How to Lose Weight and Be Active With Type 1 Diabetes

Editor’s Note: Cliff Scherb, Founder of the Glucose Advisors Consulting community and Tristar Athletes LLC, is a nutrition, health, and dosing expert. He consults virtually through the Glucose Advisors University, teaching the Scherb Method decision support system for insulin management, nutrition, weight loss, and activity. To inquire about program openings, courses, and general questions working with Cliff or Glucose Advisors, join the community or email him directly at cliff@glucoseadvisors.com.

Most of my career as a health expert, I have had the privilege of helping others. In the type 1 diabetes  (T1D) spotlight, I am one who walks the walk and talks the talk when it comes to general health and well being. Yes, most of my career has been spent as a more extreme endurance athlete – yet these days most of my endurance is spent behind a computer teaching others how to achieve their T1D goals, still active but more inclined to also be happily chasing my 1.5 year old daughter as she grows up.

Cliff Scherb

Photo credit: Cliff Scherb

Sitting more regularly and burning less energy overall each day has had some meaningful changes to my management methods. Let’s face it, if I continued to eat the same amounts of calories each day such as when I was racing and training, I would blow up like a balloon!

I have always maintained what I will call a “normal” lifestyle and stayed true to what most do in life who do not have T1D. Meaning I don’t bend my will to T1D and I’m not afraid of carbohydrates or feel compelled to eat only fats. I believe that you can do what’s best for you, and if it makes you happy to join one of these extremes, by all means do it.

The internet is full of advice for people with T1D and never before have we had the wealth of information at just a fingertip-length away. How you put that information together and use it to your benefit is what is not so easy to do. Knowing what is worth your time and what is not can mean the difference between brilliant blood sugar control and avoiding longer term complications. The following tips we use have helped our students stay on track.

Here are five things you can do as a person with T1D that can help to improve your blood sugar and to help maintain a lean body composition:

1. Consider an Insulin Pump

If you have the option and ability, the pump allows you to lower and raise your total daily insulin dose more easily. When there are periods of your day that do not include insulin, there is a greater opportunity to process fat stores. If you are using multiple daily injections you may want to speak with your doctor about moving away from long-acting insulins such as Lantus, which have close to a 24-hour duration. On an insulin pump, only short-acting insulin is used, which is out of the body more quickly and may help lower the total daily insulin dose.

2. Choose More Fiber

Consuming an adequate amount of fiber in your diet can help not only by giving you the feeling of fullness but also by not requiring any extra insulin. Considered a carbohydrate, it does not generally impact blood sugars and can be subtracted out of your total carbohydrate count at meals.

3. Choose Lean Proteins

Proteins are great at promoting blood sugar stability and also have fewer total calories per gram when compared to fats. Fat grams, while having the benefit of blood sugar stability, can promote insulin resistance (increased insulin demand) and have nearly twice as many calories.

4. Time Your Carbohydrates Earlier in the Day vs. Later at Night

This means having a larger carbohydrate-loaded breakfast to supercharge your energy during the day and setting it up so that your insulin levels overnight are lower. This is a great way to lower your total daily insulin dose. You should also try to limit insulin prior to activity and time it post-activity when you are more sensitive and need less insulin overall.

5. Create Insulin Sensitivity

Being active is a great way to introduce a higher level of insulin sensitivity. This sensitivity will lower your total daily dose overall, aiding in total reductions in body fat. When timed with an appropriate meal plan and diet it can be a recipe for success!

Keep in mind, anything worth doing takes work! What is one of the biggest obstacles to T1D management success? It certainly isn’t a lack of desire. No, it’s just one thing…

Follow-through.

All the tools in the world don’t matter if you aren’t implementing what you learn. Practicing your nutrition timing and activity can help you to create greater insulin sensitivity which lowers your total daily dose. Ultimately, when you track the total daily insulin dose, this can help lead to longer-term weight loss and happiness with enhanced blood sugars.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Virta Health: An Unparalleled Leader in Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a condition characterized by high blood glucose levels due to the inability to effectively utilize insulin (insulin resistance). It is well-known that it is often possible to reverse type 2 diabetes by adjusting lifestyle factors, in particular, through dietary changes and sustained weight loss. However, many patients are not able to achieve this.

Virta is a company that was founded in 2014 and has made it their mission to help people reverse their type 2 diabetes. In their program, “most patients achieve blood sugar control while removing medications like insulin, often in a matter of weeks.”

