Paleo Breakfast Casserole Egg Bake

This content originally appeared on Low Carb Yum. Republished with permission.

This super flavorful breakfast casserole is one of my favorite ways to enjoy eggs.

For a long time, my go-to was an omelette filled with cheese and vegetables. However, I discovered that dairy causes inflammation for me, so I’ve been trying to eat less cheese.

Simply eliminating the cheese from my omelette felt unsatisfying, though. I needed a new favorite breakfast. And that’s when the idea of a paleo breakfast casserole came to mind!

This is the kind of hearty breakfast that keeps you full and happy for hours. The sausage gives it amazing flavor, plus it’s packed with veggies. To be honest, I didn’t even miss the cheese in this dish.

It’s also a fantastic way to meal prep for the week. If you’ve been searching for healthy, budget-friendly meal prep ideas, this paleo egg casserole is the perfect solution. It will keep well in the fridge for a week, or you can freeze slices for later!

Easy Paleo Breakfast Casserole with Sausage

An easy paleo breakfast casserole with sausage and vegetables. Make ahead on the weekend for a full week of low-carb breakfasts or freeze some for later.

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil (or avocado oil)
  • 1 pound nitrate-free paleo sausage ( no casing (or other ground meat))
  • 2 cloves garlic (minced)
  • 1/2 teaspoon dry minced onion flakes (optional)
  • 3 cups yellow summer squash (cubed)
  • 12 ounces broccoli (chopped)
  • 12 eggs
  • 1/2 cup almond milk (or coconut milk)
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  1. Cook sausage, garlic, and onion flakes (if using) in oil over medium-high heat until sausage is browned.

  2. Add squash and broccoli and cook until vegetables are tender.
  3. Spread sausage and vegetable mix into a 9×13 casserole dish.
  4. In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, almond or coconut milk, salt, and pepper.

  5. Pour egg mixture over sausage mix.
  6. Bake at 375°F for 30-35 minutes or until eggs are set and the top has started to brown.

Feel free to change up the recipe by using different vegetables, different meat, or adding in cheese (for non-Paleo).

Paleo Breakfast Casserole Egg Bake Recipe

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Recipe Roundup: 5 Veggie-Loaded Dish Recommendations from Nutritionists

The key to living longer is not top-secret. When researchers found out this natural way of reducing health risks such as heart disease and stroke, it wasn’t a discovery. It was just a confirmation of an age-old health tip: Eat your fruits and vegetables!

Now it’s easy to devour fruits on their own, but vegetables— let’s admit many of us haven’t fully come to terms with their bitterness. Thankfully, the nutritionists we have reached out to have thought of tasty ways to make this challenge easier to overcome.

creamy roaster purple cauliflower soup

Photo credit: Jackie Newgent

Creamy Roasted Purple Cauliflower Soup

The two main ingredients Jackie Newgent, a natural culinary nutritionist, used for this recipe are cauliflower and chickpeas. She suggests using not just the cauliflower florets but also the stem and the leaves for another layer of flavor. The half can of drained organic chickpeas “punch up protein and create extra creaminess when pureeing the soup.” Apart from sliced scallions, Jackie garnished this with roasted chickpeas, but you may skip this or substitute it with anything low-carb like bacon tidbits or shredded chicken.

Photo credit: Lizzie

Veggie-Loaded Slow Cooker Mexican Shredded Chicken

What makes this recipe of Lizzie Streit, the registered dietitian at It’s a Veg World After All, perfect for those always on the go but still want healthy and tasty homemade food? Three things. First, it’s super quick to prepare, and with a slow cooker as your primary equipment, you can run errands while the ingredients simmer in the pot. Second, you can “batch cook” this as it freezes well. It’s ideal to have lean protein on hand. Third, this dish is quite versatile. You can eat it on salads, sandwiches, tacos, or rice, etc., but we suggest giving it a try with some low-carb bread.

