA changed their rules so that companies would have to disclose how much added sugar was in their products along with the % of the daily value. This is helpful but there are over 50 other names for added sugars, making it even more difficult to detect. Check out the nutritional label and be sure to pay attention to the order of ingredients as they are listed with the highest % first. Some of the common names to look out for are: high-fructose corn syrup, cane sugar or juice, maltose, dextrose, molasses, rice syrup and caramel.

If you are looking to get better control of your blood sugar or are looking to lose or maintain your weight, cutting back on sugar is an easy way to better your health. Taking the steps above will ensure you much success in your diabetes and weight management efforts.

Have you tried cutting back on your sugar intake? What measures did you take and what were the results? Comment and share below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

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