The program centers around utilizing a very low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diet, tailored specifically to meet each patient’s need. The dietary change can help facilitate both weight loss, and improve blood glucose levels, often quickly, allowing for discontinuation of various blood glucose medications under medical supervision.

In addition to a health coach”, blood sugar testing supplies, a “smart scale”, the company offers a variety of educational resources, community engagement among patients, and personalized advice provided by medical experts.

“Powered by technology and data science, physicians and nurses provide expert medical care, when and where patients need it, via Virta’s custom-designed app medical records system.”

One of the main reasons that a very low-carbohydrate diet can work so well for many people with diabetes is depicted below.

Photo credit: Virta Health

In fact, a very low-carbohydrate approach as an integral part of diabetes management is becoming more and more accepted and recommended by medical professionals and health organizations. Learn more about the most recent research and recommendations about low carb for diabetes here:

Low-Carb for Type 1 Diabetes

Low-Carb for Type 2 Diabetes

Low-Carb for Pre-Diabetes

Check out some of the very impressive Virta clinical study outcomes in patients who utilize the program:

Additionally, the researchers noted weight loss as a “side-benefit”, with patients losing an average of 30 lbs., or 12% of their body weight, a clinically-significant result that was maintained at the one-year mark since the start of the trial. Even more strikingly, participants experienced significant cardiovascular disease risk reduction, lower blood pressure levels, lower levels of inflammation, and lower risk for fatty liver disease.

Of course, all these health improvements also translate to cost savings for both patients and health insurance providers. Many employers and health plans are now working with Virta to increase patient access to this treatment approach. To get started, you can fill out a short form to schedule a free call to determine the next steps in the process.

With superior success to a traditional diabetes care approach already established, Virta aims to continue to broaden its reach with the challenging and very admirable goal of “reversing type 2 diabetes in 100 million people by 2025.

Have you heard of or participated in this program? What are your thoughts on carbohydrate restriction as a primary means to achieve weight loss and tighter blood sugar management? Please share your thoughts in the comments below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How the Keto Diet Paved the Way for a “Normal” Life

By Matt Barrie

I have type 1 diabetes since age three, and am now 37 years old. Living a ‘normal life’ has always been my number 1 goal, but how this has manifested has been different through different stages of my life. As a teenager, I hung out with friends and wanted to do all the same things as them, eat the same things as them and just be a ‘normal’ kid. I made it through, although there were several seizures and hospital visits.

My twenties had their ups and downs both with health and life events. I had weight fluctuations from quite low to an extra unhealthy 20 lbs., and my HbA1cs were also all over the map. By 26, I made some big changes and adopted a healthy, standard carb-diet lifestyle and enjoyed that sense of ‘normalcy’ that we all crave. I played soccer, ran, skied, and lifted weights.

By my late twenties, I made some big life-changing decisions, like heading back to school to change direction with my career. Through studying and supporting myself at the same time, my health began to slip slowly and steadily. By the time my degree was finished, I had put on 50+ lbs., had developed very unhealthy eating habits, and could barely make it up a flight of stairs without being out of breath.

Doctors were giving me all the warnings, my HbA1c was up in the 8s and 9s and most significantly, the diabetic retinopathy that had begun to develop in my 20s worsened and progressed into macular retinal edema. So, monthly visits to the ophthalmologist (daily, when I developed an infection from the injections I was getting that almost took my eye!) became my new normal. With fear as a driving factor and determination as the driving force, I jumped into action, although not sure where to begin.

keto diet

Moussaka made with eggplant, zucchini, cashew-béchamel, ground beef sauce and cheese. Photo credit: Matt Barrie

I started experimenting with the ketogenic diet after reading that it had proved successful for many people with diabetes, both types 1 and 2. This was around 3.5 years ago. Most of the success I read about then was regarding type 2 diabetes and reversing it with the diet.

I was very curious though how I could make this work for myself so the experimenting began. I tried cyclical, where you rotate carbs in and out, but this didn’t work. I tried semi-strict, with the infamous ‘cheat days’ which I needed at the time to preserve those foods I ‘missed’, but ultimately this didn’t work either. I tried many different iterations of the diet and for two years saw small successes – up to 20 lbs. [weight loss] here and there. It was enough to keep me going but I never saw that breakthrough success that I was truly after.