Photo credit: Rosemary Squires

Kale and Shaved Brussels Sprouts Salad

Reading the ingredients of this salad, you’d know that Rosemary Squires, a registered dietitian nutritionist, created a “power dish.” Kale and Brussels sprouts are rich in vitamins and minerals. Quinoa and parmesan cheese are excellent sources of protein. Grapes and sunflower seeds are loaded with antioxidants. Almonds give you healthy fats. Mix her tangy dressing with the salad ingredients, and you have a delicious, complete meal.

Caesar Kale Salad

Photo credit: Meredith Stone Wellman

Caesar Kale Salad

If you want to add more kale in your weekly meal plan because you’re amazed at how much nutrients you can take in with this superfood, check out this recipe from another registered dietitian, Meredith Stone Wellman. She uses croutons made with whole-grain (rich in fiber!) bread here, but if this causes unpleasant sugar spikes, you can reduce the amount of servings or look around the web for a low-carb version. She also suggests consuming the greens with a piece of fish or chicken for an extra boost of protein.

Sheet Pan Cauliflower Fried Rice 2

Photo credit: Jessica Beacom

Sheet Pan Cauliflower Fried Rice

A cup of rice has about 50 grams of carbohydrates, a considerable number for any person with diabetes. So if you’re craving Chinese takeout but worried about sugar intake, try this healthy and tasty alternative. Jessica Beacom, a registered dietitian at The Real Food Dietitians, says this is quick to prepare and endlessly adaptable too. You can toss in your favorite veggies, leave out the egg if you prefer a plant-based meal, or add your favorite fish, pork, shrimp, or other protein to the pan.

What vegetable-packed recipes have you recently tried? Share them with us ⁠— they might be our new favorite!

Recipe Roundup_ 5 Veggie-Loaded Dish Recommendations from Nutritionists

Source: diabetesdaily.com

On Falling in Love and Climbing Mountains with Diabetes

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Siobhan Casey

The Catalyst

“What if you got ill, what would you do then? Who would you call? How would you get home? Why don’t you start with a smaller trip?”

While my counselor posed reasonable questions, my answers convinced me, after twelve years of self-doubt and physical struggle that no, my identity was not “Type 1 Diabetic” or “Thirty-Two Year Old, Unmarried Woman.” Instead it was introspective adventurer, writer, childcare provider, and admirer of all things beautiful.

So that Friday, I compiled well-marked maps and packed my bags for the next five days. They overflowed with insulin pens, needle tops, cliff bars, glucagon pens, bags of Swedish Fish, bottled water, continuous glucose meters, glucose gel, old fashioned glucose meters, test strips, a hiking bag… As most traveling type 1s know, the list is far too long to enumerate. But I woke up in the spring of 2019 with the desire not just to survive and be helpful to others, but to head south and climb a great height. My destination: the Blue Ridge Mountains. This was no impulse. No, this was a conviction.

The Journey Begins

My palms were sweating as I set out on the scenic route, taking back roads in lieu of the more efficient highways. As with any good trip, nothing went quite as planned. For one thing, I got lost on my second day in Virginia, and my phone picked up no bars. But as soon as I found my way to a safe trail, I felt at home among the bugs and canopies of trees. Truthfully, I felt much less alone, in solitude and cloaked in Shenandoah National Park’s shades of blue, than I did among most people.

Siobhan Casey

Image source: Beyond Type 1

After meandering through and taking many breaks to eat the glucose and lunch I had packed, I found my way back to the main road. I stopped at each overlook to spread my arms and become a part of the staggering landscape. When I arrived back home, something small but essential shifted inside of me. I felt different, lighter, and more confident. I began to take my bike on longer, solo trips through the park. And I began to entertain the idea that my next trip would be far better with a companion. But I hesitated because my romantic relationships over the past decade had been fraught with oversharing or hiding how much I struggled with type 1 diabetes (T1D).

Things changed on a rainy spring evening. I decided to meet Roy mostly because he seemed like he knew something I didn’t, smiling and sipping out of a coconut in the photo in his dating profile. On the phone, we both liked to think and laugh in equal amounts and we loved the same Indie band and the same eccentric meditation guru. When I stepped through the door of the bar, I caught sight of him before he saw me. His dark hair fell to one side of his thoughtful face and unlike most people sitting on their own, he wasn’t scrolling through his phone but looking at the world around him. We hit it off, and in typical fashion, I didn’t trust it one bit.