After the summer of 2019, I had taken a ‘break’ with visiting relatives and had gained back all my losses and then some. It was very discouraging, but it was the motivation I needed to make a serious change. I hit a saturation point where I knew I couldn’t keep continuing on the way I had been. I weighed in over 210 lbs., which on my 5’8″ frame felt like [an extra] 100 lbs. I committed to myself that I would be absolutely strict keto, I signed up with a trainer twice a week to stay accountable, and committed to running twice a week. I also began practicing intermittent fasting with the 16 hour/8 hour split between my fasting and eating window.

Photo credit: Matt Barrie

Within the first month, I dropped 15 lbs. and the weight and body composition began to change week by week, month by month. By the time the pandemic hit, I was well on my way to my weight loss goal and was able to stay on track. I lost 50 lbs. by April of 2020 and have been working on building lean muscle mass ever since!

My insulin needs have dropped significantly – basal by about a quarter and fast-acting by over 3/4! My HbA1c is in the low 6s and most significantly, I have reversed my macular edema and the retinopathy seems to be going into remission as well. My ophthalmologist was blown away that there was no fluid in my retina.

Photo credit: Matt Barrie

It’s hard to put into words the effect these lifestyle changes have had in my life. My energy, ability to perform, clarity of mind, spirit, and purpose are all significantly improved. Thinking and being told by convention that carbs were essential led me to high levels of insulin resistance, fat storage, yo-yo blood sugars, and unnecessary highs and lows due to over-correction. I now enjoy steady blood glucose levels during exercise, during waking hours, and overnight. I’m also enjoying much lower insulin needs and feel confident that my risk of diabetic complications is significantly decreased.

Keto Diet - Matt Barrie

Left: Sablefish (black cod) with puréed butternut squash, pan-fried Brussels and topped with red cabbage sauerkraut. Right: Grilled pork chop with seared zu Chinju, roasted carrots and cauliflower. Finished with mushroom cream sauce. Photo credit: Matt Barrie

I can’t shout from the roof loud enough that the ketogenic lifestyle can be such a powerful tool for diabetes management! I’m not saying it’s the only way, but it has certainly worked for me and changed my life. At first, you do miss the foods from a standard carbohydrate diet that we are all programmed to accept, but with time the cravings go away and the way you feel on the other side is totally worth it! It doesn’t even feel like a sacrifice anymore and being creative in the kitchen to make satisfying, delicious food is all part of the fun!

Left: Zucchini tuna melts with cheese and avocado mayo. Right: Cauliflower, bacon and asparagus soup with homemade almond flour cheese scone. Photo credit: Matt Barrie

If you’d like to follow my journey and pick up any tips and tricks I’ve discovered along the way, I’ve recently started a public Instagram account. You can follow along @type1ketoguy.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

10 Healthy Foods that Can Sabatoge Your Diet

Some of the most popular go-to healthy foods can often be very high in calories, which can make reaching your goals more challenging. This doesn’t mean you should avoid them but if you’re aiming to stay within a certain daily calorie allowance, you’ll probably want to familiarize yourself with how these foods measure up in terms of calories as well as the other macronutrients.

Here are some common healthy go-to foods that may sabotage your weight loss efforts so be mindful of the labels and your portion size:

Protein Shakes/Smoothies

Everyone loves a good protein shake or smoothie, especially at this time of year. But you must be mindful of what you are putting in it as most are between 250-600 calories per a 16-oz serving. Also, check the labels of your protein powder to make sure you are using one with minimal sugar. My favorite low-carb and low-calorie protein shake consists of 1 scoop of protein powder, 2 tablespoons of peanut butter powder, 1/2 of a small container of Greek yogurt and a splash of almond milk. It is filling but macro-friendly.

Guacamole

Guacamole is packed with heart-healthy and potassium-rich avocados, and it’s also packed with calories. One cup (which sounds like a lot but have you ever sat at a table with guac and chips?!) contains about 360 calories. If you want to indulge, you can swap your chips for veggies to cut out some calories and carbs.

Chia Seeds

Chia seeds are a great healthy choice thanks to their fiber, omega-3, and protein content but they are also very caloric. A single tablespoon contains 70 calories, meaning you can easily add an extra 200 calories to that smoothie without even realizing it. Use chia seeds sparingly in order to still get the health benefits minus the unwanted calories.

Olive Oil

Just 2 tablespoons of olive oil add 238 calories to your meal or salad. And yes, those calories count even if you are just using it to cook. While olive oil is full of healthy fat, use it sparingly to keep the calories in check. Consider using avocado oil which has fewer calories and can withstand high heat.

Dried Fruit

Dried fruit is high in sugar and carbohydrates and it’s not the easiest snack to keep to one portion at a time. It also doesn’t have the water associated with regular fruit, so it is not as filling and satiating. You are best served to single-portion this snack out ahead of time to keep the calories in check.

Nuts and Nut Butter

Nut butter is one of my favorite guilty pleasures. It contains healthy fat and is very versatile and can be added to a variety of snacks or dishes, such as smoothies, yogurts and much more. But 2 tablespoons of peanut butter contain almost 200 calories, so be careful with your serving size or consider one of the many new peanut butter powders which are less caloric and contain less fat, too.

Nuts are also a great healthy snack, just one small handful of almonds contains over 7 grams of protein and 18 grams of healthy fats. Since they’re very calorie-dense, just two handfuls per day with a meal or as a snack can quickly add hundreds of calories. Make sure to be mindful of portion size with this snack.

Gluten-Free Foods

If you are one of many people living with diabetes who also have celiac disease, you are probably accustomed to eating gluten-free foods. While they are amazing substitutes for wheat, they are not necessarily healthier. Many contain less protein than their wheat counterparts. Also, while the calorie count usually remains the same, you may eat more of the gluten-free one because it appears “healthier.”

Prepared Salad Kits

We all love the convenience of running into a store on your lunch break and grabbing a salad to go. But to think that is automatically a healthier choice because it is a salad is incorrect. Many are loaded with extra calories and fat from the cheese, bacon and pouches of dressing. You can still buy these prepared kits but don’t overload on all the toppings. Or better yet, create your own salad and keep the calories in check.

Granola

One cup of homemade granola can serve up a full meal’s worth of calories. At 597 calories and a whopping 29.4 grams of fat per cup (exact totals may differ based on ingredients), this is one of the foods you should skip if you want to lose weight. Consider making your own, there are great recipes out there to try.

Sushi

The fish and vegetable components of sushi are healthy, but once you add in the creamy sauces, fried dough and rice, it can become a real dent in your diet. One roll can easily contain 500 calories! Consider having a few pieces of a sushi roll along with a salad, miso soup and edamame. Or, choose rolls that don’t contain mayonnaise or fried ingredients.

Watching calories can be tricky but if you are mindful of your choices, you can definitely succeed! Do you have any low-calorie staples that help you not go overboard? Comment and share below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Review: Withings Connected Devices Help You Manage Your Health

Featured in Newsweek Best Products of 2020, Withings products and services can provide a range of accurate real-world data, including weight, heart rate, temperature, and blood pressure readings, as well as activity and sleep—so you can be on top of your health and also have data that can be very useful for your healthcare provider to help manage your care. With much of healthcare going remote, these products are more important than ever to stay on top of your health.

Who They Are

A start-up company founded in 2008 by Eric Carreel sought out to develop connected devices and apps that allow people to measure, and track what is important for their health and then take the information to make educated decisions to achieve their goals.

Today, Withings connected scales, hybrid watches, blood pressure monitors and sleep monitors, are used by millions of people around the world.

What Products Do They Offer

Withings carries scales, watches, blood pressure monitors, thermometers and sleep monitors–all of which are synced to one app for easy tracking. You can also share this data with your medical care team, which will make your appointments that much more productive. And now with most healthcare professionals switching over to telehealth in the wake of COVID-19, having useful information to share with your provider will help you get the most out of these virtual appointments.

My Review

I received the Withings Body + scale which was voted best body composition scale of 2019 by Verywell and the BPM connect blood pressure monitor. The company provided me with the product at no charge. I received no additional compensation for this review and all opinions are my own.

Withings Scales

Withings offers 3 different scale options all of which give you a comprehensive view of your health by performing a 30-second reading when you step on the scale. Within seconds you can get a complete body analysis–an accurate weight, BMI, body fat, water %, muscle and bone mass. Each of the scales offers slightly different features, with the Body Cardio scale also offering cardiovascular health via heart rate. Another great feature on all of the scales is the local weather. This is great for me since I usually weigh in before I step outside for the day.

Every time you weigh-in, the information appears in the Health Mate’s easy to set up app, automatically, via WI-FI or Bluetooth sync. It can store information for up to eight people at a time and also connects to over one hundred other apps. There is also a baby and pregnancy mode, which helps new moms or moms-to-be during this exciting time. Having all of this information at your fingertips can help you keep up the good work and make better decisions regarding your health.