The Rare Type

For one thing, he seemed like an impossible burger of a person! He was completing a fellowship in Cardiology and had very little ego. He worked long hours caring for patients in heart failure but rarely became exasperated. He played music, could write like a boss, and genuinely appreciated my varied pursuits of art and childcare. He was honest without being hurtful. I didn’t trust how beautiful this could become and so by the end of the first month of dating, I compiled mental notes of any small signs that he couldn’t “handle” my diabetes. It was a difficult task because he never once judged how I managed my numbers. Instead, he wondered aloud how I functioned on so little sleep.

By that August, he acknowledged that type 1 diabetes was nowhere nearly as straightforward to manage as he had previously thought. But he remained undeterred, and we took a week-long trip to the west coast, traveling between San Francisco and Monterey, stopping in solitude and solidarity to watch the Pacific roll in between coves and cliffs along Big Sur. He often said, “I don’t think of you as a sick person, you know…” and this assertion aligned with my own stubborn belief that in spite of the relentless nature of type 1, I could do so much with my life. As it turned out, I woke each day before he did, more than ready to take on Highway 101 and hike the heights of Pfieffer State Park, the trip I had always dreamed of making.

As type 1s, most of us wax grateful for strangers who help when we are having a low sugar in a public place. But in a relationship, what counts is not the fact that someone brings you juice. It’s that they do it, as Roy still does, at five in the morning three days in a row without any outward irritation. And that they genuinely believe you can do most things for yourself. They treat you as strong as you actually are inside but understand when you are worn down and could use a hand. Looking back, the first month together was a mountain of growing pains for me, of learning that, yes, this person has existed in the world this whole time and even if my pancreas is defunct, I am not. This love has been both as attainable and as rare as climbing the side of the Blue Ridge mountains with insulin on ice in my backpack before heading home – the journey never easy but always good.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Keys to Long Term Success and Preventing Complications

Contrary to popular belief, you can live a long, healthy life with type 2 diabetes, without developing complications. In its 2010 report, Diabetes UK found that someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to have a reduced life expectancy by up to 10 years, and someone living with type 1 diabetes is likely to have a reduced life expectancy by up to 20 years.

However, with advanced technologies and therapies, people are living longer and healthier than ever. Results from the University of Pittsburgh after a 30-year longitudinal study found that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years — longer than any study had ever previously found.

In part four of our four-part series on living well with type 2 diabetes, we will dive into the keys to long term success managing your condition, and how to prevent complications over the long term.

What Causes Complications?

It’s important to know what causes complications in people with type 2 diabetes. Not everyone living with diabetes will develop complications, but the occurrence of chronic hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, can lead to heart disease, kidney failure, nerve damage, and retinopathy (the most common complications of diabetes). It’s important to keep your blood sugars in range as much as possible to help prevent the onset of these complications.

Keys to Long Term Success

A number of factors have been shown to help slow the progression of (or completely prevent) complications in people with diabetes:

  • Keep HbA1c in range – Studies have shown that keeping your HbA1c lower than 7% can prevent the onset of complications, and closely monitoring your blood sugar (testing regularly) can help tighten your control. Talk with your doctor about the ideal number of times she would like you to test per day, and make sure you always test before and after meals.
  • Take your medications as prescribed – Some people think that insulin is “bad” or they just don’t like the thought of taking a pill every day. You’re prescribed your medicine for a reason, and you should follow all doctors’ orders to take them as prescribed. Rationing or skipping doses can quickly lead to complications or even premature death.
  • Follow a sensible diet – You don’t need to go completely paleo or keto to have better blood sugars, but speaking with your doctor or seeing a nutritionist can help you develop an eating plan that will work for you that you can sustain. Be sure to include plenty of fresh vegetables, protein, and water. Eating similar foods, eating a low carbohydrate lunch (of 20 grams or fewer) and limiting meals at restaurants has also been shown to help improve blood sugar management in people with diabetes.
  • ExerciseExercise is one of the most important things you can do to prevent complications. Not only does it lower blood sugars, but it gets the heart working and the blood pumping, increasing circulation and strengthening your whole cardiovascular system. Exercise boosts your immune system, and increases serotonin in the brain, making you feel good and helping to prevent the onset of depression. According to our Thrivable Insights study, people with type 2 diabetes who have an HbA1c <6.5% are more likely (20% vs 8%) to exercise 4-6 times per week than people living with type 2 diabetes who have an HbA1c of 8% or higher.
  • Surround yourself with support – Diabetes is a marathon, not a sprint, and the journey can be lonely at times. A study from the University Hospital in Denmark found that loneliness may actually cause premature death by damaging the blood vessels of the heart, which can be compounded with a diagnosis of diabetes. Long term success with your diabetes care is much more likely if you surround yourself with supportive family and friends, or if you can find a community who will understand. Sharing your thoughts, worries, and feelings will help lighten your load, and you may just learn a thing or two that you didn’t previously know about diabetes and how to better care for yourself!

Have you had diabetes for a long time, and are thriving without complications? What are some of the best strategies you’ve employed to achieve success? Share this post and comment below!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Traveling Abroad with Diabetes: Have Your Dolce and Eat It Too!

This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Maria Horner

Maria shares her experiences and strategies for managing blood sugar levels while studying abroad

Like many young adults, I love to travel and will take any excuse to do so. Going into college, I knew that I wanted to study abroad; the moment I learned about my university’s semester program at their Rome campus, I was ready to go. However, traveling with diabetes isn’t always easy. The longer the trip, the more complicated it can be, and especially a trip to Italy, a country known for all of its carbohydrates!

What’s someone with diabetes to do about managing their diabetes while living in Italy?

Preparation is key!

One of the most important things I did to ensure my trip went well was put a lot of time into preparation. This means figuring out the quantity of diabetes supplies you’ll need, ordering them in advance, and finding space to pack it all. On my blog, I created a handy spreadsheet that helps you calculate exactly how much of each item you’ll need. You should start refilling your prescriptions as frequently as possible months before you travel, to make sure you stockpile enough supplies to last the whole trip. When I was preparing to go to Italy, my insurance only allowed me to order three months of supplies at one time, so I had to wait a few weeks before refilling my prescription. If you’re short on time, ask your healthcare professional if they can help you order extra supplies.

Preparation also means making back-up plans in case anything goes wrong, like talking through solutions to possible challenges. I have a great team of people that support me at home, including my parents, friends, and healthcare professionals, so before I left, I made sure I had several ways to contact them while abroad. Once I arrived in Rome, my host family, my friends, and the staff at my school became the people who could help me if I needed assistance.

Here are some things to talk about with your support team before you travel:

  • If I run out of a diabetes supply, what will I do? Can I get this supply abroad? Is having it shipped to me an option, considering what can be sent through the mail, what is allowed through customs, and the reliability of the mail system?
  • If I need to see a doctor or go to the hospital, can I find English-speaking doctors? Where is the closest hospital?
  • How does insurance work? Do I need to get special insurance while I am abroad?
  • How can I get in contact with my doctor? Can someone from my support team contact my doctor if I can’t?

Here’s a little story about how back-up supplies and my support team saved the day while I was in Rome:

About halfway through my semester, I was returning from Venice on an overnight trip and I arrived back in Rome early in the morning. I must have been sleep deprived, because I left my phone on the train! To anyone else, that would be very frustrating but manageable; most of the things people use their phones for, like email and messages, can be done on a computer. For me, it felt like a disaster, because my Dexcom G5 continuous glucose monitor (CGM) was tied to my phone. I love being able to check my blood sugar with just a glance at my phone, but without my phone, I couldn’t use my CGM. Because I’m used to constantly knowing my blood sugar, not having readings for an extended period of time was hard. Long story short, it was two days before I could get my phone back, and only with help from my support team in Rome. Thankfully, I had plenty of test strips and a blood glucose meter (BGM), so my back-up supplies came to the rescue.

Enjoy new foods, but do so in moderation.