For me, personally, as a person who weight trains, I love having the muscle mass feature and body fat % feature since I am much more concerned with my body composition than my weight. I am also constantly trying to stay hydrated so being able to see my water % gives me the motivation I need to go refill my cup. Having a full body composition scale allows me to measure so much more than just the number on the scale. This scale also isn’t an eyesore with its sleek look and chrome finish, it is easy to tuck away or display.

Withings reports that two-thirds of their users having a weight loss goal reported losing weight within the first six months of installing their scales. They also found that 7 out of 10 users lost a significant amount of fat loss after tracking using their new Withings scale.

Blood Pressure Monitor

High blood pressure is the most preventable cause of cardiovascular disease and can often go without symptoms. The American Heart Association recommends home monitoring for anyone with hypertension in order to continuously reassess and make any necessary medication changes.  Now, with telehealth appointments becoming the new normal, having a blood pressure monitor system at home is of the utmost importance.

Developed alongside cardiologists, Withings blood pressure monitors are clinically validated, ensuring you are getting the most accurate results. The arm monitor is easy to use and only takes one push of a button. It then syncs to the Health Mate app via Bluetooth and WiFi, providing you with key information using international standards and explains your results in an easy to understand manner.

Both the BPM Connect and BPM Core offer blood pressure and heart rate readings immediately on both the device and the app. Both models allow you to share the information with your doctors so your doctor can also track your health. The BPM Core also offers ECG records and a digital stethoscope. A bonus perk of the BPM connect model is that it is FSA (flexible savings account) eligible.

For someone looking to invest in some useful technology that can help track their health goals as well as weight goals, the Withing products are of the highest quality and accuracy. Making an investment in your health is always a good idea but now, more than ever, having home monitoring products like this is so beneficial for maintaining your overall health. These products are also extremely useful to healthcare providers so they can track their patients remotely, conduct research studies as well as other wellness programs. Withings is a company whose products are exactly what we need as we embark on this new way of healthcare.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Book Review: Diabetes Essentials

Diabetes Essentials: Tips & Recipes to Manage Type 2 Diabetes, is a brief, easy-to-understand, illustrated introduction and guide to living with type 2 diabetes, that was recently published by registered dietitian and diabetes educator Karen Graham, and endocrinologist Dr. Mansur Shomali. I received the book for review at no charge and all opinions are my own.

My Review

When a person is newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes it can feel isolating and overwhelming, especially for those who were previously unfamiliar with the condition and what diabetes management entails. This short, easy-to-understand, illustrated guide covers the main concepts and provides concrete advice to help set new patients on the right path to healthy living with diabetes.

The information in the book is organized in easy-to-read “top-ten” lists and focuses on many categories that are relevant to life with diabetes, including diet, exercise, blood sugar management, healthy lifestyle choices, weight loss, mental health, planning for pregnancy, and much more. The information covers the basics, without going into detail, and is in line with the commonly prescribed medical advice that is typically offered to patients with diabetes.

Throughout, the book offers helpful and specific tips that aim to help people with diabetes better understand their condition and improve their health. From advice on mindful eating to smoking cessation to preventing and identifying complications, this book covers so many aspects of living well with diabetes. I particularly liked the list with advice for getting through the first 10 days after a diabetes diagnosis, as well as the guide to different doctors’ appointments.

A considerable section of the book is dedicated solely to “diabetes-friendly” recipes, including a sample ten-day meal plan, along with ideas for salads, soups, dinners, snacks, and desserts. Most of the recipes are moderate in carbohydrates, high in fiber, and low in fat. Detailed nutritional information is provided alongside each recommendation.

One section I liked, in particular, discussed trending research and recent diabetes advancements. These included a discussion of continuous glucose monitoring technology, as well as newer insulins and diabetes medications. The authors also cited some relevant information from the national Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). I thought this section was particularly useful to help new patients understand how recent advances in care (even if not yet practiced in the mainstream) can help people with diabetes better manage their condition.

The last section of the book consists of quizzes on various topics to help readers reinforce their understanding of the educational materials. This also provides a fun way to learn about some common misconceptions. Finally, the detailed index at the end makes it easy to quickly find a specific topic of interest.

Summary

Overall, this text provides a competent and easy-to-understand overview of type 2 diabetes basics and advice for newly diagnosed patients. It informs without overwhelming the reader with too many details and provides concrete strategies to help manage the condition and related health issues.

Diabetes Essentials costs $24.95 and can be purchased online here.