After all my preparation, living in Rome still brought different challenges my way. Even though I wanted to experience all that Rome had to offer, I still had to keep blood sugar management in the back of my mind, especially during mealtime. Italian cuisine is full of carb-heavy foods, from pastries for breakfast to sandwiches, pizza, and pasta for lunch and dinner. Unfortunately, all these unknown carbs can make it hard to keep one’s blood sugar in range.

I didn’t want to deny myself all of the delicious, yet carb-rich, Italian foods. But I also didn’t want to drive my blood sugars out of my target range. I found that my best option was to eat these foods in moderation (just one or two bites), and fill myself up with delicious lower carb options, like vegetables and meat.

To prepare for a meal that may contain many carbs, make sure to dose extra insulin before the meal. If you end up eating more carbs than expected (which can easily happen with Italian food), the sooner you’re able to dose additional insulin – even if it means stopping in the middle of the meal to take insulin – the more quickly your blood sugars will respond.

Do some research and know what to order at restaurants.

When eating out at a restaurant, a good tactic is to order a meat, seafood, or vegetable-based dish as your main entree. Before you’re faced with ordering low-carb food in a foreign country, it’s helpful to know what you can expect from a local menu. Here’s what I learned in Italy:

  • Italian meals consist of several courses, including antipasto (appetizer), primi (the first course, typically pasta), secondi (the second course, usually meat or seafood), contorni (a side dish, usually a vegetable), and dolci (dessert).
  • Most people order either a primi or secondi as their main dish.
  • You can find the best low-carb options in the antipasti, secondi, or contorni sections of the menu.
  • If you have diabetes, ignore the primi section – it won’t be helpful for keeping your blood sugars in range.

One more tip: when you’re not sure what something is on the menu, it never hurts to ask the server or look up a picture online. This was important for me in Italy, since some of the meat dishes are breaded. I’ve included a list of my favorite low-carb Italian orders at the end of this article.

Share food with friends and family!

If you don’t want to miss out on experiencing all the pizza and pasta, get your friends to help you out. If they order a high-carb dish, ask if you can trade a few bites of your food for theirs – that way, you get to taste some pizza or pasta, while still keeping your meal low-carb. The same thing can apply to desserts, like gelato: ask a friend for a few bites, or offer to split one.

No matter what you decide to eat, just make sure you watch your blood sugars carefully, especially when trying new foods and guessing on insulin doses. Don’t let your diabetes stop you from exploring all the wonders of a new cuisine and culture, but also, don’t let impulsive food choices throw your blood sugars off. That balance can be hard to find, but do the best you can and enjoy the experience. Mangia bene (eat well)!

For more details, tips, and advice on studying abroad with diabetes, visit my blog, Winging It.

Here are some of my favorite low-carb Italian food orders, classified by course.

Antipasti (appetizers):

  • Insalata caprese (mozzarella, tomato, basil salad) – if you’re lucky, they’ll use fresh mozzarella di bufala, the most delicious cheese I’ve ever tasted!
  • Verdure grigliate misti (mixed grilled vegetables)
  • Affettato misto or salumi misti (mixed cold cuts)
  • Prosciutto (ham)

Secondi (entrees):

  • Tagliata/bistecca/filetto di manzo (beef)
  • Salsiccia (sausage)
  • Petto di pollo (chicken breast)
  • Vitella (veal)
  • Bollito alla picchiapo (beef stew in tomato sauce)

Contorni (side dishes):

  • Carciofo alla romana (roman artichoke)
  • Peperone (bell peppers)
  • Spinaci (spinach)
  • Insalata (salad)
maria horner

Image source: diaTribe

Maria Horner is a college student from Northern Virginia. She was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age seven, but she hasn’t let that hold her back! She had the incredible opportunity to study abroad in Rome during the fall of 2018, and recently started a blog about her experiences, to help and encourage other people with diabetes that are interested in studying abroad. When she’s not in class, you can find her taking a dance course or trying out a new recipe in the kitchen. She also loves travelling and going on adventures, one of her most recent adventures being skydiving!

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Traveling with Type 1 Diabetes: Hanoi, Vietnam

Dr. Jody Stanislaw has had type 1 diabetes (T1D) for 40 years this June and is on an inspiring mission to inspire T1Ds everywhere that living a healthy and adventurous life with T1D is 100% possible.

She’s been traveling the world for the past 5 months and this month she is living in Hanoi, Vietnam. Watch this video to hear about the challenges she is facing.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Coronavirus and Diabetes: What You Need to Know

Unless you’ve been living under a rock the past few weeks, a new and deadly virus has quickly been spreading around the world: Coronavirus, or COVID-19, is a highly infectious, acute respiratory disease that is closely related to the SARS virus. This disease only affects mammals and birds, and seems to have originated from a seafood market in the Wuhan Province of China.

The numbers are changing daily, but the most recent numbers show that over 76,000 people have been infected with the virus, with 99% of them occurring within mainland China. There are now over 2,000 reported deaths, none of which have occurred within the United States. So how dangerous is the Coronavirus, and what do you need to know as a person living with diabetes? Read more to find out:

Do Not Panic

On January 30th, the World Health Organization declared the virus a global health emergency. There are currently protocols in place to restrict passengers entering the United States from mainland China (where the outbreak is the most devastating), and passengers suspected of being contaminated with the virus are being funneled through speciality airports with temperature screenings, to make sure they’re not bringing the virus into the United States. If someone is detected at an airport with the virus, they are being quarantined until they are no longer contagious, to stop the spread of the disease.

The Virus is Mostly Mild

Many people who are infected with the virus never seek treatment, and while COVID-19 is more contagious than SARS or MERS, the Chinese CDC estimates that the fatality rate is hovering around 2.3%. According to the World Health Organization, signs of the infection include fever, cough, shortness of breath, and difficulty breathing. If you suspect you may be infected, see your doctor right away.

Protect Yourself

To protect yourself from getting any type of seasonal virus, it’s best to avoid contact with other sick people, wash your hands frequently (especially and always after using the restroom and before preparing food!), wear a protective mask when traveling through airports or busy bus/train stations, get your flu vaccination, maintain a healthy sleep schedule, and eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. According to the CDC, Coronavirus is spread by respiratory droplets in the air, when an infected person sneezes or coughs. The virus can also be spread when an uninfected person touches a surface where the virus is (bathroom countertops or door handles), and then touches their face or mouth. Carrying antibacterial hand sanitizer with you can help to eliminate this threat!

Numbers Don’t Lie

Sometimes our diabetes gives us clues when we’re starting to get sick, and one of those clues is higher-than-normal blood sugars. If you’re starting to see your numbers creep up for no reason, it could be a sign that you’re coming down with something. Check out our sick day tips to stay on top of your diabetes when you get ill.

Seek Help

If you think you’ve become infected with the Coronavirus, call your doctor immediately. Even though most cases are mild, having a chronic illness and a virus at the same time can cause major trouble. If it’s severe enough, the Coronavirus can progress, eventually causing pneumonia and even death in some cases. Let your loved ones know you’re worried, and contact emergency medical help right away if you suspect something is wrong.

Have you or a loved one been affected by the international Coronavirus outbreak? Share your experience in the comments, below.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Mediterranean Chicken of Love

This content originally appeared on TCOYD: Taking Control of Your Diabetes. Republished with permission.

By Chef Robert Lewis

You will find joy in serving this hearty dish. It’s rich in protein, packed with vegetables, and flavored with herbs.

Mediterranean Chicken of Love

Tender, juicy chicken infused with garlic and herbs is blended with tomatoes and beans for a rich and full-flavored nod to Greek cuisine.