***

Have you purchased this book already? Please share your thoughts with us in the comments below.

Also, check out this comprehensive list: The Best Books About Diabetes.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Why a Ketogenic Diet Works for Kim

Meet Kim Carter. Kim has been living with type 1 diabetes for over 24 years. She has tried many different tactics to manage her blood sugar and her weight over the years. She has found following a ketogenic diet to be the best way to successfully manage her diabetes and her waistline. 

I spoke to Kim about the ketogenic diet, the transitioning to and the results of following this way of eating.

At what point did you start a ketogenic diet? What was the catalyst?

I started in May to help lose weight, and as an alternative to pain medication, I was taking for fibromyalgia.

Did you find it hard to adapt to your new lifestyle?

The first few days were hard. I went through the keto flu. I had heard it would happen but living it was rough.

Why a Ketogenic Diet Works (3)

Kim has tried different ways of eating but the keto diet along with regular exercise helped her achieved her weight loss goals. | Photo credit: Kim Carter

How soon did you start seeing the effects of your new eating habits?

I lost ten pounds in the first week and stopped the fibro meds within three weeks. Blood sugars were excellent the first week after I adjusted a few things.

What were some of the positive changes you noticed in your overall health? What about your blood sugars?

I’m off all opioid pain medication, A1c of 5.3% on MDI [multiple daily injections], more energy, lost 55 pounds.

What were some negative changes you noticed in your overall health? What about your blood sugars?

Hair loss. I had to incorporate collagen into my diet to make up for this. In the first few days, I had some low blood sugars, but then I was able to adapt. Now I rarely have a high and rarely have a low — straight line on my CGM most days.

Do you find this way of eating easy to manage and sustainable? 

I travel for work, so this is a godsend. I only have to worry about one meal a day while on the road. It’s a little socially awkward to go out for brunch or lunch and not eat, but when I explain the results I’ve had, people understand. It’s also more economical when grocery shopping.

Typically, in the course of your day, how many low and high blood sugars do you have? 

None!

Why a Ketogenic Diet Works (3)

Photo credit: Kim Carter

What does your morning look like? What is your fasting blood usually around? What does breakfast look like?

I drink a cup of coffee in the morning. My blood sugar is pretty much 85-100 mg/dL all of the time.

Do you find managing your blood sugar takes a lot of your time and energy throughout the day? Do you have to interrupt your daily routine to take care of highs and lows?

I use the Libre, and it’s an easy way to look at my blood sugar quickly in the middle of the day. I honestly worry less about my blood sugar with this way of eating than I did before.

Do you exercise? Does managing your blood sugars ever interfere with your workout? Do you eat anything pre-workout, and if so, what?

I walk and ride my bike. I walk without eating beforehand but will eat something before a bike ride. I exercise about four times a week.

Why a Ketogenic Diet Works (3)

Photo credit: Kim Carter

How do you sleep well at night? Do you set alarms or wake up on your own to check your blood sugar?

I sleep more soundly with this way of eating. My fear of going low in my sleep has diminished.

What is your current A1c? What was it before adapting to this lifestyle?

It’s 5.3%. It’s been 5.2-5.4% for the past few years. I take way less insulin now and have been on MDI, and it’s wonderful.

What would be your advice to someone considering this way of eating?

Research. Start slow and do it. So beneficial.

Thank you, Kim, for sharing your experience with us! We appreciate the feedback and hope it helps those who may be considering following a ketogenic diet!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Review: Cuisinart Air Fryer – A Healthier Way to Make Your Favorite Foods

I am always searching the diabetes online community for new healthy recipes. It seems more and more people are using and having great success with air fryers. An air fryer is an appliance that works by using a convection mechanism to produce a crispy coating due to hot air circulating at high speed. You need […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

Editor’s Note: You Are Not Alone

May is Mental Health Awareness Month and here at Diabetes Daily, we take this issue very seriously. Managing an invisible disease, day in and day out, can create a lot of other issues for people with diabetes. It is important that everyone feels comfortable talking about their problems, reaching out for help and knows they […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

I Thrive: Being the Architect of Your Future

While Basil’s story might not be about epic adventures of climbing mountains or sailing around the world, his story is real and unapologetically his. He’s a husband, father, uncle, son, and entrepreneur. His story deeply resonates. During the years when his body was in a pre-diabetic state, he actually wasn’t aware it existed and ultimately […]
Source: diabetesdaily.com

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