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon garlic
  • 2 white button mushrooms (large, sliced)
  • ½ red bell pepper (sliced)
  • ½ green bell pepper (sliced)
  • 1 Roma tomato (diced)
  • ½ red onion (sliced)
  • 1/4 cup vegetable broth
  • 5-6 stalks asparagus
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1 teaspoon rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon basil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh garlic
  • 8 oz skinless chicken (sliced, precooked )
  • 10 black olives (pitted )
  • 1 can white Italian beans (15 oz., drained)
  • black pepper (to taste)
  • ½ fresh lime
  1. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
  2. Add the mushrooms, bell peppers, onions and asparagus and sauté for 3 minutes.
  3. Add the cooked chicken and garlic.
  4. Lower heat. Add vegetable broth, oregano, rosemary, basil, diced tomatoes, beans, olives, and simmer for about 5 minutes.
  5. Cook over low heat until chicken is nice and hot.
  6. Season with pepper to taste and a squeeze of lime.

Mediterranean Chicken of Love RECIPE

Source: diabetesdaily.com

Recipe Roundup: 4 Protein-Rich Recipes from Dietitians

Many people with diabetes follow a high-protein diet for good reasons. It’s low glycemic, which means it doesn’t cause abrupt sugar spikes. It also makes you feel fuller for a longer time, which can help you sustain your energy until your next meal. Studies have also proven it’s good for weight loss, building muscles, and bone health.

All these health benefits made us think of reaching out to dietitians and nutritionists for recipes that are not only protein-rich but also palatable. Here are their suggestions:

Pizza Chicken Foil Packet

pizza chicken foil pack

Photo credit: Abbey Sharp

Insulin dosing for pizza can be tricky, due to its combination of high carbohydrates and high fats, so if you’re craving for some but want to ditch the carbs, this savory meal can be a good substitute. Registered dietitian, Abbey Sharp, says it’s easy to pull this off and can be readily modified depending on what’s in your fridge or what you or your family like on your pizza. To ensure that it’s low in carbs, be sure to use sugar-free sauce.

Salmon Burgers

salmon burger

Photo credit: Alexis Joseph

Packed with omega-3 fatty acids, this salmon recipe is a sure hit for everyone in the family. Hummusapien registered dietitian, Alexis Joseph, offers options to keep the carbs low. Instead of using breadcrumbs to keep the patties together, you can use almond flour. Instead of serving it in a bun with greens, you can chop it up and devour it in a loaded salad. The best part is that these burgers freeze well, making your dinner on busy days a breeze.

Easy Blackened Shrimp

blackened shrimp

Photo credit: Kaleigh McMordie

Is it possible to cook something healthy within 5 minutes? Yes, Kaleigh McMordie, the registered dietitian at Lively Table, proves this with this shrimp recipe. Just place the shrimp in a bowl, toss some lemon juice and blackening seasoning, and cook the shrimp in a non-stick skillet for 2-3 minutes each side. You will have extra blackening seasoning from this recipe, so be sure to store it in an air-tight container for future use.

Miso Chicken – One Pan Meal

miso chicken

Photo credit: Natalie Brady

Baked chicken and vegetables can be boring, but using a delicious dressing or sauce can make a huge difference in your meal. Registered Clinical Nutritionist, Natalie Brady offers her miso sauce as one of your options. Miso, a thick Japanese paste made from fermented soybeans, is rich in protein and nutrients.

What protein-rich recipe do you serve at home regularly? Share them in the comments – we would like to know and try them out!

Recipe Roundup_ 4 Protein-Rich Recipes from Dietitians

Source: diabetesdaily.com

How Type 1 Diabetes Brought My Father and I Closer Together

This content originally appeared on Beyond Type 1. Republished with permission.

By Samuel Frank

Lifelong Reality

I have no memories of my father without diabetes. My father was diagnosed with type 1 in 1989 when I was 3 years old. Diabetes and Papa Frank were always hand in hand, one and the same. As a chemistry professor and academic, he seemed to get a thrill from stable numbers and consistent control and he would never shy away from talking about it.

My father is incredibly loving, especially to his family. He loves to share a story or an exciting idea. I’m blessed to have grown up with such a loving, kind-hearted father — at no point were aggressive assertions of masculinity expected from me nor my brother. He is also very particular, specific, and regimented — presumably from having type 1 for so many years, or maybe, that’s just how he is.

Growing up, my father would work as a professor and come home around 5:00 p.m. And he had a list of maybe ten meals he would prepare, with occasional variations. He developed a “square meal” that was his baseline, average, expected, protein-and-vegetable rich meal. No snacks or sugary beverages, caution and restriction while eating out — all told, a marvelous diabetic. As a child, I don’t recall a moment when his health was in danger or his diabetes management was questioned. And it wasn’t a mystery; my father loved to disclose his diabetes management. A dinner out would often end with a round of, “Guess what my blood sugar is?!” And as a child, I knew enough about the symptoms of hyper- and hypoglycemia to make a prediction. When my father was on target after dinner, he was almost elated. The 115 mg/dL was a symbol of harmony for me. If my father was happy, I was too.

Kindred Spirits

I always saw myself in my father and he was always quick to relate to me. We both had one older brother, which created a powerful and unique dynamic of understanding. But it wasn’t just this. My father loved identifying our similarities and I loved being recognized, being seen, and losing that feeling of being alone. Today, I am 33, and this has remained ever so consistent. There have always been physical and emotional similarities between us. So, echoing my father, throughout my life, I imagined what it would be to have type 1. The poking and prodding of needles appeared horrific. And I often wrote it off, as he would be the first to remind us that he was 44 — later in life — when he was diagnosed. It happened the same way with his aunt and grandmother.

Samuel

Image source: Beyond Type 1

But it happened to me at 27, earlier than the other members in my family. I was in my second year of graduate school for social work and marvelously stressed. I went into DKA on December 27, 2013 while visiting my family in Fresno for the holidays. At one point in the weeks prior, I recognized some of the symptoms but attributed them to stress from graduate school and chose to ignore them. My family didn’t recognize the DKA since no one they knew had experienced it before, but they followed their instincts and my parents took me to the ER as I continued to get worse.

While traumatizing, it couldn’t have happened at a better time of year. After 3 days in the hospital, I took a week off from my internship in San Francisco and stayed home with my parents, acting as my father’s diabetes mentee. It was emotional and challenging and confusing, but I was so thankful not to have to do this alone.

So during that week, I dove into diabetes management, meals, and lifestyle adjustments. After meeting with a few endocrinologists and health educators, I learned about carb counting and daily totals. My father doesn’t carb count; since he has such a solid meal regimen, he knows how many units of insulin to take to maintain a functional rhythm. As I was learning how to bolus, he would lean over my shoulder, look at my plate, and create an approximation. My father owns his decision to use his square meal method instead of carb counting, stating, “I see it not as a calculation, but as an art.” I don’t think he’s wrong, but it felt divergent from the messaging I received from medical professionals. The nurse would tell me one thing but my Papa would tell me something else. I needed to make my own way.

The Same but Different

We were never apart, but diabetes brought my father and I closer together. To this day, it gives us something to talk about. I’m often captivated by his stories of obscure blood sugars at an inconvenient time, and I can share mine. When I’m fed up with abnormalities, my father is always there for support and advice. We learn together about modern technology to help our management and share information. Plus, most importantly, by growing up with a diabetic parent, he normalized the subject matter. I speak about my disease, my insulin pump, and management style with glee to my coworkers and friends. I think I notice a little bit of my father come through when I speak with good friends about a successful bolus for a carb-heavy meal.

Don’t get me wrong, we are also different people. I’m now 33 and don’t have children, so my lifestyle remains much more variable than my father’s ever appeared. My mealtimes are quite inconsistent, and my diet often fluctuates; I drink, I travel, I stay up late. But to this day, when he and I are eating the same meal and the same portion, it’s nearly the exact same size bolus that we give ourselves. I truly have my father’s disease. And that means I carry my family line ever so truly.

It always meant so much that I didn’t have to learn this alone. I wish for every parent of a child with diabetes to not just have compassion, but empathy and robust understanding, to normalize frustrations of the disease and its limitations for that child. I learned recently that type 1 isn’t always genetic, and often diagnosed earlier in life. The Frank family pancreas seems to just give out after a while, leaving us diagnosed later in life. But that makes our situation all the more unique, rare, and maybe even, special.

Source: diabetesdaily.com

1 2 3 24

Search

+